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The Honorable Larry Card

Judge Larry Card was born on October 23, 1947 in Liberal, Kansas to Mary Card and Kenneth Card. He graduated from Liberal High School in 1965, and went on to attend Wichita State University in Wichita, Kansas, where he earned his B.A. degree in political science in 1969. He later received his J.D. degree from the University of Kansas School of Law in 1976.

Card enlisted in the U.S. Air Force as a commissioned second lieutenant in 1969, serving eight years of active duty and twelve years in the reserves. After earning his J.D. degree in 1976, Card moved to Anchorage, Alaska, where he worked as an assistant judge advocate for the U.S. Air Force Judge Advocate General Corps. In 1981, Card entered into private practice as a criminal defense attorney in Anchorage. He then worked as an organized crime drug enforcement task force assistant U.S. attorney and federal prosecutor from 1989 to 1991. Two years later, Card became the first African American attorney appointed as a superior court judge in the State of Alaska. There, he chaired the criminal pattern jury instructions committee, and was a member of the Supreme Court of Alaska equal access to justice committee and domestic relations rules committee. Card became a senior superior court judge in 2006. He was also a member of the Alaska Judicial Council from 1993 to 2005. Following his retirement in 2017, Card served as an adjunct professor at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

Card was a member of the Alaska Supreme Court’s advisory committee on fairness and access. He also served on the board of directors for the Boys and Girls Club of Alaska. Card taught free community classes on legal issues with Law Day Academy, and served as a mentor for Color for Justice, an organization that encourages young women and youth of color to pursue careers in law. Card was a recipient of the U.S. Air Force Reserves commendation medal with oak leaf clusters, in addition to the National Defense Service Award.

Card and his wife, Minnie E. Card, have three children: Larry II, Krista, and Kenneth.

Judge Larry Card was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 23, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.104

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/23/2018

Last Name

Card

Maker Category
Schools

Wichita State University

University of Kansas School of Law

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Liberal

HM ID

CAR39

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer and Fall

State

Kansas

Favorite Quote

A Closed Mouth Doesn’t Get Fed.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alaska

Birth Date

10/23/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Anchorage

Country

USA

Short Description

Judge Larry Card (1947 - ) was the first African American attorney appointed to serve as a judge in a superior court in the State of Alaska, serving from 1993 to 2017.

Employment

Alaska Superior Court

Favorite Color

Red, Yellow

The Honorable Paul Webber

Senior judge in the District of Columbia Superior Court, Paul Rainey Webber, III was born on January 24, 1934 in Gadsden, South Carolina to Paul Rainey Webber, Jr. and Clemmie Embley Webber. His parents, both educators, met at South Carolina State University. Webber’s mother is the author of My Treadwell Street Saga and The College Soda Shop – An Education for Life, chronicling the business. Webber attended Felton Elementary School, the South Carolina State College Lab School and graduated from Wilkinson High School in 1951. He earned his B.A. degree in political science in 1955 from South Carolina State College and his J.D. degree from South Carolina State College’s School of Law in 1957.

Webber practiced law in Columbia, South Carolina for nineteen months and taught at Allen University. He was married in 1958 before leaving for UCLA where he was employed as assistant law librarian in 1959. In 1960, he joined Golden State Mutual Insurance Company as associate legal counsel. Webber was appointed trial attorney for the Antitrust Division of the United States Justice Department in 1964. In 1967, he becomes managing attorney for the Neighborhood Legal Services Program, serving during the 1968 riots. Webber became a partner with Thompson Evans Dolphin and Webber in 1969, which later became Dolphin Branton Stafford and Webber. In Washington, Webber taught at Howard University School of Communications and later at George Washington University School of Law. Webber was appointed Washington, D.C. Superior Court Judge in 1977. In 1985, he was named “Outstanding Trial Judge of the Year” and was rated “One of the Best Trial Justices in the Washington Metropolitan Area” by Washington Magazine in 1996. Webber ascended to Senior Judge of the D.C. Superior Court in 1998 and was inducted into the National Bar Association Hall of Fame that same year.

Webber is a member of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Think Tank, the Council for Court Excellence, and the Guardsmen. He serves as board member and general counsel for the Boule, Sigma Pi Phi and is also the author of Enjoy the Journey, One Lawyer’s Memoir.

Webber is married to Fay DeShields Webber and has three grown children.

Webber passed away on October 24, 2019.

Webber was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 6, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.049

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/6/2007

Last Name

Webber

Maker Category
Schools

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

Felton Laboratory Charter School

South Carolina State University Lab School

First Name

Paul

Birth City, State, Country

Gadsden

HM ID

WEB05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ocean Pines, Maryland

Favorite Quote

Always Do The Best You Can

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/24/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Superior court judge The Honorable Paul Webber (1934 - 2019) was a senior judge of the Washington, D.C. Superior Court.

Employment

Allen University

University of California Los Angeles School of Law

Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company

District of Columbia Superior Court

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:10902,394:45222,764:57906,1116:59061,1137:63142,1176:72586,1285:72882,1290:75694,1344:81170,1443:81614,1450:82206,1459:92510,1658:99240,1744:101702,1800:102086,1811:114288,1922:117954,1965:125442,2042:131106,2132:131471,2138:133971,2155:136204,2204:136589,2210:137590,2254:139515,2293:142903,2357:143750,2380:144597,2392:153008,2473:153980,2487$0,0:8366,135:12908,194:14964,212:16276,240:28800,446:29190,452:31296,506:31686,512:52202,810:63320,1002
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475982">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of the Honorable Paul Webber's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475983">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475984">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475985">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's childhood in Orangeburg, South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475986">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475987">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475988">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his father's education and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475989">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his father's semi-professional baseball career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475990">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his siblings and how his parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475991">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475992">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his childhood in Orangeburg, South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475993">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475994">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his personality and how he takes after his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475995">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475996">Tape: 1 Story: 15 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls the influence of Benjamin Mays</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475997">Tape: 1 Story: 16 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers music from his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475998">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his early interest in politics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/475999">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Orangeburg, South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476000">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his parents' political involvement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476001">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his decision to attend South Carolina State College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476002">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mentors at South Carolina State College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476003">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers learning about African American history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476004">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls joining Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476005">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his activities at South Carolina State College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476006">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers meeting Negro League baseball players</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476007">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers South Carolina State College School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476008">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his studies at South Carolina State College School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476009">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about the Orangeburg massacre</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476010">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about public school integration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476011">Tape: 2 Story: 14 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his early law career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476012">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls being hired at Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476013">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls meeting attorney Leo Branton, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476014">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his work at Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476015">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his work at the U.S. Department of Justice</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476016">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls managing the Neighborhood Legal Services Program in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476017">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the casework of the Neighborhood Legal Services Program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476018">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476019">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls joining the law firm of Thompson, Evans and Dolphin</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476020">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476021">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers Thurgood Marshall, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476022">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his former law partners</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476023">Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his appointment to the District of Columbia Superior Court</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476024">Tape: 3 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the highlights of his career as a judge</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476025">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his judicial philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476026">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about trying juveniles as adults</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476027">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Weber recalls the impact of drugs on crime in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476028">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about media representations of the judicial system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476029">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his hopes for the criminal justice system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476030">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476031">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his organizational involvement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476032">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476033">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476034">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/476035">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his father's semi-professional baseball career
The Honorable Paul Webber recalls meeting attorney Leo Branton, Jr.
Transcript
He [Webber's father, Paul Webber, Jr.] was involved in athletics for a long time, I guess, we just looked at the pictures before we started?$$Yes. He was assistant football coach [at the Colored Normal Industrial Agricultural and Mechanical College of South Carolina; South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, South Carolina] for a number of years, he was, he formed a baseball, a semi-pro baseball team called the Orangeburg Tigers, right after the war and they played teams in North [North Carolina], South Carolina in Virginia, Florida and they played a lot of the negro major league [Negro Leauges] teams when they were barnstorming throughout the South, they would come to Orangeburg [South Carolina] and the Tigers had a pretty good record against teams like the Homestead Grays, the Birmingham Black Barons, the Atlanta Black Crackers, one of my favorite names, and the New York Black Yankees (laughter).$$So they had a good record against these, I mean they, they had a--$$Yeah--$$--they could hold their own against this, they could play (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) They could, they could. I think because they had two colleges there, and neither college at that time had a baseball team, a lot of talented young men went out for the semi-pro team and so I think the fact that they had so much talent there was attractive not only to the teams that they barnstormed against but to the fans. So they drew a lot of fans until Jackie Robinson signed with the Dodgers [Brooklyn Dodgers; Los Angeles Dodgers] and then when they cou- when fans could see Jackie on TV or hear the games, the Dodgers games on radio, the interest in semi-pro teams started to drain, and dwindle and the team disbanded about 1954, I think they started about 1946.$$Okay, okay. So, was, was that an exciting time to be around when the teams?$$It really was, it really was. I was batboy and traveled with the team, they had a bus that they painted orange and back with big tigers on each side and little towns throughout the South where the bus went through, the kids would always run up and cheer and anytime we had a team, that bus was a major attraction. And just sitting on the bus and listening to stories being told by some of the players, not all of the players were college age, some of them were World War II [WWII] veterans, guys who had been around the world and had a lot of interesting tales to tell. So, for a kid my age, around twelve to fourteen or so, it was an exciting time.$At some time thereafter I met Leo Branton [HistoryMaker Leo Branton, Jr.] who had, one of those years when I was out there was the Los Angeles [California] layer of the year, as I recalled, his total verdicts in trials in that year was the highest of any lawyer in Los Angeles County [California]. And so he was named lawyer of the year and it was a banquet or something for Leo and I went and that's where I met him.$$Okay. All right, had you heard about him before--well I guess you hadn't.$$I had not heard about Leo until I moved to Los Angeles.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$And I heard he handled quite a few high profile black clients.$$That's right. He was at one time the lawyer for Nat Cole [Nat King Cole], Dorothy Dandridge, Jimi Hendrix, [HistoryMaker] Angela Davis, among others.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$So this is like 1959 maybe or?$$No, no. This was around 1962, at that point.$$Sixty-two [1962]? Okay, all right.$$Um-hm.$$So you had been there a while?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$Nineteen sixty-two [1962].

The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr.

Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. was born February 10, 1941 in Atlanta, Georgia to George Robert and Maggie Andrews Arrington. After graduating from Henry McNeal Turner High School in 1959, he entered Clark Atlanta University on a football scholarship and earned his B.A. degree in 1963. After a year at Howard University School of Law, Arrington transferred to Emory University School of Law and earned his J.D. degree in 1967.

In 1969, he and Maynard Jackson were elected to the Atlanta Board of Aldermen, a precursor to Atlanta’s City Council. Four years later, Jackson would defeat incumbent Mayor Sam Massell and become the first African American to be elected mayor of a large southern city. In 1980, Arrington would be elected president of the City Council and would serve in that capacity until he stepped down in 1997 to unsuccessfully run for mayor of Atlanta.

During his service on the City Council, Arrington introduced legislation to support federal prohibitions against housing discrimination and he ensured aggressive enforcement of state and federal housing laws designated to stabilize transitional neighborhoods. Arrington spearheaded Atlanta’s efforts to include minority-owned banks as equal partners with other participating banks. He worked with Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to pave the way for Atlanta to host the return of Muhammed Ali to the ring after his four-year ban from boxing for draft avoidance. Arrington appointed the first woman to chair the city council’s powerful finance committee and he championed the retention and proper funding of Zoo Atlanta. He initiated measures to require that all city council and standing committee meetings be recorded and kept on file by the city clerk. Arrington used the buildup for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics to convert run down public housing projects to upgraded housing. He coordinated the funding for erection of the statute of Hank Aaron, which stands at the entrance of Turner Field.

A senior partner in the Arrington and Hollowell law firm, he was appointed, in 2002, as a Fulton County Superior Court Judge by then - governor, Roy Barnes.

Arrington serves on the board of trustees of Clark Atlanta University and Emory University Law School and he has been awarded an honorary doctorate from Clark Atlanta University. He is a member of the National Bar Association; American Bar Association; State Bar of Georgia; Lawyers Club, Gate City Bar Association Hall of Fame and Kiwanis International. A member of Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopalian Church, Arrington is the father of two adult children who are also lawyers.

Arrington was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 18, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2006

2/25/2008

Last Name

Arrington

Maker Category
Middle Name

S.

Organizations
Schools

Henry McNeal Turner High School

A.F. Herndon Elementary School

Clark Atlanta University

Emory University School of Law

First Name

Marvin

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

ARR01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

The Best Day Of My Life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/10/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood, Steak, Gumbo

Short Description

Superior court judge and city council member The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. (1941 - ) is a senior partner in the Arrington and Hollowell Law Firm, and a judge in the Fulton County Superior Court.

Employment

Arrington and Rubin

Board of Aldermen, Atlanta City Council

Kleiner, Herman, DeVille and Simmons

Emory University School of Law

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:1330,19:1986,80:2396,91:3052,100:4118,118:5184,157:16020,314:17448,375:20955,451:38054,633:52781,782:55336,813:55606,819:56686,846:57496,864:61866,927:62254,932:64490,964$0,0:1552,47:2813,62:8320,147:24680,351:25005,357:39850,543:48950,657:51522,669:56005,723:76600,1041:93076,1246:106626,1392:108146,1413:111648,1461:113690,1476:114090,1563:122849,1661:125350,1702:128650,1727:150144,2208:151596,2241:153506,2247:154850,2262:164980,2334
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534465">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr.'s interview, session 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534466">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534467">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his mother's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534468">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534469">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes the origin of his family name</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534470">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534471">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his father's side of the family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534472">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his maternal family reunions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534473">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls police brutality in the South</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534474">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534475">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls black athletes from H.M. Turner High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534476">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his time at H.M. Turner High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534477">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes the importance of education for his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534478">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. reflects upon his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534479">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his childhood holidays</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534480">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls learning how to cook</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534481">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534482">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls the Atlanta neighborhoods where he grew up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534483">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his H.M. Turner High School teammates</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534484">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls instances of discrimination in Atlanta</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534485">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his teachers and classmates at Henry McNeal Turner High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534486">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. talks about Henry McNeal Turner and Vernon Johns</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534487">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his childhood personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534488">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his decision to attend law school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534489">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes the impact of the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534490">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls Atlanta's civil rights leaders</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534491">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his attitude towards church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534492">Tape: 2 Story: 14 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. remembers notable African American athletes</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534493">Tape: 2 Story: 15 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his Henry McNeal Turner High School classmates</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534494">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls the first anniversary of the March on Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534495">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls transferring to Emory University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534496">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his experience as a black student at Emory University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534497">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes Atlanta's 1960s music scene</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534498">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls Atlanta's Auburn Avenue</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534499">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and student leaders</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534500">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls Atlanta's civil rights leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534501">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes the decline of Atlanta's Auburn Avenue</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534502">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. talks about Atlanta's Butler Street YMCA</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534503">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534504">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. remembers Malcolm X and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534505">Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls the deaths of civil rights leaders</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534506">Tape: 3 Story: 13 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. reflects upon civil rights legislation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534507">Tape: 3 Story: 14 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls joining the staff of Kleiner, Herman, Deville and Simmons</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534508">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls personalities from Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534509">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. remembers the support of Ben Brown</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534510">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. talks about Charles Hamilton Houston</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534511">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his work for the War on Poverty</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534512">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his law partner, S. Richard Rubin</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534513">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls Senator Leroy R. Johnson's lessons</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534514">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls running for Atlanta's Board of Aldermen</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534515">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his suit against the State Bar of Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534516">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. describes his legislative proposals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534517">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls the Board of Aldermen's racial composition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534518">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls co-sponsoring boxing legislation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534519">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls the significance of Maynard Jackson's election</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534520">Tape: 4 Story: 13 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. reflects upon Georgia's African American leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534521">Tape: 4 Story: 14 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. reflects upon the country's black leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/534522">Tape: 4 Story: 15 - The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. remembers Benjamin Mays and Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr.</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

8$10

DATitle
The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his suit against the State Bar of Georgia
The Honorable Marvin S. Arrington, Sr. recalls his decision to attend law school
Transcript
Was it before your election [to the Board of Aldermen, Atlanta City Council] or after your election that you sued the Georgia bar [State Bar of Georgia]?$$I sued them in 1970 along with the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union].$$And for what purpose was that?$$All the blacks who had applied and some was gradate from Harvard [Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts], Yale [Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut], the best law schools in the country. And all the black applicants were--did not pass the bar exam. I upset about it, I was appalled. I just did not believe that could happen. And we sued 'em and--under the Title VII, you know, the voters right act [Voting Rights Act of 1965] it did apply. But the next time the bar exam was given, the numbers increased substantially. And it was the right thing to do because as the late Vernon Johns always said, if you see a good fight, get in it. And it was a good fight for the right thing, yeah.$Do you recall what--whether you had dreams and aspirations as early as high school [Henry McNeal Turner High School, Atlanta, Georgia]?$$I used to watch (laughter) 'Amos 'n' Andy,' and Calhoun [Algonquin J. Calhoun] was a lawyer. And it's something about that role that impacted me, speaking for others. And I had a buddy of mine who was a superior court judge out in Sacramento, California, had this distinguished picture on his wall when you walk in his house. And I said, "Jimmy [ph.], who is that?" He says, "Man, that's Calhoun." He said I've wrote and got on the Internet, Google, and found it, but that was the only black lawyer I knew anything about. And then when the Civil Rights Movement came about in the early '60s [1960s] and I was a young student at Clark Atlanta University [Clark College; Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia] and got a chance to see, from my perspective, the greatest civil rights student and demonstrator was a boy by the name of Lonnie King [Lonnie C. King, Jr.]. It wasn't much better than that. Danny Mitchell [Daniel B. Mitchell], Ben Brown, [HistoryMaker] Marian Wright Edelman, Carolyn Long Banks, Annie Ruth Borders, so many others who literally put their life--their lives on the line so that we to--could succeed. And then I got a chance to see one of the finest lawyers in America's history, Donald L. Hollowell, who had graduated from Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee. English major, articulate, bright. And I would cut class--classes to go down and sit in the courtroom just to see Mr. Hollowell take care of his business. And that's when I knew that I wanted to go to law school.$$Amen. And that was right here in Atlanta [Georgia] that you were able to do that (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes, at AU Center [Atlanta University Center Consortium, Atlanta, Georgia]. But it all started at North Carolina A and T [Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina], sitting down at the Woolworth [F. W. Woolworth Company] counter, lunch counter trying to get some food. And it spread it throughout the South, where our students basically said we're not going to be denied our basic constitutional rights, you know. And I wanted to go on and do well. Do it to do good.

The Honorable Marcus O. Tucker

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Marcus O. Tucker, Jr. was born in Santa Monica, California, on November 12, 1934. His father was a physician who migrated from Kansas and his mother a teacher and realtor from Georgia.

Tucker graduated from University High School in Los Angeles in 1952. He briefly attended Fisk University but soon transferred to the University of Southern California. There, Tucker was an honor student and majored in international studies. When he earned his B.A. in 1956 his plan was to attend Law School. His uncle, Chicago lawyer James McClendon, was a role model who became an Illinois state senator. Tucker attended Howard University Law School and served on the editorial staff of the Howard Law School Journal from 1959 to 1960. He matriculated with a distinguished class that also included Vernon Jordan. Tucker earned a J.D. in 1960 and in 1997 earned an MA. in Criminal Justice from Chapman University.

Returning to Santa Monica, Tucker served as the first Santa Monica African American deputy city attorney in the criminal division from 1963 to 1965. He was an assistant U.S. attorney in the Los Angeles Criminal Division from 1965 to 1967. Tucker was the first African American to serve as presiding judge of the Long Beach Municipal Court in 1977 and was a supervising or presiding judge in Los Angeles-area juvenile courts from 1987 to 1994. In 1985, he became judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. As presiding judge of the Los Angeles Juvenile Courts, Tucker was in charge of the largest system in the United States. Tucker innovated low-cost drug testing for parents under the court's jurisdiction, referrals for community resources and a new system for tort lawyers. Tucker initiated Teen Courts with peer juries and closely monitored truancy rates. He also established a playground facility for children awaiting court action.

As a member of the John Mercer Langston Bar Association, Tucker initiated the History of Black Lawyers in Los Angeles project. Among his many honors and affiliations, Tucker was named to the National Bar Association Hall of Fame in 2002.

Tucker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers in 2002.

Tucker passed away on August 8, 2015.

Accession Number

A2002.209

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/22/2002

Last Name

Tucker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

O.

Organizations
Schools

University High School

Grant Elementary School

University of California, Los Angeles

Emerson Community Charter School

Fisk University

University of Southern California

Loyola Law School

Howard University School of Law

Chapman University

First Name

Marcus

Birth City, State, Country

Santa Monica

HM ID

TUC01

Favorite Season

Football Season

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Montreal, Canada

Favorite Quote

When The Going Gets Tough, The Tough Get Going.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/12/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Tacos (Chicken)

Death Date

8/8/2015

Short Description

Superior court judge The Honorable Marcus O. Tucker (1934 - 2015 ) served as a Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge.

Employment

City of Santa Monica

Los Angeles Superior Court

Long Beach Municipal Courts

Los Angeles Juvenile Court

U.S. Army Reserve

Private Practice

Los Angeles County Superior Court

Favorite Color

Red

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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75251">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcus O. Tucker's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75252">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marcus O. Tucker lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75253">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75254">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his maternal grandfather, Toombs McLendon</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75255">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marcus O. Tucker describes how his father relocated to California from Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75256">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75257">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his father's educational background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75258">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his father's family move from Oklahoma to California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75259">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75260">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences growing up in Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75261">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Marcus O. Tucker describes the challenges he faced as a grade school student</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75262">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences attending the University of California, Los Angeles Teacher Training School for elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75263">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences attending University High School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75264">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his football team at University High School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75265">Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his negative perception of Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75314">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about attending University High School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75315">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcus O. Tucker describes the experiences of several popular high school athletes from Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75316">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcus O. Tucker describes racial tensions in Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75317">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcus O. Tucker describes Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75318">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcus O. Tucker describes transferring from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee to the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75319">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences with discrimination as a student at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75320">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences attending Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75321">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences attending the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75322">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the University of Southern California football team</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75323">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the professors that influenced him at the University of Southern California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75324">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the significance of his liberal arts education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75325">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Marcus O. Tucker describes what inspired him to become a lawyer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75326">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his uncle, Illinois State Senator James A. McLendon</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75327">Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences attending Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/75328">Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the challenges he faced adjusting to Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74854">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his professors at Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74855">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about prominent African American attorney graduates of Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74856">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about Vernon Johns</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74857">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcus O. Tucker talks those whose lectures he attended at Howard University Andrew Rankin Memorial Chapel</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74858">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcus O. Tucker reflects upon attending Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74859">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about Diane Nash</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74860">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his favorite course at Howard University School of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74861">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about serving in the U.S. Army and opening a private practice in his mother's office in Santa Monica, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74862">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his hiring as the Deputy City Attorney for the City of Santa Monica</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74863">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences working as the Deputy City Attorney for the City of Santa Monica and the Assistant U.S. Attorney in Los Angeles,…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74864">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Marcus O. Tucker describes his career from 1967 to 1977</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74865">Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Marcus O. Tucker describes meeting and marrying his wife, Indira Tucker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74866">Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Marcus O. Tucker describes the racism he faced as a presiding judge of the Long Beach Municipal Court</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74867">Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Marcus O. Tucker describes presiding over educational code violations in Long Beach Municipal Court</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74868">Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Marcus O. Tucker describes how minors that start out in dependency court get trapped in the legal system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74869">Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about gang violence in Long Beach, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74870">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcus O. Tucker describes how he emphasizes education while presiding over juvenile court, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74871">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcus O. Tucker describes how he emphasizes education while presiding over juvenile court, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74872">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcus O. Tucker describes the ways in which some of the minors whose cases he handled have attained various levels of personal success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74873">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcus O. Tucker describes some of the weaknesses of the juvenile penal system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74874">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcus O. Tucker describes why parents are crucial to the juvenile penal process</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74875">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcus O. Tucker describes how a minor's peer group can shape his or her behaviors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74876">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the John Mercer Langston Bar Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74877">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the History of the Black Lawyers of Los Angeles oral history project</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74878">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about his concern with the legal ethics of the O.J. Simpson case</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74879">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Marcus O. Tucker shares his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74880">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Marcus O. Tucker shares his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74881">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Marcus O. Tucker shares his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74882">Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the false sense of opportunity athletic excellence provides to young people, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74397">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about the false sense of opportunity athletic excellence provides to young people, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74398">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcus O. Tucker reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74399">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcus O. Tucker talks about how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/74400">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcus O. Tucker narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

10$13

DATitle
Marcus O. Tucker describes his experiences working as the Deputy City Attorney for the City of Santa Monica and the Assistant U.S. Attorney in Los Angeles, California
Marcus O. Tucker describes the racism he faced as a presiding judge of the Long Beach Municipal Court
Transcript
A pointed atmosphere of racial, I guess, tension on some level (unclear).$$Well, there was tension, but not a great deal--I didn't find that. There were some people who--I'd go into the, the lounge and one lady, one girl who--she'd walk out, you know, she wouldn't stay there long; she'd just walk on out. But most of the people were friendly and the staff of--his staff was quite friendly. I've, you know, been friends with him for years, and most of the people in Santa Monica [California] were friendly. The two judges in the Municipal Court were, were fine, I mean I didn't have any difficulty with the judges; they became--particularly (unclear) Bater (ph.) became a friend of mine and (unclear) Gibbons (ph.), and so I didn't have any problems. And then I was attorney for the Planning Commission and--but I thought it was a very positive experience. And then I went to the U.S. Attorney's Office in downtown Los Angeles, and the thing I like about the U.S. Attorney's Office was it didn't pay well; I mean it paid less than the City Attorney's Office, so I took a pay cut. But I like it because all--the lawyers were young lawyers but--basically in the criminal section, and there was all--and they were interested in the law and we socialized together and it was a very positive experience in, in, in many ways. And it's great contact; you make good--very good contacts because some of the lawyers have done very well; I mean they've, they've become the city attorney of the City of Los Angeles, and the present governor's appointment secretary was in the office with me, Burt Pines, and--and I have a number of friends who are still friends of mine out of the, out of the U.S. Attorney's Office.$So you were active in civic activities?$$Yes, I was; I was very active in civic activities--in Long Beach Chamber of Commerce and all that kinda thing. And I was presiding judge of the municipal court here four different times (unclear) nine years, and so I was very active in, in, in the, in the municipal court.$$Yeah, well were you able to use your position to help the civil rights activists here?$$Well, I didn't really come in contact with the civil rights activists here in that sense. Basically, the municipal court is a court where you have a lotta drunk driving cases, and it's misdemeanors except for the felony prelims; and they did have--and I don't remember any real civil rights incidences here at Long Beach [California] that came to the court when I was on the court. At one time, we had three black judges out of seven just here in Long Beach--yeah. And there was some racism here, I mean the--some of the older judges weren't ready for black judges and all that, so I got challenged when I was here by two prosecutors--one that didn't practice in my court, and the other one who was a city prosecutor; and I won the election, obviously, else I wouldn't be here. And the bar supported me very strongly and--the paper and the bar and so forth supported me very strongly and it was a racist campaign and so forth 'cause they wouldn't put anything in writing but they would say, "Let's get the nigger off the bench," and all that stuff. And the police supported him, although the police chief supported me, and so it was, it was a dirty campaign; it was a rough campaign--yeah. But I think that law--I think it embarrassed Long Beach [California]; I think the campaign embarrassed Long Beach because we, we were known as an international city and we didn't want the image of somebody who's a, a racist being a judge here, you know, who has racist kind of a, you know, tendencies, you know, where it splits the community--as a judge in the city, so I got a lot of support of the, the people who run the city, yeah.

The Honorable John Allen

Superior court judge Hon. John Allen was born on January 17, 1943 in Columbus, Georgia to Beatrice and Daniel Allen. Allen distinguished himself in the United States Air Force before becoming a significant jurist serving as a Superior Court Judge in Georgia.

Allen graduated from Tuskegee University in 1966 with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. R.O.T.C. designated him a "Distinguished Military Cadet," and he was awarded a commission as a regular officer in the U.S.A.F. As such, Allen gained top secret clearance, piloted an F-4 Phantom Jet-Fighter and taught both academics and flight. He served two tours in Southeast Asia and was decorated repeatedly, earning five Distinguished Flying Crosses, 23 Air Medals and two Air Force Commendation Medals among others. In 1973, Captain Allen was honorably discharged.

Continuing his education, Allen worked towards an M.S. degree at the University of South Florida, but discontinued those studies to pursue a law degree. He received a J.D. from the University of Florida in 1975. Allen maintained a private law practice in Columbus, Georgia and gained extensive civil and criminal trial experience. He worked as a city attorney for Geneva, Georgia and then as a Recorder's Court Judge in Columbus. In 1987, Allen became a State Court Judge and held that position until 1993, when he was appointed to be the Chattahoochee Judicial Circuit Superior Court Judge. He continues to serve the six counties in his jurisdiction.

Allen acts as a mentor to newly appointed or elected State Court Judges, a position for which he was selected by the Institute for Continuing Judicial Education of Georgia. The Georgia Supreme Court selected him to work on the "Court Futures Vanguard," drafting proposals to prepare Georgia's courts for the future. Allen has also served as a member of the Columbus Airport Commission, the Columbus High School Vocational Education Advisory Board, the Urban League Board of Directors, the Area Ten Special Olympics Advisory Board and the African American Historic Preservation Society, among other civic organizations. He has three children.

Accession Number

A2002.012

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

3/11/2002

Last Name

Allen

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Tuskegee University

University of South Florida

University of Florida

William Henry Spencer High School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Columbus

HM ID

ALL01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Georgia

Favorite Quote

Fate has its benefits but doubt gets you an education.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/17/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood or Soul Food

Short Description

Superior court judge The Honorable John Allen (1943 - ) was appointed Chattahoochee Judicial Circuit Superior Court judge in 1993 and has held appointments as a city attorney, a Recorder's Court judge and State Court judge.

Employment

United States Air Force

Delete

Muscogee County, GA

State of Georgia

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48259">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John Allen's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48260">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John Allen talks about his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48261">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John Allen talks about his parents, Beatrice and Daniel Allen</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48262">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John Allen talks about his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48263">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John Allen shares his memories of growing up in a housing project in racially segregated Columbus, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48264">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John Allen documents the transformation of Columbus, Georgia from a textile town</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48265">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John Allen talks about racial segregation in Columbus, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48266">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John Allen describes his childhood personality and his gang activity as a youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48267">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John Allen remembers the sights and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48268">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John Allen talks about elementary school and riding public buses</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48269">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - John Allen talks about his grade school years and secondhand school supplies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48270">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John Allen talks about influential teachers during his grade school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48271">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John Allen talks about his decision to major in engineering at Tuskegee Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48272">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John Allen talks about realizing his dream of flying at Tuskegee Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48273">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John Allen describes how his drive to excel was shaped by racism and his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48274">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John Allen remembers being paid by the state of Georgia to not integrate the Georgia Institute of Technology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48275">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John Allen talks about signing up for the ROTC at Tuskegee Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48276">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John Allen talks about joining The Civil Rights Movement, recruiting Malcolm X to speak at Tuskegee Institute, and joining the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48277">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John Allen reflects on his thoughts of Malcolm X</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48278">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John Allen talks about his reluctance to be a leader at Tuskegee Institute before co-founding the Tuskegee Institute Advancement League</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48279">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - John Allen describes his summer internship with IBM in New York in 1965</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48280">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - John Allen talks about pilot training with the U.S. Air Force after graduating from Tuskegee Institute in 1966</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48281">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - John Allen talks about racism in the U.S. Air Force and his service in the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48282">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John Allen talks about serving as a fighter pilot in the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48283">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John Allen describes how racism led him to leave the U.S. Air Force despite his outstanding record</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48284">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John Allen talks about his excellence as a fighter pilot</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48285">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John Allen describes American racism and hypocrisy in Southeast Asian during the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48286">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John Allen talks about a catch-22 in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48287">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John Allen recalls his second tour of duty with the U.S. Air Force and the racism he experienced</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48288">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John Allen reflects on his lack of fear during war missions and how the Vietnam War affected him</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48289">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John Allen talks about his emotional distance from killing people, his accuracy as a fighter pilot, and the pressure to succeed as a black pilot</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48290">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - John Allen details the characteristics of good fighter pilots</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48291">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - John Allen reflects on his military service and his decision to study law school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48292">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - John Allen talks about being admitted to the University of Florida's Levin College of Law</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48293">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John Allen shares his observations of Thai culture</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48294">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John Allen talks about working as an instructor pilot and his decision to go to law school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48295">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John Allen talks about why he refused to work as an airline pilot</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48296">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John Allen reflects on his law school experience at the University of Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48297">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John Allen talks about being accepted by others in Columbus, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48298">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John Allen talks about practicing law in Columbus, Georgia, starting the first integrated law firm in town, and how his military record helped his professional career…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48299">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John Allen describes how he established his reputation as an activist lawyer and his community involvement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48300">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John Allen talks about paving his own way as an activist lawyer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48301">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - John Allen shares why he became a judge in Muscogee County, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48302">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - John Allen talks about his work as a judge</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48303">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John Allen talks about using his position as a judge to improve race relations in Columbus, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48304">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John Allen talks about controversial decisions he has made as a judge</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48305">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John Allen reflects on his judgeship and his hopes to increase his community activism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48306">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John Allen talks about his mother's popularity with politicians like Marvin Arrington and Gordon Joyner as a talented seamstress</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48307">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John Allen expresses his appreciation for his mother and sisters' support</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48308">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John Allen describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48309">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John Allen describes why the South is susceptible to political manipulation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48310">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - John Allen reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48311">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - John Allen narrates his photographs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48312">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - John Allen narrates his photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48313">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - John Allen narrates his photographs, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/48314">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - John Allen narrates his photographs, pt. 3</a>

DASession

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DAStory

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DATitle
John Allen talks about joining The Civil Rights Movement, recruiting Malcolm X to speak at Tuskegee Institute, and joining the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965
John Allen describes how he established his reputation as an activist lawyer and his community involvement
Transcript
What about the--what else about Tuskegee [Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama] would you say sort of stands out? And how did you end up--$$Quite a--$$Oh--deciding on your major in mechanical engineering?$$I decided on the major simply from being prompted from high school. The--and fairly good at math. Tuskegee not only stands out as indelibly imprinted of course as its imprimatur on me throughout. I'm grateful for the opportunity of being in that--again, in a nurturing environment--at first somewhat isolated from a lot of other happenings, the Civil Rights Movement, until a couple of buddies and I--and we didn't even get any credit, nor did we seek credit for this. We decided that Tuskegee was being too conservative, so we did two things. We--several things--but we founded an organization called Tuskegee Institute Advancement League--get students to go out into the community and help educate the persons who were--farmers who were uneducated; do whatever was necessary to assist them in going back to school, babysit, tutor--form--founded Tuskegee Advancement League. A friend called Theodore Boles--I remember his--there were several of us and Eddie Phillips, all engineering students. And Tuskegee was not actively participating in marches at that point, as were North Carolina (unclear) and other schools. I went to the dean of students, said we need to be a part of the movement. Again, Theodore--Theodore Boles, Eddie Phillips, and I and some others, we weren't officers in the--in any of the classes. We were just activist engineers. That's not even written anywhere, by the way. I don't think it's even in the archives of Tuskegee. But we went to the dean of students and said we need a taste of what's happening outside of Tuskegee. And we really fought hard. And we got Malcolm X to come to Tuskegee to speak. And it was the beginning of inspiring Tuskegee students to get involved, and we did, quite a bit after that incident. And I think Malcolm X was killed within six months of coming to Tuskegee. So Tuskegee gave us--gave me an environment--a nurturing environment of sharing a common experience with other black kids from a lot of different areas, prepared us academically a lot better than I even thought at that time because I had no standard of comparison. And eventually getting involved in the Civil Rights Movement expanded our horizon. In fact, after Malcolm came, went to--I went to Tuskegee on the Selma and Montgomery march [1965 Selma to Montgomery Marches], not all the way. I cheated; I met it outside of Montgomery and jumped in line and marched up. And we also went on a couple of other marches into Montgomery [Alabama] and--around Tuskegee. So it was a life-expanding environment.$So how long did it take you to build your law practice, 'cause you--and what made you--$$I--$$You did--you just ha--did you just hang your shingle?$$Well, I came here and I went in practice with a black female for about a year. And she left town [Columbus, Georgia] and so I just hung my shingle and just started on my own, taking appointments, taking whatever came in the door. I paid my secretary more than I earned at that time--and just working hard, studying hard, practicing hard, taking appointments, building a reputation. I practiced for ten and a half years before the judgeship--state court judgeship came available 'cause there were no blacks in the judiciary here. Well, Albert Thompson had been appointed Superior Court judge and then lost. So I was the first ever elected judge in this area. The--got appointed, kind of showed people that I, I was gonna be fair and could be fair. And then I've been unopposed in every election so far. I actually garnered--I have some of the most--the largest corporations in the town, their officers sit on, on my election committee so (laughter) you know--you know, very high-placed Republican on one side and high-placed Democrat on the other, you know. They've been--the corporate world has been very supportive of me here. Of course I've been involved in a lot of things in the city during this time period and not all of them conciliatory. I was--I was a chairman of the board of PUSH [Operation PUSH]. I don't think I put it on there for a while. When we--in the election office with the portrait of--marched down and had them to install a portrait of the individual that broke the black--I mean the white-only primary. I sued the police department for discrimination. I sued the fire department for sex discrimination. I took the city on without pay to make them accommodate the handicapped, 'cause my client was a white female in a wheelchair. I mean those kind of things help--and forced the city to, to provide for access for the handicapped, they never had it before. So I--I'm not so sure I planned to do it that way. It's just that my sentiments leaned toward helping the underdog. And these cases gave a lot of publicity and a chance for me to get my name out and be involved. And after some of those fights, I was asked to be on committees, various boards. The first black on the airport commission, for instance, and then several things, chamber of commerce and on and on. So I guess I've been the beneficiary of good timing also.$$Well, they say sometimes good timing is being--having worked hard enough to be at the right place at the right time.$$Requires some of that.