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Danny Bakewell, Sr.

Broadcast Entrepreneur Danny Bakewell, Sr. was born in 1946 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Also raised in New Orleans, he graduated from St. Augustine High School in 1965, and went on to attend the University of Arizona.

At the age of twenty-one, he moved to Los Angeles, California, where he was hired as a community organizer with the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project. During this time, he also worked as the director of new careers at the University of California, Los Angeles before becoming involved with the Black Congress. In the early 1970s, Bakewell was named president and chief executive officer of the Brotherhood Crusade, a Los Angeles-based civil rights and community development organization, where he served until 2006. During his long tenure, he raised over $60 million for community initiatives. He also co-founded the National Black United Fund in 1974.

In 1982, Bakewell became chairman and chief executive officer of The Bakewell Company, one of the largest African American-owned development companies in the United States. In 1986, Bakewell was named president of the Cranston Securities Company, a national investment banking firm. Then, in 2004, he purchased the Los Angeles Sentinel, the oldest and largest African American newspaper on the West Coast. Soon after, in 2007, Bakewell purchased the New Orleans radio station WBOK and in 2009, he was elected chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

Bakewell also established the Brotherhood Crusade Business Development and Capital Fund, the African American Unity Center, and the Taste of Soul of Los Angeles. In memory of his daughter, Sabriya, who lost her life to leukemia, Bakewell founded the SABRIYA’s Castle of Fun Foundation for hospitalized children. The Foundation has established over 200 units in hospitals around the country.

Bakewell’s numerous awards include the Trumpet Award from the Trumpet Foundation, the JFK Profiles in Courage Award by the Democratic Party, the U.S. Congressional Black Caucus Adam Clayton Powell Award, the Roy Wilkins Award, and the Martin Luther King Drum Major Award, among others. He has also been honored by the NAACP and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and was inducted into the International Civil Rights Walk of Fame. In addition, the Los Angeles Unified School District honored Bakewell by naming a school after him.

Bakewell lives in California with his wife, Alina. He has two children: Danny, Jr. and Brandi.

Danny Bakewell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 29, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.169

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/30/2014

11/10/2014

Last Name

Bakewell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Joseph

Schools

St. Augustine High School

University of Arizona School of Law

First Name

Danny

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

BAK07

State

Louisiana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/17/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Short Description

Broadcast entrepreneur Danny Bakewell, Sr. (1946 - ) was the founder and owner of The Bakewell Company, which included among its holdings the New Orleans radio station WBOK and the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper. He was also president and chief executive officer of the Brotherhood Crusade for over thirty years.

Employment

Neighborhood Adult Participation Project

University of California, Los Angeles

The Brotherhood Crusade

The National Black United Fund

The Bakewell Company

Cranston Securities Company

The Los Angeles Sentinel

WBOK Radio Station

Lois Wright

Broadcast executive and lawyer Lois E. Wright was born on June 25, 1949 in Newark, New Jersey, to parents Robert Wright and Elise Onion. Wright earned her B.A. degree in American Studies from Douglas College at Rutgers University in 1970. After attending the Bout Hall School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, Wright transferred to the Rutgers School of Law and graduated with her J.D. degree from there in 1973.

Upon graduation, Wright was hired by the City of Newark as an attorney in the corporate counsel’s office. She became a lawyer for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1977, and served there for three years in the Broadcast Bureau as well as the Office of Plans and Policy. In 1980, Wright became the general counsel for Inner City Broadcasting (ICBC), one of the first African American-owned broadcasting companies. She was later appointed as the executive vice president and corporate counsel for ICBC.

In 1996, Wright became a member of the Hudson Valley Chapter of The Links, Inc. She later served as the counsel to the board of directors for the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB), and as a member of the board of directors for the National Conference of Black Lawyers (NCBL). Wright is also a member of the National Bar Association (NBA),

In 2010, Wright received the distinct honor of being named as one of “The 50 Most Influential Women in Radio” by Radio Ink magazine.

Lois E. Wright was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 14, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.280

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/14/2013

Last Name

Wright

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Elaine

Schools

Rutgers School of Law

Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California

Rutgers University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Lois

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

WRI07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/25/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Sole (Dover)

Short Description

Broadcast entrepreneur and lawyer Lois Wright (1949 - ) served as the executive vice president and corporate counsel for Inner City Broadcasting (ICBC), one of the first African American-owned broadcasting companies.

Employment

Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

City of Newark, New Jersey

Favorite Color

Black

Barry A. Mayo

A passionate music lover, Barry Mayo’s early inspirations were the jazz and R&B albums his father played each evening on the family record player. Mayo has taken this love for African American music and shaped it into a broadcasting career of unprecedented success. His first exposure to the industry came during the 1970s while attending the School of Communications at Howard University. Mayo became the first general manager of WHBC, a position that rocketed him into a radio industry career.

Over a span of twenty years, Mayo served as program director in numerous markets across the nation, including Nashville, Tennessee; Norfolk, Virginia; and Little Rock, Arkansas. During this time, he exhibited a passion for music and marketing skill, which earned him several awards. More important, Mayo created a mix of musical genres and styles that has since become an industry standard because of its upbeat blend of jazz, R&B, funk and soul. In doing so, Mayo continued to reengineer the formats of stations in Chicago, New York and Detroit, bringing them and others to number one in their markets.

Mayo’s reputation as an innovative radio programmer spread quickly throughout the industry and he was offered a position at one of the largest urban stations in the country, WRKS-FM (KISS-FM) in New York. Three years after joining the programming staff at KISS-FM, Mayo became vice president and general manager of this station. His place in the radio industry firmly set, Mayo decided to leave the station and become an entrepreneur. In 1988, he and a group of partners founded Broadcast Partners. Originally a five-station network, Broadcast Partners grew under Mayo’s guidance into a twelve-station, publicly traded company with stations in Dallas, New York, Chicago and Charlotte. In 1995, Mayo sold his share of Broadcast Partners and founded Mayomedia, a media consulting firm specializing in urban markets.

In 1995, Mayo received the Entrepreneur of the Year Award from the National Black Programmers’ Coalition and in 1996 received the Martin Luther King Legacy Award from the Boys and Girls Club of Chicago. Mayo is currently exploring a career as a photographer while spearheading the creation of the National Jazz Museum.

Accession Number

A1999.002

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

12/7/1999

Last Name

Mayo

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Organizations
Schools

Queens College, City University of New York

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Barry

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

MAY01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/30/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Stone Ridge

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Broadcast entrepreneur and radio program director Barry A. Mayo (1952 - ) is a broadcasting management pioneer. Mayo was a radio programmer throughout the United States before he got his big break being hired by one the largest urban stations in the country, WRKS-FM (KISS-FM) in New York. Mayo is known for mixing musical genres including jazz, R&B, funk and soul, which has since become an industry standard.

Employment

WHBC Radio

WRKS Radio

Broadcast Partners

Mayo Media

Favorite Color

Black

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10533">Tape: 1 Slating of Barry Mayo interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10534">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo's favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10535">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo recounts his earliest memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10536">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo recalls his early affinity for music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10537">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo details his love of jazz music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10538">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo discusses his interest in a Chicago jazz museum project</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10539">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo considers the impact of jazz music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10540">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo describes his childhood in the Bronx, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10541">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo details school life in the midst of desegregation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10542">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo shares the importance of friendship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10543">Tape: 1 Barry Mayo describes his family structure, part I</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10544">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo describes his family structure, part 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10545">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo recalls his time at the City College of New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10546">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo describes the challenges he faced early in his career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10547">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo recalls his time at Howard University, Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10548">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo recalls his role in developing WHBC radio station</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10549">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo relates how he left college for a radio job in Little Rock, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10550">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo describes other students' reactions to his management of their college radio station</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10551">Tape: 2 Barry Mayo decodes his decision to leave college to start a career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10552">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo offers his views on education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10553">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo remembers influential mentors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10554">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo reveals how he avoided drug addiction</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10555">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo discusses his first jobs in radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10556">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo discusses his strategy for success in radio broadcasting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10557">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo remembers influential co-workers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10558">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo evaluates his career path</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10559">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo describes his experience working in Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10560">Tape: 3 Barry Mayo recalls his move from Chicago, Illinois to New York, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10561">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo discusses his career successes at 98.7 KISS-FM, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10562">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo reveals his unexpected ride to become the top black radio mogul</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10563">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo details the price his family paid for his professional success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10564">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo emphasizes the role of radio research</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10565">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo describes his instinct for radio programming</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10566">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo weighs the effect of changes in the radio industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10567">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo considers the future of African Americans in the radio industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10568">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo discusses his love for hip hop music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10569">Tape: 4 Barry Mayo considers the evolution of rap music, part 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10570">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo discusses the evolution of rap/hip-hop music, part 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10571">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo considers hip-hop music's staying power</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10572">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo comments on holding rap artists as role models</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10573">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo considers the Internet's impact on the music industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10574">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo considers his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10575">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo describes his interest in photography and race</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10576">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo discusses the influential 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10577">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo gives advice on faith and determination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10578">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo discusses the influence of Minister Louis Farrakhan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/10579">Tape: 5 Barry Mayo reflects on his accomplishments so far</a>