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Jane Bond Moore

Civil rights attorney and law professor Jane Bond Moore was born Jane Marguerite Bond on September 1, 1938, in Nashville, Tennessee. Her mother, Julia Hynes Washington Bond, was a second generation college graduate and her father, “race man” Horace Mann Bond, was a world class scholar and president of Fort Valley State University and Lincoln University. As a child, Moore met Paul Robeson, Kwame Nkrumah, Ann Morrow Lindberg, and Philippa Duke Schuyler; she attended Fort Valley Demonstration School, “School at Ms. Foster’s House,” Village School at Lincoln University, Cambridge School in Weston, Massachusetts, and graduated from Wilmington, Delaware’s Friends High School in 1955. After first attending University of Pennsylvania and Lincoln University, Moore graduated from Spelman College in 1959 with her B.S. degree in psychology.

She worked for the Southern Regional Council, helping to monitor Southern lynchings. During the 1960s; volunteered in the Atlanta offices of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC); and worked with James Forman, Ruby Doris Smith, and her brother, Julian Bond, helping with his successful 1966 campaign for a seat in the Georgia State Legislature. In 1971, Moore relocated to Berkeley, California with her husband, Howard Moore, Jr. Jane Bond Moore graduated with her J.D. degree from Boalt Hall at the University of California in 1975, and began practicing law in 1980. Moore worked for a time with the Federal Trade Commission, and from 1990 to 2001, she worked with the Oakland Unified School District. At the Oakland Unified School District, Moore represented clients in public school student discipline cases and public employees in both discrimination and disciplinary matters.

Moore began working as a law partner with her husband at Moore & Moore in 2001. In addition, Moore taught employment law and civil rights law at John F. Kennedy University Law School. Moore also taught “The Constitution, Labor, and the Law” at the undergraduate level at Notre Dame de Namur University. Moore was a member of the Labor and Employment Section of the State Bar of California; the California Law Association; the National Law Association; the Alameda County Bar Association; and the Charles H. Houston Bar Association. The Center for Social Justice presented Moore on 2006’s Civil Rights and Diversity Series, where her speech was entitled “Black, Brown, and Yellow, Encounters with the Constitution and School Segregation.”

Moore is the mother of three grown children: Grace, Constance, and Kojo.

Accession Number

A2007.138

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/14/2007

Last Name

Moore

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Bond

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Wilmington Friends School

The Cambridge School of Weston

Fort Valley Demonstration School

University of Pennsylvania

Lincoln University

Spelman College

University of California, Berkeley School of Law

First Name

Jane

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

MOO11

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/1/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Berkeley

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Peanut Butter Cookies

Short Description

Law professor Jane Bond Moore (1938 - ) spent over twenty-six years as an attorney, and enjoyed a long and successful teaching career at multiple institutions of higher learning.

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99591">Tape: 1 Slating of Jane Bond Moore's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99592">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99593">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore talks about her maternal family history, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99594">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore talks about her maternal family history, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99595">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore talks about her mother, HistoryMaker Julia Bond</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99596">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore talks about her paternal family history, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99597">Tape: 1 Jane Bond Moore talks about her paternal family history, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99598">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore talks about her father's career in higher education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99599">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore describes her parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99600">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore talks about discussions about race in her family and African American newspapers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99601">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore describes her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99602">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore describes sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99603">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore describes the role of church in her upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99604">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore recalls meeting famous African Americans like Jackie Robinson, Paul Robeson, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Philippa Schuyler</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99605">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore remembers meeting Anne Morrow Lindbergh and her brother, Dwight Morrow</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99606">Tape: 2 Jane Bond Moore describes her childhood personality and growing up on the campus of Lincoln University in Oxford, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99607">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore describes her young love of reading and her favorite books</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99608">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore recalls her grade school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99609">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore talks about her boarding school experiences at The Cambridge School of Weston and Wilmington Friends School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99610">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore recalls her favorite teachers in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99611">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore describes her experience away from the black community while attending Wilmington Friends School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99612">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore describes her college career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99613">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore recalls teachers who influenced her during her college career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99614">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore recalls her lack of interest in sororities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99615">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore talks about her graduate school career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99616">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore describes how she got involved in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99617">Tape: 3 Jane Bond Moore recalls meeting her husband, HistoryMaker Howard Moore, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99743">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore recalls leading figures in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99744">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore describes her role in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99745">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore talks about integration in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99746">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore talks about her three children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99747">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore describes her memories of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the relationship between SNCC and the SCLC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99748">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore talks about the impact that SNCC and SCLC had in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99749">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore recalls her concern for the safety of her brothers, James Bond and HistoryMaker Julian Bond</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99750">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore recalls her eagerness to leave Atlanta, Georgia for Berkeley, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99751">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore recalls cultural differences between Atlanta, Georgia and Berkeley, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99752">Tape: 4 Jane Bond Moore talks about her decision to attend the University of California Berkeley School of Law and her experiences there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99847">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore reflects upon her experience as a lawyer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99848">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore describes what she would change about the judicial system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99849">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore shares memorable court cases from her legal career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99850">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore describes her work at Moore & Moore and as a legal lecturer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99851">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore talks about her involvement in several professional organizations and her volunteer work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99852">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99853">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore reflects upon what she would do differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99854">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore talks about her three children and their careers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99855">Tape: 5 Jane Bond Moore talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/99450">Tape: 6 Jane Bond Moore narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$1

DAStory

10$6

DATitle
Jane Bond Moore describes how she got involved in the Civil Rights Movement
Jane Bond Moore talks about her paternal family history, pt.1
Transcript
Well, well tell us how you got involved in the Civil Rights Movement, I mean what happened?$$Oh, 'cause through Julian [Bond, HM], through the--his friends because I was older than he, so I had already graduated and through Julian I got involved and then I got--.$$Now he was involved with SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee]--?$$With SNCC, yeah.$$And what specifically were they doing that got you involved?$$Well let's see how--actually I got involved not only through him but through my roommate [Dorothy Miller Zellner], and I'll explain how I got to the roommate. I got a job, I stopped going to graduate school and I got a job at a place called the Southern Regional Council which is an organization in Atlanta [Georgia] that was founded by among other things a woman called Mrs. Tilley who was one of those white women who was trying to stop lynching. I don't know if you knew there was a group of white women and they'd go to trials and just sit in the courtroom, and I'm sure they did other things, so she was one of the founders, but anyway it was sort of an early integration or fellow, you know integration organization, sort of a white organization, mostly white organization and they were supporting integration efforts, you know the efforts that were being made at that time and I think they did some work with voter education and education and different things, but anyway I had a very menial job there as a--what I would do is read papers including the Pittsburgh Courier which was still I guess pretty popular then, read those and cut out the stories having to do with race in the South and file them and a young woman from New York, Dottie Miller, came there and I met her and then we decided to room together, which all the secretaries who were black at the Southern Regional Council thought was scandalous, that shows how far--I mean they thought they couldn't believe that I was actually going to not live with my parents and live in this apartment with this other girl, and I wasn't married or anything, you know it's just like us being a complete wild person in there, I don't know what they thought I was going to do, but they, I remember they just keep--they were incredulous, they could not believe I was going to do that so we got an apartment and then she started working with SNCC, and I stayed at the Southern Regional Council and then soon around that time I met Howard, got married, had a baby and then he was representing everything.$Okay, now can you give us your father's full name and spell it for us?$$Horace, H-O-R-A-C-E, Mann, M-A-N-N, Bond, B-O-N-D.$$Now he was named after the--what they call the "Father of American Education"--.$$Yes, who--.$$Horace Mann?$$Yeah, who was connected to Oberlin College [Oberlin, Ohio] and my father's mother was a student at Oberlin College so I'm sure that's why she named him Horace Mann.$$Did she know Horace Mann?$$I don't know, I never knew my grandparents from that side, and now I'm thinking about it all my uncles and aunts from that side of course are now dead so I don't know if they ever did or not.$$Yeah it would be interesting, I--cause Horace Mann went on to found Antioch College in Yellow Springs [Ohio], right down I guess maybe a hundred miles away from Oberlin.$$I don't know, I guess we could you know it could be easy to find if we found out when she was there and if he was around or what.$$Okay and what is date of birth and place of birth?$$Oh, he was born in Nashville [Tennessee] too I'm pretty sure, if not that was in Louisville, Kentucky, but I'm sorry I don't know his date of birth. He died in 1972 I think and he was in his--he may have been about my age you know or maybe in his seventies, I don't know. So maybe he was born--if my mother was born in 1910 or, let's see, she's ninety-eight, that's almost a hundred, a hundred and six. She was probably born in 1908, so my father probably was born in 1900, 1901, 1902, something like that, but maybe I might have those all off, don't take my word for it.$$Okay well that gets us close to it anyway, all right and what do you know about the ancestors on your father's side?$$Well, let's see I know that his father was the son of a white man and a black woman. His name was James Bond and he went to college in Berea, Berea College in Kentucky which is a college, do I need to tell all that about Berea?$$Well, yeah go ahead.$$Well Berea was a college in, still is, it's still there, is a college in Kentucky that was founded by a man name John Fee who came from a slave-holding family and somehow became a great egalitarian so he founded this college in Kentucky up in the mountains of Kentucky and it was, actually it was very remarkable, not only was it racially integrated but they, women were students too so and always this man was very far ahead of himself and then I heard I think the one time I went to Berea they were, someone somewhere there they told me that everyone around them wasn't happy (laughter), that they were there and they would, they kind of built the campus so that the homes of the black professors or people were on the inside so they could be protected by the people on the outside. At any rate he went to school there and then after that he worked for the YMCA, and did a lot of work on race relations, things like that. I don't know, I know Julian [Bond, HM] probably knows some more specifics about his--.$$So James Bond worked for the YWC--YMCAs?$$YMCA I believe, yeah.$$And, okay.$$He was also a minister because at one point he was minister of a small congregation with a church in Atlanta that's still there, it's very near the Atlanta University Center and my--where my father and his family lived in Atlanta for a while.

David Ewing

Attorney David Steele Ewing was born on March 29, 1967, in Nashville, Tennessee, to Florence Steele Ewing Kidd and Dr. Richard Albert Ewing, III. Possibly descended from Andrew Jackson, he is a ninth-generation Nashville resident and direct descendant of Prince Albert Ewing, the first African American to practice law in Tennessee and a six time judge. Ewing attended Peabody Demonstration School from nursery school to the twelfth grade. In his undergraduate studies Ewing was on the rowing team at Connecticut College, from which he received his B.A. degree in 1985. Ewing later earned his J.D. degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1989.

In 1993, Ewing served as director of legal and government services for the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. Joining Gaylord Entertainment Company in 1999, Ewing served as director of government and community relations. In 2004, The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce (NACC) announced the addition of Ewing to the organization’s senior management team. Ewing, a 12-year government relations veteran, assumed the newly created role of senior vice president of government relations and community improvement. In this capacity, he directed programs and initiatives that bolstered five of the Chamber’s eight strategic areas, including supporting the community commitment to education; supporting the development of a comprehensive regional transportation infrastructure; celebrating cultural diversity; assuring a vital downtown; and providing advocacy within the government.

Ewing served on the board of over twenty different civic organizations and businesses, including Capital Bank & Trust; Summit Medical Center; Cheekwood Museum of Art; the Nashville Opera; and Middle Tennessee Boys & Girls Club. Ewing is a collector of local African American history and culture. Ewing married noted Nashville author Alice Randall.

Accession Number

A2007.095

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/17/2007

Last Name

Ewing

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Steele

Occupation
Schools

Vanderbilt University Law School

University School Of Nashville

Connecticut College

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

EWI02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/29/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

Lawyer David Ewing (1967 - ) served as the senior vice president of government relations and community improvement for the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce.

Employment

Gaylord Entertainment Company

Nashville Chamber of Commerce

Tennessee Higher Education Commission

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443913">Tape: 1 Slating of David Ewing's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443914">Tape: 1 David Ewing lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443915">Tape: 1 David Ewing describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443916">Tape: 1 David Ewing describes her maternal great-grandfather's relationship with Booker T. Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443917">Tape: 1 David Ewing recalls his mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443918">Tape: 1 David Ewing describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443919">Tape: 1 David Ewing talks about his paternal great-great-grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443920">Tape: 1 David Ewing talks about his family background in the law profession</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443921">Tape: 2 David Ewing talks about the Nashville Bar Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443922">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes his paternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443923">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes his parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443924">Tape: 2 David Ewing talks about his brother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443925">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443926">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes his neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443927">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443928">Tape: 2 David Ewing recalls his early hobbies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443929">Tape: 2 David Ewing remembers the entertainment of his youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443930">Tape: 2 David Ewing recalls his early interest in reading and computers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443931">Tape: 2 David Ewing describes the Peabody Demonstration School in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443932">Tape: 2 David Ewing recalls his mentors at the Peabody Demonstration School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443933">Tape: 2 David Ewing remembers the University School of Nashville in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444078">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls volunteering for political campaigns</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444079">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls his aspiration to join the banking industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444080">Tape: 3 David Ewing remembers the Harlem neighborhood of New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444081">Tape: 3 David Ewing describes Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444082">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls his mentors at Connecticut College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444083">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls his organizational involvement at Connecticut College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444084">Tape: 3 David Ewing remembers his graduation from Connecticut College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444085">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls working at Chase Manhattan Bank in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444086">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls the crew team at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444087">Tape: 3 David Ewing remembers his mentors at Vanderbilt University Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444088">Tape: 3 David Ewing describes his studies at Vanderbilt University Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444089">Tape: 3 David Ewing recalls his work for the Tennessee Higher Education Commission</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444090">Tape: 3 David Ewing describes his role in the desegregation of higher education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444091">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about the Gaylord Entertainment Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444092">Tape: 4 David Ewing describes his role in the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444093">Tape: 4 David Ewing describes his board memberships</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444094">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about the history of Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444095">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about the history of Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444096">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about his collection of family artifacts, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444097">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about his collection of family artifacts, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444098">Tape: 4 David Ewing describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444099">Tape: 4 David Ewing reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444100">Tape: 4 David Ewing reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444101">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444102">Tape: 4 David Ewing describes his wife's book, 'The Wind Done Gone'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444103">Tape: 4 David Ewing talks about his connection to President Andrew Jackson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/444104">Tape: 4 David Ewing describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/443961">Tape: 5 David Ewing narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
David Ewing describes her maternal great-grandfather's relationship with Booker T. Washington
David Ewing talks about his collection of family artifacts, pt. 1
Transcript
What about your [maternal] grandmother's side of the family?$$Yeah and he [Ewing's maternal grandfather, Frank Steele] also practiced medicine in Opelika, Alabama, we lived across the street from the Darden family who wrote that--the kids wrote that book 'Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine,' ['Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine: Recipes and Reminiscences of a Family,' Norma Jean Darden and Carol Darden-Lloyd] very prominent kind of family there. My grandmother like I said she grew up in Montgomery [Alabama] then they moved to Tuskegee [Alabama]. Her father was on the faculty at Tuskegee [Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama], was one of Booker T. Washington's students, built a lot of buildings on the campus, put the clock on Dorothy Hall, built most of the buildings. There's this wonderful kind of old story that this was--this must have been around 1885, 1886 Booker T. Washington had just come to Tuskegee and my great-grandfather was there too and he's, he was passing a house on the way you know into Tuskegee that was on fire and it was, it was not The Oaks but it was where Booker T. Washington was living before he built The Oaks and you know basically ran in there and kind of rescued him from you know this horrible fire and they were very close ever since. Interestingly enough you know he taught carpentry, he taught you know, Booker T. Washington really believed that, you know, students could work with their hands as well as their minds but their hands were very important too and it was very interesting that he had gone to Tuskegee and he dropped out so a lot of his he had many, many siblings, had about eight siblings so some of them could finish college and he went to work and when he was later hired to teach at Tuskegee you know he didn't have a college degree and there was always you know this you know kind of I think drama around during graduation time or at least drama for the administration not for him you know would you know Jailous Perdue, which was his name, what would he show up in commencement. And they of course since it was a commencement they wanted to show up in caps and gowns and all this other stuff but since he didn't have a degree he didn't wanna show up in caps and gowns and so he would wear his overalls and bring his tools with him and march down the aisle like everybody else but with tools of his trade. So that was very interesting. One of the other interesting stories that my grandmother Corrine Steele [Corrine Perdue Steele] used to tell about Booker T. Washington and you know she died a couple years ago, she knew all five presidents of Tuskegee. She was very proud of and she was a little girl when Booker T. Washington, I think she was born in 1911, but she was a little girl when Booker T. Washington was still at Tuskegee but one of the things that she told that her father told her that you know Booker T. Washington was very proper, he was very adamant about you know raising these black students in a proper way that they can kind of fit into society and be gentlemen and ladies and do the proper things. A person came around the turn of the century to Tuskegee's campus trying to sell stock and you know Booker T. Washington heard about this person and basically shooed him off campus because he didn't that this product was decent or suitable for African Americans because this product was something, not the product itself, but how the product was served was something he didn't believe in and he didn't believe that African Americans should drink out of bottles and of course this is from someone from Cocoa-Cola [The Coca-Cola Company] in Atlanta [Georgia] right in the early, early days of the company so of course you know lots of fortunes could have been made but that was Booker T. Washington. That's what kind of person he was and you know it, it carried over to every part of his life.$You've collected some materials yourself? Like, just tell us about some of the things that you've, you have personally collected. We were speaking--$$Sure.$$--in the car about a copy of 'Imperium in Imperio' [Sutton E. Griggs] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Imperio.$$Imperio--$$Yes. One of my favorite kind of collecting stories was in kind of searching for Taylor Ewing, Jr. [Taylor G. Ewing, Jr.] who I didn't know about until I started researching this and I ran into a legal document recorded in our courthouse in Nashville [Tennessee]. It talked about a Taylor Ewing, Jr. in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and that's all I knew about him. If I go, I gotta go to Vicksburg. I didn't know Taylor [Ewing's paternal great-great-uncle, Taylor G. Ewing, Sr.] had a son. Maybe he's got some descendants whatever. So I called the little historical society down there and there's I find out the cemetery and they go out and read the grave, the plot that he owns. It's he and his wife Lucille Hampton [Lucille Hampton Ewing (ph.)] and he died in and he was born in 1873 died in 1944 and Lucille Hampton died in 1951 and she was I think born around 1880 and there was nobody else in the plot and so I go down to Vicksburg, drive down there, and find his old house which was on Main Street and I found out that the godson, Taylor's godson, had a son of the godson had just died and that was part of the estate that had the Dillon Funeral Home [Dillon-Chisley Funeral Home, Vicksburg, Mississippi] and this house. The house was boarded up, graffiti on the outside. It looked kind of dangerous actually so I go to the funeral home and I was like, "I came all the way from Nashville, Tennessee. I'd love to see the inside of that house." He was like, "You don't wanna go in there. It's like you know a lot of gangs in there. It's been used as a crack house. They tried to burn it down." "But I drove all the way from Nashville. I gotta see inside this house." He was like, "Okay," so they send someone out with me who digs ditches, digs graves, not ditches, for this funeral home, take the boards out of the house. There's no electricity on, it's just ransacked on the inside and you have to remember this was probably around 1996 and Taylor had been dead since '44 [1944], his wife since '51 [1951] so there's a lot of stuff in there that people lived in there and did things and of course the vandalism that gone there every since then. And then there was some clothes and busted furniture and things like that and so I just spent hours and hours and hours. They took the front boards off the window so you could--the light could come in so I could see. I found checks that belonged to Taylor. I found legal stationary that belonged to Taylor, I found a bust of Longfellow [Henry Wadsworth Longfellow] that belonged to Taylor which was on a little pedestal, and I found a bookshelf, a lawyer's bookshelf full of not legal books but Paul Laurence Dunbar, W.E.B. Du Bois, Sutton Griggs [Sutton E. Griggs], Hawthorne [Nathaniel Hawthorne], Longfellow, books on the French Revolution, books on Napoleon [Napoleon Bonaparte] and these were Taylor's books and they were all on a nice little bookshelf and it was funny because the rest of the house was ransacked but they--the people that were in there didn't really touch these books for some reason, these thugs, these gang members, so I go back--$$So there's a theory behind that you know. We don't--$$--in there I found his World War I [WWI] button that used to be on his uniform so I go back to the funeral home. I'm thinking okay I can't leave without the stuff. I gotta buy the stuff. He was like nope, I'm not gonna sell it to you. I'm thinking well how much I have to offer I say this is--they didn't know Taylor existed. They were junior and you know if I don't this stuff, I'm never gonna get it and was begging this guy. And so he was like, "I'm not gonna sell it to you, I'm gonna give it to you. If you don't take it, the crack heads will," and so I took the books, took the bookshelf.

Julia Bond

Librarian Julia Agnes Washington Bond was born on June 20, 1908, in Nashville, Tennessee, where her parents graduated from Fisk University. Bond's mother, Daisy Agnes Turner Washington, worked as a teacher, and her father, George Elihu Washington, served as the principal of Pearl High School. Both stressed the importance of education. Bond attended Meigs Middle Magnet School until the eighth grade, and then went on to Pearl High School, where she graduated in 1924 when she was sixteen years old. Like her parents, Bond attended Fisk University and graduated with her B.A. degree in English in 1929. In her senior year at Fisk University, she met a young instructor, one of the few African American teachers at Fisk University in those days, Horace Mann Bond. Soon they were courting. They both attended graduate school at the University of Chicago, Illinois where they got married. They later had a marriage ceremony in Nashville in order to satisfy their parents. Unfortunately, Bond did not return to school due to their finances. Horace earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, Illinois.

Her husband, Dr. Horace Mann Bond, was appointed president of Georgia’s Fort Valley State College in 1942. In 1945, he became president of Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. In 1956, Dr. Bond was named president of Atlanta University. Julia Agnes Bond acted as First Lady for her husband in all of these positions. She also traveled with her husband to Europe and Africa on behalf of the University. She attended the inauguration of Osageyfo Kwame Nkrumah as Ghana’s first president in 1957.

Returning to school at Atlanta University, Bond earned her Masters of Library Science degree and was a mainstay at the Atlanta University Library beginning in the 1960s. Bond and her husband supported their daughter and their sons Jane, Julian and James, in their civil rights activities including the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in the 1960s. The venerable Bond retired from the Atlanta University Library in 2000, at the age of ninety-two years. Her husband, Dr. Horace Mann Bond, passed away in 1973.

Bond passed away on November 2, 2007 at age 99.

Accession Number

A2006.119

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/14/2006

Last Name

Bond

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Agnes

Occupation
Schools

Meigs Middle Magnet School

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

Fisk University

University of Illinois at Chicago

Clark Atlanta University

First Name

Julia

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

BON03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/20/1908

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Death Date

11/2/2007

Short Description

Librarian Julia Bond (1908 - 2007 ) worked as a librarian at Atlanta University. She was the wife of Horace Mann Bond, former president of Lincoln University, and the mother of civil rights leader Julian Bond.

Employment

Atlanta University; Clark Atlanta University

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
0,0:2139,100:3910,191:15715,380:41000,681:54010,794:106325,1337:118090,1460:136630,1704:137198,1715:146310,1802$0,0:24095,315:57161,708:57525,713:60892,754:61529,800:77654,923:96702,1109:110152,1330:112466,1362:116471,1419:122080,1451:124080,1486:130780,1654:146362,1797:146678,1802:150628,1872:151181,1880:181774,2253:197680,2491
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631712">Tape: 1 Slating of Julia Bond's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631713">Tape: 1 Julia Bond lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631714">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her parents' family backgrounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631715">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her parents' educations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631716">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631717">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her childhood community in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631718">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her childhood activities in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631719">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her experiences at Pearl High School in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631720">Tape: 1 Julia Bond describes her experiences at Fisk University in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631721">Tape: 2 Julia Bond recalls the community of Fisk University in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631722">Tape: 2 Julia Bond recalls meeting and marrying Horace Mann Bond</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631723">Tape: 2 Julia Bond describes her experiences at the University of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631724">Tape: 2 Julia Bond describes her married life with Horace Mann Bond</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631725">Tape: 2 Julia Bond recalls her friendships with African American intellectual leaders</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631726">Tape: 2 Julia Bond recalls her husband's years as a college president</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631727">Tape: 2 Julia Bond recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631728">Tape: 2 Julia Bond talks about her work as a librarian</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631729">Tape: 2 Julia Bond reflects upon her life and legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631730">Tape: 2 Julia Bond describes her family and how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631731">Tape: 3 Julia Bond narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/631732">Tape: 3 Julia Bond narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Julia Bond recalls meeting and marrying Horace Mann Bond
Julia Bond recalls her friendships with African American intellectual leaders
Transcript
Now you met your husband [Horace Mann Bond] at Fisk [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee], right, when you were a senior?$$Yes.$$Okay. Now what--tell us what happened.$$Nothing. We heard that he was coming and my mother [Daisy Turner Washington] and grandmother were very impressed because they had known his mother [Jane Browne Bond] and thought very highly of her. So they were very receptive to him.$$Okay. Was he from Kentucky, too?$$Yes.$$Was he from Mount Sterling [Kentucky]?$$Huh?$$Was he from Mount Sterling, too?$$No. He was from Louisville [Kentucky], I think.$$Louisville, all right.$$Yeah.$$Okay. So I heard that some of the girls tried to get in his class so they could talk to him (laughter)?$$Yeah.$$So what--but you didn't do that, right?$$No, I didn't. He--they knew that he was coming and we would--and several had a young black teacher, and they were all trying to be in his class, but I decided I wouldn't rush into it.$$Okay. So, how did you become acquainted? Did he--what happened?$$I don't remember how we first met. I guess somehow on the campus.$$Okay. So did you like him?$$Huh?$$Did you like him when you met him?$$Yes. Uh-huh. And my parents liked him because they knew his mother.$$Okay. So, how long--so I guess you--did you date him when you were a senior?$$Huh?$$Did you go out with him when you were a senior? Did he--?$$Go out with him?$$Yeah. Did he court you or, you know?$$Yes.$$What was dating like in those days? I mean, how--did you?$$It was very supervised, very curtailed.$$Okay. Did one--did your mother have to be around when he was there or your father [George Elihu Washington] have to be present or something or--?$$What?$$Did someone have to be there when he was--?$$Yes, most of the time. Very close if not in the room.$$Oh, okay.$All right. So (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I remember once Dr. Du Bois [W.E.B. Du Bois] came and I was going somewhere and he was at the station, and I spoke to him and he was very haughty because he didn't know me (laughter) and he thought I was just pushing myself on him.$$Okay. Yet, do you have any other stories about Dr. Du Bois?$$Huh?$$Do you have any other stories about him?$$I don't know. We were sitting down before the fire and he was reading the newspaper and I was taking care of my children, and somebody said, "Some students are coming over to see Dr. Du Bois," and he got up and went upstairs right away (laughter).$$So, he wasn't the most friendly person, I guess?$$Huh?$$He was not very friendly, I guess?$$No, he was all right once you knew him, but it was--he was hard to know.$$Okay. Did you like him?$$Yes, I did.$$Okay. What did you like about him?$$Well, I liked to listen to him talk and people would of course ask him many, many questions.$$Okay. Was he as smart as people say now?$$Huh?$$We always hear about how bright he was, how intelligent he was.$$Yes, he was.$$Was that true?$$Uh-huh.$$Okay. Did his wife [Nina Gomer Du Bois] ever come with him when he traveled?$$No. She was busy at the Du Bois' chasing dirt. (Laughter) She was a good housekeeper.$$Okay. Who else do you remember that came by?$$Who taught?$$No, that stayed with you. Who stayed at your house in those years? Who else stayed at your house?$$Who else--$$Stayed at your house when--during those days?$$Oh, anybody who spoke at the school [Fort Valley State College; Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, Georgia] and they would have various speakers during the year. Let's see, Franklin Frazier [E. Franklin Frazier]. I can't think of anybody else. Maybe Langston Hughes.$$What about E. Franklin Frazier? What--tell us about him. Do you have any stories about him?$$He was a neighbor and he was a friend. He was full of fun and jokes.$$Okay. What about Langston Hughes? Do you have a story about him?$$I know he took Julian [HistoryMaker Julian Bond] and Jay [James Bond] to eat at Paschal's [Paschal's Motor Hotel and Restaurant, Atlanta, Georgia] for lunch and--$$(JAMES BOND): That's here in Atlanta [Georgia].$$I don't know. Jay was kind of critical of Julian and he defended Julian.$$Yeah. Okay. All right. But that's here in Atlanta [Georgia], right? That's--$$Huh?$$That's here in Atlanta (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Atlanta, yes.$$Right, right.

Lynn Carol Allen

Tri-Star Gymnastics founder and multicultural education specialist, Lynn Allen was born October 22, 1951, in Nashville, Tennessee to educators, Richard and Ruby Stephenson. After having lived in Fort Chafee, Arkansas, the family moved to Chicago where Allen attended Copernicus, Burnside, and McDade elementary schools. Playing the piano and saxophone, Allen graduated from Harlan High School in June of 1969. At the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Allen majored in secondary education and minored in physical education; in her junior year, she began taking tumbling and gymnastics classes and made the women’s gymnastics team.

Graduating in June of 1973, Allen began teaching history at Chicago’s Unity High School; at the same time, she also started a gymnastics club. Allen went on to open Lynn Allen’s Gymnastics Center on July 5, 1977, to train children between the ages of 2 and 18; over time, the program moved from a tiny storefront to a larger warehouse space on Chicago’s South Side. Allen’s gymnastics school was featured in several local newspapers, including The Chatham Citizen, the April/May 1982 issue of Dollars and Sense magazine, and on the television news magazine Two on Two with Harry Porterfield in 1981 on WBBM Channel 2 in Chicago.

In 1983, the program moved to the Oak Park, Illinois, recreation department. In September of 1988, Allen’s Tri-Star Gymnastics, Inc. was established as a completely independent non-profit organization and moved to a 7,200 square foot warehouse; five years later the program moved to Forest Park. Tri-Star Gymnastics remains a culturally diverse program that serves some 800 children per week from Oak Park, Forest Park, River Forest, Maywood, Cicero, Berwyn and throughout the Chicago Metropolitan area.

Allen later returned to college to earn her M.A. degree in school leadership in 2003, and became the Director of Multicultural Education for Oak Park School District 97 in November of 2003.

Accession Number

A2005.222

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/27/2005

Last Name

Allen

Maker Category
Middle Name

Carol

Organizations
Schools

John M. Harlan Community Academy High School

Langford Academy

Burnside Elementary Scholastic Academy

James E. McDade Elementary Classical School

Nicholas Copernicus Elementary School

University of Illinois at Chicago

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Lynn

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

ALL02

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Dr. Richard E. Stephenson, Jr

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Disney World

Favorite Quote

Live Long And Prosper.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/22/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Potatoes

Short Description

Education administrator and gymnastics coach Lynn Carol Allen (1951 - ) co-founded Tri-Star Gymnastics outside of Chicago in the town of Forest Park. Tri-Star serves the gymnastics community of the near western suburbs and the City of Chicago.

Employment

Unity Catholic High School

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Turquoise

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322808">Tape: 1 Slating of Lynn Carol Allen's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322809">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322810">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen talks about her mother's ancestry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322811">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322812">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen describes her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322813">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen explains how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322814">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322815">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen describes her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322816">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322817">Tape: 1 Lynn Carol Allen recalls her childhood in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322818">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen remembers Chicago's Burnside Elementary School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322819">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen recalls becoming interested in history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322820">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen remembers President John Fitzgerald Kennedy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322821">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen remembers the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322822">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen describes the neighborhood of Chatham in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322823">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen remembers her childhood friend, Charlotte Thuston</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322824">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen recalls the community of Chatham in Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322825">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen describes her activities as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322826">Tape: 2 Lynn Carol Allen describes Chicago's John Marshall Harlan High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323184">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen remembers the band at Chicago's John Marshall Harlan High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323185">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen describes her political engagement as a girl</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323186">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323187">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen explains why she wore her hair natural</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323188">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen remembers teaching at Chicago's Unity Catholic High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323189">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen remembers deciding to attend University of Illinois at Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323190">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen talks about pop culture from her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323191">Tape: 3 Lynn Carol Allen compares the Black Panther Party to the Black Muslims</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323192">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen describes the social atmosphere at University of Illinois at Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323193">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen describes her interest in African American history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323194">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen remembers learning gymnastics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323195">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen remembers opening Lynn Allen's Gymnastics Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323196">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen recalls negative assumptions about the South Side of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323197">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen remembers moving her gym to Oak Park, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/323198">Tape: 4 Lynn Carol Allen talks about leading African American women gymnasts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322842">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen talks about gymnastics programs in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322843">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen remembers founding Tri-Star Gymnastics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322844">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen describes her annual gym show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322845">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen describes the diversity of Tri-Star Gymnastics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322846">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen talks about body image issues in gymnastics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322847">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen remembers her gymnastics student, Agina Simpkins</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322848">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen describes the benefits of Chicago area gymnastics programs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322849">Tape: 5 Lynn Carol Allen describes the dangers of gymnastics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322850">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen explains how she became involved in the Oak Park School District</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322851">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen recalls dealing with a racist mural in an Oak Park school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322852">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen recalls becoming the multicultural education director of Oak Park School District 97</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322853">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen describes her work as director of multicultural education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322854">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen talks about mediating between parents and teachers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322855">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen talks about the minority student achievement gap</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322856">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322857">Tape: 6 Lynn Carol Allen describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322858">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322859">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322860">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen describes her hopes and concerns for Oak Park, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322861">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen talks about her children, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322862">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen talks about her children, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322863">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen lists her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/322864">Tape: 7 Lynn Carol Allen describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Lynn Carol Allen describes the diversity of Tri-Star Gymnastics
Lynn Carol Allen explains how she became involved in the Oak Park School District
Transcript
That's something I'm really, really proud of, that you know, we have so many kids. What happened when we left the park district, we really left under protest, we felt that there was nothing else that we could do and the program was mostly white, but I'm black, one of my partners was black and one of the partners was white. We didn't know if the community would support us, we just had no idea, and they did. They--it was unbelievable and we didn't even have a place to move to, or actually we found a place but they would not let us rent unless we had a certificate of insurance. Well we couldn't have a certificate of insurance without paying liability insurance. We didn't have any money to do that and so we asked the parents to pay for classes upfront, and we just waited to see what they would do and they did, and that's what allowed us to keep going. So we rented a church basement for a little while and then we found a place and we had some work--some construction work to do on Lake Street in Oak Park [Illinois] and that was our first real gym and then from there we moved into Forest Park [Illinois], and we've moved a couple of times in Forest Park, but we've been in Forest Park for the last probably thirteen or fourteen years. We have kids coming from Chicago [Illinois], from Maywood [Illinois], from Oak Park and River Forest [Illinois], from Berwyn [Illinois], Cicero [Illinois], Riverside [Illinois], Brookfield [Illinois], just kind of all over. I think we even have somebody coming from Elmhurst [Illinois], as far away as Elmhurst, and so it's a very diverse gym, and that's kind of my thing in college was cultural history of minorities. That was my thing; that was the thing that I really liked and teaching at Unity [Unity Catholic High School, Chicago, Illinois], was you know teaching all those different kinds of history classes, so in Oak Park one thing about this gym is that it's very multi-cultural. We have all kinds of different kids and our coaches, we have, I'm black, there is another black coach, we have a white coach who is Polish, a white coach who is Hungarian, we have a Mexican coach, we have a Russian coach and then all kinds of other coaches and the kids even say, "You know we have such a diverse gym," and they start talking about their heritage and it just makes everybody feel good about being there. As a multi-culturalist, there are a few things I've had to deal with at the gym, for example one of the kids came into the gym and she said something about, "That's so gay." I said what 'cause I never heard that before. "That's so gay." I said what does that mean, and she said, "Oh, you know just bad." And you know now we have gay families that bring their kids to our gym. In Oak Park, if you know anything about Oak Park, Oak Park was listed as one of the best places for gay families to live in the country. So, I said, "Well you know," I was trying to figure out how I was going to deal with that issue and I did not want to put her on the spot so I didn't say anything to her right then, but maybe a week later cause I heard it from somebody else in the gym, and a week later I said, "You guys sit down, I need to talk to you," and I said, "It doesn't matter to me how you feel about any particular people or lifestyle, but you must show respect to all people in this gym," and I explained that there are some gay families here and we do not want anybody's feelings hurt and then I said, "You know how I feel about this as if you said, 'That's so African American,' and you meant it was bad. How do you think I would feel?" And they got the point, they understood, and so then nobody ever said that anymore.$$Now what was the nationality of the person who, the ethnic group of the person who said it?$$She's Hungarian.$$Okay.$$Hungarian-American, I don't know if she identifies herself as Hungarian, but I know her name is Hungarian and so you know, but she understood. It was something, in Oak Park kids get that a little bit because Oak Park prides itself in being very diverse, even though we still have work to do, but she didn't live in Oak Park and so her mindset was very different. It wasn't, I mean everybody says that where she's going to school, and that's one thing about Tri-Star [Tri-Star Gymnastics, Forest Park, Illinois] is that we have kids coming from every school there is, every school in Oak Park, almost every school in the surrounding suburbs, plus Chicago kids, and Maywood, you know just all over, so we become a family and interact and it really helps I think promote good human relations. I don't know if they take it back. I think they do because they become friends with each other and they stay friends for a long, long, long time, and so you know we've had Indian kids who are friends with Jewish kids, who are friends with you know, all kinds of kids. So, and one thing I'm really proud of is that for the last ten years at least, even though gymnastics is not a traditional sport for black kids, we have always had at least one black girl varsity member on the team at the high school, and I'm trying to get it to be more than that, but we have at least one. Next year we will have at least two, so I, you know, but it's, it's something.$Well tell us about multicultural education, and you're the multicultural education specialist for the grade school [sic. Oak Park Elementary School District 97, Oak Park, Illinois]--$$I'm the director of the department (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) the director, okay.$$We have--in Oak Park [Illinois] we have a multicultural education department. It is part of our elementary school system, our district supports it, and I'm the director of that department.$$Now when did you start doing that, I mean you 'cause you were--you said for a long time you didn't teach--.$$Right, well what happened is when I had my kids I was still coaching at the gym with Tri-Star [Tri-Star Gymnastics, Chicago, Illinois] and I started, I'm a political person. I've always been pretty political and so I became involved in some of the political issues in the village and I served on a committee, it was a strategic planning committee for District 97 and I also was volunteering in the schools. I was always in school helping with you know reading or helping with something while my kids were going through, and I became involved with the strategic--I also took training when they were working on school improvement plans. I took training as a parent representative 'cause I was one of the main parent volunteers in the school at the time, so I went through this training which made me one of the parent leaders, and then I served on the strategic planning committee which worked on diversity issues. Now Oak Park has had for twenty-five, twenty-six years what was called a Multicultural Resource Center and it was like a library and like a museum; or--not so much like a museum until recently, but it was like a library and what happened is they made curriculum guides on diversity, you know teaching about Native American Indians, teaching--you know there's an African American curriculum guide for teachers to use. There's a Rainbows of Understanding [ph.] curriculum guide, there's a Hispanic Latino curriculum guide for teachers to use to bring diversity into the classroom, and that's been going on for a long time. They also made things like they would make, just maybe clothing or you know African-type clothing and that kind of stuff and it would be a resource teachers could come in and check it out and use it in their classrooms. Well, in 1990 the strategic planning committee recommended that the resource center become a department, not just a library but become a department and that it would be involved in things like staff development, hiring, curriculum, textbook selection, all those kinds of things, and I had served on a committee for the Multicultural Resource Center called the Multicultural Advocates, we called them the MAC and what we would do, these were community members who were interested in diversity issues and we would advise the director or the director of the resource center, and some of the issues that we dealt with were things like the religion policy in schools.

John Britton

Distinguished African American journalist and college administrator, John H. Britton, Jr., was born July 21, 1937, in Nashville, Tennessee, to Martha Parrish Britton, a school teacher, and John Henry Britton, Sr., a minister. He credits them with instilling in him lifelong strong values and religious principles. He graduated from Pearl High School in 1954, a few days after the U. S. Supreme Court’s decision on Brown v. Board of Education. He enrolled in Lincoln University in Missouri, transferred after two years to the University of Michigan, and in 1958, he graduated from Drake University with a B.S. degree in journalism. In 1962, he earned an M.S. degree in journalism from Syracuse University in New York.

Britton moved to Atlanta, where he served as a reporter for the Atlanta Daily World. In 1962, he was hired by Jet magazine and worked there as an associate editor until 1966 when he went to work for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and later on the Ralph Bunche Civil Rights Documentation Project in Washington, D.C. In 1968, he returned to Jet magazine as managing editor. In 1971, Britton worked as a publicity manager with Motown Records, and then, in 1973, he was hired as director of public affairs with the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington. He then moved to The Washington Post in 1976 to serve as public relations manager. In March 1978, Britton was hired as the director and then associate vice president for public affairs at the University of the District of Columbia, where he served for nineteen years.

In 1998, Britton returned to Nashville, Tennessee, as associate vice president for marketing and assistant to the president of Meharry Medical College. He continues to serve in the latter position. Throughout his career, he has served as a speechwriter and editorial consultant. Britton is married to Mrs. Cherrie Alvilda Dean Britton and is the stepfather of two adult sons. He and his first wife are the parents of one son, John H. Britton III of Potomac, Maryland. A member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity since his undergraduate days at Lincoln University, Britton is also a member of the NAACP, and an associate member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

Britton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 5, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.188

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

8/5/2005

Last Name

Britton

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Carter-Lawrence School

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

Lincoln University

University of Michigan

Drake University

Syracuse University

Carter Lawrence Elementary Math and Science Magnet School

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

BRI05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico

Favorite Quote

It is what it is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/21/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Academic administrator and newspaper editor John Britton (1937 - ) worked for Jet magazine covering the Civil Rights Movement. Britton later was the publicity manager at Motown Records and the Washington Post, and serves as the assistant to the president of Meharry Medical College.

Employment

Atlanta Daily World

Jet Magazine

United States Civil Rights Commission

Motown Records

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Washington Post

University of the District of Columbia

Bowie State University

Meharry Medical College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16790">Tape: 1 Slating of John Britton interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16791">Tape: 1 John Britton's favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16792">Tape: 1 John Britton remembers his parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16793">Tape: 1 John Britton remembers his mother's family members, part 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16794">Tape: 1 John Britton remembers his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16795">Tape: 1 John Britton discusses his mother's family history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16796">Tape: 1 John Britton describes his father's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16797">Tape: 1 John Britton remembers his father's personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16798">Tape: 1 John Britton describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16799">Tape: 2 John Britton remembers his mother's family members, part 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16800">Tape: 2 John Britton describes his parents' meeting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16801">Tape: 2 John Britton discusses his early musical pursuits</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16802">Tape: 2 John Britton shares memories from his early life in Nashville, Tennessee, part 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16803">Tape: 2 John Britton shares memories from his early life in Nashville, Tennessee, part 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16804">Tape: 2 John Britton recounts his early school life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16805">Tape: 2 John Britton describes his childhood personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16806">Tape: 2 John Britton recalls his early interests: music and journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16807">Tape: 2 John Britton recounts his high school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16808">Tape: 3 John Britton remembers influential teachers from high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16809">Tape: 3 John Britton recalls his high school activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16810">Tape: 3 John Britton discusses his pursuit of college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16811">Tape: 3 John Britton recounts his college experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16812">Tape: 3 John Britton recounts his pursuit of graduate studies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16813">Tape: 3 John Britton recalls his early career in journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16814">Tape: 3 John Britton remembers influential figures during his time at the 'Atlanta Daily World'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16815">Tape: 3 John Britton reviews his career in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16816">Tape: 4 John Britton remembers covering important events of the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16817">Tape: 4 John Britton recalls the political assassinations of the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16818">Tape: 4 John Britton remembers influential figures from the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16819">Tape: 4 John Britton recounts his employment with Motown Records</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16820">Tape: 5 John Britton describes the impact of the Vietnam War on Motown Records</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16821">Tape: 5 John Britton describes his involvement with the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16822">Tape: 5 John Britton recounts his employment experience at 'The Washington Post'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16823">Tape: 5 John Britton recalls his employment with the University of the District of Columbia and Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16824">Tape: 5 John Britton discusses his employment at Meharry Medical College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16825">Tape: 5 John Britton discusses technology's impact on his career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16826">Tape: 5 John Britton reflects on the course of his career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16827">Tape: 5 John Britton reflects on the role of politics in black lives</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16828">Tape: 5 John Britton shares his values</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16829">Tape: 5 John Britton's message for future generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16830">Tape: 5 John Britton discusses his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16831">Tape: 6 John Britton considers his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16832">Tape: 6 John Britton shares recommended reading</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/16833">Tape: 6 John Britton reflects on the significance of history</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

6$1

DATitle
John Britton recalls his early career in journalism
John Britton describes the impact of the Vietnam War on Motown Records
Transcript
You graduated from Syracuse [University, Syracuse, New York] in June of '62 [1962], and in the interim, you had begun your career in journalism.$$Oh yeah, yeah.$$What was your first job, and what was it like--?$$My very first job--.$$--and where was it?$$--in journalism was in Buffalo, New York. It was called the 'Empire Star'. It was run by a fellow named A. J. Smitherman. Mr. Smitherman, I, you know, I, I enjoyed what I did there because I learned something more than just writing and editing because at his paper, I had to do everything. He had me going out selling ads. There were days I came back in and had to help him run the, the, that old print press. I learned to do that. I learned to work a linotype machine, which was, you know, it used to be hot lead. But Mr. Smitherman didn't pay me but once. And I was there for three months, and now, it was fortunate that when I got there, some people who must have known about him took pity on me, and had me in a rooming house where the woman who ran the rooming house didn't charge me anything, particularly when I told her I wasn't being paid. Well, after about another month and a half or two months of that, I, I decided that I was imposing on this woman because, you know, she, she's trying to make some money. So I quit, and I went back to Nashville [Tennessee] with my tail tucked between my legs because I expected my mother [Martha Marie Parrish] to say, "I told you so" because she could never figure out how in the world I was gonna get a job in journalism. She was, because she wanted me to be a teacher, but my mother, bless her heart, never said. She never said, I told you so. She just said, "What you gonna do?" And I said, "Well, you know, I'm gonna send some letters out and with, with my resume and see what comes back." So I, my sister [Naomi Louise Britton], with my sister's assistance, I sent out letters to at least 150 daily newspapers in this country. I got only five responses. Three of those five said, no. One response came back--no, that wasn't from a daily. The response that came back was from the 'Amsterdam News' in New York [New York], that was a weekly. And the 'Amsterdam News' said, yeah, you can come on up, and we'll hire you, but we can only pay you twenty-five dollars a week. And I said, New York, and twenty-five dollars a week. I know this is just 1958, but gee, that sounds like a little bit of money. So I turned that one down, and I turned down the 'Cleveland Plain Dealer' [Cleveland, Ohio] because they were offering less than that. So I said to my mother, "I'm going to go on in the [U.S.] Army and just go on and see what happens in the Army and we'll go from there." And she, she almost fainted cause she didn't want her, her baby boy going to the Army. So she got on the phone--she, no, she made some inquiries around town. And I don't know who she called, but the next I, I know she was on the phone calling C. A. Scott down here in Atlanta [Georgia]. And she told C. A. her story. Her son was talking about going to the army. He must be crazy, and he's tried everything he could. He's a good boy, and the next thing I know, she had beaten C. A. into the ground, and C. A. finally said, well, send him on down. We'll hire him. So I got that job based on my mother's plea (laughs) and so, that's how it happened. That's how it started.$$All right, and you worked for the 'Atlanta Daily World'?$$Correct, I worked there, except for the, the year or so that I was in grad school. I worked there from '58 [1958] to '62 [1962].$The Vietnam [War] affect, affected Motown [Records] in terms of the music, the hit, I might say, hit music that came out of Motown that was very much anti-war. You may recall Marvin Gaye's famous album, "What's Going On". That was all about, you know, questioning the, the wisdom of Vietnam. There was another producer at Motown named Norman Whitfield, who was less well known, but a very rich man these days because of the music he wrote for the Temptations, you know. And the Temptations had the song called--no, maybe it wasn't the Temps. But one of the, one of the groups had a song called 'War', "What is it good for? Absolutely nothing".$$Edwin Starr.$$Yeah, Edwin Starr, and I believe that either Edwin wrote it and, and Norman [Whitfield] produced it or, or vise versa. I know Edwin sang it, yeah. But that kind of music began to become extremely popular. And it also--and Stevie Wonder started also writing some music that could be really interpreted as anti-war. That had an impact on the population, particularly, the youth population. And I think it made Mr. [Berry] Gordy nervous, but it was bringing in the money. So, you know, I don't Gordy ever turned his back on the dollars. So he had to put up with the creat--the creative aspect that was making that money. So, and particularly, you know, they were dead set against Marvin doing what he did, but once that album, which was probably one of the first, what they called, concept albums. And there's a strain that goes through every song on album. And that album just went through the roof in terms of sales. And then, of course, what the Temptations were doing with Norman Whitfield's music and also anti, anti-war, was also selling very well. So, it had an impact on the company's bottom line, but it had a greater impact in my mind, on the people's feelings about the war. Base--people hear from lyrics to music than they do on, on, from news, particularly, young people. So it had an impact.

Cheryl McKissack Felder

Architect Cheryl McKissack Felder was born with her twin sister, Deryl, on May 15, 1961 in Nashville, Tennessee. Felder comes from a family of architects that start with an enslaved Ashanti ancestor in 1790. Grandfather Moses McKissack founded the family business in 1905. Her father, William DeBerry McKissack, took it over in 1968. Felder’s mother, Leatrice Buchanan McKissack, grew the business after her husband died. Felder attended Peabody Demonstration School, graduating in 1979, in the meantime earning her B.S. degree in civil engineering in 1981 and her M.S. degree in 1983 from Howard University.

At the United States Department of Defense, Felder provided quality assurance and quality control for government research projects, including MX missile silos, the United States Embassy anti-terrorist program and a large space structures project for NASA. From 1985 to 1989, she worked as a civil engineer for Weidlinger Associates and, in 1989, she served as an estimator for Turner Construction, both New York City firms. Felder also served as the estimation manager for the $2.5 million restoration/addition of the historic Schomburg Theatre. In 1991, she formed The McKissack Group (TMG), a full service construction management firm based in New York City. In 1999, Felder launched McKissack and McKissack Associates, an architecture and design company.

As The McKissack Group’s chief executive officer, Felder managed construction of the US Airways maintenance hangar in Philadelphia. She also served as project executive for the Medgar Evers Academic Building and Student Support Services buildings in Brooklyn, New York. Felder was the principal in charge of Philadelphia’s $395 million Lincoln Financial Field football stadium, the $450 million US Airways International Terminal in Philadelphia and the $1.5 billion renovation and reconstruction of the School District of Philadelphia. Other projects include the Brooklyn NBA Stadium, the University of Pennsylvania Hospital, the New York School Construction Authority and the African Burial Ground Monument in New York City. Felder and her husband Fred Felder belong to the 25,000-member Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn, New York.

Accession Number

A2005.043

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/9/2005

Last Name

McKissack-Felder

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

University School Of Nashville

Howard University

First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

MCK07

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ That Strengthens Me

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/15/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Short Description

Architect Cheryl McKissack Felder (1961 - ) was the CEO of The McKissack Group and McKissack and McKissack Associates, an architecture and design company. As The McKissack Group’s chief executive officer, Felder managed many large projects and was the principal in charge of Philadelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field, the US Airways International Terminal in Philadelphia and the renovation and reconstruction of the School District of Philadelphia.

Employment

McKissack and McKissack

Turner Construction

Weidlinger Associates

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261267">Tape: 1 Slating of Cheryl McKissack Felder's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261268">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261269">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her maternal family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261270">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her maternal family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261271">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her paternal ancestry, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261272">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her paternal ancestry, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261273">Tape: 1 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes how McKissack and McKissack was founded</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261274">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about McKissack and McKissack's early notable achievements</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261275">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder remembers her father, William McKissack</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261276">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her sisters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261277">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261278">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder remembers her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261279">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261280">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her neighborhood and her childhood home</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261281">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes herself as a young girl</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261282">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her time in grade school at Peabody Demonstration School, Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261283">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder remembers growing up in Nashville, Tennessee during the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261284">Tape: 2 Cheryl McKissack Felder remembers her mother's relationship with Wilma Rudolph</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261285">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her aspirations when she was in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261286">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder recalls her time at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261287">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder remembers inspiring teachers and students at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261288">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her graduate research at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261289">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her early professional career as an engineer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261290">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder recalls returning to Tennessee to join the family firm, McKissack & McKissack, in 1990</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261291">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her preferred projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261292">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her mother, HistoryMaker Leatrice McKissack, taking over the family business, McKissack & McKissack</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/261293">Tape: 3 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about projects completed by McKissack Group Incorporated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260720">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about expanding goals and opportunities for minority-owned and women-owned businesses, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260721">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about expanding goals and opportunities for minority-owned and women-owned businesses, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260722">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder reflects upon the disadvantages minority and women-owned businesses face</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260723">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about the three firms she started</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260724">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes M and M Solutions LLC's first project for the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260725">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about upcoming large-scale projects for McKissack & McKissack</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260726">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her goals and aspirations for McKissack & McKissack</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260727">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her husband and children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260728">Tape: 4 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260567">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260568">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260569">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her plans for African American monuments in New York, New York and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260570">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about the institutions she plans to support with the Second Century Celebration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260571">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260572">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder talks about her membership in Christian Cultural Center in New York, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/260573">Tape: 5 Cheryl McKissack Felder narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$1

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Cheryl McKissack Felder describes M and M Solutions LLC's first project for the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Cheryl McKissack Felder describes how McKissack and McKissack was founded
Transcript
We [Felder's company, M and M Solutions LLC] looked at the needs, the IT [information technology] needs in the City of Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]. Philadelphia has spent $20 million on getting information in digital form, whether it's tax information. They were getting ready, (unclear) information, property information, and they were getting ready to spend another five to $6 million on getting water, the water department records into a digital form. So the question, what do you do with all of this? How do you use it? How do you take the legacy system in the city and marry them into new systems, whether it's accounting, whether it's security, police department? I mean some of the stuff we saw was absolutely incredible. When we saw how the fire department operated, we couldn't believe it, you know. It was a big board, and they turned switches. This is an old city. So evaluated that with Deloitte and Touche [Deloitte] and then we wrote recommendations and prioritized what the city should do in the way of IT. We also identified funding sources from the federal government and from the state. And what it did for us was create just a whole platform of, whole smorgasbord of opportunities that we could just select from. And so what happened is, from that we ended up doing the uniform land map, which is putting the entire city in digital form. And then you use a, the geographic system to overlay databases. So if you, it's all based to a map. It's all based on a map. So if you wanna know how many vacant properties are there for a developer close to SEPTA [Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority] station or close to the highway or close to the airport, you could query this system and come up with it, come up with that information. At the same time, the Mayor [John F. Street] was doing the NTI, which is the Neighborhood Transformation [Initiative]. And so there were sixty-six thousand or more sites identified that needed to be demoed. So he needed a software package that would allow him to walk in a community, walk up to a site, go onto his telephone and pull down all the tax information on a particular site. So we wrote that system for him, and we started working for the--Street's department. And they wanted to compile traffic reports to see where, you know, the largest traffic report--or traffic incidences were in the city so they could begin to correct the roads. And then that just grew. And now it's into [U.S. Department of] Homeland Security.$$The Homeland Security director is Tom Ridge. He just resigned last month, I guess. He was a senator from Pennsylvania.$$He was a governor.$$Governor, right, that's right. You're right, I'm sorry. Governor of Pennsylvania. So what--have you, you know, gained a bit of business in security since--$$The uniform land map will be the basis for security for the City of Philadelphia. What we found out in our study was, we could write the software, but we didn't have the infrastructure. So the city said, okay, we're gonna take twelve buildings. We want to lay fiber optics. We wanna own our own telephone lines. And so we're doing that project right now. We've been working on that for the last eighteen months. And what that allowed the city to do was reduce their Verizon bill. They essentially own their own telephone lines. So once they finish the twelve buildings, they'll do all sixty buildings that the city owns. That would be the basis, along with the uniform land map, for Homeland Security or for security for the City of Philadelphia.$$Now, did you all--$$So it's starting from the ground up.$$I know in the mid-'90s [1990s], the city started to us--well, Chicago [Illinois] started using MapInfo [Corporation], I think to do crime mapping for the police department. That was one thing they were doing. And I think MapInfo, do you all use that program?$$No, we use Esri, which is Esri, which is, I guess, has kind of surpassed MapInfo.$$MapInfo was created by insurance companies I think, I remember it was first used by insurance companies to determine who (unclear)--$$Um-hm.$$--to charge the most money to for (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, okay.$$It really was a, it was almost like a redlining tool.$$I wanna say it didn't have open architecture or something like that. Esri is a software where you can interface with Oracle and other software, so it's considered to have an open architecture.$So they're [Felder's paternal ancestors, Moses McKissack III and Calvin McKissack] really the founders of the family business [McKissack & McKissack] as we know it now, right?$$Yes. And in 1905, there were no such thing as architectural license. So they were just considered builders, constructors. And they built homes basically. And they built homes for the very wealthy in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1921, is when the state instituted architectural licensing, and it was a requirement to have a license to practice architecture, which they had already been practicing for fifteen, sixteen years. So they went to architectural school through correspondence and then petitioned to take their exam. Of course, they were denied because they were black. And, but they continued to pursue the process, and being denied over and over again. They finally met with a board member who found favor in them, and he convinced other board members to let them at least take the exam. They took the exam and passed the first time. Then they were denied their license. So the board member again lobbied on their behalf and the State of Tennessee finally granted them license 118 and 119--117 and 118 in the State of Tennessee. And those are the licenses are out in the lobby.$$And when did they finally get their license?$$Nineteen twenty-two [1922].$$Okay, so that's not too bad. They're about a year, but they had to take the test over and over again.$$They didn't have to take the test over. They just, it was just getting--$$Oh, lobbying.$$Right. They're the first black men known to have architectural licenses in the country.$$Okay, now before they required licenses, did they experience, it seemed like they were fairly successful as builders and designers of buildings and architects prior to the licensing, but I mean in a state like Tennessee which is a prejudice place, I mean in those days, and Ida B. Wells was run out of Tennessee.$$Oh, yeah, the Ku Klux Klan [KKK] started in Pulaski, Tennessee.$$Right, exactly, so I mean that's not the easiest place to operate a black business necessarily. So how were they able to, are there any stories about, you know, what they had to do to remain successful in that kind of environment?$$It was a period of time where black people really worked together to build economic strength. It's interesting you ask that because over the holidays when I was home, my mother [HistoryMaker Leatrice McKissack] and I had that conversation because I do a lot of travel because we have an office in New York [New York]. But New York is only ninety miles from here [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]. They did work not only in Tennessee, but Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, on, you know, the East Coast. And so, I mean the conversation, the question is, how did they travel? Where did they stay? How did they, you know, get around the prejudice and, you know, your life was on the line everywhere you went. And they were in Texas. And so my mother was telling me what happened, they had crews all over. And they had friends. So they could stay at their homes when they traveled. And they would get in a car and they would drive all day and barely get out of the State of Tennessee and stay with friends. And while they were there, they would check on their projects in that area. Then they would move on to the next city and to the next city and to the next city.$$Okay, now, in those days, I mean were they primarily working on black projects, black building projects because I know in those days, people were building black schools. The black colleges [HBCUs] were being built?$$They did black colleges.$$Churches.$$Black churches. We built Tuskegee University [Tuskegee, Alabama], a lot of those projects there. We built the Tuskegee Air Force Base [Sharpe Field, Tuskegee, Alabama], Rust College [Holly Springs, Mississippi]--$$Down in Holly Springs [Mississippi], right?$$Um-hm, so it's a list, Xavier [ph.]. There was some work done there. At Meharry [Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee], we built all of the buildings there except for one; Tennessee State [University, Nashville, Tennessee], Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. In, actually, in 1990, we renovated a building at Tuskegee that my grandfather [Moses McKissack III] built in the early 1900s. So can you imagine traveling from Nashville to Tuskegee, Alabama? We have done probably two thousand churches.$$Okay.$$So they had crews everywhere.

Richard E. Stephenson, Jr.

Richard Earl Stephenson was born in Nashville, Tennessee on June 4, 1929. Following the divorce of his parents, his mother, Odessa returned to school. While there, she met the man who became Stephenson's stepfather, and both of them stressed the importance of education. When World War II broke out, Stephenson's stepfather George was drafted into the Army and Stephenson became the man of the house, working hard and continuing his schooling. A skilled pianist, Stephenson earned a piano fellowship to Fisk University and he also played in a jazz ensemble. Transferring to Tennessee A & I State College, Stephenson earned a B.S. in chemistry in 1950. He later returned to school to earn an M.A. from the University of Chicago in 1967 and an Ed.D. in administration and supervision from Nova University in Florida in 1976.

After earning his B.S., Stephenson joined the Army, where he served from 1951 to 1954 as an artillery and guided missile officer. Following his discharge, he relocated to Chicago, where he first worked as a research associate at the University of Illinois Medical School before going into education in 1959 as a teacher. From there, he began his ascent through the administrative levels, serving as first an assistant principal at Forrestville Elementary in 1962 and retiring in 1993 as the Interim General Superintendent of Chicago Public Schools. During his years of involvement with the Chicago public schools, Stephenson also served as vice-president of the Illinois High School Association and vice-president of the Chicago Area Boy Scouts.

Today Stephenson is still active with Chicago public schools, lending his support as chairman of the selection committee that chooses outstanding principals and administrators. He has also been involved with charter schools that oversee "at risk" youth. In 2002, he was honored by the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education as an outstanding alumnus of Tennessee State University. Stephenson is married to retired teacher Ruby Jordan Stephenson. They have four children.

Stephenson passed away on November 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2003.258

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/30/2002

Last Name

Stephenson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

E.

Schools

Washington Junior High School

University of Chicago

Tennessee State University

Nova Southeastern University

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

St. Vincent de Paul School

First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

STE02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico

Favorite Quote

I Can't Stop You From Coming Over Here, But I Will Sure Delay Your Departure.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/4/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak, Potatoes, Salad

Death Date

11/12/2018

Short Description

School superintendent Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. (1929 - 2018) was the former interim general superintendent of Chicago Public Schools. Stephenson has also served as the vice-president of the Chicago area Boy Scouts.

Employment

University of Illinois Medical Center

Chicago Public Schools

Favorite Color

Dark Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185936">Tape: 1 Slating of Richard E. Stephenson, Jr.'s interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185937">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185938">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his maternal family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185939">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about a paternal uncle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185940">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his paternal family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185941">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes his relationship with his father, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185942">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes his relationship with his father, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185943">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes his stepfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185944">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his mother and she and his stepfather's college educations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185945">Tape: 1 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls playing pranks on his mother and stepfather as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185946">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his strabismus and playing football in elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185947">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his talent for playing piano and a few of his favorite piano players</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185948">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about the challenge of attending a Catholic school as a member of a Methodist household</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185949">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his childhood household</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185950">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls a harsh punishment he received from a nun at St. Vincent de Paul School in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185951">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how teachers at Pearl High School instilled a sense of competition within him</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185952">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about playing high school basketball in the 1940s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185953">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about working in high school to support his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185954">Tape: 2 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his decision to attend Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186402">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his experience at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University in the late 1940s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186403">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his relationship with Dr. Clyde Dillard at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186404">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his extracurricular activities at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186405">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls enrolling in Officers Candidate School and his first duty assignment at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186406">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls dealing with racial discrimination in the U.S. Army in the 1950s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186407">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls the circumstances surrounding his college commencement address</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186408">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes his experience in Officer Candidate School in the early 1950s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186409">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. remembers a time when a fellow officer defended him at Officer Candidate School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/186410">Tape: 3 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his first job after retiring from the U.S. Army and how he met his wife</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448849">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls pranks he played as a research assistant at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448850">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains his decision to quit his research assistant position at University of Illinois College of Medicine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448851">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about his early teaching career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448852">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about changes to Chicago, Illinois' 47th Street</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448853">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became assistant principal of Forrestville Upper Grade Center in Chicago, Illinois in 1967</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448854">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls an encounter between a student and a police officer at Forrestville Upper Grade Center in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448855">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about a family he tutored in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448856">Tape: 4 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became principal of Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1971, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448857">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became principal of Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1971, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448858">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. shares a story demonstrating his creative approach to problem-solving</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448859">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became principal of Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1971, pt. 3</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448860">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains his decision to accept the position of principal at Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448861">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes how he cultivated a relationship with Lovell Roebuck, a shop teacher at Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448862">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes how he cultivated a relationship with Lovell Roebuck, a shop teacher at Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448863">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls an interaction with Dunbar High School music teacher Willie Naylor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448864">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about individuals he met at Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448865">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois during his tenure as principal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/448866">Tape: 5 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about moving into an Eastern European neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182544">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about the demographics of Chicago, Illinois' Chatham neighborhood in the 1960s and 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182545">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about Chicago School Superintendent Benjamin Willis and "Willis Wagons"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182546">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes the qualities of a successful school administrator</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182547">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about instituting better accounting procedures as principal of Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182548">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains the respective roles of school administrators and central staff in the Chicago Public School system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182549">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about the allocation of federal education funds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182550">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. shares stories from his tenure as Chicago school district superintendent, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/182551">Tape: 6 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. shares stories from his tenure as Chicago School District Superintendent, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185972">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls once intervening in principal selection at a local school council meeting as Chicago school district superintendent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185973">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. shares his views on school reform</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185974">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became interim superintendent of Chicago Public Schools in 1993</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185975">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. assesses the contemporary state of teacher salaries in the Chicago Public Schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185976">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. lists education nonprofits to which he contributes</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185977">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185978">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. talks about the contemporary state of the Chicago Public Schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185979">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. shares his views on charter schools and public school vouchers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185980">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185981">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. considers what he would have done differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185982">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/185983">Tape: 7 Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$7

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. explains how he became principal of Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1971, pt. 1
Richard E. Stephenson, Jr. recalls once intervening in principal selection at a local school council meeting as Chicago school district superintendent
Transcript
How did you become principal at Forestville [Upper Grade School, Chicago, Illinois]? Well, I could see--almost see how you got--$$Yeah, the--I had to deal with these rebellious teachers, and when they saw--when the community and the kids saw that I could, they wanted me. And of course, the district superintendent wanted me because he sent me there, so when I became the acting principal there and then, of course, when I took the principal's exam and passed it, I--they assigned me there--$$Okay.$$--and shortly after that, but every--almost everywhere I've gone in the school system [Chicago Public Schools, CPS], and 'course, maybe the school system itself was a series of crises 'cause it's--it seems to be in a crisis all the time. But my experiences in the school system have been--has been a series of crises. I left--I went into Forestville as a--you know, as a result of a crisis. I left Forestville and went to Dunbar [High School, later, Dunbar Vocational Career Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois] as a result of a crisis.$$Now, what was the crisis at Dunbar?$$The principal of Dunbar was promoted, and the assistant principal was made the acting principal for two years. He assumed that he would pass the principal's exam. They had to take an exam. At the end of the two years, he took the exam and did not pass it for the fifth time. He then got the teacher's--well, he, he upset the teachers, got them to petition, to get a lawyer, and insist that no principal be sent there, that instead, asked--demanded that he be made the director of the school, and had the kids telling Mrs. [Wendell E.] Green who, at that time, was a black board member, they would walk out if he were not made the principal. And he told the guy who was supposed to be assigned there for the summer school session who was his buddy, who played poker with him every Friday night that the shop teachers would burn down the school (laughter) if he came there. Dunbar was a tough school, and they knew it was a tough school because, as an example, at the strike just preceding this, there was an assistant principal who went into the school with the principal. The teachers not only--and I guess these was shop teachers--they're the tough ones--they not only went to his home and painted his garage and slashed his tires and all that kind of stuff, but when he came back to school, they put a bloody hog's head on his desk.$So, on the following Friday, I was there at the [teachers] meeting. He introduced me as Mr. Stephenson [HM Richard E. Stephenson, Jr.], and of course, I started to explain the [principal selection] process, and about--as soon as I started to explain, he interrupted me. He said, "Mr. Stephenson, so-and-so-and-so-and-so-and-so." And I noticed that the black teachers looked at each other and punched each other, and I thought, Oh, yeah, that's right, this guy refused to call [William] Bill Finch, Dr. Finch. And so, I said, "Okay." So I addressed this guy as Charlie [ph.]. "Oh, Charlie--listen, Charlie, you so-and-so-and-so-and-so." He was--and he is Dr. Charles--I've forgotten his last name. Oh, man, that killed him. The teachers just--you could see 'em, you know, light up, and we, you know, I did this several times. Well, there was no more of that. At any rate, I told them. The next night was the--the next Tuesday night was the council meeting. I've never seen a council meeting like that. I went in--$$It's a local school council meeting [for Chicago Public Schools, CPS].$$Local school council meeting for principal selection. I went in--dead silence, and a auditorium full of people. Nobody talkin' to anybody. And when they wouldn't talk to--you know, they weren't--even the council members weren't talkin'. So I got up and I explained to the council, and to the people that this is the most important thing that a council, council could do, select their principal that, you know, if you don't do it, I have to do it, and after all, you're gonna be with this person for the next four years, and you don't want me to select who you're gonna be sleeping with for the next four years. Well, that got their attention. They voted him out ten-nothing. As I left, couple of--one of the council--well, I'd better not tell that. That's kind of bawdy.

Ricardo Patton

College basketball coach Ricardo Maurice Patton was born on October 23, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee to Juanita Patton and Leroy Reed. After his 1976 graduation from Nashville's Hume Fogg High School, where he lettered in basketball, Patton attended Belmont College in his hometown and studied physical education. He earned two athletic letters and was named a small college All-American during his senior year, paving the way for his induction into Belmont's Sports Hall of Fame. Patton earned his bachelor's degree in 1980 and went to work as a studio cameraman at Nashville's CBS affiliate, WTVF-TV. In 1985, his passion for sports began to blossom into a career when he accepted a coaching position at Two Rivers Middle School and Hillwood High School, both in Nashville.

Moving into the arena of college basketball, Patton served as assistant coach for Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee for two seasons between 1988 and 1990. He obtained an M.A. in Administration and Supervision from Trevecca Nazarene College in 1989. In 1990, Patton accepted a post as assistant coach at Arkansas-Little Rock University, but returned to Tennessee in 1991 to assist head coach Frankie Allen at Tennessee State University. Patton achieved the title of head coach at the University of Colorado in 1996. In his first season, he led the Golden Buffaloes to win 22 games - their most wins ever - resulting in their first NCAA Tournament since 1969. The team has continued to play extremely well under his direction, and the recognition Patton earned gained him the title of head coach for the 2000 Big 12 All-Star Team during a tour of Austria. However, Patton prizes good character and determination above basketball skills. To encourage these qualities, he requires his team to take an etiquette class prior to each season.

Patton golfs avidly and holds a fifth-degree black belt in Tae Kwan Do. He is a member of the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Patton and wife Jennifer have two sons, Ricardo, Jr. and Michael.

Accession Number

A2002.118

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/18/2002

Last Name

Patton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Hume-Fogg Academic Magnet High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ricardo

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

PAT01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Golfing

Favorite Quote

We're All About The Same.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/23/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

College basketball coach Ricardo Patton (1958 - ) was the head coach of the University of Colorado basketball team.

Employment

Middle Tennessee State University

University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Tennessee State University

University of Colorado

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:24630,311:44210,554:46450,604:47990,631:52120,704:60730,868:61220,881:67330,905:69650,954:87330,1172:88240,1194:89150,1199:91516,1228:107775,1434:108675,1452:109650,1470:114075,1555:118719,1585:121645,1696:122107,1704:122723,1713:138258,1938:139170,1979:153308,2234:155046,2272:170836,2425:179104,2568:179615,2577:180199,2588:191352,2751:197974,2843:200210,2885:215517,3100:216101,3119:223870,3196$0,0:5682,119:10356,208:11996,252:18310,414:37950,654:45750,845:46800,863:50925,986:51450,995:58570,1038:58905,1044:60714,1088:86760,1491:91750,1584:96352,1671:106024,1845:106492,1852:114430,1921:121878,2077:127832,2137:131686,2213:137590,2331:147575,2454:150520,2504:159958,2702:160262,2707:160794,2715:161934,2747:169530,2861:170565,2877:174291,2957:180544,3029:180832,3034:181980,3049
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55583">Tape: 1 Slating of Ricardo Patton's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55584">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55585">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton describes his parents' backgrounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55586">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton talks about his maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55587">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton shares his Baptist church experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55588">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55589">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton talks about attending Glen Elementary School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55590">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton talks about his struggles during childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55591">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton describes his personality as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55592">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton describes growing up in poverty</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55593">Tape: 1 Ricardo Patton describes his childhood aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55594">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton recalls his first jobs in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55595">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55596">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton talks about playing basketball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55597">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton recalls his self-growth at Hume Fogg High School in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55598">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton describes his basketball career at Hume Fogg High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55599">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton recalls changing his attitude while attending John C. Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55600">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton talks about attending Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55601">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton talks about quitting the basketball team at Belmont College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55602">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton recalls his basketball career at Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55603">Tape: 2 Ricardo Patton recounts meeting his wife and leaving Belmont College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55604">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton describes his jobs after graduating from Belmont College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55605">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton describes coaching at the collegiate level</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55606">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton describes his recruiting technique</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55607">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton shares his advice to basketball players</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55608">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton talks about his transition to head coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55609">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton reflects upon the community response to his coaching position</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55610">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton describes how his childhood affected his coaching style</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55611">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55612">Tape: 3 Ricardo Patton describes his coaching strategy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55613">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about the challenges he has faced as a coach</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55614">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton describes his players' recent injuries</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55615">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about factors that influence the strength of his team</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55616">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about his future plans</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55617">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton reflects upon the joys and pressures of coaching basketball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55618">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about what college basketball players need to know</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55619">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55620">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55621">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton talks about his two sons</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55622">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton describes what being a HistoryMaker means to him</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55623">Tape: 4 Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/55624">Tape: 5 Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando
Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques
Transcript
Okay, now you also took up taekwondo too, right?$$I started practicing martial arts, Taekwondo, in the ninth grade. And I'd come home every afternoon and watch the "Green Hornet" and fell in love with Bruce Lee at that point and had to start practicing martial arts. And fortunately we had a Taekwondo school which was in walking distance, probably three or four miles, but that was, that was walking distance for me and was able to go to, to practice with Master Shin Young Kong.$$Now did--were you able to pay for this yourself or?$$You know, at the time, we had to sign a contract. I had to sign a contract and I'm sure as a young kid. I'm not familiar with all the legalities of contracts, and I just remember not paying and, and receiving a notice from a collection agency that I owed this money. And my instructor never said anything to me. I guess he had just kind of turned delinquent bills over to the collection agency, and they sent the letters. But I finally ended up paying him later on, and he's still a very dear friend to me now, and he's still my instructor.$$What's his name again?$$Shin Young Kong, S-H-I-N, Y-O-U-N-G, K-O-N-G.$$And he's, he's a Korean, right?$$He is from Korea. He is a ninth degree master, a grand master actually, and he's one of the few in the United States. And he has really helped shape my attitude about a lot of different things and, and, and certainly I think my players now see some martial arts background in, in just kind of the way I, I do things and some of the philosophies I have about how we work.$$What, what, what's the most important part of that philosophy that you use in your basketball coaching?$$Well, I think--you know, the thing I remember most that my instructor said to me when I received my black belt was, to become a black belt means you should become a better person. And that's one of the philosophies I've, I've tried to hold onto and pass along to, to my guys. A few years ago here--a couple of years ago, the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union] attacked me because we were having prayer on the court after practice, after games, and they thought that I was trying to force religion on the guys. And, and I explained to them that by no means am I trying to force religion on any of my guys. All I'm asking them to do is have a good heart and be a good person. And I think that, that goes hand in hand with what my instructor said to me years ago: To become a black belt means you should become a better person.$$Okay, that's--I like that, but do, do you think that there's a way that you could, you know, pass those values on outside of the context of prayer, you think or?$$I think certainly; I think just in the way that you conduct yourself. I think that my players have to see the, the type of values that I'm preaching, they have to see them in me first, because I think they can, they can quickly identify someone that's being not true to, to what he's, what he's talking about or what he's preaching. And so I think first they have to see those values being displayed by, by my actions, and if they do that, then, then I think they will believe that what I'm saying is something I truly believe in.$Now I know you're, you're--have a reputation as an intense coach. And when you--what, what are some of the techniques that you use to get your team ready for a game? I know I was reading about--I think the first time you all played the University of Kansas you kind of locked them in or something, right?$$Well, well, you know, one of the things we did was I was looking--I was tossing and turning. This was my first game as an interim coach and it's against Kansas, the number four team in the country. They're coming here, and it's gonna be a packed house. So I'm tossing and turning the night before, thinking of how can I motivate these guys to come out and lay it on the line, give all they have and because at that point they hadn't done that yet. And so I finally came up with, you know, I think we ought to just sleep in the gym. Until we learn to protect our home court, we ought to just sleep in it. So then I'm tossing a little bit longer, and I'm thinking, well, we can't do that. So I wake up the next morning and I still have this deal about, you know, we ought to just sleep in the gym until we learn to protect it. So I, I, I, I talk to the athletic director about it. And, and I said, you know, the one thing I don't want it to be--become is a gimmick. I don't want the media to get a hold of it, because I don't want it to appear like it's a gimmick. This is something I truly believe in, and a lot of that stems from a martial arts background, the discipline that it teaches. So he said, "Ricardo, if you wanna do it, you can do it." So I called the local hotel. It was--it's a Ramada now. It was a Holiday Inn. I called them and got some rollaway beds, and so we, we camped out. We came to, to, to the girls' game that night. We went to the girls' game, watched them play for a half. Then we went in our locker room and watched the movie "Glory," and, and then we camped out that night. And we lost by one or two points to the number four team in the country. And I think the fans realized that things were gonna change, and they did change.$$But did the players live up to your expectations?$$They did, and that was the same group--that year was a struggle. Again, we only had six games, and I think we won probably--probably went five hundred in those games. But that was better than they had, had been, 'cause we finished the year nine and eighteen. And again, I, I coached the last six games, and we won three of those. But the following year that same group took us to the NCAA tournament.$$And that's the year you, you had Chauncey Billups.$$Chauncey Billups; had another McDonald's All-American by the name of Martice Moore, who had transferred in from Georgia Tech, who had been a freshman a year in ACC [Atlantic Coast Conference] a few years before. And so, and then we had four other seniors that were quality reserve players for us. And so they did; they lived up to the expectations. We worked extremely hard. There was some discipline in the program, and it was a good group to coach.

Charlene Jordan

Charlene Jordan, proprietor of Charlene's House of Beauty, operates one of the oldest African American-owned businesses in Denver, Colorado's Five Points district. She was born on July 2, 1924 in the country near Nashville, Arkansas. Life was hard for young Charlene and her family. Her father, Miles Jordan, lost the family land to unscrupulous white officials while her mother, Curlie Hill Jordan, struggled to make ends meet. Jordan had to work long hours in hot cotton fields for ten cents an hour. Her nephew was attacked by a mob and disappeared within earshot of her house.

After graduating from high school in 1943, Jordan joined Roosevelt's National Youth Administration and left Arkansas. Recruited to work for Boeing Aircraft Company in Seattle, Washington with other youth, Jordan also served as a "tank scaler" in Vancouver, British Columbia. She returned to Arkansas in 1948 and attended the Velvatex College of Cosmetology in Little Rock. She then moved to Denver, Colorado. Jordan took a refresher course at Duncan Beauty School, enhancing her hot comb pressing technique before opening her own "House of Beauty." She joined the Colorado Hair Dressers and Cosmetologists Association and the Success Club of America, becoming a member of the Incomparable 75. Later she purchased storefronts on Welton Street, now better known as "Jordan's Corner."

Denver's rich and poor alike have sought Jordan's services, including some of the top entertainers and celebrities that appeared at the Rassonian Hotel and other historic Five Point venues. Over the years, Charlene Jordan has become a pillar and anchor of Five Points. Of her many accomplishments, she is most proud of her daughter.

Accession Number

A2002.115

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/21/2002

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

First Name

Charlene

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

JOR01

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Atlanta, Georgia

Favorite Quote

If You Give A Person A Fish, He Can Eat For A Day, But If You Teach A Person To Fish, He Can Eat Forever.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/2/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cornbread, Greens

Short Description

Salon owner and hairdresser Charlene Jordan (1924 - ) was the founder of Charlene's House of Beauty, the oldest continuous business in Denver's Five Points neighborhood.

Employment

Charlene's House of Beauty

Boeing Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:2819,51:4502,79:43250,567:67816,847:91558,1156:96682,1254:97102,1260:139395,1740:140975,1782:146730,1810$0,0:32250,421:47350,595
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56314">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56315">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56316">Tape: 1 Slating of Charlene Jordan's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56317">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56318">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56319">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan describes why her mother married her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56320">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan describes her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56321">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56322">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan describes when her family lost their farm</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56323">Tape: 1 Charlene Jordan talks about working for the National Youth Administration and attending cosmetology school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56324">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56325">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about her grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56326">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes her experiences attending Childress High School, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56327">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about her childhood interests and activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56328">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes her experiences attending Childress High School, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56329">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan shares memories of her childhood church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56330">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes why she was determined to move away from Nashville, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56331">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes race relations in Nashville, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56332">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes the challenges of becoming a cosmetologist in Denver, Colorado</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56333">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about entertainment and Denver, Colorado's Five Points neighborhood in the 1940s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56334">Tape: 2 Charlene talks about some of her famous male clients</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56335">Tape: 2 Charlene talks about Dinah Washington in Denver, Colorado</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56336">Tape: 2 Charlene talks about opening Charlene's House of Beauty</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56337">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about Madame C.J. Walker and A'Lelia Walker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56338">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about her connection to businesswoman Marjorie Stewart Joyner</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56339">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about the Five Points Black Business Association fashion show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56340">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about businesses in the Five Points Black Business Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56341">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan talks about goal-setting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56342">Tape: 2 Charlene Jordan describes her hairstyling techniques and customer service philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56343">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes how her success has allowed her to purchase what she wants</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56344">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes the process of styling hair</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56345">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about beauty shop gossip</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56346">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about helping others and being helped</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56347">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about styling mishaps</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56348">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes her involvement with the Colorado Hair Dressers and Cosmetologists Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56349">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about Rose Morgan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56350">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about being a successful businesswoman</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56351">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes how hairstyles have evolved since the 1940s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56352">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan compares styling of white and black hair</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56353">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about styling wigs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56354">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan comments on what makes hair healthy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56355">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes how Denver, Colorado has changed</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56356">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes how the changes in Denver, Colorado have affected the black community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56357">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about the Juneteenth celebration in Denver, Colorado's Five Points neighborhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56358">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan describes how the Five Points Business Association was divided</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56359">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56360">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan shares advice for aspiring cosmetologists and business owners</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56361">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan shares her favorite sayings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56362">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about helping others</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/56363">Tape: 3 Charlene Jordan talks about her family and how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

9$12

DATitle
Charlene Jordan describes when her family lost their farm
Charlene talks about Dinah Washington Denver, Colorado
Transcript
So, did you have to work on a farm when you were a little girl?$$Yes, I had to work on the farm and at the time we was born pretty wealthy, but my mother's baby sister and my father's baby sister had a fight and my father's baby sister came out to help her mother fight and they had a little girl and she came out to help her mother fight, so she got cut up in the fight. So, after she got cut up in the fight, then they gonna send my daddy's baby sister to prison for cutting up this little girl. So, my daddy [Miles Hill] had to mortgage everything thing we had, this beautiful home and land and we had cattle and everything. Mortgaged it and they mortgaged it $1,000 and they had to pay $100 a month, and a $1,000 was a lot of money back in those days, so he mortgaged it to keep his sister from going to prison and they let us pay back all that money, let us pay it back $100 a month 'till the last two payments and then they would not accept the last two payments and they came out and took everything that we had. I can hear my daddy bending over crying right now when he, they would take our cows out and the cultivators and everything. He was like crying, but he was grown. He was bent over. I was a little bitty girl, but I can him and I could hear him crying right now and that's why we got to--back down real poor again.$$That's pretty sad, that's sad, yeah.$$Yeah, that's--(unclear)--$$So, so he lost everything?$$We lost everything and our money too.$$Now, did the sister stay out of jail?$$Yeah, she stayed out, they kept her out of jail.$$Do, do you know what the fight was about?$$I heard it was about one of those men down there, but at my age you didn't ask too many questions when you was a little kid about stuff like that, but you couldn't help but hear what the people were saying.$Who else--were, were there any--were any of the women clients of yours?$$I don't remember doing the women. I remember the women being in Denver. I remember Dinah Washington came here, and she got in a quarrel with a man and this man put all of her shoes and all of clothes in a bathtub and put boiling hot water on 'em and her shoes look like little doll shoes when they took them out of that boiling hot water. And I remember Leo Green, singing about Release Me And Let Me Go. I remember Etta James, I think Etta James is coming, she's coming to Denver real soon, if she's not already here.

Barbara Bowles

Financier Barbara Bowles was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on September 17, 1947. Growing up in racially segregated Nashville, Bowles was an excellent student. She received her B.A. in mathematics with honors from Fisk University in 1968 and then accepted an offer from First National Bank of Chicago to fund her M.B.A. in finance, which she earned in 1971 from the University of Chicago, while working as a management trainee. She was the first African American in the program. Bowles spent over a decade in the investment management area of First National Bank (now Bank One) after she graduated, becoming the first African American woman there promoted to vice president. Bowles moved on to head the investor relations departments at Beatrice Companies, Inc. from 1981 to 1984 and Kraft, Inc. from 1984 to 1989.

In 1989, Bowles became the first African American female equity manager in Chicago when she established the Kenwood Group, Inc. It took six months to win her firm's first client, Quaker Oats. Since then, the Kenwood Group has attracted many other high profile clients, including: Abbott Laboratories, the Field Museum and the Chicago Transit Authority. Bowles' firm manages pension, endowment and public funds, is 100 percent minority-owned and manages assets of nearly $500 million. In 1996, Bowles became the first African American woman to launch a mutual fund with the debut of the Kenwood Growth and Income Fund. Her company has been featured in Crain's Chicago Business, Black Enterprise and various other media.

Bowles serves on the board of directors at Black & Decker Corporation; Georgia-Pacific Corporation; Wisconsin Energy Corporation; Hyde Park Bank and Trust Company of Chicago; the Chicago Urban League; Children's Memorial Hospital and Fisk University.

She is married to Earl Bowles and has one son.

Accession Number

A2002.098

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/16/2002

Last Name

Bowles

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Speakers Bureau

No

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

BOW01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Tennessee

Favorite Quote

If you believe it and if you work at it, you can achieve it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/17/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

Investment manager Barbara Bowles (1947 - ) became the first African American female equity manager in Chicago when she established the Kenwood Group in 1989. In 1996, Bowles became the first African American woman to launch a mutual fund with the debut of the Kenwood Growth and Income Fund.

Employment

First National Bank

Beatrice Companies, Inc.

Kraft, Inc.

Kenwood Group

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3720">Tape: 1 Slating of Barbara Bowles interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3721">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3722">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles describes her parents' backgrounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3723">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles remembers her neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee during her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3724">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles recalls the schools, teachers and experiences from her childhood in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3725">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles talks about segregation and the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3726">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles weighs her major in college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3727">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles details her experiences at Fisk University and being recruited by IBM</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3728">Tape: 1 Barbara Bowles details her experiences as a young executive at First National Bank of Chicago during the late 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3729">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles shares an anecdote of her mother's hardscrabble existence in Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3730">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles shares stories from her experiences at First National Bank of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3731">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles talks about her transition into a new position at Beatrice Foods International</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3732">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles details her job duties at Beatrice Foods International and Kraft Foods Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3733">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles decides to start her own investment company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3734">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles explains the activities of her investment company, The Kenwood Group, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3735">Tape: 2 Barbara Bowles details how her investment company obtained Quaker Oats as a client</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3736">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles explains life on the stock exchange trading floor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3737">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles offers financial advice for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3738">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles contemplates the legacy of her investment firm, The Kenwood Group, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3739">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles explains the significance of the business name, The Kenwood Group, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3740">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles gives career advice to youth wanting to get into investment banking</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/3741">Tape: 3 Barbara Bowles comments on her mother's view of her success and how she would like to be remembered</a>