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W. Paul Coates

Publisher W. Paul Coates was born on July 4, 1946 in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Edna Coates and Douglas Cryor. Coates enlisted in the U.S. Army and served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1967. He later received his B.A. degree in community development from the Homestead Montebello Center of Antioch University in Baltimore, Maryland in 1979 and his M.L.S. degree from Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1980.

After Coates returned from Vietnam, he settled in Baltimore, Maryland and began volunteering for the community breakfast program organized by the Baltimore chapter of the Black Panther Party. In 1970, Coates became defense captain of the Baltimore Black Panthers. There, he was in charge of managing all Panther activities in Maryland, including implementing free clothing and free food programs and housing assistance, before leaving the organization in 1971; and, establishing the George Jackson Prison Movement to bring Afrocentric literature to inmates. By 1978, the program had transition into the Black Classic Press (BCP), which Coates founded in order to publish books by and about people of African descent. After receiving his M.L.S. degree, Coates joined the staff at Howard University’s Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. In 1990, Coates was a contributing editor for the published work, Black Bibliophiles and Collectors: Preservers of Black History along with Elinor Des Verney Sinnette and Thomas C. Battle. In 1991, Coates retired from the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center; and, in 1995, he launched BCP Digital Printing to specialize in short-run printing. In 1997, author Walter Mosley granted Black Classic Press domestic and foreign rights to publish his novel Gone Fishin’. The book sold more than 100,000 copies, making it one of the biggest books ever published by Black Classic Press.

Black Classic Press republished several works including Seize the Time: The Story of the Black Panther Party and Huey P. Newton by Bobby Seale in 1991; Black Fire: An Anthology of Afro-American Writing by Larry Neal and Amiri Baraka in 2007; and, in 2012, it also published A Lie of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s “Malcolm X,” by Jared A. Ball and Todd Steven Burroughs.

Coates is the father of nine children; Kelly, Jonathan, Malik, Menelik, Ta-Nehisi, Darius, Jared, Damani and Kristance, including two additional adult children through marriage.

W. Paul Coates was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 20, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.005

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/20/2019

Last Name

Coates

Maker Category
Middle Name

Paul

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Sojourner-Douglass College with Annapolis High School

Clark Atlanta University

First Name

W.

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

COA02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

7/4/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Publisher W. Paul Coates (1946 - ) former Black Panther and founder of Black Classic Press (BCP) and BCP Digital Printing.

Employment

Black Classic Press

Howard University Moorland-Spingarn Research Center

BCP Digital Press

Favorite Color

Blue

Charles W. Cherry II

Publisher, radio station manager and lawyer Charles W. Cherry II was born in 1956 in Daytona Beach, Florida to Julia T. Cherry and Charles W. Cherry, Sr., founder of the Daytona Times and Florida Courier newspapers. In 1978, Cherry received his B.A. degree in journalism from Morehouse College, where he also interned for WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia. He then went on to receive both his M.B.A. and J.D. degrees from the University of Florida in 1982.

Cherry had his own law firm for twenty-one years and served as a city prosecutor for Fort Lauderdale, Florida and as a state prosecutor in South Florida. He also served as general counsel for the Housing Authority of the City of Fort Lauderdale, where he worked closely with its former executive director, the late Dr. William H. Lindsay. In 1989, Cherry and his father purchased WPUL-AM 1590, a Daytona Beach-area radio station. From 1998 to 2000, he served as general manager of Greenville, South Carolina’s WCSZ-AM. In 2000, Cherry was named general manager of WPUL-AM and became host of the station’s Free Your Mind radio show.

In 2004, upon the death of his father, Cherry returned to journalism and newspaper publishing. In 2006, the Cherry family re-launched the Florida Courier as a statewide newspaper; Cherry became its publisher and his column, Straight, No Chaser appeared weekly. He also went on to write commentaries, editorials, and stories for his other family-owned newspaper, the Daytona Times. In addition, Cherry served as vice president, secretary and general counsel of his family’s Tama Broadcasting, Inc., as well as vice president of corporate communications for Global Health Professionals, Inc.

Cherry published Excellence Without Excuse: The Black Student's Guide to Academic Excellence (1994), which has been used as a textbook in college-preparation classes and seminars. He was elected to the board of directors of the National Newspaper Publishers Association in 2009, and served on the Government Affairs Committee of the Florida Press Association. He also founded the Florida Black-Owned Media Coalition, Inc., a trade association representing Florida mass media owned by African Americans.

Charles W. Cherry II was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.230

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/7/2014

Last Name

Cherry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

William

Schools

Campbell Elementary School

St Paul's Catholic School

Father Lopez Catholic High School

Seabreeze High School

Morehouse College

University of Florida

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Daytona Beach

HM ID

CHE08

Favorite Season

None

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

West Africa or the Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow, For the Kingdom of Heaven Is Within

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

8/6/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Lauderdale

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Scallops

Short Description

Publisher, radio station manager, and lawyer Charles W. Cherry II (1956 - ) is the publisher of the 'Florida Courier' newspaper. He also served as vice president, secretary and general counsel of Tama Broadcasting, Inc, and as a city and state prosecutor in South Florida. He is the author of Excellence Without Excuse: The Black Student's Guide to Academic Excellence.

Employment

City of Fort Lauderdale

State of Florida

Housing Authority of the City of Fort Lauderdale

WCSZ-AM

WPUL-AM

Florida Courier

Tama Broadcasting, Inc.

Global Health Professionals, Inc.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles W. Cherry II's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his maternal African ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his mother's childhood in Leslie, Georgia pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his maternal grandmother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his mother's childhood in Leslie, Georgia pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his mother's college experience at Morris Brown College and her career as a home economics teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the Barlow family, his father's maternal ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's education at Morehouse College and Alabama State University

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's various jobs and business ventures

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the two newspapers his father started, the Westside Rapper and the Daytona Times

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his likeness to his parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's entrepreneurship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the roles he and his siblings play in the family business

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Daytona Beach, Florida pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Daytona Beach, Florida pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the "wade-in" to integrate the beach in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the march his father planned to protest the Apollo space missions

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his family being threatened with violence

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the impact of school desegregation on the African American community in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his first grade teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about reading the World Book Encyclopedia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his lack of religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about having a father who was an entrepreneur

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience at Seabreeze Senior High School in Daytona Beach, Florida pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience at Seabreeze Senior High School in Daytona Beach, Florida pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about transferring out of Catholic school to Seabreeze High School in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the impact of racism on mental health

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his interest in journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about applying for college

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the night before his high school graduation

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's newspaper, the Westside Rapper, going out of print and where the word "rapper" came from

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his first semester at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his friend from Daytona Beach, Florida leaving Morehouse College due to sexual harassment

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his professor HistoryMaker Na'im Akbar at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his journalism internship at WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience studying journalism at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about earning his J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about receiving academic support from black students in graduate school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about becoming a state prosecutor in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the inspiration for his book, 'Excellence Without Excuses: The Black Student's Guide to Academics Excellence'

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's newspapers, the Daytona Times and Florida Courier

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being the outside counsel for the Fort Lauderdale Housing Authority pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being the outside counsel for the Fort Lauderdale Housing Authority pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about ways to create safe public housing

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about changing the way he dressed after visiting Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about what he learned from purchasing his first radio station, WPUL

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being general manager of WPUL

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about small local radio stations being pushed out of the market

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Tama Broadcasting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his controversial radio talk show 'Free Your Mind'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the problems in Daytona Beach, Florida's black communities

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about production and distribution of his newspapers, the Florida Courier and Daytona Times

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the content within the Florida Courier

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about HistoryMaker President Barack Obama's presidency

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about HistoryMaker U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Florida's Stand Your Ground law

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about political trends in Florida's African American communities

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about adjusting his newspapers to the digital age and the books he is writing

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his business ventures in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II reflects on what he would do differently in his career

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II considers his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

10$3

DATitle
Charles W. Cherry II talks about his journalism internship at WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia
Charles W. Cherry II talks about what he learned from purchasing his first radio station, WPUL
Transcript
You were talking about your career trajectory in college you're majoring in journalism even though you were greatly influenced by psychology.$$Greatly influenced by, by psychology and [HM] Dr. [Na'im] Akbar but decided to go ahead and, and just make the media the main career and so we went over to Clark [later Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia]. All of, all of the media folks at, at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia] actually were taking classes at Clark. And which was a great thing because they had a top notch journalism, you know journalism and, and broadcast school there.$$Who was in charge of that? Or who was the main influence over there?$$My main influence was Nellie Dixon who was the, the journalism instructor and we had a, a Herb Eichelberger was over the, the, the broadcast school. And what happened was at that point in time, this was, this was, this was early in, in TV broadcast with regard to having black folks as part of, of, of there was a, there were issues in the TV in, in the TV industry in Atlanta [Georgia] because they had maybe one or two black, black reporters. And so we were told folks from--in journalism at the AU Center [Atlanta University Center, Atlanta, Georgia] so that was Morehouse, Clark, and Morris Brown [College, Atlanta, University] and Spelman [College, Atlanta, University]. We, they had a conference with those of us who were in journalism and broadcast and said, "all right we are going to take some of y'all 'cause and y'all gotta be top notch because we have told these white folk that we have some, some kids over here who can get the job done. We're gonna put, put some, we're gonna put some of y'all in some internships in some of these stations over here and here's what our expectations are of you. You will do well. If you can't do well, you know you're not gonna embarrass the AU Center, you're not gonna set this project back so tell us right now if you're not gonna be able to get it done." So I was one of those who volunteered and they, they gave me an internship at WAGA-TV which was Channel 5 in Atlanta for my last two and a half years at Morehouse. And that was, that was a great experience. I was a sports producer. On the weekends I did a certain part of the six o'clock news. So I wrote and produced small sections of the six o'clock news and 11 o'clock news on some week days and on the weekends. And they put me with Bill Hartman who was a guy who was a, a sports guy who's been there probably thirty years. And I, I functioned well. And [Bill] Hartman says I was the best intern that he had. He was hating to see me go but I tell you what happened?$$What?$$I decided to take the law school aptitude test my senior year did well on it. Again on a humbug decided to apply to the University of Florida. University of Florida came back with a full ride of, of grants not, not loans but grants and told me if I came that they, they'd make sure I got a grant as long as I could make it through the first year. So I decided to go to law school and not because, because of the money and at that point in time again, the University of Florida [Gainesville, Florida] was under the Consent Decree so they had to have black students. I knew I was gonna be coming back to Florida I figured that a law degree would probably be a pretty good thing. So I accepted that. But before I decided to actually go I had a conversation with the, the station manager because they offered me a job. So I, I was when I went to the meeting with the station manager, I expected that he was gonna say, "Well Charles you done a great job, you're, Bill Hartman, your boss likes you. You know the six o'clock news, the major producers like you. You know you done a great job. Gonna put you on salary X amount of dollars and you got a great career here." Well, he, what he told me was, "That what we're gonna do, we're gonna give you forty hours, but we're gonna extend that at the minimum wage that we're paying you as an intern right now." And I, I, I was flabbergasted. I was like, "I'm sorry, sir, but I worked here two and a half years. I done an excellent job as you, as you have told me and are you saying that I have a forty hour job but that even with a college degree and two and a half years of experience at this station, that I'm only gonna make minimum wage?" He said, "Yes." I was done. That was my media career.$Now let me go well, I'm gonna go to 1989 with the purchase of WPUL [-AM]. Your, your, your father [Charles Cherry, Sr.] and your brother [HM Dr. Glenn W. Cherry] were involved in this right?$$Yes, my father, my brother and a group, a group of my fraternity brothers from Omega Psi Phi fraternity at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, University] we had established a venture capital fund so we got funds from Morehouse's venture capital fund and we got, got some, some friends and some family put some money together and bought that station in Daytona [Beach, Florida] that dad ran in conjunction with the Daytona Times for a number of years.$$Okay. Now was this a station that was black-oriented at the time you purchased it?$$Country western. So it was a country western station. We made the biggest mistake that we, that we made as radio owners which is a rookie mistake which is to change the format from country western to black, basically R&B and all of our, our white clients just, they, they just left. You know we thought that it doesn't matter what the format is and, and it did matter. Because we lost every dollar from the little country western bars and the, the, the, the saddle stores and the, the, the shoe shops and all the rest of that, that had put money into this so. If we had to do it over again, we would have left it alone. But I think at that point in time we, we were just so happy in Daytona Beach [Florida] to have our own station that could play Earth, Wind and Fire and Teddy Pendergrass and all that 24/7 that we just--it was a big, it was sort of a big juke box for us when we, when we first started.$$Okay. But did the advertising come?$$No. Well advertising came but it didn't come from there. So we when you are in a black format and once--that's one thing we've learned along the way that you pay a, you, you pay a disproportionate penalty for targeting black people in almost any business because you sort of, you sort of pigeon hole that white owned businesses or traditional or mainstream businesses. You have to sort of prove to them that you'll bring value that, that black people do consume and, and, and it's, it's, it's an uphill struggle for the most part, particularly post--post-desegregation. Again black folks can take their money anywhere. And so you have to prove your value to both your black consumers as well as everybody else. And that's sort of a double standard that I think that a whole lot of, of black businesses deal with. But unfortunately that, that's just of sort of where we are right now.$$Okay. Okay. So, where does your advertising revenue come from now?$$Well it comes from, from folks who, who--well let me, let me back up. What we decided to do particularly when we started having multiple stations is that we have multiple formats. So you have, you have a chance to go to multiple customer, customer bases. So we have a--you have a R&B format, you're looking at people who are targeting a black/urban audience. You know you have a, a Hispanic format. You have a jazz format. You have a religious format. You have a top forty format. So when we, when we got, where we had eleven stations, we sort of run the--ran the gamut in terms of the number of formats and so you have a better chance of, of, of having a, a much broader consumer base that you can, that you can serve and then you have different formats that you can sell to, to an advertiser.$$So, so you started, well you started with WPUL was that sort of like a testing ground for what you would do with the rest of your stations? 'Cause the other stations were purchased from what I understand from 2000 to--from 1998 to 2000,--$$Right.$$--I guess?$$Yep, yep.$$Okay.$$Un huh. Well we--I think we learned how to be broadcasters at WPUL. You know we, we learned, we learned how to, how to tell time 'cause radio time is very exact. You learn what people respond to and what they don't. You learn how to, how to, how to carve expense. I mean the whole issue of revenue and expenses in radio is, is different from, from other kinds of industries. You know you learn, you learn, so you learn it and it wasn't something that I think we did consciously originally to go and get bigger, but when we--what we saw, when we saw how daddy was having fun and he was making money, we looked at it from a, from a financial perspective that radio has value and that there are stations out there that we can get and we learned enough about radio to turn it around and a sort of get stations that may be undervalued or that maybe, that may have too many, too much expenses and then from a business perspective put 'em in a--shape, pick a format and then move, move it forward.

Sheila Robinson

Marketing chief executive and publisher Sheila A. Robinson was born on September 20, 1961 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She graduated from Parkland Senior High School in Winston-Salem in 1979, and went on to receive her B.A. degree in pre-law/political science from North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina in 1986. Robinson later received her Masters of Entrepreneurship (M.S.E.) degree from Western Carolina University in 2011, as well as a Chief Learning Officer Certificate from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. In 2012, she entered the Chief Learning Officer Ed.D. program at the University of Pennsylvania. She has also completed Stanford University’s Professional Publishing Program.

From 1987 to 1989, Robinson worked for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company as a market research assistant. In 1990, she was hired by DuPont, where she went on to serve as a marketing director with the company’s apparel division. When her division at DuPont was sold in 2004, Robinson established Robinson & Associates Communications, LLC and became founder and publisher of North Carolina Career Network magazine. In 2007, Robinson expanded Career Network nationally and launched Diversity Woman magazine, where she served as chief executive officer and publisher. Robinson also hosted the Diversity Women's Business Conference and founded Iamaleader.org, the nonprofit extension of Diversity Woman in 2012.

In 2009, Robinson was honored with a Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Image Award for her career achievements and for being a positive role model for young women. She was named in 2009 as one of the Top 50 Women in Magazine Publishing by Publishing Executive. Robinson was also the keynote speaker at the 2008 wives luncheon at the NFL Pro Bowl, and was honored as the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce Minority Business Person of the Year in 2011. Her Diversity Woman magazine was nominated for The 2011 North Carolina Small Business of The Year.

Robinson is a member of the National Association for Female Executives and the National Association for Women Business Owners, and serves on the boards of Women in Periodical Publishing and Business and Professional Women. She is the author of Lead By Example: An Insiders Look at How to Successfully Lead in Corporate America and Entrepreneurship, which was published in 2014.

Sheila Robinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 15, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.180

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/15/2014

Last Name

Robinson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Annette

Schools

Parkland Sr. High

Hill High

Griffith Elementary

Diggs Elementary

Mineral Springs Elementary

North Carolina Central University

Western Carolina University

University of Pennsylvania

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

Winston-Salem

HM ID

ROB27

Favorite Season

Fall

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near The Ocean

Favorite Quote

What Someone Else Says Or Does, Is A Reflection Of Who They Are And What You Say Or Do, Is A Reflection Of Who You Are.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

9/20/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Burlington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Marketing chief executive and publisher Sheila Robinson (1961 - ) was the founder, publisher and CEO of Diversity Woman magazine and author of the book Lead By Example: An Insiders Look at How to Successfully Lead in Corporate America and Entrepreneurship.

Employment

R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

DuPont Company

Robinson & Associates Communications, LLC

North Carolina Career Network Magazine

Diversity Woman Magazine

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheila Robinson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson talks about how her parents met and their personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson remembers her neighborhood in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson recalls Jefferson Davis Diggs Elementary School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson remembers her favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson remembers her favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson lists the high schools she attended

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson remembers joining her high school cheerleading team

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson recalls facing discrimination on the cheerleading team, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson recalls facing discrimination on the cheerleading team, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson describes her social activities at Parkland Senior High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson remembers her early career aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson recalls attending North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson describes her first impressions of North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson recalls her experiences at North Carolina Central University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson remembers her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson talks about the decline of the tobacco industry

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson recalls her transition to the textile industry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson talks about her work with E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson remembers her challenges at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson recalls her transition to the marketing department of DuPont Textiles and Interiors

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson describes her experiences as marketing assistant at DuPont Textiles and Interiors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson recalls leaving E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson talks about the highlights of her career at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson remembers her mentors and opportunities at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson recalls founding the North Carolina Career Network magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson remembers rebranding her magazine as Diversity Woman

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson describes the mission of Diversity Woman magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson talks about the success of Diversity Woman magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson recalls founding the I Am A Leader organization

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson recalls pursuing a doctorate at the Wharton School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson describes her book, 'Lead By Example'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson describes her public speaking career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson shares her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson reflects upon her professional legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Sheila Robinson recalls founding the North Carolina Career Network magazine
Sheila Robinson describes her public speaking career
Transcript
Now in 2005, you founded Robinson and Associates Communications, LLC?$$Yes.$$And tell us what that, what you intended to do?$$Well, I, it, it came about, I had never thought I would ever try to have my own business. It came about after numerous rejections. I had an incredible load of experience from DuPont [E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company] and I went out to all of these organizations. I can remember the president of the division I was in, a $6.5 billion industry, was used, as a reference. I had the greatest references, I had fascinating interviews but I was not given an opportunity, particularly in the area that I was living in and the last time that I was told, "You have a boatload of experience and more marketing and brand marketing that we could ever need at this organization but I'm concerned you're not the right fit," you know. I knew then that I was no longer going to go job hunting, that I needed a break, I was going to do something different, I needed to explore. I don't know if I'm going to explore going back to school, explore relocating to another area, explore, you know, just, I had to just stop because the rejection was just more than, two years of rejection, it just seemed like it, I had been out there two years looking for a job because I had started looking in advance when they told us we would be laid off, and I had this vision when I was at DuPont to start a magazine to support women in business. It's sort of like an Essence and a Black Enterprise but for women and then I thought, well, you know, I want to help anyone with their careers because there was something I had always been known for, if someone asked me how to do their resume or practice for an interview and I've always had this love, love affair with magazines and I took my passion for magazine journalism to, and my passion for helping others advance in their careers. I brought it to one and I had designed the template and the idea before I left DuPont and one of my friends told me that I should explore that vision I had for the publication and I told her, you know, there was no way that I had any funding to do that and she said, "Well I didn't tell you to do it, I just told you to explore it," and I did. I, at that time, I thought it was a great shift going on in North Carolina, we were shifting from becoming a tobacco and a textile industry, the two industries I had just gotten laid off from, to a biochemistry, biotechnology and a logistics and I thought, why not come up with a North Carolina career publication and talk about all of these different industries and opportunities that are taking place in my state. And so that's what I was passionate about. I was, I wanted to bring awareness to how our industries had shifted in this area and put it into a magazine and help people that had been laid off, significant layoffs like I had been in the textile and tobacco industry, and help them get jobs in other industries and long story short, North Carolina Career Network was in the market in 2005 and it was just a little small regional publication that got a lot of attention, including being on the newsstands and Borders bookstores [Borders Group, Inc.] and Barnes and Noble bookstores [Barnes and Noble Booksellers, Inc.].$$Okay, okay. So, so did you distribute any in the black churches or the, or any of the other, well, black colleges [historically black colleges and universities (HBCUS)] or--$$No, because it, at that time, it was not a, it was not just for African Americans. It was for anyone in the State of North Carolina, men and women, and so I distributed it at the chamber of commerce [North Carolina Chamber]. I started, I knew from having events at DuPont, how successful I could be if I had an event. So I had an event and I distributed it there because I knew how to create promotional events from my experience there and that was the way I got it out.$Well tell us about your public speaking career.$$Well my public speaking career took off unexpectedly. It actually started at DuPont [E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company], a funny story where I was at a PR [public relations] event and the agency we were working with said, "Sheila [HistoryMaker Sheila Robinson]," and this was an event I was doing with Queen Latifah in front of Bloomingdale [Bloomingdale's] store and E! Entertainment was there and she said, "I have an opportunity to get you on camera," and normally they just want the celebrities and the stars but I know where she was like, "You got a chance to plug Lycra, you know. This is how you do it," and I was like, "Okay." So they put the mic to my phone, to my mouth and all I could see is Queen Latifah, lights, cameras, paparazzi and I freeze. I freeze, and the next day they, my boss, enrolls me in a course for public speaking, ten thousand dollars. They fly me to New York [New York], and I'll tell you how this fascinating career was I had at DuPont and I started doing public speaking, being a spokesperson for the company at DuPont. That's how I had the opportunity to do the on air interview with Sara Blakely of Spanx [Spanx, Inc.], and in, rolled over into entrepreneurship. Schools started asking me to come speak to the students and college students and then as my business grew, organizations have asked me to speak. And so one of the things I learned, when the publishing industry, anyone that is in publishing that, that, that's watching this now or even any consumer will know that this industry, the print industry, has hit a fall and one thing that I learned at Stanford University [Stanford, California] was, if you're going to stay in publishing, then you have to have multiple streams of revenue. So, it was an idea to create an additional arm to my business and at that time, I worked with a very small agency on creating a packet and sending it out and we sent it out to the NFL [National Football League] in New York and I got hired to speak at the Pro Bowl in Hawaii and it was just awesome. I was interviewed, I was hired by the vice president of the NFL, out of New York, and I was the keynote luncheon speaker for the wives doing the Pro Bowl and they had asked me to speak on entrepreneurship and how, at that time, women, entrepreneurship for women was very, very good and I think the league was really wanting to inspire and support any spouse or mate that had access to this disposable income and to put it and invest it in someone, where they could pay off in the future and it was great thinking on their part because so many times you hear about, you know, they blew their money and had, you know, millions of dollars gone down the drain but, you know, they had programs in place to help the players and their spouses invest for the future. So, speaking engagements such as that, as well as corporations that have diversity programs or women's conferences and I continue to do that today.

Lafayette Jones

Marketing chief executive and publisher Lafayette Glenn Jones was born on February 17, 1944. He credits his parents, who managed a small landscaping business, with his own entrepreneurial drive. Jones received his B.A. degree from Fisk University in 1965, and went on to attend executive management programs at Dartmouth College’s Amos Tuck School of Business and Stanford University’s School of Business.

Jones first worked for the Job Corps and the YMCA as a program director in the mid-1960s. He then directed client promotions at the Washington, D.C. radio station WOL from 1967 to 1969. From 1969 to 1974, he worked as a sales and marketing executive for Lever Brothers, Pillsbury Company and General Foods. From 1974 to 1979, Jones served as a marketing manager for Hunt-Wesson, where he created the Orville Redenbacher Gourmet Popping Corn and Hunt's Manwich strategies. In 1979, he was appointed as vice president of marketing and sales at Johnson Products Company in Chicago, Illinois. In 1981, Jones founded and served as executive director of the American Health and Beauty Aids Institute (AHBAI), the trade association of black hair care companies. He also founded Smith-Jones & Associates, an association management firm.

In 1988, Jones was named vice president and general manager of Supreme Beauty Products Company, the hair care subsidiary of Johnson Publishing Company. He then joined Sandra Miller Jones’ Segmented Marketing Services, Inc. (SMSi) in the early 1990s, where he went on to serve as president and chief executive officer of SMSi-Urban Call Marketing, Inc. and publisher of the company’s Urban Call magazine. Jones also became publisher of SMSi’s Shades of Beauty magazine in 1998.

Jones has authored articles for numerous publications including OTC Beauty Magazine and the Beauty Industry Report. He authored a column in Sophisticate's Black Hair Styles and Care Guide and the 1999 Green Book’s special section on ethnic hair care. Jones also wrote a column for ShopTalk magazine for fifteen years. He is a frequent speaker at conferences and has guest lectured at Harvard University, Dartmouth College, Duke University, Wake Forest University, and Howard University. Jones has also served on the boards of several organizations including Urban Getaways, the Mardan Institute and the Promotion Marketing Association.

Jones is married to his business partner, Sandra Miller Jones. He is the father of four children: Kevin, Melanie, Tara and Bridgette.

Lafayette Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 14, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.215

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/14/2014

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Fisk University

Dartmouth College

Stanford University

First Name

Lafayette

Birth City, State, Country

Cincinnati

HM ID

JON40

State

Ohio

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

2/17/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Winston-Salem

Country

United States

Short Description

Marketing chief executive and publisher Lafayette Jones (1944 - ) is the president and chief executive officer of SMSi-Urban Call Marketing, Inc. and publisher of Urban Call and Shades of Beauty magazines. He also served as a marketing executive for Lever Brothers, Pillsbury Company, General Foods, Hunt-Wesson, Johnson Products Company and Johnson Publishing Company, and founded the American Health and Beauty Aids Institute.

Employment

Job Corps

YMCA

WOL Radio

Lever Brothers; Pillsbury Company; General Foods

Hunt-Wesson

Johnson Products Company

American Health and Beauty Aids Institute

Smith-Jones & Associates

Supreme Beauty Products Company

Segmented Marketing Services

Urban Call Magazine

Shades of Beauty Magazine

Hiram Jackson

Publisher Hiram Jackson was born in 1965 in Highland Park, Michigan to Hiram Jackson, Sr. and Naomi Jackson. He attended the Detroit Country Day School and received his B.S. degree in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University in 1987.

Upon graduation, Jackson joined a management training program at Ford Motor Company and worked in the corporation’s labor relations department. He resigned from Ford in the early 1990s and co-founded New Center Collision, which marketed auto body repairs to corporate fleets. In 1994, Jackson sold his share of New Center Collision and used the funds to buy DMC Technologies, Inc., a low-voltage cabling and wiring firm, where he served as chairman and chief executive officer. He then established GlobalView Technologies, LLC and Genesis Energy Solutions in 1998, and purchased the Wixom, Michigan-based Clover Technologies, Inc. in 2001.

In 2003, Jackson became part of an ownership group that purchased the Michigan Chronicle and several other newspapers from Chicago-based Sengstacke Enterprises Inc., which resulted in the formation of the multi-media company, Real Times Media, LLC. He was named chief executive officer of Real Times Media in 2006 and appointed as publisher of the Michigan Chronicle in 2012.

Jackson has served on several Detroit area boards including the Detroit Zoological Society, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, First Independence Bank CDC, the Detroit Branch of the NAACP, and the Boys and Girls Club of Southeastern Michigan. He is a member of Governor Rick Snyder’s Office of Urban and Metropolitan Initiatives Advisory Group, and was elected to the board of directors of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) in 2013.

Jackson has received numerous acknowledgements and accolades throughout his career. He has been profiled in several publications including Savoy magazine, Diversity MBA Magazine and Black Enterprise. He was also recognized as a top 40 executive under the age of 40 by Crain’s Detroit Business, and was named one of Michigan’s most powerful African American leaders by Corp! Magazine. In 2011, Jackson received the General Motors African Ancestry Network (GMAAN) GMAAN Trailblazer Award and the National Association of Security Professionals annual Maverick Award.

Hiram Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 23, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.140

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/23/2014

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Eric

Occupation
Schools

Detroit Country Day School

Cornell University

Cortland Elementary School

George W. Ferris School

First Name

Hiram

Birth City, State, Country

Highland Park

HM ID

JAC34

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Turks and Caicos

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

4/4/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Publisher Hiram Jackson (1965 - ) was the CEO of Real Times Media, LLC and publisher of the Michigan Chronicle.

Employment

Ford Motor Company

New Center Collision

DMC Technologies, Inc.

GlobalView Technologies, LLC

Genesis Energy Solutions

Clover Technologies, Inc.

Real Times Media, LLC

The Michigan Chronicle

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hiram Jackson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hiram Jackson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hiram Jackson describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hiram Jackson describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hiram Jackson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hiram Jackson talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hiram Jackson describes his parents' personalities and how he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hiram Jackson talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hiram Jackson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hiram Jackson remembers his parents' careers in Highland Park, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Hiram Jackson remembers his childhood home in Highland Park, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Hiram Jackson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hiram Jackson remembers his early educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hiram Jackson recalls his decision to attend the Detroit Country Day School Upper School in Beverly Hills, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hiram Jackson describes his athletic activities at the Detroit Country Day School Upper School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hiram Jackson remembers being recruited by college football teams

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hiram Jackson remembers his graduation from the Detroit Country Day School Upper School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hiram Jackson describes his experiences at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hiram Jackson talks about the Africana studies department at Cornell University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hiram Jackson reflects upon his career at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hiram Jackson describes his position at the Ford Motor Company

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hiram Jackson talks about his decision to found New Center Collision, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hiram Jackson talks about African American entrepreneurship

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hiram Jackson talks about the success and demise of New Center Collision, Inc. in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hiram Jackson remembers establishing DMC Technologies, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hiram Jackson describes GlobalView Technologies LLC's acquisition of Clover Technologies, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hiram Jackson recalls the bankruptcy of GlobalView Technologies LLC

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Hiram Jackson describes the creation of Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Hiram Jackson describes his role at Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hiram Jackson describes his role as CEO at Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hiram Jackson talks about the outreach programs at Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hiram Jackson talks about the changes in the news media industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hiram Jackson describes the staff of Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hiram Jackson talks about the revenue of Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hiram Jackson remembers the financial crisis of 2008

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hiram Jackson remembers acquiring the Who's Who Publishing Company

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hiram Jackson talks about the DRIVEN in Living Color project

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hiram Jackson describes how he came to be the publisher of The Michigan Chronicle

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hiram Jackson describes his role as publisher of the Michigan Chronicle

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hiram Jackson talks about the staff of the Michigan Chronicle

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hiram Jackson talks about his plans for the future of Real Times Media LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hiram Jackson talks about the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hiram Jackson reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hiram Jackson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hiram Jackson talks about his future

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hiram Jackson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Hiram Jackson talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Hiram Jackson describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Hiram Jackson describes GlobalView Technologies LLC's acquisition of Clover Technologies, Inc.
Hiram Jackson talks about the outreach programs at Real Times Media LLC
Transcript
Well GlobalView Technologies [GlobalView Technologies LLC, Detroit, Michigan], that's, that's important in this story, right?$$Absolutely. We, I would say we started DMC Technologies [DMC Technologies, Inc., Detroit, Michigan] in maybe '92 [1992] or '93 [1993] and we had a hard time. I mean it was--we were struggling. We were struggling. We, you know we had a very difficult time growing the business, and I would say somewhere around '96 [1996] we started having some good luck. We got a couple of major contracts with some local school districts and then there was a program called E-rate from the federal government. And E-rate was, were federal dollars that were designed to go into urban classrooms to pay for technology installations. We developed a, an expertise on how to apply for E-rate grants and how to install E-rate projects and that was around '96 [1996]. We started doing some major installations and that caught the eye of Detroit Edison [Detroit Edison Company; DTE Electric Company, Detroit, Michigan], the local utility at the time. We were--we had also proposed on trying to build a fiber optic network around the City of Detroit [Michigan]. Detroit Edison was looking at getting into some unregulated businesses and so we thought it would--we developed a partnership, Glo- and that partnership was called GlobalView Technologies. I owned 60 percent of it and DTE Energy owned 40 percent of it. And the company started growing immediately. We were doing about twenty million [dollars] in sales in '98 [1998], we were doing installations all over the country, in school districts and municipalities and you know for a few years the company was doing well. It's one of the fastest growing black companies in the country at the time.$$Okay. What happened? Did you get--did you, I mean did it cease to you know generate as much profit or did you see it declining?$$No, actually we--you know I had developed an expertise at turning troubled companies around. I mean that was my craft, raising capital, finding companies that were in distress, turning them around. And GlobalView, we found a company called Clover Technologies [Clover Technologies, Inc., Wixom, Michigan]. At the time Clover was a company that had been around fifty years, highly successful, entrepreneurial company, and Ameritech [Ameritech Corporation; AT&T Teleholdings, Inc.] had bought Clover from a local entrepreneur. When Ameritech got to it, the company started to go down pretty much because you take this highly entrepreneurial small company, Clover was doing about a hundred million dollars a year and you put this big corporate bureaucracy on it, it kind of lost its step and it didn't work. It didn't work. So they never (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's an interesting place--way to put that--lost its step.$$Yeah (laughter), but you know the thing is, is that Ameritech never integrated into their corporate infrastructure because Ameritech had their own kind of department that did similar work. But when all this was going on, SBC Communications [SBC Communications Inc.] out of Texas actually bought Ameritech and they made the decision that they wanted to sell Clover Technologies. And you know we tried to buy it. We tried to buy it, they wouldn't return our calls. We were a competitor so they were--made it very clear that they were very uninterested in selling us that company. But we stayed at it and then one day I remember it very clearly, I was on the phone with Bill Pickard [William F. Pickard] on a Sunday morning and I was telling him that these folks would not even let us bid on the company. And he said, "You know what," he said the--Roy Roberts who was at General Motors [General Motors Corporation; General Motors Company], Roy Roberts was a, one of the highest ranking African Americans in the history of the automotive industry was at General Motors. He said, "You know Roy is on the board with the CEO of SBC, Mr. Whitacre [Edward Whitacre, Jr.]." He said, "Maybe we can get his attention that way." We ended up calling Roy and asking for his assistance and one thing led to the next and we ended up buying Clover Technologies for $5 million. And that immediately took us from a $20 million company to a company that was doing about $120 million operating all over the world. We had seven offices. We were doing work for the federal government. We were working in automotive plants around the world, and it was kind of an overnight kind of deal.$Now this is a treasure. We were talk- talking about this off camera.$$Sure.$$All the photos of great photographers that worked for the Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier [New Pittsburgh Courier] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$--and, yeah. So well, you know talk about some of the photos, the kind of photos that are around?$$Sure. Well we [Real Times Media LLC], you know when we started this process, we--I'd walk into the office and there'd be photos on the floor. Just, you know not even in a file cabinet, just on the floor. You might see a photo of Fidel Castro and Muhammad Ali just, on the floor. Or Sammy Davis, Jr. and Jesse Jackson [HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson] with their kids on the floor. And so you know we had to immediately just figure out what we had and just real- on a basic sense, just start filing them away. But these are photog- these are photos that are one of a kind photos. I mean you know the Emmett Till funeral, open casket funeral, open casket photo. We have photos that--$$Yeah, that's one that rocked the world. I mean every other person in that generation we talk to or everyone in that generation that saw it in the Jet in '55 [1955] were rocked by it.$$Absolutely. And Jet [sic. Johnson Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois] is the only other company that has that photo other than the Chicago Defender. And we don't just have a photo, one photo or two photos in these collections, we have a file of the Emmett Till case, we have a file of Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] when he lived in Chicago [Illinois] for a short- point in his life when he was exposing poverty and some of the conditions of the Chicago housing department [Chicago Housing Authority] where African Americans were living. We have photos that talk about the Double V campaign.$$Oh yeah.$$You know success at war, success at home, eliminating racism. So these photos are one of a kind and they are shocking in their uniqueness and so I just really felt like you know this could be a part of our future, finding a digital platform that these photos can ride on to make them universally available to anyone who wanted to see them, you know. So that became very much a part of our diversification strategy, take these photos off the floor and out of file cabinets and digitize them and make them universally available around the world and so we've been working on that part of it. We have about ten thousand photographs that have been digitized and we're going to be launching our website later in the year with some very unique photography. And ultimately what I'd like to do is build the infrastructure so that all of the papers in the black press can put their images on our infrastructure and make them universally around the world.$$So would they be available for a fee or would they--?$$They would be available for a fee.$$Okay.$$We have a unique service today where we've already digitized our newspapers from 1905 to 1976, all of those have been digitized in Pittsburgh [Pennsylvania] and Chicago [Illinois] and Detroit [Michigan] and, so all of our papers are online. So if you're a college student in Amsterdam or a college student in Chicago, you can go online and if your university or college has signed up to our program, you know you can have access to these images now. And so we've been able to monetize the digital newspapers and now we're trying to digitize the photography. So that was part of our diversification strategy. We started doing events. We created some pretty interesting events. One of our signature events is called Pancakes and Politics. We started that event in Troy--in Detroit and it's really a town hall meeting of the movers and shakers. We use our brand to highlight issues that are impacting southeastern Michigan and it's a television show and we partner with, we have print partners and television partners and that's been a huge success for us. We do, today we do over fifty events around the country with our various properties and so with the special events, the digital strategy, we do a number of community outreach programs and we started a marketing services division to help companies better understand the African American consumer. So we're not only a newspaper company anymore. That was a bitter pill for some of our folks to swallow because you know they believed in the newspaper business and wanted to stay very much in the newspaper business. But given the trends and what's happening in the digital world, you know we're not giving up on our print products and we're not giving up on our newspaper division; they do quite well now. But we really felt it necessary to expand into some of these other areas to diversify our platform and take advantage of the relationship that our brands have with this, with this growing African American community.

Cheryl Smith

Journalist and publisher Cheryl Lynn Smith was born on June 20, 1958 in Newark, New Jersey to Joseph Smith and Earline Gadson. Smith attended public elementary schools in Newark and East Orange, New Jersey, and graduated from East Orange High School in 1976. She received her B.S. degree in journalism from Florida A&M University in 1980, and her M.S. degree in human relations and business from Amberton University in Dallas, Texas in 1986.

In 1980, Smith was hired as editor for Capital Outlook News in Tallahassee, Florida. From 1981 to 1984, she worked as a production coordinator for TV Watch in Dallas, Texas and JC Penney Life Insurance Company in Richardson, Texas. In 1987, Smith was hired at The Dallas Weekly, where she served as a staff writer, executive editor, editor-in-chief and columnist. Smith also worked for five years for Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price. From 1997 to 2000, she served as executive editor of Future Speak, a weekly newspaper produced by Dallas area high school and college students for the Dallas Examiner newspaper.

Smith worked as a producer and talk show host at KKDA-AM from 1990 until 2012, and as a show host of PAX-TV’s “The Ester Davis Show” from 2010 to 2012. She was also the host of Blog Talk Radio’s “Cheryl’s World,” and cable television’s “On the Dotted Line.” In 2011, Smith founded I Messenger Enterprises, where she serves as publisher and editor of I Messenger, The Garland Journal and Texas Metro News. In addition, she was an associate professor at Paul Quinn College from 1999 to 2010, and an adjunct professor at the University of North Texas from 2002 to 2009.

Smith has served as the president of the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Journalists and the Dallas-Fort Worth Florida A&M University National Alumni Association. She was a two-term National Association of Black Journalists regional director, and has served as president of the Dallas-Metroplex Council of Black Alumni Associations. In 1994, she became the first African American and female to chair the North Texas Health Facilities Corporation. Smith has also served on the boards of the Dallas Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Irving Cares and the Leslie K. Bedford Foundation. In 1995, she established the Don’t Believe the Hype Foundation.

Smith has won numerous awards, including the Messenger Award from National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Journalism Excellence Award from The Dallas Examiner, the Outstanding Journalist Award from Elite News, the Barry Bingham Sr. Award from the National Conference of Editorial Writers, as well as multiple awards from the Texas Publishers Association, the NNPA, the NAACP, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators. The National Civil Rights Museum awarded her the “Invisible Giant” Award, and in 2005, the Omicron Mu Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. presented her with the “Image Award.” In 2009, Smith was honored by the Journalism Educator’s Association. She also received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the Dallas-Metroplex Council of Black Alumni Associations and Woman of the Year award from the Women Empowering Women Foundation.

Since 1992, Smith has been raising her nephew and three nieces: Andre, Alayna, Annya and Ayanna.  

Cheryl Smith was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.096

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2014

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Chancellor Ave

Whitney E. Houston Acad

G. Washington Carver Institute

East Orange Campus High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Amberton University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

SMI30

State

New Jersey

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/20/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist and publisher Cheryl Smith (1958 - ) was the publisher of I Messenger, The Garland Journal and Texas Metro News. She also worked for The Dallas Weekly for over twenty-five years as a staff writer, executive editor, editor-in-chief and columnist.

Employment

IMessenger

Dallas Weekly

KKDA-AM

Ester Davis Show

University of North Texas

Paul Quinn College

Carolyn Glenn

Publisher and entrepreneur Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was born on June 28, 1947 in Greenesboro, Georgia to parents Flossie Hill and Albert Jernigan. In 1963, Glenn graduated from Carver High School at the age of sixteen. She went on to receive her B.S. degree in business education from Albany State University in Albany, Georgia in 1967. She then received two M.S. degrees from Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, one in business and vocational education in 1972, and one in in educational administration in 1985. She is also licensed to practice real estate in Georgia and Florida.

Glenn spent twenty years working in public education, as a secretary, business teacher, vocational coordinator, and high school administrator. In 1991, Glenn and her husband, Dr. Earl Glenn, established ACE III Communications and founded The Champion Newspaper with Glenn as publisher. The Champion is Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, and, since 1996, has been the most award-winning weekly among all newspapers in The Georgia Press Association. In 1999, they launched Atlanta Goodlife, a magazine focused on the lifestyles of African Americans in the Atlanta metropolitan area. In 2008, Glenn became the president of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation. Under the auspices of that foundation, she and her husband created Unconditional Love for Children, which provides opportunities for disadvantaged children to become empowered through educational enrichment programs, life skills training, athletics, and access to health services. She has been a log-time Foundation Board trustee and past chair at Georgia Perimeter College, and has endowed a perpetual scholarship for students at Albany State University.

Glenn has also been the recipient of numerous awards and honors. In 1994, she received the Benjamin Hooks Business Award from the DeKalb branch of the NAACP. In 1995, her newspaper won two Business of the Year Awards, one from the South DeKalb YMCA and another from 100 Black Men of DeKalb. That same year, Glenn was named Outstanding Entrepreneur by Success Guide. In 1996, she was named Businesswoman of the Year by the South DeKalb Business Association. The Atlanta Business League named her Businesswoman of the Year in 1997, and one of the 100 Top Black Woman of Influence from 1996 to 2014. She has also been named a Woman of Distinction by Living Word COGIC and listed among six influential Georgia women in Women Looking Ahead magazine. She won a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Humanitarian Award from Georgia Perimeter College in 2006, and a Trail Blazer Award from Congressman Hank Johnson in 2013.

Glenn lives in Stone Mountain, Georgia with her husband. They have one grown son, Christian.

Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 20, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.017

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/20/2014

Last Name

Glenn

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jernigan

Occupation
Schools

George Washington Carver Middle School

Albany State University

Georgia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Greensboro

HM ID

GLE03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

This Little Light Of Mine, I’m Going To Let It Shine.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/28/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Publisher Carolyn Glenn (1947 - ) founded Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, The Champion, which became the state's most award-winning weekly publication.

Employment

ACE III Communications, Inc.

The Champion Newspaper

Earl D, Glenn, DDS

DeKalb Schools, Gordon High

DeKalb Schools, Cedar Grove

Atlanta Schools, Murphy High

Dalton GA Schools, Dalton High

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2494,37:3096,46:5418,76:6020,85:13840,200:14665,215:15565,228:15940,234:17290,280:17740,287:23476,359:23752,364:24856,390:33896,517:34376,523:36296,549:36680,554:37448,564:41546,614:42059,625:43028,651:43484,661:45384,676:45724,682:46608,696:46948,702:50198,733:51350,754:55166,833:55454,838:55742,843:56102,851:59198,914:75421,1036:88832,1268:89208,1273:93760,1294:103180,1388:107188,1453:108364,1474:109540,1496:110226,1504:113950,1546:115318,1574:119723,1607:123924,1658:127128,1695:127785,1710:128953,1735:132092,1805:137719,1897:138146,1906:139793,1946:140830,1969:142843,2023:148560,2059:149400,2080:150210,2090$0,0:328,7:1230,25:2560,33:3088,43:3418,49:5295,64:5781,71:7725,151:10722,216:11370,227:16635,361:20624,375:21014,381:21482,388:24134,453:24836,466:25304,473:26942,523:31595,543:32195,555:33545,582:36545,651:39920,731:40670,742:47645,991:48095,998:50570,1047:50945,1053:61398,1167:61722,1172:62694,1180:63342,1197:64476,1214:65286,1226:66339,1242:66987,1251:69822,1335:70308,1342:76932,1391:79660,1423:80425,1439:81275,1455:81700,1461:83485,1491:84505,1506:84845,1511:92210,1595:92802,1604:93542,1616:95688,1672:96354,1678:98574,1718:99536,1735:100128,1744:103458,1811:105012,1848:105530,1857:105974,1864:119540,2019:120030,2028:120590,2038:121990,2068:130470,2283:130870,2288:131670,2298:135070,2346:143410,2439:143870,2445:146262,2482:155072,2599:155909,2613:161685,2675:165570,2743:173069,2835:173505,2840:174486,2862:175031,2868:175467,2873:178390,2883:180568,2909:182795,2938:183485,2955:184244,2970:184589,2976:195600,3146:198620,3165:199120,3172
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carolyn Glenn's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her maternal grandfather's work to rebuild the family wealth

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her maternal grandfather's charity to black sharecroppers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the challenges of integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her neighborhood in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her activities at George Washington Carver Elementary and High School in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' fears of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls witnessing President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's motorcade

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn recalls protesting against segregation at Rich's Department Store

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes segregation in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn remembers joining the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her mentors at Albany State College in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers teaching at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes the black community in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her success at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls teaching at J.C. Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn remembers mentoring a gay student at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her promotion to vocational coordinator at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her educational philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the growth of the black community in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences as a graduate student at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transition to vocational coordinator at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the highlights of her time at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her decision to leave the education profession

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes the founding of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the first issue of The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls founding ACE III Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers The Champion newspaper's financial challenges

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn recalls preparing The Champion to become the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the legal battle over The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers creating The Champion Free Press

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about Atlanta Goodlife magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the name of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the news coverage in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her civic activities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the coverage of President Barack Obama's election in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's digital platform

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers founding the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her philanthropy in Jamaica

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the funding of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her plans for the future of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

10$2

DATitle
Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion
Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College
Transcript
So between '88 [1988] and '91 [1991] when you found The Champion newspaper, what was going on? What was informing this process by which you established the, the newspaper?$$Remember, now this is the migration, you know, of all these people coming to Atlanta [Georgia]. A lot of people said, you know, "Yeah, I live in Atlanta now." Well, you know, you--we talk about, we really said--in terms of metro. But at that time, most of the people moving here were moving to DeKalb County [Georgia]. Because you had the great location, and you had the best values in homes. So in my husband's dental office, we were working in there, you know, all day, every day together. And we're seeing all of these people, all of these important people, accomplished people, moving to DeKalb County and living in DeKalb County, and we don't even know each other. Because when I used to, when I grew up in Monroe, Georgia, the only way to get to Atlanta was to come through DeKalb County because there were no expressways or what have you. We knew that it was 95 percent white. So, now you've got a Tuskegee Airman as a patient. You've got a gentleman who designed an official stamp for the UN [United Nations]. You've got movie stars, you've got top entertainers. You've got news anchors, you've got, just all kinds of people. Who was the president at that time? The gentleman who handled the security for the president of the United States. You've got top educators, you know, retirees. You've got college presidents. Just wonderful, accomplished people. But we didn't know each other. So in my family, my husband [Earl D. Glenn] is the visionary. He sees things way, way, way ahead. I'm the worker bee. I know how to--he does the research and he puts it together and then he--I figure it out. So he said, "Carol [HistoryMaker Carolyn Glenn]," we said to each other, "we need a way to get to know one another." And eventually after lots of talks and whatever, we came up with the idea that we needed a forum, and the newspaper may be that forum. So we started The Champion newspaper.$When I went home for the summer, after the first year, I was--a letter came from Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia]. So, you know, now in my house you don't open other folk's mail. But in that it was from Spelman, I just figured it was okay. So I opened it, and I saw where my mother [Flossie Etchison Hill] had paid on the tuition, but she had not completed the first year's tuition. So, now it's, you know, time for me to get ready to go back for the second year. And I'm looking--I've got five sisters and brothers. And, you know, she's working really hard. So I decided my--this aunt, my favorite aunt [Azalie Etchison Richardson] that I was telling you about--she was a--are you familiar, familiar with Jeanes curriculum directors?$$Yes.$$She was one (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) She was a Jeanes supervisor--$$She was a Jeanes super- she was just real special.$$James Jeanes funds [sic. Anna T. Jeanes Foundation], right?$$Yes, Anna Jeanes [Anna T. Jeanes], she was really special. So she was a Jeanes supervisor down in South Georgia. And, you know, I went to stay with her during the summer or something, a week or two. And we were just very close.$$They worked on a special grant to improve the teaching in the South in small, rural schools, right?$$Absolutely.$$So they were sent down into--$$They were almost like the black superintendent. They were called supervisors, but they were like regarded on the level of a--the black superintendent, even over the principals, in most cases. So she, and she was one, she and my aunt were one of the first to get their master's degrees way back, you know, in my hometown [Monroe, Georgia]. So I guess that was a part of her acceleration, in that she had her master's degree. But she was a Jeanes curriculum director down in Cordele, Georgia then in Sylvester [Georgia], which is thirty miles from Albany [Georgia]. And I called her, and I told her what I saw. And, so she and I strategized. And I went--she took me over--I went to visit, went out secretly, clandestinely, went to Albany State [Albany State College; Albany State University, Albany, Georgia]. The dean of students, she and the dean of students had been in, had gone to co- had gone to college together, so she knew everybody. And she just walked me through, and I'm now enrolled, you know, in two hours. And, so the dean said, "Well, you know, if this is your niece, I know what stock she comes from. So she's--she has a job in my office." And that was the plum job of the campus. I worked for him the whole time I was there. And, so I told my mother and my stepfather [Julius Hill, Sr.], I'm going to Albany State. My father cursed the whole way to Albany State. "I don't know why you want to go to the country, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." And my mother cried. And it was only about, I think it was about five years ago that I told her why I did that. And she said, "I'm so glad you told me because I have never understood why you changed from Spelman to Albany State."$$That was certainly a sign of maturity, I guess and--$$Yeah.$$--to be that considerate.$$Well, again, it was--I always, I loved my mother.

Donna Byrd

Publisher Donna Byrd was born on April 26, 1970 in Fort Lee, Virginia. She was raised in a military family, grew up in North Carolina and Virginia, and graduated high school in Germany. Byrd received her B.A. degree in American government from the University of Virginia in 1992, and her M.B.A. degree from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business in 1996. She also studied business at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

In 1992, Byrd was hired as an assistant sales manager for Procter & Gamble, where she worked until 1994. From 1996 to 1999, she served as a brand manager for the Coca-Cola Company, where she developed marketing and sales strategies. In 1999, Boyd was named vice president of marketing for EzGov.com. Then, in 2001, she helped Tom Joyner launch BlackAmericaWeb.com, one of the top three African American news and lifestyle websites. Boyd served as chief executive officer of BlackAmericaWeb.com until 2003, when she co-founded Kickoff Marketing, a strategic planning and brand firm, where she was managing partner for five years.

In 2008, Boyd was hired by The Washington Post and named publisher of TheRoot.com. She has received The Lucile Harris Bluford Spotlight Award, as well as an award from The Diva Lounge for her work as publisher of TheRoot.com. Byrd was also honored at the Diversity Affluence Brunch & Awards in 2012.

Donna Byrd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 31, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.048

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/31/2014

Last Name

Byrd

Maker Category
Middle Name

Lynn

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

University of Virginia

Duke University Fuqua School of Business

University of Cape Town

James K. Polk Elementary School

Warrenton Middle School

Heidelberg American High School

Fauquier High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Donna

Birth City, State, Country

Norfolk

HM ID

BYR02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

Woo Hoo

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

4/26/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

French Fries

Short Description

Publisher Donna Byrd (1970 - ) assisted in launching BlackAmericaWeb.com, co-founded Kickoff Marketing, and was named publisher of TheRoot.com.

Employment

Procter & Gamble

The Coca-Cola Company

Ezgov.com

BlackAmericaWeb.com

Kick-Off Marketing

TheRoot.com

Favorite Color

Fuchsia

Timing Pairs
0,0:1410,31:3760,64:4136,69:13860,192:17432,272:17888,279:21384,433:23740,478:24272,492:24728,499:31130,540:31646,547:32076,553:41406,637:42288,647:42974,655:46398,691:47550,712:52275,752:53130,762:64180,866:64855,877:82406,1156:82990,1165:88936,1227:89860,1248:90454,1260:90718,1265:91048,1271:91378,1277:93292,1347:94810,1383:95338,1392:101370,1484:104024,1513:108206,1591:113593,1666:114067,1675:114383,1680:114857,1687:140390,2027:140715,2033:141820,2105:142405,2123:143640,2147:143900,2152:147020,2234:155372,2306:155677,2312:156043,2319:159314,2350:163270,2417:164505,2439:164895,2446:166520,2488:173995,2658:174255,2663:176400,2731:182482,2769:185578,2829:186438,2843:194940,3027$0,0:1510,61:10390,164:17321,251:17669,256:18278,265:23498,320:26891,382:28022,397:28718,407:35375,457:35700,463:41615,588:42135,594:43175,612:47595,731:51990,753:53030,778:53910,791:55190,810:56470,831:56870,837:57350,844:57670,849:58630,867:59910,884:61510,902:62070,910:68568,973:72866,1020:73622,1031:87390,1286:88974,1320:94830,1424:99800,1568:104735,1616:105670,1639:105945,1645:108055,1664:108363,1669:119560,1874
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Byrd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donna Byrd lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donna Byrd describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donna Byrd describes her mother's physical traits

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donna Byrd describes how her parents met, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donna Byrd talks about her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donna Byrd describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donna Byrd describes her paternal family's naming practices

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donna Byrd describes her paternal grandparents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donna Byrd describes how her father came to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donna Byrd describes her father's education at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donna Byrd talks about her father's early career in the U.S. military

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donna Byrd describes how her parents met, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donna Byrd talks about her parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donna Byrd lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donna Byrd remembers her family's frequent moves

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donna Byrd describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donna Byrd describes her community in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donna Byrd describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donna Byrd describes her childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donna Byrd describes her earliest experience of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donna Byrd remembers James K. Polk Elementary School in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donna Byrd describes her early interest in gymnastics

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donna Byrd recalls moving to Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donna Byrd describes her early entrepreneurialism

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donna Byrd describes her education in Warrenton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donna Byrd recalls moving to Heidelberg, Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donna Byrd remembers Heidelberg American High School in Heidelberg, Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donna Byrd describes her experiences as an African American in Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Donna Byrd recalls visiting East Berlin, Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Donna Byrd remembers the music of her teenage years

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Donna Byrd recalls her introduction to oratorical contests

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Donna Byrd recalls her student council position at Heidelberg American High School

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Donna Byrd recalls her decision not to attend the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donna Byrd recalls her decision to attend the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donna Byrd recalls her arrival at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donna Byrd remembers the Honor System at the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donna Byrd recalls founding the Nights of the Roundtable

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donna Byrd remembers her mentors at the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donna Byrd reflects upon her time at the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donna Byrd recalls receiving the Gray Carrington award

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donna Byrd recalls working for the Procter and Gamble Company

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Donna Byrd remembers the Fuqua School of Business in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Donna Byrd recalls studying at the University of Cape Town in Cape Town, South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donna Byrd talks about the verdict of O.J. Simpson's trial

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donna Byrd recalls her experiences of racial identity in South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donna Byrd describes the optimism in South Africa after the fall of apartheid

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donna Byrd recalls working for The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donna Byrd recalls the development of the Dasani brand

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donna Byrd recalls being denied a promotion at The Coca-Cola Company, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donna Byrd recalls being denied a promotion at The Coca-Cola Company, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donna Byrd remembers leaving The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donna Byrd remembers working for EzGov, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Donna Byrd recalls joining the staff of Black America Web

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

11$8

DATitle
Donna Byrd recalls her introduction to oratorical contests
Donna Byrd remembers leaving The Coca-Cola Company
Transcript
Now were there any significant teachers or mentors you know, in high school [Heidelberg American High School] there in Heidelberg [Germany]?$$I mean the most influential and sort of important teacher in my life actually was in Warrenton, Virginia, Warrenton, Virginia, in middle school [Warrenton Junior High School; Warrenton Middle School, Warrenton, Virginia]. Her name is Mrs. Tomlinson [Carol Tomlinson]. And I used to--I was very, very shy. I was extremely involved in school, but I didn't like to talk very much. And I--and when people would talk to me, I often stuttered a little bit. And so Mrs. Tomlinson was the advanced placement English teacher. And she always, she would always put on a play every year. And she let me try out for different roles and I found out very early on that when I was on stage, I didn't stutter. And I enjoyed having a script and acting. It went back to what my mother [Diane Diggs Byrd] used to do with us in the summers, we had quite a bit of acting that went on at the house anyway. And I enjoyed it. And so she started enter me--enter, entering me into oratorical contests. And so I started doing the American Legion oratorical contests when I was in eighth grade. And I would, I would be in first place just about every single time. I don't say this, this is not bragging; I'm just saying just about every single time on the prepared speech. And the prepared speech had to be on something--it had to be related to the [U.S.] Constitution. And it was an eight to ten minute prepared speech, no notes, no podium. And so you had the entire stage and you had to basically give a speech. And then there was a three to five minute segment on the articles and the--they would give you the--one of the articles five minutes before you spoke. And you had to come out and you had to be prepared to speak on, on one of them. Whichever one they had told you. And I would always do this. I remember my speech, I remember parts of my speech. I was talking--I remember I had Jesse Jackson [HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson] quotes in it and I was talking about the fabric of the u- I mean this country and how we were all woven and held together by the same thread. And this whole thing going on. And then I'd get to the extemporaneous piece and every single time I would freeze up. And I just, I would always--I would just--I would sort of stutter my way through the, the, the second half of the piece, the second half of the competition. So I'd go from first place to third place or second place or whatever. But I was able to pile up enough money over the years--I did it all the way through high school, all the way through twelfth grade in Germany since they had American Legions over there too. And pocketed enough money to really help with my--definitely my first year of college [at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia].$$Okay, okay.$$But Mrs. Tomlinson was the one behind all of that and encouraging me to sort of break out of my shell.$You were with Coke [The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Georgia] from '96 [1996] until--?$$Ninety-nine [1999].$$Okay.$$I was itching to get out into that, the Internet space.$$Now you were introduced to something called ezgov.com? Is that--$$I was. So I went over and worked for--I left Coke and as a brand manager on Coke Classic [Coca-Cola Classic], and I went over as a twenty-nine year old VP of sales and marketing. Everybody had VP in all these kind of great titles when everybody was in their twenties right around the Internet time. It was a great, it was sort of a fun period for young technologists and entrepreneurs that were starting businesses. And I went over and worked for EzGov [EzGov, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia]. I remember leaving Coke because when I put in my resignation, within forty-eight hours I had met with every senior vice president and the president of, of Coke U.S., U.S.A. because they all wanted to know why I was leaving. And they had me in everyone's office, "Why are you going?" And I remember a woman saying to me, one of the top women that was at the company, she said, "Why, why are you doing this?" She said, "Don't you know that one day you're going to--." She said, "Right now you can walk into any room and you can say 'I'm with The Coca-Cola Company,' and everyone's going to respect you." And she said, "And you're going to go off somewhere and you're going to have to walk out somewhere and they're not going to know what it is," and she's like, "Why are you going to do that? You're going to lose all of that, you know that immediate respect." And I said, "You know hopefully one day I'll build something and I'll walk into the room of something that I've helped to build, and maybe, maybe they'll be, they'll respect me for something that I've helped to build in this technology space. And that sounds kind of cool to me."

Solomon Herbert

Publisher, journalist and photographer Solomon J. Herbert was born on June 24, 1939, in New York to parents William and Margaret Herbert. He attended the City College of New York.

In the 1960s, Herbert served as second national vice president of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) under Jim Farmer for several years, and then under Floyd McKissick. He also became a member of the Bronx CORE, where, along with several other CORE members from the Bronx, he participated in what was to become the first direct action/civil disobedience effort outside of the south when CORE members sat in at the White Castle restaurant chain to break their discriminatory hiring policies. Herbert later became president of the Bronx CORE.

After his involvement with CORE, Herbert went on to establish and run several programs for disadvantaged youth. From 1981 to 1994, he was self-employed as a full-time freelance print and photo journalist. During that period, over 800 of Herbert’s articles appeared in numerous regional, national and international publications. Then, in 1994, he co-founded, with his wife Gloria, the award-winning Black Meetings & Tourism magazine, where he serves as publisher and editor-in-chief.

Herbert has held membership in several professional organizations, including the National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners (NCBMP), Meeting Professional International (MPI), Travel Professionals Of Color (TPOC), Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO), Africa Travel Association (ATA), Travel and Tourism Marketing Association (TTMA), Black Business Association of Los Angeles (BBA), and Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce (GLAAAC). He also sits on the board of the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers, and co-sponsors the annual Multicultural Tourism & Hotel Ownership Summit & Trade Show. Additionally, Herbert is a member of the TPOC Advisory Board, and previously served as a member of the MGM Grand Specialty Markets Advisory Council.

In 2002, Herbert served as executive producer of Globetrotting, a travel television series he and his wife created, which debuted on BET on Jazz. He has also received many awards, including the 2002 National Coalition of Black Meeting Planner's Minority Business Award, the 2005 Regional Black Chamber of Commerce of San Fernando Valley’s Small Business of the Year Award, the 2007 Outstanding Entrepreneur Award from the Black Business Association of Los Angeles, the 2008 California State Salute to Small Business Award, the 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award from NABHOOD, and the 2010 Small Business Award from the United Chambers of Commerce of the San Fernando Valley & Region.

Solomon Herbert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 19, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.351

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/19/2013

Last Name

Herbert

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Johnson

Schools

City College of New York

Brooklyn Technical High School

P.S. 36 St Albans School

P.S. 116 William C Hughley School

P.S. 40 Samuel Huntington School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Solomon

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

HER04

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

The Main Thing Is To Keep The Main Thing The Main Thing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/24/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mexican Food

Short Description

Publisher, journalist, and photographer Solomon Herbert (1939 - ) served as the second national vice president of the Congress of Racial Equality, and as president of the Bronx CORE. He published over 800 articles as a journalist, and co-founded Black Meetings & Tourism magazine.

Employment

Black Meetings and Tourism

Santa Fe Movie Caterers

Bronx Community Self Improvement Association

Anmar Designs

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Solomon Herbert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sololom Herbert talks about his maternal uncle's role in 'The Notorious Elinor Lee'

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert recalls his mother's death from cancer

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert remembers his mother's aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert talks about his father's military service in World War I, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Solomon Herbert recalls his father's homemade television set

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Solomon Herbert remembers his father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert remembers his father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert describes his father's health problems

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert talks about his family legacy in the 369th Infantry Regiment

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert talks about his father's military service in World War I, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert remembers Camp Craigmeade in Peekskill, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert describes the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert recalls hosting CORE fundraisers at Silvia's Blue Morocco in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert remembers his early influences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert describes his early experiences of religion

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert talks about his schooling in Queens, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert recalls an experience of racial discrimination at school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert remembers applying to Brooklyn Technical High School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert describes his experiences at Brooklyn Technical High School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert recalls his introduction to the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert talks about the impact of his parents' deaths

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert remembers his early interest in magazines

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert describes his social activities at Brooklyn Technical High School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert recalls his education at the City College of New York

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert remembers founding Anmar Designs

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert remembers joining the Congress of Racial Equality

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert talks about the discriminatory policies of the New York City Board of Education, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Solomon Herbert talks about the discriminatory policies of the New York City Board of Education, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert describes the Federal Bureau of Investigation's attempts to monitor the Congress for Racial Equality

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert talks about the relationships between civil rights organizations

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert describes CORE's activism in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert remembers organizing the March on Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert describes the work of James Farmer

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert describes his experiences at the March on Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert remembers organizing the March on Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert recalls the focus on white participation at the March on Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert recalls the logistics of the March on Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Solomon Herbert talks about the decline of CORE in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert remembers reconnecting with the CORE leadership and youth members

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert talks about his move to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert describes his film and television catering company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert recalls selling a script to Topper Carew

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert remembers catering for Fred Williamson

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert talks about his interactions with white actors

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert talks about his experiences as a freelance journalist

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert remembers photographing the National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert describes his start as a journalist

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert describes founding of The Black Convention magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert talks about writing 'Bill Cosby'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert remembers meeting his third wife

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert describes the content of Black Meetings and Tourism magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert talks about the advertisements in Black Meetings and Tourism magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert describes the most popular domestic destinations for African American travelers

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert talks about the most popular foreign destinations for African American travellers

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert talks about the largest black meetings and conventions

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert describes the impact of September 11, 2001 on the travel industry

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Solomon Herbert remembers founding the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Solomon Herbert remembers creating 'Globetrotting' for BET

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Solomon Herbert talks about the importance of minority representation in the hospitality industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Solomon Herbert talks about the importance of visiting Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Solomon Herbert describes his current projects at Black Meetings and Tourism magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Solomon Herbert talks about the growth of black-owned hotels

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Solomon Herbert describes his family's involvement at Black Meetings and Tourism magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Solomon Herbert reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Solomon Herbert describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Solomon Herbert reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Solomon Herbert describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Solomon Herbert narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$7

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Solomon Herbert describes CORE's activism in New York City
Solomon Herbert describes founding of The Black Convention magazine
Transcript
So what were the, some issues of--that CORE [Congress of Racial Equality] dealt with where you were in New York [New York] were education, you said, and--?$$In the school--$$Yeah.$$--and the unions and then, and the, and the original one, which was the employment. I mean, I think those were the three big areas that we were involved in. Of course, we were involved in police brutality and other things. But police brutality has al- has always been a difficult--especially back then. It's a little bit more--today with everybody walking around with a cellphone, they can take videos and everything. There's more proof of it. If it hadn't been somebody there with a camera to tape Rodney King, people probably wouldn't have believed that. And a lot of the stuff that was happening back then, it was never documented. It was just, you know, this person told me this is what happened to him. But there was no way to prove it. So that was always kind of a fringe--it was an important issue, but it was an issue that you could get little traction on sometimes because it was difficult to prove. And, you know, the police are not--and I'm certainly not anti-police. I mean my daughter is a retired police officer in New York. And her husband, my son-in-law, is a re- retired police officer. So I don't really have a problem with police when they're doing their job. But a lot of them don't do their job. And my daughter used to tell me sometimes how she had to have to either speak up or bite her tongue in a situation where she saw some of her fellow officers were acting in an inappropriate fashion. But back then there was almost no way to prove some of the allegations. So while it was--you know, we addressed those issues, very little ever came of it. But with housing or with schools, I mean you could--the numbers speak for themselves. When there's no black principals in a ci- city the size of New York for those black people, you know, how do you deny that? How do you cover that up? You can't.$$This used to be said by the powers that be that they could qua- not find qualified Negroes--$$Yeah.$$--to fill these spots.$$Well, you know, that's an argument that's still being used today. And in fact, maybe later on we'll get into that. In the industry I'm in, it's unbelievable. I mean the thing is, there aren't much better than--I mean, there are some, but there are not nearly as many as there ought to be.$So we were just talking about some of the people that you came in contact with at Black Enterprise, Black Collegian [The Black Collegian]. I guess you knew [HistoryMaker] Kala- Kalamu ya Salaam and some of the other (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes, and also a young lady, Sonya Stinson, I used to work with her there. In fact, she wrote for me up until about a year ago. So--$$Okay. So this is--now that sounds like a pretty good life, you know. You make--you're able to write and without any blocks or anything (laughter). So let's see. Now in 1990, now tell me if I'm going to fast, jumping ahead too much. But in 1990, you and a business partner launched The Black Con- Convention [The Black Convention], right?$$Yes.$$This is a monthly magazine.$$Yes.$$And, so tell us why, and what was the focus of it?$$Well, you know, Howard had been for--Howard Mills [Howard F. Mills, Sr.] from the coalition [National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners]--had been urging me for the longest time to try and put together a magazine to address the needs of the African American meeting planner and hospitality professional. And of course it was--I had never published before, even though I had done a lot of writing. So that was a whole new industry for me. And also, it was during a recession, a very bad recession during that period of time. So, but in any event, I was doing a story for one of the general market publications. And that was around 1989 or thereabouts, '88 [1988], '89 [1989]. And there was a boycott of Arizona going on at the time because they had refused to acknowledge the Martin Luther King birthday [Martin Luther King Jr. Day]. So I'm doing a telephone interview with the president of the bureau, convention and visitors bureau. And of course, when I'm doing a telephone interview, unless the people know me, they don't know who I am. They don't know if I'm black or what I am. And I, and I also, when I'm rea- if I'm writing for Black Enterprise, I know who my audience is. And, so I'm going to write, you know, with one focus. If I'm writing for a general market, well, I'm writing for a different audience. So anyway he didn't know I was black, and I wasn't trying to write a black story. I was just writing a story that I was given, an assignment I was given about Arizona. And, so I was not going to make the whole boycott thing a major part of my article, although I was trying to figure out how to get it in there without, you know, because, you know, a lot of times people don't--in a destination--don't want to talk about if they're being boycotted. They don't want to draw attention to it. So about halfway through the interview, he volunteers. He said, well, one of the things he's hoping is the boycott ends soon, because they've lost, whatever, $25 million and groups pulling out. So I said, "Fine." So I put in his little comment, a sentence or two, and went on with the rest of the story. When I sent it to the editor, submitted it, the editor said, "Oh, nobody's interested in that. That's old news." And he just took it out. And that was kind of the story that broke the camel's back. I figured well, now, first of all, the president is the one that raised the question. I didn't ask the question, and he felt it was important enough to include it in his comments. And it was relevant, even to a general market audience, I think--audience, it was relevant. But anyway, that was the kind of thing that said, "Well, maybe I need to sit down and talk with Howard about this. Because this may be the time--if we can't tell our stories, we can't rely on other people to tell them for us." So that was kind of the thing that pushed me to do it at that particular point and time.$$Okay. Well, how did this, how did the magazine do? I mean--$$Well, it was difficult, it was challenging. For that matter, it's still challenging. But we had some folks that belonged to the coalition that I--by this time I had gotten to know, who wanted to see it happen. And, so they did something that people very seldom do in this industry and almost never do. And that is that they made some commitments before anything was done and some of them even paid in front. Now you don't--in the, in the magazine industry, the drill is you send somebody their tear sheets and an invoice and then they pay you. Tear sheets are the things that come out of the magazine that show that their ad is run.$$Yeah.$$They don't pay you before that's done, because you could take the money and run. And believe me, people have done it. But we had some people who were just committed to seeing this magazine come to life. And, so we had a few of them that were, made that commitment and just--we didn't have a lot of funds, but we had enough to do what we had to do and get that first issue out there. And we started out, I think we did, we did one issue in I think November, and then we did--the next one was in January. Something like that because we were, we didn't try and do it, start out as a monthly. And then at some point after the first couple of issues were out then we went to a monthly. And we did that for a while until advertising revenue really kind of died after 9/11 [September 11, 2001]. And that's when we, somewhere around that time, we went to a bimonthly.$$So 2001, that's when it went bimonthly?$$Some- somewhere around there, may have been a little before that.

Pluria Marshall, Jr.

Publisher and broadcasting executive Pluria Marshall, Jr. was born on January 17, 1962 in Houston, Texas. His father, Pluria Marshall, Sr., is a professional photographer and a civil rights activist in the media business. Marshall graduated from Clark College, now Clark Atlanta University, in 1984 with his B.S. degree in business administration and management.

In 1981, while attending Clark College, Marshall was hired at KLTV in Tyler, Texas, as a management-training intern. He spent the next two summers in Lufkin, Texas, and continued his management-training program. He then worked for WXIA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia and for Turner Broadcasting in 1982 and 1983. From 1984 to 1985, Marshall completed his management training and development position at WLBT-TV in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1986, he served as the station manager and then as vice president of WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi. Marshall entered into an agreement to purchase WLBM in 1990, but the transaction did not consummate due to a suspicious fire at the facility in April of that same year. In 1992, he purchased The Informer & Texas Freeman in Houston, Texas. Then, in 1993, Marshall became general manager and owner of WLTH Radio in Gary, Indiana, and also purchased the KHRN radio station licensed to the Hearne, Texas, Bryan College Station radio market in 1994. He ran both the AM talk radio station in Gary and the radio station in Bryan College Station for several years.

In 1997, Marshall joined the board of the Wave Community Newspapers, and purchased a controlling interest in 1998. He then purchased the Los Angeles Independent in 2000. After the purchase of the Los Angeles Independent, Marshall merged both operations to form the Los Angeles Wave Publications Group. In 2013, he launched Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions; a media planning and buying firm that specializes in placing ads that target multicultural audiences.

Marshall has been a member of the National Black Media Coalition, the National Association of Broadcasters, and the National Association of Television Programming Executives. He has also served on the boards of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Texas Association of Broadcasters, the California Newspaper Publishers Association, and the National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation. Marshall is chairman of the board and president of the Watts Willowbrook Boys & Girls Club.

Pluria Marshall, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.295

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/15/2013

Last Name

Marshall

Maker Category
Schools

Clark Atlanta University

Lockhart Elementary School

Meyerland Performing and Visual Arts Middle School

James Madison High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Pluria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

MAR17

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Don't Make Dollars That Don't Make Cents.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

1/17/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers

Short Description

Broadcast executive, publisher, and newspaper publishing chief executive Pluria Marshall, Jr. (1962 - ) was the owner and publisher of the Houston Informer and Texas Freeman and the Los Angeles Wave Publications Group. He also operated WLTH Radio and Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions.

Employment

KLTV

WXIA TV

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

WLBM TV

WLTH Radio

KHRN

Informer & Texas Freeman

Los Angeles Wave Publications Group

Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:5100,103:7704,144:8541,158:9099,166:10587,186:11796,209:13470,250:17097,359:21654,423:36602,592:40292,717:53928,916:56594,977:57110,984:74700,1417:75351,1425:80187,1516:90224,1579:98910,1834:105930,1913:109770,2015:124190,2363:128780,2461:129410,2470:129860,2476:130580,2485:144338,2722:144758,2732:146018,2779:152298,2837:162262,3107:172825,3303:187871,3541:188306,3547:193265,3655:199964,3790:200399,3796:208841,3878:216038,3987:217936,4062:252805,4470:259455,4669:260460,4712$0,0:10552,307:10982,313:17346,419:20614,470:29254,512:40228,648:40852,655:46704,756:59185,878:61795,985:67798,1071:68320,1091:81230,1289:88160,1401:88848,1412:101350,1660:111622,1815:118837,1927:121516,1971:123172,2021:124468,2049:128788,2151:131164,2210:131668,2219:141958,2352:142490,2361:160075,2717:160585,2724:163815,2771:172099,3089:173874,3150:195450,3364
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Pluria Marshall, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his mother's upbringing in the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's civil rights activism

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his paternal grandparents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his father' role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his father's accomplishments as a photojournalist

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his household

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls accompanying his father on photography shoots

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his early interest in sports

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the influence of his father

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his experiences of integration busing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers Johnston Middle School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the racial demographics of James Madison High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his participation in athletics at James Madison High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his part-time position at KPRC-TV in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the black publications in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's relocation to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his decision to attend Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the communications department at Clark College

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his college internships, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his college internships, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the historically black college experience

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his decision to major in business

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his training at WLBT-TV in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his first impressions of Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his management approach at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the programming on WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls the major news stories in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the fire at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his sales position at KBXX Radio in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls acquiring WLTH Radio and KHRN Radio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his partnership with Lorenzo Butler

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the programming on WLTH Radio in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the programming changes at KHRN Radio in Hearne, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his decision to settle in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the Houston Informer and Texas Freeman

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his editorial philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls joining the board of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the history of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his challenges at the Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the Los Angeles Wave Publication Group's role in the community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his business strategy for Los Angeles Wave Publications Group

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers filing for bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his hopes for African American broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his family

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the Black Media Preservation Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$11

DATitle
Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi
Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls joining the board of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.
Transcript
So you were there fif- fifteen months. What happened? Why did you, well why didn't you stay longer?$$Well, as you can probably tell by my, my history, I, I like to work, and there was really not a whole lot more for me to do. I mean I had been in three years--three summers of training, been at WLBT [WLBT-TV, Jackson, Mississippi] for, you know, a little over a year. And so Frank [Frank Melton] would, you know, we'd have board meetings, and he was, he'd allow me and my cohort to attend the board meetings, you know, for the exposure. And so, they would always talk about this little station [WLBM-TV; WGBC-TV] in Meridian [Mississippi]. They said, "Oh, man, that station's not making money." The guy would come, and he would have a song and dance every month. Why we're losing money, why we're doing this, why we're doing that or whatever. And so I said to Frank, you know, I'm twenty-two, twenty-three years old, I'm like, "Frank, come on, man, you know, if it's losing money, I mean, you know, give me a shot. Let me run it," you know, and I'm, yeah, as they say full of piss and vinegar. And so he said, "Well, hell, Pluria [HistoryMaker Pluria Marshall, Jr.], you know, you can't do any worse than what's going on there now. We're losing money." And so I said, "Okay, great." So he says, "All right, you can move to Meridian." And so, I said, "Okay, great." So we had to renegotiate my little package that I was getting paid and everything. And so he said--so I said, "So what do I do?" He said, "You make it make money." I said, "Okay, so how do I do that?" He said, "You cut your expenses, raise your revenue." I said, "Oh, okay, great. That's easy, you know." And so literally, I got there and the guy that ran the station, it was a guy named Glenn Rose. Glenn was a nice old guy, but he's just not really good at raising or selling ads and things of that sort. And he used to always say, "Pluria, you just, you're just too aggressive, you just, you know, you just, you gotta be patient." I said, "Dude, I have no patience, you know, I've gotta get this done." So--$$This sounds like a clash in cultures of--in Mississippi, they do, they move slower. They move slower.$$Oh, they do. They do.$$So I mean you're like, you know--$$Yeah, I (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) anybody watching this can see.$$Oh, yeah, yeah, I'm like, hey, guys, you gotta move. You know, I mean I'm, I can't sit here and wait, you know. So, finally, after probably about, you know, two or three months, you know, Glenn gave me, through Frank, he said, "All right let him be a--," I was a station manager. And so I'd go in, "I'm sorry, fine. We can fire this person. We need to do this. We're gonna raise the rates. We're gonna make the--," I did all the things that I was trained to basically do. And so ninety days after I got there, the station made money. And so, you know, I said, "Frank. I did it, all right? So make me the general manager," (laughter). And so he was like, "You know, you're being a little impatient, Pluria." I'm like, "Yeah, I am, you know." And so I kept pushing and pushing and pushing. And so finally Glenn said, you know--and Glenn was a little bit older and been around the business for quite some time. He said, well, he's gonna basically retire. And so I said, well, you know, the station's mine at that point. And so Frank, you know, put me in as the vice president and general manager. And it also helped that NBC was on its rise in the mid-'80s [1980s]. So we had 'The Cosby Show' and we had all this great programming. Although the station was a bit of a, less than a full powered station, it covered the Meridian area. But it wasn't as big as the station in Jackson [Mississippi]. And so, you know, I kept it, it never lost a dime as long as I ran it. It was always very profitable. And so I ran it from, essentially, '85 [1985], '86 [1986] until 1990.$$Okay, and you got a large black viewing audience down there, I would imagine?$$We do, we do. Yeah, the state's about 50 percent black.$$Right.$$Yeah.$$So anything you put in the air, there's gonna be a lot of black folks, at least by this time, having--with TV sets. They can check it out.$$Right, oh, yeah, definitely, definitely.$$And watching a lot of TV.$$Yeah, 'The Cosby Show' was a hit. It definitely was.$$Okay, okay, so you were there--you weren't there that--were you there very long? I mean--$$From, from, as I said, from about '85 [1985] to '90 [1990], roughly 'cause when I spent--I was in Jackson for about fifteen months. So, and that was from '84 [1984] to '85 [1985]. So, late '85 [1985] to 1990. So I was there about, you know, for five and a half years.$Is it now talk, time to talk about the Wave?$$Sure, sure, sure, sure.$$'Cause there's--$$(Simultaneous) So, so all right, so we segued, so we have Houston [Houston Informer and Texas Freeman]. We had Gary [WLTH Radio, Gary, Indiana], we had KHRN [KHRN Radio; KVJM Radio, Hearne, Texas]. I mean we got all these properties, and so as I said, when they, they deregulated radio, it made it difficult for me to one, find stations, two, acquire financing. And, and so our offices in Houston [Texas] were domiciled within the 610 loop [Interstate 610]. So Houston has a loop system. So 610 is the loop. So there was this company that was getting a fairly large bit of notoriety called Enron [Enron Corporation]. And, you know, I knew who they were. They were big. They were doing all kinds of things.$$That's the big energy company that--$$Enron, oh, yeah.$$--the big energy that got in trouble.$$This is the big one.$$Enron, all right.$$Enron, so, you know, as I'm out looking for money, I get a phone call from someone who says, "Hey, Enron company is looking to do things locally in a local community." And so they said, "Okay, so--," I'm like, "Great, that was good. How does that help me?" "Well, they have money to invest." I said, "Oh, fantastic." So they said, "One of the first requirements--," (laughter), which was you had to be within the 610 loop. I said, "Really?" I said, "As long as my business is inside the loop, I'd qualify for one of their possible loans?" And he said, "Yes. I said, "Wow, okay," I said, "that's great." So I'm involved with NNPA [National Newspaper Publishers Association] and I'm out scouting and talking to people and so, they, I get a call that there's this paper in Los Angeles [California] called the Wave. And so I said, "Okay, fine." So I went and did my research on L.A. There was a Wave, the Los Angeles Wave was a community paper. The Los Angeles Sentinel was a black paper. So I said, "Well, heck, let's just, you know, run the gamut and see what we can find out." I contacted the people over at the Sentinel, had a real difficult time getting to the owner, just never could get any traction there at all. So I talked to the, this gentleman that was running the Wave, C.Z. Wilson. And so, you know, I talked to him, and, he says, "Oh, yeah, man, we're doing great things. We got a bunch of people, and I'm taking over, and we're looking to acquire, had some challenges." And so I said, "Okay." He said, "Oh, I want you to come over and join my board [of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc., Los Angeles, California]?" I said, "Really?" I said, "C.Z., I mean, I know I'm a young, young guy," probably thirty-eight, thirty-nine years old, "but I'm buying businesses just like this. I mean I would buy this newspaper." He said, "Oh, don't worry about it--," he used to call me young buck, "Oh, don't worry about it, young buck. You come on in." So I said, "No, I'm gonna have my lawyer write you a letter to basically let you know that essentially, I'm a fox and you're a henhouse. And I like eggs," (laughter), you know. "So I want you to be very clear that if you add me to your board, there's a possibility that I would acquire, acquire this newspaper, you know, from you guys." And so, you know, he said, "Oh, fine." I said, "Okay, no worries. I'll come in, and I'll join the board."