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Jim Vance

Broadcast journalist Jim Vance was born on January 10, 1942 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. In 1964, Vance earned his B.S. degree in secondary education from Cheyney State College (now Cheyney University) in Cheyney, Pennsylvania.

Upon graduation, Vance worked as a teacher in the Philadelphia Public Schools, and was then hired as a print journalist for The Philadelphia Independent. During this time he also worked weekends at the radio station WHAT-AM. In 1968, Vance moved to WKBS-TV in Philadelphia, where he served as a reporter and interviewed Muhammad Ali. The following year, Vance joined WRC-TV NBC 4 in Washington, D.C., where he has worked for over forty-five years.

At WRC-TV, Vance worked as co-anchor with Glenn Rinker between 1972 and 1976, and then as a co-anchor with Sue Simmons from 1976 to 1980. Vance and Simmons were one of the first African American co-anchors of a major market newscast. Since 1989, Vance has co-anchored with Doreen Gentzler and they are the longest-running anchor team in Washington, D.C.

Vance has earned numerous awards and honors, including seventeen Emmys and membership in the Silver Circle of the Washington Chapter of the National Association of Television Arts and Sciences. He holds the Ted Yates Award for outstanding community service and has been honored as “Washingtonian of the Year.” Vance was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame in 2007, and on May 2, 2008, he was inducted into the National Alumni Hall of Fame of Cheyney University of Pennsylvania. He has also appeared in the documentaries, Without Bias and The Nine Lives of Marion Barry; and the feature film State of Play.

Vance lived in Washington, D.C. with his wife, Kath McCampbell Vance. They have three children and one grandson.

Jim Vance was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 19, 2014.

Vance passed away on July 22, 2017 at age 75.

Accession Number

A2014.133

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/19/2014

Last Name

Vance

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Ardmore Avenue Elementary School

Lower Merion High School

Ardmore Junior High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jim

Birth City, State, Country

Bryn Mawr

HM ID

VAN07

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Martin and Durango, Colorado

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/10/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese

Death Date

7/22/2017

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Jim Vance (1942 - 2017 ) anchored WRC-TV Channel 4 in Washington, D.C. for forty-five years. He was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame in 2007.

Employment

Philadelphia Public Schools

The Philadelphia Independent

WHAT-AM

WKBS-TV

WRC-TV NBC 4

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:10052,137:10766,145:11684,159:12602,211:21405,307:25680,383:39990,553:55486,748:63842,821:69611,892:74050,940:74450,945:74850,950:81350,1111:83150,1138:87545,1150:87830,1156:88058,1161:88400,1168:92777,1226:95290,1249:101521,1381:103939,1412:106543,1453:107194,1461:107566,1466:119310,1517:119912,1526:120858,1539:125670,1570:126110,1575:126880,1584:127650,1594:179162,2087:179842,2111:186801,2212:208265,2465:214160,2493$0,0:3497,203:14976,469:16974,503:17270,508:18750,533:19194,540:21488,588:22598,611:23412,626:23856,634:24152,639:32044,698:36240,727:37995,775:53635,953:55330,959:55805,965:60935,1031:71244,1213:71649,1219:74160,1276:76914,1323:83820,1410:84220,1416:89766,1478:91852,1523:117030,1871:118060,1885:120635,1929:126585,2009:132516,2071:133812,2094:143078,2174:147642,2222:148026,2227:148602,2234:149274,2242:149658,2247:157722,2374:163828,2438:164730,2452:165058,2457:176600,2722:181550,2873:198230,3000
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637221">Tape: 1 Slating of Jim Vance's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637222">Tape: 1 Jim Vance lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637223">Tape: 1 Jim Vance describes his mother's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637224">Tape: 1 Jim Vance talks about his relationship with his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637225">Tape: 1 Jim Vance talks about his upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637226">Tape: 1 Jim Vance describes his mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637227">Tape: 1 Jim Vance talks about his maternal grandfather's family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637228">Tape: 1 Jim Vance talks about his maternal family's lore</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637229">Tape: 1 Jim Vance remembers his mother's emphasis on etiquette</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637230">Tape: 1 Jim Vance remembers his maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637231">Tape: 2 Jim Vance describes the Main Line community near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637232">Tape: 2 Jim Vance talks about the relationship between his maternal and paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637233">Tape: 2 Jim Vance describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637234">Tape: 2 Jim Vance remembers his paternal grandfather, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637235">Tape: 2 Jim Vance remembers his paternal grandfather, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637236">Tape: 2 Jim Vance talks about his father's career as a plumber</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637237">Tape: 2 Jim Vance talks about his father's U.S. Army service in World War II</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637238">Tape: 2 Jim Vance remembers his father's aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637239">Tape: 3 Jim Vance reflects upon his upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637240">Tape: 3 Jim Vance talks about his parents' marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637241">Tape: 3 Jim Vance remembers his family's expectations, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637242">Tape: 3 Jim Vance describes his likeness to his parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637243">Tape: 3 Jim Vance describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637244">Tape: 3 Jim Vance remembers his community in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637245">Tape: 3 Jim Vance remembers his community in Ardmore, Pennsylvania, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637246">Tape: 3 Jim Vance remembers his early experiences of religion, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637247">Tape: 4 Jim Vance remembers his early experiences of religion, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637248">Tape: 4 Jim Vance describes his schooling in Ardmore, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637249">Tape: 4 Jim Vance talks about his skin condition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637250">Tape: 4 Jim Vance remembers his early interest in journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637251">Tape: 4 Jim Vance remembers his family's expectations, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637252">Tape: 4 Jim Vance remembers an encounter with law enforcement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637253">Tape: 4 Jim Vance talks about his decision to attend college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637254">Tape: 5 Jim Vance recalls his start at Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637255">Tape: 5 Jim Vance talks about the development of his racial identity</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637256">Tape: 5 Jim Vance recalls lessons from Coach James Stevenson, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637257">Tape: 5 Jim Vance recalls lessons from Coach James Stevenson, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637258">Tape: 5 Jim Vance reflects upon his experiences at Cheyney State College, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637259">Tape: 5 Jim Vance remembers playing football at Cheyney State College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637260">Tape: 5 Jim Vance reflects upon his experiences at Cheyney State College, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Jim Vance remembers his family's expectations, pt. 1
Jim Vance remembers playing football at Cheyney State College
Transcript
I really loved my childhood. I loved being Little Jimmy [HistoryMaker Jim Vance], which is what they called me, for all of those years, because except for my mother [Eleanor Littlejohn Vance] and my [maternal] grandfather [Joseph Littlejohn], everybody else seemed to be really happy that I was around and treated me--and for a long--for a good number of years, I was the only male grandchild, and as such I was spoiled as much as you know, a kid in that level of life could be spoiled. Other side of that is, though, my man, expectations were really high. And I remember there were goodly periods of time where I was mad at those people. I adore them now, but I was angry. The last thing I was--I'll give you an example. For years (gesture) that, any time of day, all day, where an aunt or an uncle, and they were always around, they would (gesture) somebody would do that to me. The deal was, "Hold your head up boy. Do not lower your eyes because you do that you don't see the world." Number one, I remember their saying, all you see is your feet and the ground, you can't learn anything that way. Number two, you never give anybody any sense that you're defeated or dejected or whatever the case may be. Number three, you never, ever show any kind of weakness at all, you know, stand up and keep your head up. I used to hate 'em (laughter). I wanted to punch them when they did that to me. But after a while, you don't do this anymore because it's important you know to--"Okay, whatever you want." That was important to them that I meet, greet, meet, deal with the world and life with a sense of self in pride and whatever else the case may be, and I give them so much credit for that. Now it also had a downside. I was--B's were not good in grades. But whatever ball I was playing you expected to start. The job that I would go to you expected to do this job well. You asked me earlier about a favorite expression or something like that and I really have so many which is why I said, no. One of them among them, and my grandfather--good enough ain't never. He meant that, he lived by that good enough ain't never good enough, or is never acceptable as far as he was concerned. And so those kinds of expectations and demands put a lot of pressure on a kid and 'cause I didn't always feel up to it. Of course, when I grew up, you know I couldn't thank them more for raising the bar, but the bar was always held very, very high, and I was expected to (cough) meet it.$(Simultaneous) So did you play football for Cheyney [Cheyney State College; Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, Cheyney, Pennsylvania] (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, played football.$$Okay. What position did you play? I never asked you before, but should have asked.$$See how old you really are, I was a split end.$$Yeah, I know--$$Remember--what's his name, I can't remember his name at Army [United States Military Academy, West Point, New York] who was the first notable split end, call 'em wide receivers now, except we rarely went that far out normally, but it was you know just off the end. But those were the days of both ways. So if you started, you played sixty minutes of ball because, oh god, at Cheyney, because we didn't have scholarships or anything else, we had minimal number on the team. And when I say minimal, I mean we might have twenty-eight, twenty-nine guys, thirty guys. But if you started--and, oh, you were in the game, third quarter come and so you're here on offense and you don't make the first down, you just turn around and now you're a defensive man (laughter), because that's the way it goes. Bradley [Ed Bradley] and I used to always tell the story and some of the other guys of how--he was a center on the team and then middle linebacker when we turn it around. And in the first quarter--I'm sorry, I'm laughing at this 'cause it's just--you had to be there. First quarter Bradley, he's what, 255 [pounds] then kind of big for that time. "Army gang," you know the center calls the huddle, you know, and you huddle in, and he's enthusiastic, "Army gang!" And then the second quarter, "Army gang," third quarter comes, Bradley's like, "Over here, guys." And by the fourth quarter, "(Unclear) (makes sounds)," and that's all, you know, he doesn't even call it anymore, and we're all feeling the same way. And because, on each quarter, with the other teams who are at forty-five, fifty, fifty-five guys, what they put out, we're looking like, just filled with dirt and mud. Here come these new, brand new fresh uniforms, every quarter, we turn around and it's like, oh, my god, and it's a war for sixty minutes, but there's nobody on those teams that ain't my boy, 'cause when you're playing like that, and you know, they're being paid--not paid, but they're getting at least food, meal tickets. And when you're out there, just 'cause, you know, you like playing ball, the guys that are also with you like that who stay to the end of the season, 'cause a lot of times a lot of guys would come they'd stay until homecoming so they could get their picture taken and their parents and their girlfriends come see them, then they'd be off the team and they're gone. We ended most seasons--I remember my first--we ended our season with nineteen guys. We didn't have two full--eleven guys for us. You play with guys like that you're with them for all, for life.$$Okay.$$You don't lose their (unclear). Another thing for example that Cheyney gave to me.

Cheryl Burton

Broadcast journalist Cheryl Burton was born on December 25, 1962 in Chicago, Illinois to Hattie and Simpson Burton. She graduated from Chicago's Lindblom Technical High School in 1980, and then received her B.S. degree in psychology and biology from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1984.

Burton was first seen on television on Romper Room and as a contestant on Star Search. She then hosted an hour long cable television show entitled Simply Elegant and worked as a special education teacher for two years. In 1989, she was hired at WGN-TV in Chicago, Illinois, where she co-anchored “MBR: The Minority Business Report,” a nationally syndicated weekly series. In 1990, Burton moved to Peoria, Illinois, and worked as a reporter at WMBD-TV. From 1990 to 1992, she served as an anchor for KWCH-DT in Wichita, Kansas, where she also hosted the talk show Viewpoint. Burton then joined Chicago’s WLS-TV ABC 7 as a weekend co-anchor and reporter in November of 1992. In 2003, she was promoted to 5 p.m. weekday co-anchor and 10 p.m. contributing anchor for WLS-TV’s newscasts.

Burton has received numerous honors for her work, including three Chicago Association of Black Journalists awards; the 1997 Phenomenal Woman Award from the Expo for Today's Black Woman; a 1998 Kizzy Image and Achievement Award; the 2004 and 2005 Thurgood Marshall Awards; the Vernon Jarrett Par Excellence Award in Journalism; the coveted 2008 National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Salute to Excellence International Award; 2009’s Proctor and Gamble Pioneer Award for community service; and several Emmy Awards. She was also the first recipient of the 2005 "Sisters in the Spirit" Award, given by Chicago area gospel singers to persons who exemplify a faith-based life, and was the first alumnus to be inducted into the Robert Lindblom High School’s hall of fame in 2007.

Burton is a volunteer for the Boys and Girls Club of America and serves as a motivational speaker for the Chicago Public Schools. She serves on the boards of the Life with Lupus Guild, the Multicultural Dance Center and City Year. In addition, Burton is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the Chicago Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Black Journalists.

Cheryl Burton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 20, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.152

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/20/2014

Last Name

Burton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Annette

Organizations
Schools

Jane A. Neil Elementary School

Arthur J. Dixon Elementary School

Robert Lindblom Math & Science Academy High School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BUR25

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

God Is Good

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/25/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Thanksgiving Dinner

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Cheryl Burton (1962 - ) is the 5 p.m. weekday co-anchor and 10 p.m. contributing anchor for Chicago’s WLS-TV ABC 7 newscasts.

Employment

Andy Frain

Marshall Fields

Elaine Powers

Figure Salon

Paper Girl

Xerox

ABC/Disney

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:228790,3960$0,0:960,15:1422,24:1807,30:10585,190:11355,245:23022,342:23414,347:28216,414:32626,506:40858,620:41544,628:55420,692:92962,1239:94066,1269:94342,1274:94618,1279:95377,1292:95860,1301:112654,1576:116985,1665:117766,1678:124980,1745:125405,1751:125830,1757:126170,1762:126510,1767:127700,1796:136880,1946:138580,1973:152844,2115:153342,2175:154421,2190:161144,2264:175392,2517:182178,2634:183192,2651:184206,2670:185142,2684:187014,2710:187326,2715:194848,2796:197704,2842:198880,2863:199216,2868:205768,2984:210680,3010:212086,3034:245330,3561:245705,3567:246080,3573:266640,3861
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131043">Tape: 1 Slating of Cheryl Burton's interview, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131044">Tape: 1 Slating of Cheryl Burton's interview, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131045">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131046">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton describes her father's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131047">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton remembers her paternal great-grandparents in Homewood, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131048">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton describes her parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131049">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton describes her mother's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131050">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton talks about her mother's education and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131051">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton describes her childhood personality and her relationship with her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131052">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton recalls her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131053">Tape: 1 Cheryl Burton describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131054">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton describes her family's experience of racial discrimination in Cheyenne, Wyoming</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131055">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton talks about her family's move to Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131056">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton describes growing up in the Chatham community of Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131057">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton recalls the churches she attended in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131058">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton talks about her grade school years in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131059">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton recalls her experience in the Girl Scouts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131060">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton describes the activities she participated in as a child and the sacrifices her parents made to make them possible</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131061">Tape: 2 Cheryl Burton describes her personality and intelligence as a young girl</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131062">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about academic excellence in her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131063">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton recalls working for her sister at the Elaine Powers Figure Salon in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131064">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton recalls running away at age twelve so her parents would buy her a scooter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131065">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton describes Lindblom Math & Science Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131066">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about her extracurricular and athletic activities at Lindblom High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131067">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about graduating from Lindblom High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1980</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131068">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about appearing on the TV shows 'Romper Room' and 'Kiddie-a-Go-Go' as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131069">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton recalls traveling to Washington, D.C. and to Civil Rights Movement sites with her uncle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131070">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about her experience and her roommates at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131071">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about being a cheerleader for the Chicago Bears while attending the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131072">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about her decision not to attend medical school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131073">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton recalls working at Marshall Field's and as an Andy Frain usher in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131074">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton talks about her medical internship at the University of Illinois Chicago Circle Campus</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131075">Tape: 3 Cheryl Burton describes being a Chicago Honey Bears cheerleader</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131076">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton talks about the Chicago Bears and the Honey Bears cheerleaders</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131077">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton describes her schedule while she was a Chicago Honey Bears cheerleader and working at Xerox</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131078">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton describes being a Chicago Honey Bears cheerleader when the Chicago Bears won the Super Bowl in 1986</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131079">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton recounts how she met Jim Rose and how he proposed to her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131080">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton recalls working for Xerox and the 1983 election of Chicago mayor Harold Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131081">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton talks about her engagement to Jim Rose and her time on 'Star Search'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131082">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton recalls auditioning for 'Charlie's Angels' with Halle Berry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131083">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton relates her mother's recollections of life in Cheyenne, Wyoming</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131084">Tape: 4 Cheryl Burton describes her appearance on 'Star Search,' her audition for 'A Different World,' and the beginning of her broadcast news career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131085">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton recalls losing her job at the 'Minority Business Report' in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131086">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton describes working at the Home Shopping Network</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131087">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton talks about her ex-husband Jim Rose</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131088">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton describes working at WMBD-TV in Peoria, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131089">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton describes working at KWCH-DT in Wichita, Kansas, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131090">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton describes working at KWCH-DT in Wichita, Kansas, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131091">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton talks about 'Baby Your Baby,' her news segment on KWCH-DT in Wichita, Kansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131092">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton recalls working at KWCH-DT in Wichita, Kansas during the Gulf War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131093">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton talks about getting her job at WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131094">Tape: 5 Cheryl Burton recalls her father's death</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131095">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton describes working with HistoryMaker Harry Porterfield and others at WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131096">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton talks about working at WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois while building a home with her then-husband, Jim Rose</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131097">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton describes working for Joe Ahern at WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131098">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton talks about producing five news broadcasts a day at WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131099">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton talks about covering violence as a reporter for WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131100">Tape: 6 Cheryl Burton describes her sister's support after her divorce from Jim Rose</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131101">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton talks about her divorce from Jim Rose, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131102">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton talks about her divorce from Jim Rose, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131103">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton describes how she started her annual Christmas toy drive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131104">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton talks about her charitable efforts in South Africa and in the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131105">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton talks about her friendship with Oprah Winfrey, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131106">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton talks about her friendship with Oprah Winfrey, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131107">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton describes Oprah Winfrey's 2006 Legends Ball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131108">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton recalls being assaulted in downtown Chicago, Illinois in 2008</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131109">Tape: 7 Cheryl Burton considers her most difficult interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131110">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton talks about how she maintains a positive outlook</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131111">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131112">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton recounts her carjacking experience</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131113">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton describes how broadcast news has changed over the course of her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131114">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton talks about her awards and her personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131115">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton talks about the children's book series she hopes to publish</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131116">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton reflects upon her life and what she would do differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131117">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton talks about her independent learning style</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131118">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131119">Tape: 8 Cheryl Burton recounts her role with The HistoryMakers since hosting 'An Evening with Harry Belafonte' in 2000</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131120">Tape: 9 Cheryl Burton narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131121">Tape: 9 Cheryl Burton narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/131122">Tape: 9 Cheryl Burton narrates her photographs, pt. 3</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$6

DAStory

7$5

DATitle
Cheryl Burton describes her mother's background
Cheryl Burton talks about covering violence as a reporter for WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
So talk about your mother [Hattie Burton] and her background and what you know about her family?$$Well, my sister--when I was, you know, discussing that this was gonna take place, she said that, you know, my father's [Simpson Leo Burton's] descendants [sic, ancestors] were field slaves and my mom's descendants were house slaves. So it's very different. On my mother's side, everybody is educated. My grandparents are college educated. My mom and dad, you know, my mom and all of her siblings are college educated, and my mom has master's degrees, but on my father's side, they might go to high school, his parents and their grandparents might have gone to eighth grade. My father, though, and all of his siblings have post-graduate college degrees. My mom, she was born--$$Give her name too.$$Oh, my mom's name, she was born Hattie Eloise Woods, and then she married my dad, and her name became Hattie Eloise Burton, of course. And she was born in 1930 [April 5, 1930], during the [Great] Depression. So she talks a lot about that, you know, being poor in the South. But her parents were entrepreneurs, of course. They had a store in the back of their house because they had to, you know, make a way and make money. They sold candy and cookies and bread. They'd sell a slice of bread, one slice of bread. They'd sell one cookie. They'd sell one cigarette, whatever they could sell, you know, or you know, one gulp in their cup and sell that. But so my mom was educated in a one-room schoolhouse, an actual little, red schoolhouse. There were kindergarten all the way up to twelfth grade in this one-room schoolhouse. And my mom had to walk miles and miles to get to school 'cause they lived in the country. And she said they would stop halfway between and build a fire to stay warm before they could get to school. So I like to think my mom was incredibly intelligent because she was going to school with people who were seniors in high school, and she was just five in kindergarten. And her parents were educated. So they made sure that their children were educated as well. My mom excelled and she skipped so many grades when they finally moved out of the country, my mom went from like kindergarten to third grade when she started school. And they didn't say anything because she was smart, and she got right in there. My mom probably, always wanted to be a teacher. Her sister was a teacher and her other sister was a registered nurse, and my mom taught forty years in the Chicago [Illinois] Public School system. She loved having children. And, actually, though they didn't plan on having five. I think my dad probably wanted one or two, but, you know how that is (laughter), so my mom's pretty cute. So (laughter), but so my mom went to high school, and she excelled very well. She, you know, she learned how to sew. Like I said, she wanted us to sew. We all had our own personalized sewing machines where each one was labeled with our names, and we had to sew an item. If we wanted to spend the night over a friend's house, you had to make some clothes. So that was very big for my mom, and then, of course, she goes to college. I think my mom was a virgin when she met my dad. I really do. I ask her all the time, and she doesn't answer. But I think she was, and they went to prom in a Jeep, and she thought my father was so handsome and so smart 'cause she was raised in the country, you know, and he was that slick, Rosedale [Homewood, Alabama], entrepreneur, you know, I've got visions and dreams. We're gonna move to Chicago. We, you know, we're gonna do things. I got plans. I'm gonna president and so she was very impressed. But he was very nice to her, but a go-getter, you know. He had a great spirit about life, and he was always doing something that would better the lives of his family, no matter what the risk. He would do that. And so they met, and mom's the baby of three girls, by the way.$So you're--you know, it looks like a very steady growth, but are you--and you make everything seem so easy, you know--(simultaneous)--$$No.$$--in some respects. But can you--I know besides that, but what have been some of your low points? And what have been some of your--and I have some things here that I know are high points, but can we talk about low points?$$Some of the, you know, when I was a reporter, I worked the night shifts, from two [o'clock AM] to ten [o'clock AM]. So things happen a lot between that time. And I was a reporter Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, two to ten. And I would go out regularly on stories about child molestations and drive-by shootings and child abuse stories, regularly. And it began to chip away at my spirit. It was very hard to keep going to these homes and ask families for photographs of their loved ones who had been killed in a drive-by shooting or who had been molested by their teacher or who had been hit by a car. That, I have a very compassionate spirit, so I take that with me at home. And it was very hard, and it began chip away at who I was. And, you know, I know Oprah [Winfrey] talks very often about when she worked in Baltimore and that's why she auditioned for the job in Chicago [Illinois] to be this talk show host for 'AM Chicago' because she couldn't do it anymore. And I totally understand what she was saying. And people would say, Cheryl, I don't know how you do it. You know, I would go, and I would go into some of the projects in some of the most dangerous neighborhoods. And I'd be climbing up stairs in dark and hoping I wouldn't get shot or attacked with a cameraman, going to get pictures and talk to people, and hoping I wasn't gonna get beat up, coming to a crime scene very soon after, and it does happen to reporters and cameramen, things do happen like that. So I was concerned, and one time I went to a rally, and I have a picture in my office. And I'm holding hands praying with some kids, and he has a t-shirt on that says "Stop the Violence", and somebody took that picture of me and sent it. And, you know, reporters aren't supposed to get involved, but that was who I was. I needed to pray with these people and hold their hands. I'm covering the story, but they started, they asked for prayer, and I held hands and did that. And it got to me so bad that I went to Emily Barr, and I said, "Emily, we have to do something. All of these young people are being killed. And some of them are the brightest." They had futures that were just so shiny, and I said, we must do something. So she agreed with me, and we started a campaign called "Stop the Violence", and our first project that we did was, we had a town hall meeting with the mayor of Chicago [Richard M. Daley], the superintendent of Chicago, the superintendent of Chicago Public Schools. And we had some psychiatrists, some psychologists, and we had a gentleman by the name of [HistoryMaker] Roland Martin. And he will tell you that he gives me credit for starting his television career in the city of Chicago because I had hand-picked him to come and be a part of this discussion. Emily liked him so much--she was a little nervous though 'cause he could be controversial. But his verbiage was so on point, and so profound, and it was inspiring. It was motivational, and it got you to think. And so that was our very first project. After that, we did half hour specials where we began to talk to people who worked in the community. But those have been some of my--you know, I've arrived on plane crash scenes, and the deceased are still in the plane. And I've seen dead bodies, and I had to go home, and I couldn't get that out of my head. I've seen them in, dead bodies in sewers, where I've come upon a crime scene, and the police haven't arrived yet. And it was just very challenging.

Jose Griñan

Broadcast journalist José Griñán was born on July 24, 1952 in Tampa, Florida. His father was a native Cuban; his mother, a first generation Cuban-American. Griñán studied speech and theatre at the University of South Florida, but his interest in broadcasting resulted from his filming and helping to produce documentaries for the U.S. Army.

In 1975, Griñán was hired as a reporter and weekend anchor for KTSM AM-FM-TV in El Paso, Texas. From 1978 to 1982, he worked as a news reporter and anchor for Miami, Florida’s WCKT-TV (now WSVN-TV). Griñán worked as a news anchor for the now defunct Satellite News Channel in 1982 and 1983, before being hired by WTVJ-TV in Miami in 1984, where he stayed until 1990. From 1990 to 1993, he was a correspondent/host for Crime Watch Tonight, and served as a freelance correspondent and researcher for CNN, and other broadcast services. In 1991, he anchored and reported for KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas, and then, in August of 1993, Griñán joined FOX’s KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas, where he is the senior morning news anchor for the 6:00 a.m., 7:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m. and 12 noon newscasts.

Throughout his career, Griñán has covered major events of all types, including floods, hurricanes, the sewer explosion in Guadalajara, Mexico, and the Branch Davidian siege in Waco, Texas, where he was one of the first reporters on the scene. In addition, Griñán has produced a variety of special series reports, and has hosted two public affairs programs for KRIV-TV: “The Black Voice” and “Hola Houston.”

Griñán has been active in the community and has served as a volunteer for the National Kidney Foundation, The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Special Olympics and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, among others. Griñán is also a board member of the Dive Pirate Foundation, the Houston READ Commission, and Keep Houston Beautiful/Clean City America.

Griñán has been a member of the National Association of Black Journalists since 1978, and maintains membership in the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Southwest Alternate Media Project. He is the father of two adult girls.

José Griñán was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.132

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

5/8/2014

Last Name

Grinan

Maker Category
Schools

University of South Florida

Henry B. Plant High School

Jesuit High School

George Washington Carver Junior High School

Meacham Alternative School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jose

Birth City, State, Country

Tampa

HM ID

GRI10

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cayman Brac

Favorite Quote

For All Your Days Prepare, And Meet Them Ever Alike; When You Are The Anvil, Bear; When You Are The Hammer, Strike.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/24/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Latino, Creole

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Jose Griñan (1952 - ) was the senior morning news anchor on KRIV-TV Fox 26, where he worked from 1993.

Employment

KTSM

WCKT-TV (WSVN-TV)

Satellite News Channel

WTVJ-TV

Crime Watch Tonight

CNN

KDFW-TV

KRIV-TV

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664829">Tape: 1 Slating of Jose Grinan's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664830">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664831">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan describes his mother's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664832">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan describes his community in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664833">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan describes his mother's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664834">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan talks about his experiences of discrimination as a black Cuban American</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664835">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan describes the history of racial discrimination in Cuba</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664836">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan talks about the experiences of black Cubans under Fidel Castro and Fulgencio Batista</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664837">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan describes how his parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664838">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan talks about his family's roots in Cuba</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664839">Tape: 1 Jose Grinan talks about the Spanish American War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664840">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan talks about Antonio Maceo Grajales</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664841">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan talks about his mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664842">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664843">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664844">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan talks about his father's education and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664845">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan talks about the brutality of slavery in Cuba</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664846">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan lists his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664847">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan describes his home life in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664848">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan describes the sights and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664849">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan remembers Meacham Elementary School in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664850">Tape: 2 Jose Grinan remembers visiting Cuba</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664851">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan talks about the history of baseball in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664852">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan describes his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664853">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan remembers his godfather, Francisco A. Rodriguez</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664854">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan talks about his experiences at Jesuit High School in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664855">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan talks about his mentors and his aspirations to become a lawyer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664856">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan remembers his mentor at Jesuit High School in Tampa, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664857">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan recalls his early exposure to black theater and screen acting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664858">Tape: 3 Jose Grinan remembers the growth of the Black Power movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664859">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan remembers moving out of his parent's home</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664860">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan talks about the counterculture of the early 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664861">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan recalls his draft orders from the U.S. military, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664862">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan remembers appearing in 'The Daredevil'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664863">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan recalls his draft orders from the U.S. military, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664864">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan describes his start in film production, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664865">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan describes his start in film production, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664866">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan describes the film production process</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664867">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan describes his duties at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664868">Tape: 4 Jose Grinan remembers becoming a reporter at KTSM-TV in El Paso, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664869">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan remembers becoming a radio host at KTSM Radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664870">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan remembers advocating for undercover officer Frank Percy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664871">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan recalls joining WCKT-TV in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664872">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan talks about the migration of Cubans to Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664873">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan remembers the riots of 1980 in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664874">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan recalls working for the Satellite News Channel in Stamford, Connecticut</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664875">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan remembers his work on 'Crime Watch Tonight'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664876">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan talks about his first marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664877">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan talks about his role as an advocate for minority communities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664878">Tape: 5 Jose Grinan remembers the drug wars in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664879">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan talks about the height of drugs and crime in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664880">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan talks about the Mariel boatlift in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664881">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan remembers Bishop Agustin Roman's peace negotiations at the federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664882">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan recalls the aftermath of the prison riot in Oakdale, Louisiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664883">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan recalls his transition to KDFW-TV and KRIV-TV in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664884">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan remembers the mass killings of the early 1990s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664885">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan remembers the Branch Davidian siege in Waco, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664886">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan remembers joining KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664887">Tape: 6 Jose Grinan talks about the local stations affiliated with FOX</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664888">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan talks about working at KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664889">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan talks about his work with minority journalist organizations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664890">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan remembers covering the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664891">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan reflects upon his career as a journalist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664892">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan remembers saving a woman from a burning car</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664893">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan talks about the aftermath of saving a person's life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664894">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan remembers Hurricane Ike and Hurricane Katrina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664895">Tape: 7 Jose Grinan remembers experiencing a stroke on the air</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664896">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about working at KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664897">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about the importance of community relationships</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664898">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan remembers interviewing Minister Louis Farrakhan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664899">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664900">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about his father's legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664901">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about his plans to write a book about his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664902">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan reflects upon his life and legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664903">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about his daughters, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664904">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan remembers vacations with his daughters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664905">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about his daughters, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664906">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan talks about his wife, Kathryn Griffin Grinan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/664907">Tape: 8 Jose Grinan describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

11$3

DATitle
Jose Grinan remembers visiting Cuba
Jose Grinan remembers Bishop Agustin Roman's peace negotiations at the federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana
Transcript
Okay. And meanwhile, now, you're born in '52 [1952]?$$Yes.$$But in, was it '56 1956], that's when the Cuban Revolution ends?$$In '59 [1959].$$Fifty-nine [1959], yeah.$$Yeah.$$The traffic back and forth, you know.$$Well, you used to travel back and forth. In fact, I was there in '58 [1958].$$Okay.$$Before--because my father [Jose Grinan] (laughter)--it's very strange and unusual right now. Because, okay, last year I went to Cuba looking for distant relatives. Because I had addresses and phone numbers that I hadn't called and used in more than twenty years. But I went with the hope that they would still be in the same place. I go back. Yes, I find the grandchildren of the people I knew. And they're amazed that I know so much about them. I knew so much about their grandmother. But what I haven't told them is that, "I think your grandmother was my daddy's girlfriend for a while before he got married to my mother [Sylvia Grillo Grinan]." Because they both came from the same town, Remedios [Cuba], and they both moved to Havana [Cuba]. And they just stayed in touch when they were students going to school, and afterwards. And when I went as a journalist in 1978, I think we had gone to a Cuban prison called El Combinado del Este [Havana, Cuba]. I had gone through a lot of high school yearbooks in Miami [Florida] just to look to see, and see what names--, "Okay, he was captured." So when I went to the prison I could say, "Your name is Yoenio [ph.], no?" "Yes, how do you know that?" "Well, your daddy told me to tell you hello, and he's looking forward to your returning." Emotional moments in a prison. Coming back from the prison we were staying in el Hotel Nacional [Hotel Nacional de Cuba, Havana, Cuba]. At that time, Cubans were not allowed inside. So, we were getting off the bus and this little old lady just stood right in front of me, stopped my path, "You look just like your papa." "Excuse me?" And then she started running down my pedigree. She knew my grandfather [Antonio Grillo], she knew my mother's mother [Amparo Valdez Grillo]; she knew my grandmother on my father's side [Luisa Falero Grinan]. She just knew everybody. And it's like, "Who are you?" "Well, I'm Amelia [ph.]. Don't you remember coming to my house as a child?" "Are you the lady who had canaries?" "Yes, yes." You don't know what stuff like that does to somebody's mind. Very, very, emotional. Because it's tapping into a past that you really didn't know about. Now, I had to bribe a taxi driver to go to her neighborhood, because this was in 1978. You weren't supposed to walk around in Cuba if you were an American. You know, everybody's going to be watching you. And I could tell you some stories about being watched in Cuba. Amelia cooked me rice, beans and pork. And I had to ask her, "Where did you get all of this?" "We have our ways, Jose [HistoryMaker Jose Grinan], we have our ways." And she gave me a silver dollar, a Jose Marti silver dollar [Cuban peso] to give to my father, and I did that when I came back. But Amelia, interesting story. In I want to say the late '30s [1930s] or early 1940s, Communists had truckloads of food, and they would go through neighborhoods. "You want a bag of food? You could feed your family for two weeks with this, but you have to sign this paper." A lot of people signed the paper. In 1960 when Amelia left her house with her bags and went to the airport to get on a plane to go to Miami, they pulled out this piece of paper and said, "Is that your signature?" "Yes, but that was so long ago." "We don't admit Communists to the United States." So, she had to turn around and go back home. Now, if she didn't have her son staying in that house and her grandchildren staying in that house, she would have been homeless, have no place to go to. I asked her in 1980 when I was there, "What happened?" That was '78 [1978]. "What happened to the canaries? You know, I remember some, you know, all these canaries. You had a patio, you had all of these cages--big, two big cages." She said, "Jose, I was not going to let that man profit off my hard work." She's talking about Castro [Fidel Castro]. So, what she did was open all of the cages and let the birds go free. Because she was not, she wouldn't have been able to make any money on them, because the society was changing into a Socialist society.$$Okay.$$So, she said, "You know, I can't be free, but I'll let them go."$So, do you think the drugs and the, you know, there's the connection here (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The Cocaine Cowboys?$$Yeah, the Cocaine Cowboys and the Mariel situation [Mariel boatlift].$$Because many of those who came from Mariel--and this was, okay, let me explain this. Many of those who came were criminal, but some were not. But they had to engage in criminal activity here in order to feed their families. The guy who negotiated the peace at--it was a federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana [Federal Correctional Institution, Oakdale]. The guy who negotiated the peace was a lieutenant in the Cuban Navy [Cuban Revolutionary Navy] who defected to come to the U.S. But he couldn't find a job because he didn't have any documents. So, he dealt cocaine. He got arrested, sent to prison. He was getting ready to be sent back, but then they stopped that, because those who were going to be sent back were going to be persecuted. He was a good man, but he had to feed his family, so he did something wrong. And there were a lot of folks who were in the prison who did something like that, got caught, and they were thrown in prison. Now, if they had a job, if they had all of these other things, they would not have had to go to prison. But it was, it was, that was an interesting time. I think that was '88 [1988].$$Okay.$$And then in fact, that ended with Bishop Agustin Roman who--remember when I said sometimes you just have to help people? I should not have done something as a journalist, but I did it as a human being. People in Oakdale, Louisiana, they didn't have Bishop Agustin Roman's personal number. I did, because he was the bishop for the Cubans in Miami [Florida]. I had to have it, because he was one of my contacts. So, I wrote the number down in my book, and I put my book at the end of the table and told Carla Dudeck--and I remember her name because she was the attorney who was representing all of them, "Carla, there may be something down at the end of the table that you could use." And they went, looked, called the bishop, and he was there the next day. And it ended that day. Nobody else got hurt. And it was an amazing thing to see all of these hard core inmates--I mean they had ripped up the inside of the prison. They had made weapons out of the beds; they had done everything. And they were really ready to fight the corrections officers, National Guard [National Guard of the United States], anybody. But they didn't. And when the Bishop came, he got on the back of a pickup truck and rode the circumference around the gate. And it was amazing to see all these tough guys drop their weapons in a pile, get on their knees. And the Bishop blessed them all, went to another group--blessed them all. And they dropped the weapons. Was I wrong in leaving the number? I think I did the right thing, because I didn't want to see a blood bath, and they were ready for a blood bath (pause). I guess I'd think twice about doing it now, but I thought I was helping people. I didn't want to see a massacre, because that's what the National Guard would have done.

Roz Abrams

Broadcast journalist Roslyn Maria “Roz” Abrams was born on September 7, 1948 in Lansing, Michigan. She received her B.S. degree in sociology from Western Michigan University, and her M.S. degree in speech from the University of Michigan.

Abrams worked first as a reporter for WJIM in Lansing, Michigan, and then as an anchor and reporter for WSB-AM radio from 1975 to 1978. She went on to work as a news reporter/anchor at WXIA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia from 1978 to 1982, at CNN from 1982 to 1983, and at KRON-TV in San Francisco, California from 1983 to 1986. In 1986, Abrams joined WABC-TV in New York City, first as weekend anchor and general assignment reporter, and later as co-anchor of Eyewitness News at 5 p.m. She was the first African American female journalist to join WABC-TV, and the second anchorwoman of color in the New York City television market. While there, Abrams covered a number of major stories and events, including the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001; the blackout of 2003; the end of apartheid in South Africa; and the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. She left WABC-TV in 2003; and, in 2004, was hired by New York City’s WCBS-TV as the co-anchor of CBS2 News at 5 p.m. and 11 p.m. Abrams left WCBS-TV in 2006 and retired from journalism in 2010.

Abrams was the first African American vice president of the Atlanta Press Club. She has served on the editorial advisory board of “Making Waves,” a quarterly publication of American Women in Radio and Television. Abrams served as an advisory board member for the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, where she also funds a scholarship program. In addition, she has served on the board of Women in Film and the New York City Police Athletic League, and as co-chair of New York Reads Together and CAUSE-NY.

Abrams received a New York Association of Black Journalists Award for the special "The Sounds of Harlem," and received the Ed Bradley Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. She won a local Emmy in 2004 and a Gracie Award in 2006. She was also awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the New York Institute of Technology, and has been named a news legend by the Friars Club. In 2013, Abrams received the Elinor Guggenheimer Lifetime Achievement Award from New York Women’s Agenda.

Abrams resides in Westchester County, New York. She has two grown daughters, Denise and Melissa, and four grandchildren.

Roz Abrams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 17, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.044

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/17/2014

Last Name

Abrams

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Maria

Schools

Main Street Elementary School

West Junior High School

J.W. Sexton High School

Western Michigan University

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Weekends

First Name

Roslyn

Birth City, State, Country

Lansing

HM ID

ABR02

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Teens and Seniors

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

It Takes A Giant To Bend.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/7/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak, Chicken, Hamburgers, and French Fries.

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Roz Abrams (1948 - ) was a pioneer in broadcast journalism and served as a news anchor for WABC-TV and WCBS-TV in New York City.

Employment

WJIM TV

WLTA FM Radio

WSB Radio

KRON TV

WXIA TV

WABC TV

WCBS TV

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96045">Tape: 1 Slating of Roz Abrams' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96046">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96047">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams talks about her mother, Esther Caldwell Abrams</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96048">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams describes her paternal family history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96049">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams talks about her two siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96050">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96051">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams talks about the impact of her parents' divorce on her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96052">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood in Lansing, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96053">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams talks about her parents' divorce and their support for her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96054">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams describes her religious upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96055">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams recalls being disciplined as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96056">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams remembers her grade school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96057">Tape: 1 Roz Abrams talks about going to therapy after her parents' divorce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96068">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams talks about her father's photography and her mother's ambition for her children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96069">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams shares her memories of family gatherings during the holidays</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96070">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams describes her childhood neighborhood and her mother's determination to expose her to cultural activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96071">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams talks about growing up with a prettier older sister</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96072">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams describes her admission to Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96073">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams talks about her experience at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96074">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams talks about her graduate studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96075">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams describes her entry into journalism at WJIM TV in Lansing, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96076">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams describes her career as a broadcast journalist in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96077">Tape: 2 Roz Abrams talks about groundbreaking African American journalists including HistoryMakers Jocelyn Dorsey, Monica Kaufman, Xernona Clayton, and Belva Davis</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96085">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams describes her husband, Kenneth Showers, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96086">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams describes her husband, Kenneth Showers, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96087">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams describes her experience at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96088">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams recalls black anchors in Atlanta, Georgia and the decline of African Americans on air</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96089">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams talks about reporting and mistakes on air</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96090">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams talks about lessons she learned from her mentor at CNN, Bob Cain</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96091">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams talks about Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96092">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams describes her move from CNN to KRON TV in San Francisco, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96093">Tape: 3 Roz Abrams talks about working with agents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96097">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams talks about the early days of the AIDS epidemic in the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96098">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams describes how she attracted viewers in San Francisco, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96099">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams talks about her colleagues at KRON TV including HistoryMaker Belva Davis</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96100">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams talks about her decision to leave KRON TV for WABC TV in New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96101">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams talks about her adopted daughters, Denise and Melissa</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96102">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams recalls her acquaintances in the Bay Area</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96103">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams talks about juggling home life while working as an anchor in New York City, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96104">Tape: 4 Roz Abrams describes working at WABC TV with Oprah Winfrey, Melba Tolliver, Roger Grimsby, Bill Beutel</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96105">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams talks about her priorities as an anchor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96106">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams talks about her early years, her co-anchors, and the news director at WABC TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96107">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams talks about learning to fulfill beauty standards as an anchorwoman</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96108">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams talks about Roger Grimsby and her mentor, Chickie Bucco</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96109">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams recalls memorable stories from her news career, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96110">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams recalls memorable stories from her news career, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96111">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams talks about her least favorite assignments and her weekly magazine show "New York Views"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96112">Tape: 5 Roz Abrams recalls the consequences of asking a gotcha question during HistoryMaker David Dinkins' mayoral debate</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96113">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about HistoryMaker David Dinkins' mayoral term</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96114">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about the Northeast blackout of 2003 and New York City's communities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96115">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams remembers her father, Herbert Abrams</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96116">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about her father and his attempts to trace the family genealogy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96117">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about leaving WABC TV for WCBS TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96118">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams describes her activities after leaving her news career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96119">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about the end of her marriage to Kenneth Showers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96120">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about retired life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96121">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about her hopes for the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96122">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96123">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96124">Tape: 6 Roz Abrams describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/96125">Tape: 7 Roz Abrams narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Roz Abrams recalls memorable stories from her news career, pt.1
Roz Abrams talks about the Northeast blackout of 2003 and New York City's communities
Transcript
So what parts of--so let--let's--I want to understand your--the stories that still stand--stay--you know, stick out with you. You talked about the AIDS crisis and KR--you know, when you were in San Francisco [California]. But what are the news stories in, you know, this long career that you've here? What are the news stories that stick out to you? You talked about the 19--I don't know if you talk about the 1984 convention. You talked about (simultaneous)--$$Eighty-four [1984], when watching a woman [Geraldine Ferraro] be nominated vice president, and nobody knew it was coming, at least I didn't. And I just said, my God, this could happen. A woman--because I'm a feminist. You gotta remember I was covering Gloria Steinem when she was saying you have to have equal pay for equal work, and I took that to heart. And I said when I ever get in the position to be really good, I'm not gonna sit next to somebody who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars more than I do. Now that's easier said than done. And most of the time I would tell my agent don't sell me cheap. You know, I may not get it the first year; I may not--but if we got a four-year contract, I need to be there at the end of the four years just so that I can look at myself in the mirror and say Roz, it's okay. And he goes oh, you are so full of it, but he did it. He did it on my behalf and at my behest. So much of the time because I was a feminist, I was always fighting to get women for sound bites. You gotta remember, back in the '70s [1970s] it was male everything unless you were talking about women's issues. And I would spend so much time in Atlanta [Georgia] trying to find a woman to give me a sound bite because it was critical, it was important, and they were out there. It's just that nobody at that point in time was willing to talk to a woman about MARTA [Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority], because all the people doing MARTA, the top people were men. But there were women in positions of power, and you just had to find them. So the stories were the stories, but I was always looking to bring--if I could, bring women into them, especially if it was a long going four-year, five-year story. I did a whole lot of crime. I have seen a lot of dead bodies, and that--that's stays with you. When you see people who have been--I walked into an apartment--they said Roz, there's something going down on Auburn Avenue, da, da, da, da. I'm in radio. I run in, and there is a woman with a butcher knife through her--and it's so deep in the door that it's holding her up. And they haven't covered her; they haven't taken her down; I was not prepared.$$There--a dam burst at a school called Toccoa Falls. They called me at 4:00 in the morning. They said Roz, get up, go to Toccoa Falls. All we know is that there is a dam that burst. And by the time I got there, the dormitory--it was a very, very small Christian school. The dormitory, which was identified as a dormitory four stories high, the bottom two stories were filled with silt and sand from floor to ceiling. And you knew that in every single one of those rooms there were two roommates who never saw it coming. And I remember it like--they'd, they'd give you details, and luckily I was still in radio. But I can remember as I was giving these radio reports with my hands shaking, because there was death, and it was the death of young people, and there were mothers and fathers who started to arrive, and there was screaming. All of that affects you. It doesn't just roll off. It, it sort of sits somewhere.$$And then you'll be doing an interview on AIDS in San Francisco, and you're talking to a kid from Norway who came to San Francisco as a hippie. And he was sleeping in a field to raise money for the cause of AIDS. And he didn't have the money. There were ten of them sleeping in a field, and a tractor came through, didn't know these kids were sleeping there, ran over all of them, left them all with major spinal cord injuries. And you're talking to this guy and your--and suddenly you just lose it. You just go how could this happen to this kid? And you were talking to him because he said I have no regrets. I'm still raising money for AIDS in my wheelchair.$And then what other news stories in the--in the '90s [1990s] that, that were sort of critical? What other--$$The covering the, the blackout in 2000 [sic, 2003] and whatever.$$Yeah, the blackout.$$That was--that was--that was such a throwback to a time--we're not used to not having power in Manhattan [New York City, New York], no streetlights, no--how do you get home first of all? None of the streetlights were working. You had to drive very slow.$$Talk, talk about what happened and then what--$$Part of the Northeast went out, not us. Part of the Northeast went out so we knew it was coming. We were covering that aspect. We were preparing to do our shows about this swath in the Northeast when we were suddenly plunged into darkness. And even though we have backup generators, it took a very long time to get Channel 7 back on the air, a very--we were hours off the air because it takes so much power. And 9/11 taught us you don't put your microwaves on top of buildings that can be brought down because that can destroy your signal. We were off the air unless you had cable. But we never thought about the basics of electricity, how much electricity it takes to keep a television station running. You have to have enough lights to write by, hundreds of computers on every floor, air conditioning, heating. And we were--we were off the air for a long time. But when we went out to do the stories, there were people sitting out on their stoops just like they used to do in the summer a long time ago when they didn't have air conditioning and they didn't have TV. And people were like dancing in the streets, and they--you're not supposed to take liquor outside of bars, but you know, the police were just doing policing. You could go and, and sit outside and drink a beer and talk to people. We connected. We connected as a city in, in ways that I have never seen before. So on one level it was sweltering. Hospitals were tremendously affected, and the city learned from that. But it was--it was a throwback to a time--I really liked being out talking to people who were on the stoops. And if they had an old person there, like oh, I remember when we used to do this back in the '40s [1940s], oh yeah, da, da, da, before there was television to keep us inside and--it was--it, it was a little frightening because you say if it goes down again, it's bad. But it wasn't for that long a time. And you saw this city, and people with candles, and people talking to each other in a way they didn't before.$$So you really--what you're also describing--well, that's 2001. Prego (ph.) to that--well, what you're also describing is a lot of community that--$$Well, that's how New York is, communities--I mean the, the communities where people live there all their lives, and their parents die, and they stay in their parents' home. It's changing now in Manhattan, and I--it--because there's so much--it costs so much to live in Manhattan now. Harlem [Manhattan, New York City, New York] has, has been gentrified. But when I started here in the mid '80s [1980s], it was--it was nothing but communities with a certain type of people that did things a certain way and traditions, you know, the Jewish communities, the Haitian communities, Harlem, Spanish Harlem. They were like beautiful little worlds, and I was not used to most of these communities. I was prepared for living with a lot of black folk because of Atlanta, but I'd never really been in a large Jewish community. I'd never been to a seder. I--and I was like a sponge. I wanted to learn. I wanted to learn about Haitian foods and Haitian culture. I wanted to learn about Jewish food and the religion. And so this was a great place to be a sponge, and I was.$$You became part of New York, and New York became part of you.$$It did and I am so much better for it. I can't live anywhere else. Can you imagine me going back to Lansing, Michigan? Oh my God, never--that's not an option. I can't even go back and be comfortable in Atlanta [Georgia] anymore.

Sharon Epperson

Journalist Sharon Emily Epperson was born on April 12, 1968 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Her father, Dr. David E. Epperson, served as a dean at the University of Pittsburgh; her mother, Cecelia T. Epperson, was a schoolteacher in the Pittsburgh Public School System. Epperson graduated from Pittsburgh’s Taylor Allderdice High School in 1986. She launched her career as a reporter while a participant in the Pittsburgh Black Media Federation’s first high school journalism workshop during her sophomore year and later worked as an intern for three summers at her hometown paper “The Pittsburgh Press.” She went on to graduate with her bachelor's degree in sociology and government from Harvard University in 1990, and her Master of International Affairs degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs in 1993. While in college, Epperson interned as a journalist with several prominent papers, including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Boston Globe.

From 1993 to 1996, Epperson worked as a correspondent for Time magazine, where she covered business, culture, social issues and health in the New York bureau. She was then hired by CNBC in 1996 as a correspondent in the business news division. Epperson was subsequently named CNBC’s senior commodities and personal finance correspondent. She reports on personal finance for CNBC and other NBCUniversal properties. She has also reported on global energy, metals and commodities markets from the floor of the New York Mercantile Exchange since 2005.

In 2000, Epperson was hired as an adjunct assistant professor at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, where she teaches a course on professional development for graduate students interested in pursuing media careers.

In addition to reporting for CNBC, Epperson is a regular contributor on NBC's "Today" and Today.com and appears frequently on NBC Nightly News, MSNBC and NBC affiliates nationwide. She also reports for Public Television's "Nightly Business Report." Epperson has been featured in numerous publications, including USA Weekend, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Self, Essence, Ebony and Time magazine. She is the author of the 2007 book The Big Payoff: 8 Steps Couples Can Take to Make the Most of Their Money -- and Live Richly Ever After.

Epperson won the Alliance for Women in Media's 2014 Gracie Award for Outstanding Online Host for her "Financial Advisor Playbook" video series on CNBC.com, which was the second time she has been honored by this organization. In addition, she has received numerous other honors: the Vanguard Award from the National Urban League Guild, All-Star Award from the Association of Women in Communications, Trailblazer of the Year Award from the New York Association of Black Journalists, first place honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, and the Silver World Medal from the New York Festivals.

She and her husband, Christopher John Farley, also an award-winning journalist and author, live in Westchester County, New York, with their two children.

Sharon Epperson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 17, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.062

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/17/2014

Last Name

Epperson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Emily

Occupation
Schools

Taylor Allderdice High School

Harvard University

Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sharon

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

EPP04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Islands

Favorite Quote

To Give As Much As I Can Of My Time, Talent and Treasure To Others.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

4/12/1968

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lasagna

Short Description

Journalist Sharon Epperson (1968 - ) is CNBC’s senior commodities and personal finance correspondent. She is the author of The Big Payoff: 8 Steps Couples Can Take to Make the Most of Their Money and Live Richly Ever After.

Employment

Pittsburgh Press

Wall Street Journal

Boston Globe

Blackside Productions

WCVB-Boston

Washington Post

American University in Cairo

Time Magazine

CNBC

Favorite Color

Red and Purple

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117070">Tape: 1 Slating of Sharon Epperson's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117071">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117072">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson talks about her mother's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117073">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson talks about her mother's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117074">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson talks about her father and his family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117075">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson describes her parents' religious faith and practices</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117076">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson tells the story of how her parents met and married</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117077">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson talks about her family's dry cleaning business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117078">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117079">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson talks about her younger sister, Lia Epperson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117080">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson describes her integrated childhood neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's Belmar Gardens</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117081">Tape: 1 Sharon Epperson reminisces about her family life as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117082">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117083">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117084">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson talks about her love of school as young girl</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117085">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson recalls her elementary school education and her mother's impact on her education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117086">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson talks about her relationship with her younger sister and family vacations as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117087">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson talks about her father's role as the Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117088">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson describes challenges her father faced as Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117089">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson talks about her father's lessons in self-reliance</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117090">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson talks about her grade school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117091">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson describes her interest in journalism at Taylor Allderdice High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117092">Tape: 2 Sharon Epperson describes her interest in journalism at Allderdice High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117621">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson describes her experience in an actuarial science summer program at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117622">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson describes her decision to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117623">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson talks about her early experience at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117624">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson talks about her extracurricular activities at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117625">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson talks about attending Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts with her sister</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117626">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson describes her media internships while a student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117627">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson talks about her news internships at the Boston Globe and the Wall Street Journal's Pittsburgh office</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117628">Tape: 3 Sharon Epperson talks about working with Henry Hampton and Juan Williams on 'Eyes on the Prize'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117629">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson talks about her upper middle class background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117630">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson talks about formative friendships at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117631">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson describes her experience working at the American University in Cairo, Egypt</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117632">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson talks about her graduate school experience at Columbia University in New York City, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117633">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson describes the beginning of her career at Time magazine in 1993</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117634">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson describes her coverage of HistoryMaker Minister Louis Farrakhan while at Time magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117635">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson describes changes in how African Americans were covered by Time magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117636">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson talks about Janice Simpson, her mentor at Time magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117637">Tape: 4 Sharon Epperson describes her start at CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117110">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson talks about the beginning of her career at CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117111">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes CNBC's beginnings and its changes over the years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117112">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes her first five years at CNBC, and her development as a television journalist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117113">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes reporting on economic downturns at CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117114">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson talks about people she interviewed at CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117115">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes the motivation behind her book, 'The Big Payoff'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117116">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes the process of writing her book, 'The Big Payoff', pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117117">Tape: 5 Sharon Epperson describes the process of writing her book, 'The Big Payoff', pt.2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117118">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson talks about Pamela Thomas-Graham during her tenure as President and CEO of CNBC, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117119">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson talks about Pamela Thomas-Graham during her tenure during her tenure as President and CEO of CNBC, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117120">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson talks about why she stayed with CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117121">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson reflects on her role at CNBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117122">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson talks about her professional life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117123">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson offers advice to aspiring journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117124">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117125">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson describes her hopes for her children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117126">Tape: 6 Sharon Epperson describes her hopeful outlook on the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117127">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson describes the current distribution of wealth in the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117128">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson talks about her generation's legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117129">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117130">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson talks about what she would do differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117131">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson talks about her history with Jack and Jill of America, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117132">Tape: 7 Sharon Epperson talks about her history with Jack and Jill of America, pt. 2</a>

Clarice Tinsley

Broadcast journalist Clarice Tinsley was born on December 31, 1953 in Detroit, Michigan to Janet and Clarence Tinsley. She attended Beaubien Junior High School and Samuel C. Mumford High School. Tinsley graduated from Wayne State University with her B.A. degree in radio, television and film.

From 1975 to 1978, Tinsley worked for WITI-TV in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she started as a general assignment reporter, and later became co-anchor of the weekday noon news as well as producer and co-host of two monthly public affairs shows. In 1978, Tinsley was hired as an anchor for the ten o'clock news at KDFW-TV, where she became the longest-serving news anchor in the Dallas/Fort Worth television market. Tinsley has covered a number of major events, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, Operation Desert Storm, and Hurricane Alicia. In 1995, she established “Clarice’s Hometown Heroes,” a weekly KDFW franchise show that salutes volunteers in North Texas. Tinsley has also appeared as a news anchor or reporter in several Dallas-based television productions, including The Good Guys, Prison Break, Walker, Texas Ranger and Wishbone.

Tinsley has received the George Foster Peabody Award, a DuPont-Columbia Citation, two Emmy Awards, three Dallas Press Club Katie Awards, and two Awards of Excellence from American Women in Radio and Television. She has been honored with the Best Investigative Reporting Award from Texas Associated Press, the Texas Headliner Award for Investigative Reporting, the Journalistic Award for Excellence from the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Director's Community Leadership Award from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Asante Award from the Dallas Fort Worth Association of Black Journalists, the Dallas Historical Society Award of Excellence for Outstanding Contributions in the Creative Arts, the Mary McLeod Bethune Award from the National Council of Negro Women, and the inaugural “High Tea with High Heels” Award, among others. She was also inducted into the Lone Star Emmy Chapter's Silver Circle.

Tinsley is a member of the Board of Directors of Girls Scouts of Northeast Texas and SLANT. She is an Advisory Board Member of St. Philip's School in South Dallas, as well as an Advisory Board Member for the School of Journalism at Southern Methodist University. She is a member of the YET Board of Directors and chairs the YET Communications and Public Relations Committee. Tinsley was a member of the Super Bowl XLV Host Committee's Board of Directors and was Chair of the Super Bowl XLV Communications Action Team. She has been named a 2014 Style Council Ambassador for DIFFA/Dallas.

Clarice Tinsley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.082

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/6/2014

Last Name

Tinsley

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

L.

Schools

Sherrill Elementary School

Beaubien Middle School

Samuel C. Mumford High School

Wayne State University

Schulze Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Clarice

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

TIN01

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Michigan

Favorite Quote

Copy That.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/31/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chinese Food
Italian Food
Fruit

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Clarice Tinsley (1953 - ) was an evening news anchor at KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas for over thirty-five years.

Employment

L.G. Haig

WITI - TV 6

KDFW - FOX 4

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651470">Tape: 1 Slating of Clarice Tinsley's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651471">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651472">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley describes her maternal grandmother's siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651473">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley talks about her maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651474">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley describes her great aunt's music venue in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651475">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley describes her mother's upbringing in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651476">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley talks about her mother's teaching career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651477">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651478">Tape: 1 Clarice Tinsley talks about her parents' South African pen pal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651479">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley recalls how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651480">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley describes her parents' personalities and professions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651481">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley talks about her sister</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651482">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley remembers being hit by a car as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651483">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651484">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley recalls the development of her interest in journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651485">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley remembers the television coverage of the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651486">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley describes her early interest in reading</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651487">Tape: 2 Clarice Tinsley remembers the riots of 1967 in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651488">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley remembers the major events of 1968 in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651489">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls the Motown Records scene in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651490">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley describes her early education in Detroit, Michigan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651491">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls her early interest in broadcast journalism, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651492">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley describes her teenage social group</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651493">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls her journalism studies at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651494">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls her journalism studies at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651495">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley talks about 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651496">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls her early interest in broadcast journalism, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651497">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley recalls being hired at WITI-TV in Milwaukee, Wisconsin</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651498">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley remembers her introduction to the WITI-TV newsroom</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651499">Tape: 3 Clarice Tinsley describes memorable news stories she covered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651500">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley describes memorable news stories she covered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651501">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley recalls joining the ten o'clock news team at KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651502">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley describes her early reporting at KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651503">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley remembers her experiences in Kuwait</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651504">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley recalls her coverage of the Air Canada Flight 797 accident</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651505">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley recalls covering Hurricane Alicia in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651506">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley describes her investigative news story, 'A Call for Help,' pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651507">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley describes her investigative news story, 'A Call for Help,' pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651508">Tape: 4 Clarice Tinsley recalls meeting her husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651509">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley describes her coverage of the drug trade between Mexico and Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651510">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley remembers reporting on the Challenger disaster</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651511">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley talks about the political news coverage in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651512">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley describes the network affiliation of KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651513">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley describes her weekly segment, 'Clarice's Hometown Heroes'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651514">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley remembers the death of her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651515">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley talks about the African American broadcast journalists in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651516">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley describes the television news market in the Dallas, Texas area</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651517">Tape: 5 Clarice Tinsley talks about covering tragic news stories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651518">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley remembers the attacks of September 11, 2001</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651519">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley talks about the FBI Citizens Academy class in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651520">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley describes her grieving process after September 11, 2001</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651521">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley recalls covering the special agent training at Marine Corps Base Quantico</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651522">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley describes her appearances on television programs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651523">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley describes the social media satire, 'Fox 4 Goes Social'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651524">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley talks about her coverage of celebrities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651525">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley talks about radio personality Tom Joyner</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651526">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley shares her advice to aspiring journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651527">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651528">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651529">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley reflects upon her legacy and journalistic philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651530">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley talks about her community engagement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/651531">Tape: 6 Clarice Tinsley describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

10$8

DATitle
Clarice Tinsley recalls being hired at WITI-TV in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Clarice Tinsley describes her investigative news story, 'A Call for Help,' pt. 2
Transcript
As you're approaching graduation, did you have any job prospects?$$No. I graduated in December of 1974, and again I'm on that hyper thing, right? So, I put four years of college into three. Because at that time that's when TV stations were starting to open the doors of the newsrooms to women and minorities. And back then, we weren't sure how long that was going to exist. So, I wanted to make sure I could take advantage of that while that opportunity was still present. So, I had identified I don't know, maybe a year and a half, maybe two years prior that I wanted to try to put four years of college into three, and get out one year ahead of schedule. Worked really hard, had great support from my parents [Janet Lampton Tinsley and Clarence Tinsley]. They had saved money for my college education, but being in that generation, I wanted to be very independent. But you can't be independent if you're living at home, not paying rent, and eating your parents' food. So, I figured okay, I want to get a job. And they were like, "Why? We've got this money for you." And I said, "I want to do as much of this as I can." They were like, "Okay." They know their daughter. I am very independent. So, I got a job at a shoe store, L.G. Haig. I didn't sell shoes; the guys sold the shoes. But I was the cashier. I would ring up the shoe sales, and I sold the purses and the stockings. And I got a commission on what I sold. I think I had that job for two years, maybe two and a half years. It was perfect, because I would go to school in the morning; and then during the week, I would have that job in the afternoon. And then on Saturdays, I worked a full shift. I think college back then for me was like seventy-four dollars a quarter. I mean insane, right. But I got to pay for that through my job. That made me feel so proud, because I was doing something on my own for myself. So, working at Wayne State as a student, working at L.G. Haig, really that was my life. When I graduated in December I was really proud, because I had set a goal, I reached it; and then I had interviews with the three news directors in Detroit [Michigan]. And I'm like hometown girl, I know the issues, Wayne State University [Detroit, Michigan]--"I'm ready to work and do a good job for you." And they're like, "Great, Ms. Tinsley [HistoryMaker Clarice Tinsley], come back in five years when you have the experience." I'm like, "What? Five years?" They're like, "Yeah. Learn, make your mistakes, grow; and then come back." I was like, ooh, I didn't even think of that. And I said, okay. I sent out seventy resumes, really small stations--Michigan, Ohio, Indiana. Three of them, only three, bothered to acknowledge that I existed. One was a rejection letter, which I still treasure to this day, because at least they acknowledged that I sent them something. All those others were like (gesture), they never even responded. But you can't be dejected; you can't give up and get a no and just say, "Okay, that's it." I sent out more resumes, working at the shoe store full time. And then my mother called me in June of 1975 at the shoe store and said, "Carl Zimmermann is going to call you at the shoe store. He's the director of communications at WITI [WITI-TV] TV-6 in Milwaukee [Wisconsin]." I get the call from Mr. Zimmermann, they have an opening for a reporter. They got my interv- they got my audition tape, audio tape--not video--audio tape. And he said, "You know, we want to fly you over for an interview." They did, and I was just amazed. I'd never been to Milwaukee. And then they sent me back home. And then I guess maybe a week later, they said, "You've got the job." So, I started July 13, 1975.$I was single, it was a Friday night; I was going out with some girlfriends to a nightclub. But before I left the newsroom, I called one of my contacts in the fire department. He wasn't home, he was at a lodge meeting. And his wife said, "Oh, you can call back later." And I'm like, "Well, what time?" And she said, "Well, he'll be back around midnight." And I'm like, "You're sure that's not too late?" She said, "Oh, Clarice [HistoryMaker Clarice Tinsley], we love you. You can call at any time." And I thought, yeah, if you knew why I was calling, you wouldn't be saying that. So, there's no smartphone, right. So, I go to the nightclub; my girlfriends and I are having fun. Midnight, I excuse myself and go to the payphone. I call the fire department guy, and he's chatting, and he's like, "Nope, don't know anything about that, haven't heard anything about it. I don't know, can't help you." I'm like, "Okay." Saturday--I don't work on the weekends, but I made thirteen calls from home. On the thirteenth call, I had that pregnant pause, and the guy says, "Yeah, I heard about it. It didn't go down the way we would have liked. And that's all I'm going to say." And he hung up on me. And I'm like, okay, something happened. So, I had my notebook. Monday, I go to work, I lay everything out to my news director. I had called the city, and they refused to give us the audiotape. So, we filed under the Texas open records act [Texas Public Information Act], which is an amazing document. On the thirteenth day, the city called and said, "You can come down and record the audiotape." I had my notebook. And the amazing thing is that everything that Mr. Boff [Larry Boff] said to me--that I had written down--was on that audiotape, and in order. It was verbatim, which is very rare. Because cops will tell you, eyewitness testimony is suspect--you're in shock, you may think I can't believe this is happening; you don't necessarily remember what you think you remember. Everything was on that tape, in order, in my notebook the way he told me. Even though I had the tape, I didn't have a story. I didn't know what the procedure was for 911. I didn't know what the training was. So, I put together an investigation for one month, talked to all the principals involved, did all the phone work, put the story on the air in March on a Monday, six o'clock. We got eight hundred phone calls, (snaps fingers) like that. "You're making the City of Dallas look bad, Clarice. You're going to need an ambulance tonight, and it's not going to be there." I got death threats. "How can this happen in Dallas? This is horrible." "You think that's bad? Let me tell you what they did when I called for an ambulance." We aired the same story at ten o'clock. We got 975 new phone calls. Again, outrage, disbelief, a few death threats. We aired--we didn't air it again. The next day, the networks picked it up. CBS picked it up; 'Nightline' did the story; CNN picked it up. I heard from Texans who live in Europe who saw it who were outraged. And then the next day, everybody who didn't want the story, who didn't think it was a story in this market, got involved. Every single person in the Channel 4 [KDFW-TV, Dallas, Texas] newsroom was involved in some aspect of carrying that story forward, to make sure we stayed competitive on it, and that we stayed in the lead. Also, TV stations and newspapers all across America said, "This happened in Dallas, Texas. Could it happen in Detroit [Michigan]; Los Angeles [California]; Atlanta [Georgia]; Washington, D.C.?" I mean, the whole country was looking at their 911s. Based on the story and the reaction that it produced, the City of Dallas did its own investigation. People were demoted, people took early retirement to avoid punishment; people were fired. But the most significant thing is that the system changed. It's regrettable that a woman [Lillian Boff] had to die in order for that to happen. And based on that story, I received the George Foster Peabody Award, which in broadcast journalism is considered the highest award that one can get because the Peabody represents a story that brings about change. The 911 system changed in Dallas.$$Okay, okay. This is 1984, right (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm.$$And you're thirty-one years old--$$Um-hm.$$--you're still young, and (laughter).

Brenda Wood

Broadcast journalist Brenda Blackmon Wood was born on September 8, 1955 in Washington, D.C. to Welvin Bray and Bernice Blackmon. Wood graduated from Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland in 1973. She went on to receive her B.A. degree in speech communication and mass media from Loma Linda University in Southern California in 1977.

Upon graduation in 1977, Wood was hired as a news reporter for WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama. In 1978, she left that market for a brief time to serve as a general assignment reporter at WSM-TV in Nashville, Tennessee. One year later, Wood returned to WAAY-TV as the evening news anchor. In 1980, she moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where she spent eight years as the evening weekday news anchor for WMC-TV. In 1988, Wood was hired as the evening news anchor and reporter at Atlanta, Georgia’s WAGA-TV, where she also hosted the Emmy award-winning news magazine show, Minute by Minute. She then joined WXIA-TV in Atlanta in 1997, where she anchors the 6pm and 11pm weekday newscasts, as well as her signature newscast, The Daily 11 at 7 with Brenda Wood. Wood was also co-producer and host of WXIA-TV’s Emmy award-winning prime time show, Journeys with Brenda Wood, which has received the National Association of Black Journalists’ 1998 award for Community Affairs Programming.

Throughout her career Wood has received numerous honors and awards, including eighteen Emmy awards from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) Southeast Region; six awards from the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists (AABJ); and three awards from the Georgia Association of Broadcasters (GAB). In 2013 she was named Georgia Woman of the Year by the Governor's Office of the Georgia Women's Commission, and received the Legacy Award from the Atlanta Business League. Wood has also been named Who's Who in Atlanta; awarded the NAACP's Phoenix Award for "Best News Anchor," and named "Best Local News Anchor" by Atlanta Magazine in 1998. Wood has also received an award from the Georgia Chapter of Women in Communication, the Gabriel Award of Merit from the National Association of Catholic Churches, and a journalism award from the Georgia Psychological Association, as well as several awards and honors from local civic and community organizations.

Wood is a member of the NATAS, the NABJ, the AABJ, the Atlanta Press Club, and Women in Film. She serves on the boards of Kenny Leon's True Colors Theater Company and Chayil, Inc., a nonprofit that helps domestic abuse victims. In addition, Wood serves on several local advisory boards in the Atlanta area.

Wood lives in Atlanta, Georgia and has two daughters, Kristen and Kandis.

Brenda Wood was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.072

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/21/2014

Last Name

Wood

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Blackmon

Schools

Takoma Academy

Loma Linda University

Oakwood Adventist Academy

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Brenda

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WOO11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Turks and Caicos

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/8/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Macaroni, Cheese

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Brenda Wood (1955 - ) has worked as a reporter and news anchor for Atlanta, Georgia’s WAGA-TV and WXIA-TV for over thirty-four years. She has received eighteen Emmy awards, six awards from the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists, and the NAACP's Phoenix Award for "Best News Anchor."

Employment

WAAY TV, Huntsville

WSM TV, Nashville

WMC TV, Memphis

WAGA-TV (Television Station: Atlanta,Ga.)

WXIA-TV, Atlanta

Favorite Color

Teal

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158791">Tape: 1 Slating of Brenda Wood's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158792">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158793">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood talks about her biological mother and her adoptive mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158794">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood talks about her adoptive parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158795">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood describes the history of musicianship in her maternal family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158796">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood describes her adoptive father's family background and talks about his career as a musician</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158797">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood talks about the death of her biological mother in 1960, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158798">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood describes her adoptive mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158799">Tape: 1 Brenda Wood describes growing up in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158800">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about the death of her biological mother in 1960, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158801">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood explains why her adoptive father, Henry Blackmon, immigrated to the Netherlands</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158802">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood recalls her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158803">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about her upbringing as a Seventh Day Adventist and attending Seventh Day Adventist schools throughout her education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158804">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood describes her experience at Smothers Elementary School in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158805">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about her experiences at Woodson Junior High School and the Dupont Park Church Seventh Day Adventist School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158806">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood remembers taking piano lessons from her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158807">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood remembers watching JC Hayward and Max Robinson on Channel 9 in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158808">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about her mother's friendship with singer and actress Joyce Bryant</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158809">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about her mother's relationship with singer Roberta Flack</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158810">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood talks about wanting to be a Broadway performer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158811">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood describes her experience at Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158812">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood remembers the riots in Washington, D.C. in 1968 after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158813">Tape: 2 Brenda Wood describes the racial demographics of the student body at Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158814">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood describes how she became interested in speech and communications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158815">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks about deciding to attend Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158816">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks briefly about the Loma Linda University Medical Center's legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158817">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks about transferring to Loma Linda University and wanting to become an investigative filmmaker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158818">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood remembers being interviewed by WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158819">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks about joining WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama in 1977</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158820">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood explains why she chose not to leave Huntsville, Alabama for Ohio State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158821">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks about receiving an offer to join WSMV-TV in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/158822">Tape: 3 Brenda Wood talks about her marriage in 1978</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Brenda Wood remembers watching JC Hayward and Max Robinson on Channel 9 in Washington, D.C.
Brenda Wood remembers being interviewed by WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama
Transcript
So, now, did you pay--considering what you're doing today, did you pay special attention to news people on television?$$No, not really. I do remember, I was--I remember when JC Hayward and Max Robinson arrived at Channel 9 in Washington [D.C.] and loved them, probably, I guess, because I don't know this to be a fact, but we watched Channel 9 all the time. And they were the first blacks that I saw on TV giving the news. So, my mom [Alma Montgomery Blackmon] was very, very proud of that. She loved Max Robinson, you know. They were always in--so I watched them growing up. I can't say, though, that I, you know, that was not--I didn't look--I don't know. You know, I, I admired them greatly, but I don't really recall thinking one day I want to be JC Hayward, you know what I'm saying? Don't--it wasn't that. But I did watch them all the time.$$Okay, so you were keenly aware of them, but you weren't--$$Absolutely.$$--you didn't see them as future, you know--$$No, you know, at the time, I wanted to be a Broadway singer, or you know opera singer. That's kind of where my head was 'cause that's, that'a what I was hearing all the time.$I was--by this time I was engaged. My fiance was slated to graduate in December, and then we were gonna get married. And then I was gonna start the master's fellowship there in Ohio [at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio]. He was gonna do his residency there. So between June of graduation from undergrad and December I had this free time. So I applied for a job somewhere in Huntsville [Alabama]. And I, you know, I had done a little bit of radio in college at the college radio station, and I had done some internships--$$I was gonna ask you if they had a station there?$$Yeah, they did. It was all automated, so, yeah, I didn't do very much but punch buttons. And I had done some internships in Los Angeles [California] with a couple of independent film companies. So I had a small resume. I'd sent it back home to then Huntsville. And I just, you know, sent it everywhere to radio, TV, newspapers, just, you know, I just needed something to do. And I wanted to do something in communications. And--$$Now, this is in the space between Loma Linda [University, Loma Linda, California] and Ohio State?$$Correct.$$Would have been Ohio State.$$Right, so I sent out my resume like in April. I knew I was gonna be graduating in June, so I had put together a little resume and sent it out before graduation. I got an inquiry before graduation from a couple of newspapers, little local newspapers, couple of radio stations that were interested, and a television station. And my first week back home from, after graduation, I only went to the TV station for the interview, not smart, you know. It's like, "Oh, I don't wanna work at a newspaper. And I don't wanna work at a radio station." I wanted to--and the reason why I wanted to do the TV was because they shot film. And this is 1977. So they're still shooting film. So in my little brain, I'm thinking, well, I wanna do film, and they do film. So I'll (laughter) do film. So I went, I accepted the, the invitation to come and do an interview at the television station there.$$Okay, so you saw yourself as behind the cameras kind of--$$Yeah, yeah, right, but they--and they were, I knew they were looking for a reporter. And I had taken one journalism class. So, you know, I wasn't so much interested--what drew me to the TV station wasn't that I wanted to be a reporter or let me see what reporting is like? It was, I, you know, I don't know. I knew nothing. So, you know, it was like, they shoot film, and I wanna do film. So I'll go to the television station and apply to be a reporter. And it doesn't really connect. But that's what I did. And Adrian Gibson was the news director at the time, and he interviewed me, and I said, really all the wrong things, thinking back on it. You know, I said, I don't wanna be, I'm not interested in being a reporter. You know, have you ever done any reporting? No, taken, you know, have you taken classes? Just one. Yeah, well, what do you see in your future? Well, I wanna be a filmmaker. Do you wanna be a reporter? "No, not really. And by the way, I'm leaving in six months 'cause I'm going to Ohio State to get my master's in filmmaking. And then I'll be gone. Oh, and on top of that, I don't work on Friday nights or Saturdays 'cause I'm Seventh Day Adventist." And this man hired me (laughter). I don't know why. I did a, they put me in front of the camera on the news set in the studio and asked, you know, just said, talk, you know, just talk to the camera. And I did, and I don't even know what I said.$$This is your first time talking, I mean being the talent on a television program.$$(No audible response) 'Cause, you know, we didn't have the--different from today. At, at--neither at Oakwood [College, Huntsville, Alabama] nor at Loma Linda did they have a studio set up, you know, did they have a, you know, a little news operation. They had none of that where I was, none of that. So it really was the first time I'd been in a studio, the first time I'd talked in front of a camera or any of that.$$Okay. So did they build your work around your religion and other--$$Yeah, they did. They gave me a Sunday through Thursday schedule. Fortunately, because they're in Huntsville, they knew of Oakwood's existence. They knew of the Seventh Day Adventist College. So they--and the woman that I was replacing who was also a black female, ironically, left to go to Ohio State University to work on her master's degree. Isn't that just funny how life works. So, you know, and because it was the '70's [1970s], and I filled two quotas, I was black and female, you know, I would, I was, you know, I was a twofer. So they wanted to hire--they had a slot for (laughter) a twofer. They were losing one, a black female. And so they get to hire one. So that probably was more of the motivating factor than anything else (laughter) in hiring me. I was there (laughter). I was a warm body (laughter).$$Now, well, you had the credentials which some, it was like a driver's license in some ways. You have a degree in communications.$$Yeah.$$So they can say, they can justify your hiring by pointing to these degrees.$$Right. It wasn't a degree in journalism.$$I mean in communications.$$That would have been helpful. Well, yeah, it was in communications. You said it right. You know, it was very broad, very generic, yeah.$$All right.$$But I filled the bill.$$Okay, okay, and ever--anyone ever told you that you looked like a television talent?$$No.$$Really, up to that point?$$Oh, no. No, as a matter--$$Interesting.$$--of fact, when I was in college, people would say to me, you know, "What's your major?" "Communications." "Oh, what's that?" You know, that--it's the '70s [1970s]. It was a new major. "What's that?" And my standard answer in explaining what that was, you know, "Well, you know, I wanna go into filmmaking." "Huh?" And then my retort would be, "Well, anything but news."

Gregory Davis

Broadcasting CEO Gregory Davis was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas in September 24, 1948. He received his B.A. degree in biology from Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee. After serving in the United States Army, he returned to school and earned his master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University.

Davis then began a twelve-year television career that took him to a number of major cities, including Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Detroit. From 1982 to 1986, he worked as a National/Local Sales Manager of Multimedia Broadcasting for WLW-TV in Cincinnati, Ohio. He began his company, Davis Broadcasting Inc., in 1986, when he acquired radio stations in Columbus and Augusta, Georgia. He later purchased stations in Macon, Columbus, and Atlanta, Georgia, as well as in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 2000, Davis sold the radio stations in Charlotte and Augusta to focus on building his operations in Columbus. Davis Broadcasting Inc. comprises ten radio stations based in Columbus and Atlanta, Georgia: WFXE-FM, WEAM-FM, WIOL-FM, WIOL-AM, WOKS-AM and WKZJ-FM in Columbus, and WCHK-FM (La Mega), WCHK-AM, WLKQ-FM (La Raza), and WNSY-FM in Atlanta. Its hip-hop and R&B station, WFXE-FM (Foxie 105), has been rated the number one radio station in the Columbus market since 1993. In 2004, La Raza became Atlanta's first Spanish language FM radio station. These ten stations offer a variety of music genres, including urban contemporary, gospel contemporary, Spanish language programming, and sports.

In addition to operating several radio stations, Davis Broadcasting Inc. has hosted many annual philanthropic events. These include the Women’s Empowerment Luncheon, held each March for National Women’s History Month, Family Day in the Parks, and the Needy Children's Christmas party, which provides three to four thousand needy children with gifts every Christmas. Davis also serves his community by participating on boards both locally and nationally. These include the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, Columbus Regional Hospital, United Way, Better Business Bureau, First Union Bank, and First Citizen Bank of North Carolina. He has also served on the board for the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters, the Georgia Association of Broadcasters, and the North Carolina Association of Broadcasters.

Davis and his wife Cheryl reside in Columbus, Georgia. They have three grown children, Geniece, Michelle, and Greg, Jr.

Gregory Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 20, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.056

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

2/20/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A.

Organizations
Schools

St. John's HeadStart Center

St. Anne's Academy

Lane College

University of Arkansas at Fort Smith

Eastern Michigan University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Gregory

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Smith

HM ID

DAV31

Favorite Season

Christmas time

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

What You Put In is What You Get Out

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/24/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Barbecue

Short Description

Broadcast chief executive Gregory Davis (1948 - ) is the founder of Davis Broadcasting Inc., which runs ten radio stations based in Columbus and Atlanta, Georgia. These stations include WFXE-FM, or Foxie 105, the number one radio station in the Columbus market since 1993.

Employment

Flint Board of Education

London Central High School

WJRT-TV Pool Broadcasting

Field Communication WKBD-TV

ABC -Television WXYZ-TV

ABC - National Sales

MultiMedia-TV

Davis Broadcasting

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2581,49:18254,232:31216,465:39718,648:40264,656:40576,661:41824,684:55138,851:63100,922:65340,1199:101798,1572:115570,1736:127590,2007:132015,2096:145938,2313:146270,2331:159596,2490:171264,2708:183591,2873:188838,2962:206074,3265:227280,3583:269881,4166:270497,4176:299120,4579:300298,4605:302300,4616$0,0:4284,51:13872,229:14168,234:14464,239:26915,376:40458,586:41052,598:42768,625:53940,780:56540,790:58988,834:59564,849:59852,857:61796,900:65942,932:72403,1053:76024,1149:82485,1312:83053,1321:83905,1335:92228,1379:93724,1402:104988,1586:112652,1682:113108,1689:117668,1776:119720,1820:120936,1842:129044,1942:132014,1994:132938,2027:133202,2032:141544,2109:152216,2206:159075,2325:159660,2335:160635,2359:161675,2379:162260,2390:174859,2488:175732,2498:194492,2734:194862,2740:215852,2961:216282,2967:216798,3059:222686,3102:226986,3188:230640,3211:231288,3268:247940,3455:249540,3482:260678,3634:268764,3710:271190,3742
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116309">Tape: 1 Slating of Gregory Davis's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116310">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116311">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116312">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis describes his mother's upbringing in Fort Smith, Arkansas and her education at Arkansas AM&N College in Pine Bluff</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116313">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116314">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis talks about his paternal grandparents' jobs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116315">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis remembers helping his father find a job at the Colonial Baking Company in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116316">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis recounts how his parents met, his mother's career, and his father's personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116317">Tape: 1 Gregory Davis talks about his mother's personality and about his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116318">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis describes his childhood neighborhood in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116319">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis talks about the history of Fort Smith, Arkansas and his religious upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116320">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis describes his experience at St. John's Elementary School in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116321">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis recalls listening to radio and watching television growing up in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116322">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis talks about segregation in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and his maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116323">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis talks about integrating St. Anne's High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116324">Tape: 2 Gregory Davis his experience as the first African American on the football team at St. Anne's High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116847">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis recounts his experience of racial discrimination during his football career at St. Anne's High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116848">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis describes his academic and athletic performance at St. Anne's High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116849">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis talks about his difficulties getting an athletic scholarship to college due to racial discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116850">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis recounts his decision to attend Westark Junior College in Fort Smith, Arkansas and then Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116851">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis talks about his experience at Westark Junior College in Fort Smith, Arkansas and Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116852">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis describes undergraduate years at Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116853">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis describes moving to Flint, Michigan to work as a community school director</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116854">Tape: 3 Gregory Davis recalls being drafted into the U.S. Military during the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116333">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis talks about the importance of dialogue in business, and his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116334">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis describes experiencing racial discrimination in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116335">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis describes his U.S. Army service in Europe and teaching at United States Army Dependent Schools in London, England</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116336">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis talks about pursuing a graduate degree in education from Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116337">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis talks about his first job in television at Flint, Michigan's WJRT-TV, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116338">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis talks about his first job in television at Flint, Michigan's WJRT-TV, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116339">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis recalls how he met his wife</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116340">Tape: 4 Gregory Davis talks about moving from Flint, Michigan to Detroit, Michigan where he worked at WXYZ-TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116341">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis recalls working as a national spot salesman for ABC and moving to the NBC affiliate in Cincinnati, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116342">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis talks about selling advertising for Cincinnati, Ohio's NBC affiliate and deciding to buy his own station</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116343">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis talks about how he started Davis Broadcasting, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116344">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis talks about how he started Davis Broadcasting, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116345">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis describes the early years of Davis Broadcasting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116346">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis talks about the challenges of selling advertising for an African-American radio station</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/116347">Tape: 5 Gregory Davis describes the demographics of his radio stations</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Gregory Davis his experience as the first African American on the football team at St. Anne's High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas
Gregory Davis talks about how he started Davis Broadcasting, pt. 1
Transcript
So were you able to integrate without, you know, incident, nobody calling you names and--$$Oh no--oh no.$$Okay.$$(Laughter) No, Larry. It's--those are--those are moments that I think back and our first--my first experience in real racial prejudice is when I first went out to play football. I called up the coach and asked him if my mother [Rizetta Theola Davis]--they decided we're gonna go--we were gonna go to St. Anne's, and I wanted to play football. And I called up the coach on my own, unbeknownst to my mother and father [Fred Davis, Jr.]--that I just wanna make sure I can play football, 'cause I always wanted to play football for the Lincoln High School Pirates. And I called him up and I said Coach--I says my name is Greg Davis. I said I'm at St. John's. I says I'm, I'm planning to come to St. Anne's next week--next year--and I'd like to play football, and I wanted to talk to someone about that. He said if you make the team, you can play, goodbye.$$Wow, he was really in--interested in you, right?$$Yeah. So, I went out, and the very first time my mother dropped me off. She went out to the school and when I first came out there I got out of the car. I looked back and I could see tears in my mom's eyes. And, and I didn't--I didn't want her to be worried. I said mother, I'm fine. I walked out--you didn't know a soul. You walked out there, and I knew the colors were blue and white. And they said you wear blue and white shorts and pants. Well, Lincoln High School's [Fort Smith, Arkansas] colors was blue and white too. Black--at the black high school, they wore blue pants and white shirts. And I went up to St. Anne's, I thought that--I came out there with my blue pants and white shirt, what I always knew. And they had just the opposite; they had white shorts and blue shirts. So I came out of the very first time, and introduced myself. No one said a word.$$Now this is before formal school starts, right, football practice?$$This is--this is in August before school even--$$Yeah, okay.$$--starts so you didn't know anyone.$$All right, so this your first exposure to this school.$$Remind me so much of watching the movie '42.' I mean it was almost a peril of my life, when I walked in, how they just stopped and got quiet; nobody talked; and you walked--you didn't know what to say, what to go--where to go. And finally I introduced myself, and they didn't--no one said hello or nothing. And one guy says--I said my name is Greg Davis. He says my name is Greg Avelos (ph.). I said well, Greg, we gotta--got the same name. So I'm trying to think about what my dad would do, 'cause my dad could talk to anybody. And we got to talking, and that's how after that we got to be close. And other people began to talk. But it was very, very difficult. And, and I got out there, and they would run sprints. And I'd take off running, and I'd be ahead of everybody, and then I would slow because I thought they was looking at you--why you running so fast, you know, that type of thing, but very good experience. Life went on to show me that--we went on and played football, and be honest with you, we had one of the best careers that I could have ever asked for in high school. We never lost a football game in high school.$$Now what position did you play?$$We played both ways. We played--I played offensive left halfback, and defensive safety, and I did kickoffs and kickoff returns.$$Okay.$$So we, we kind of went both ways.$$All right, so, so didn't lose a game. Were, were there any other black players in your league?$$Not at that time. Later on my brother and them came through two years later, but there was nobody else other--on--well, we played schools around the state. And just--not just in Fort Smith. We would go to Alma, Arkansas, Charleston, Arkansas, and different once, cause we were a Catholic parochial school, and we had to play schools from there. But we--$$So did your team embrace you--I mean--you know?$$Didn't embrace me initially, but after the--after we kind of established ourselves and you know played sports, and began to catch, and run, and play, and they began to open up. But they were very reluctant initially, 'cause they not--never been around blacks. But it's, it's amazing how four years make a difference. My--after my fourth year, I was elected senior captain of the team, and that was elected by your peers. So it kind of shows you how transition took place, and really made it better for my brother [Fred Davis, III] who played on the football team two years later--he was two years younger--and others after that.$Now, let's, let's tell people about the incentives that the FCC [Federal Communications Commission], you know--$$Right.$$--granted to owners. Tell us about that.$$They call it certificate. At this time, there was a certificate that they would provide owners who owned--at this time, it was majority the mino--the majority of the stations were owned by non-minorities by the white community. And they gave them a certificate that if you sold it to a minority, you would get a tax incentive. You would get a percentage back, and it was a tax incentive where you would not have to pay taxes on so many of the dollars if you sold it to a minority. So, but the minorities' biggest thrust was trying to come up with the initial cash in order to get in. The, the cost of entry was extremely difficult. It was 10 to 20 percent at that time trying to come up with the monies to buy those stations.$$So this was--this is an attempt to encourage white business to sell to blacks, because they'd actually make money.$$Oh, it was economics.$$It, it was a way that you could make more money selling these stations than if you sold them to a white person.$$That's correct. It's a called a tax certificate.$$Yeah.$$And that's what they provided to the FCC, and they would get a rebate for selling to minor--so it was an economic incentive for them to sell to minorities.$$Okay. I guess this works better than moral appeal to the--$$Yes, than the moral appeal and plus it was an incentive for them to get cash money.$$Yes, yes. So, so you looked--you--was it hard to get the financing to--was that the biggest struggle, to get the financing to initially buy it.$$I was--partly, yes. It's always difficult. I mean and not partly. It was yes. That was the most difficult piece, to find a bank that would loan you the kind of money to get into the business, and especially when it was millions of dollars. And you didn't have the wherewithal; you didn't have the mothers and the fathers, and people that had the back and support in most cases to get there. And most institutions--financial institutions--were not real comfortable in loaning money to minorities anyway. But I started in 1982, and it took four years for me to finally get a chance to buy a TV station, the TV station that identified, that was up for sale, that's something that we could afford to purchase was an NBC station in Columbus, Georgia.$$Now how--so it's NBC's station in Columbus, Georgia. But--now who, who--what financial institutions or you know--well, did--I mean who loaned you money?$$That's a good question. It was so difficult. And I started my process of trying to find out who would loan the money. It took me four years, and I went to at least a dozen institutions. And they would all--and they all said no. I had made a decision that I was gonna--whenever they said no, I would write down why they told me no. It could be you don't have any experience; it could be you don't have enough down--cap--down--upfront capital. Whatever it may be, I, I wrote 'em down. And always said to the person I don't mind you telling me no, but just tell me why you're telling me no. And I began to go back and correct those concerns that they had, so when I go to the next one, I would fix that one. When I go to the next institution, I'd fix those. So when I got down to--after, again, over eleven to twelve institutions saying no, I knew that there as one institution that might say yes, that was my best chance. But I had corrected all of those concerns that the banks had. And I got to this final institution out of Cleveland [Ohio], a bank called Ameritrust Bank. And I went to them, and they said yes, and I borrowed the money to start my first company.

Condace Pressley

Journalist Condace Pressley was born in 1964 in Marietta, Georgia. She graduated from Marietta High School in 1982, where she was a columnist for her high school paper and co-editor of the school’s year book. She then went on to attend the University of Georgia and served as the news director of the college’s radio station before graduating magna cum laude with her B.A. degree in journalism in 1986.

Pressley was first hired at Cox as a reporter/anchor in 1986. She worked her way up, and in 1999, became the assistant program director and worked on radio stations AM750 and NOW95.5FM News/Talk WSB. In 1992, she was promoted to Cox’s general manager; and in 2012, became the general manager for WSB-AM. Pressley hosts her own show, Perspectives , where she interviews celebrities, authors, news makers and community leaders. She also contributes news reports to Atlanta's Morning News with Scott Slade and the Sean Hannity Show .

Pressley has been recognized numerous times for the quality of her journalism. In 1990 and 1991, she was named Radio News Woman of the Year Atlanta by the American Women in Radio and Television; and in 1990, she was also named Radio News Woman of the Year Atlanta by the American Women in Radio and Television. Pressley was elected president of the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists in 1993. In 2001, she was elected president of the National Association of Black Journalists, and became director of the Radio Television News Directors Association. Pressley was honored at the 2010, YWCA Tribute to Women Leaders, and named a Pioneer Journalist by the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists in 2012. Marietta Mayor Steve Tumlin named July 11, 2012, Condace Pressley Day.

Pressley has been published in the Nieman Reports , the Federal Communications Law Journal , and The Atlanta Daily Journal , and has served as a featured as a guest on CNN and C-SPAN .

Condace Pressley was interviewed by The History Makers on February 19, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/19/2014

Last Name

Pressley

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Levica

Schools

St Joseph Catholic School

Marietta High School

University of Georgia

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Condace

Birth City, State, Country

Marietta

HM ID

PRE05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida Panhandle

Favorite Quote

It Doesn't Matter Who Gets the Credit as Long as You Get the Job Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/10/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Condace Pressley (1964 - ) is the assistant program manager for Cox Media Group in Atlanta, hosts the radio program Perspectives, and was previously the president of the National Association of Black Journalists and the director of the Radio Television News Directors Association.

Employment

Cox Media Group Atlanta

WSB Radio

Georgia Radio News Atlanta

WRFC Radio, Athens

WNGC/WGAU Radio

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133855">Tape: 1 Slating of Condace Pressley's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133856">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133857">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133858">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley describes her mother's upbringing, education, and nursing career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133859">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley describes her mother's career as a nurse at Kennestone Hospital and at the Lockheed Corporation in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133860">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley recounts her mother's experiences during the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133861">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley describes her father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133862">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley describes her father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133863">Tape: 1 Condace Pressley talks about her father's career as a shopkeeper for the Lockheed Corporation and the Ford Motor Company in Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133864">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley recounts how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133865">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley describes her parents and her brother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133866">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley talks about her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133867">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley describes her childhood homes in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133868">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133869">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley recalls her childhood neighborhood in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133870">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley talks about her grade school years at St. Joseph's Catholic School in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133871">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley talks about the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968, and her mother's mentor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133872">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley describes her transition to Marietta High School in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133873">Tape: 2 Condace Pressley talks about her experience at Marietta High School in Marietta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133874">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley describes changes in Georgia during the 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133875">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley describes working on the yearbook staff at Marietta High School in Marietta, Georgia, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133876">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley describes working on the yearbook staff at Marietta High School in Marietta, Georgia, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133877">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley recounts her decision to attend the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133878">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley talks about her parents' divorce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133879">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley describes her teachers and her first radio journalism jobs while at the University of Georgia in Athens</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133880">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley talks about athletes at the University of Georgia and Marietta High School, like Herschel Walker, Dominique Wilkins, and Dale Ellis</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133881">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley describes HistoryMakers Monica Kaufman and Jocelyn Dorsey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133882">Tape: 3 Condace Pressley talks about her A.B.J. degree and her extracurricular involvement at the University of Georgia in Athens</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133883">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley talks about extracurricular activities at the University of Georgia in Athens</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133884">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley describes interning and working at the Georgia Radio News Service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133885">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley recounts how she was hired at WSB Radio in Atlanta, Georgia while working at the Georgia Radio News Service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133886">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley describes working at WSB Radio in Atlanta, Georgia with Skinny Bobby Harper</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133887">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley describes covering politics on WSB Radio in Atlanta and meeting four U.S. presidents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133888">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley recalls working with Atlanta, Georgia mayor Maynard Jackson while president of the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133889">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley recalls interesting local stories she covered at WSB Radio in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133890">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley describes becoming president of the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists and hosting the first UNITY conference in 1994</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133891">Tape: 4 Condace Pressley talks about covering politics during the 1994 election of Atlanta, Georgia mayor Bill Campbell</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133892">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley describes interviewing civil rights leaders including Coretta Scott King and HistoryMakers John Lewis and Andrew Young</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133893">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley recalls the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133894">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley talks about professional boxer Evander Holyfield</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133895">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley explains her journalistic philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133896">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley talks about her radio program, 'Perspectives,' on WSB in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133897">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley recalls the 1994 and 2000 Super Bowl games in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133898">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley reflects on the major events in Atlanta, Georgia since the 1990s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133899">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley remembers the September 11 attacks at the World Trade Center, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133900">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley remembers the September 11 attacks at the World Trade Center, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133901">Tape: 5 Condace Pressley recounts her term as president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) from 2001 to 2003.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133902">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley reflects upon African American representation among news directors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133903">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley talks about challenges facing African American news directors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133904">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley explains how broadcast news programming has changed since the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133905">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley reflects upon how the cable news networks like CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC have affected the American news market</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133906">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley reflects upon how African American political views are represented in cable and broadcast news</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133907">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley explains why conservative voices dominate the talk radio format</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133908">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley talks about news and en Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133909">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley talks about her civic involvement and about HistoryMaker Xernona Clayton</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133910">Tape: 6 Condace Pressley reflects upon her future plans and what she would do differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133911">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley describes attending the 2009 and 2013 presidential inaugurations of HistoryMaker Barack Obama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133912">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley talks about Antoinette Tuff, who convinced a gunman to surrender at McNair Discovery Learning Academy in DeKalb County, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133913">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133914">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley describes her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133915">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133916">Tape: 7 Condace Pressley describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/133917">Tape: 8 Condace Pressley narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Condace Pressley describes covering politics on WSB Radio in Atlanta and meeting four U.S. presidents
Condace Pressley reflects upon how African American political views are represented in cable and broadcast news
Transcript
I remember February 17, 1991, when the air war started [Gulf War], that was the moment at which our program director morphed our station [WSB Radio, Atlanta, Georgia] from being a full-service radio station into a news talk radio station. We went to all news in the morning, talk throughout the day, news--heavy news presence in the afternoon. And that has evolved in the twenty-plus years since.$$Okay. Okay. So. So you became the morning show producer in '87 [1987], is that?$$Yes. Yes.$$Okay. All right. And this is [Skinny] Bobby Harper is on in the morning?$$Yes. He was with us until--Bobby left--Bobby and Kathy [Fishman] left--they left in '91 [1991], 'cause I remember that I was here. The [Atlanta] Braves went worst to first. I got to cover the World Series that year. That was a lot of fun. And then, as I say, when the Gulf War started, me at the radio--the one thing that is certain about working in radio is the uncertainty of working in radio. And so the program director then, they blew up the radio station, and Bobby and Kathy left. And we put on--we pull our guy out of the helicopter, the traffic reporter, and made him the host of our morning show. His name is Scott Slade, and he's still hosting our morning show today. But, yes. I went from being a nighttime anchor to being a producer and a reporter, a morning reporter, and then I was the news assignment editor, and then I was the assistant news director--the assistant program director, and now the manager of programming operations and community affairs.$$Wow. So you covered the Democratic National Convention [DNC] in '88 [1988]?$$Yes, I did.$$Here in Atlanta? Yeah.$$Yes. I think I've covered every political convention since '88 [1988].$$Yeah. [HM Reverend] Jesse [L.] Jackson was a big feature in that.$$And that was that eternally-long Bill Clinton speech. Yes. (laughs).$$Okay.$$Well, yeah. Jesse was here for that one as well.$$And Michael Dukakis (simultaneous)--$$Yes.$$--was the nominee of the Democratic Party.$$Yes. He was. He was--that was--I actually have--I've had great--covering politics, I've great experience covering politics and presidents. I covered the DNC in '88 [1988], and I've covered the DNC and the RNC [Republican National Convention] since. We used to do what we call ascertainment interviews. And we would invite in community leaders when--before deregulation of the industry. And we would sit in the big boardroom and have lunch and discuss issues of community interest. And once President [Jimmy] Carter came, and I had to sit next--in the big boardroom in our old building, I sat next to Jimmy Carter, and we had lunch, and we talked, and he was the nice--he is the nicest man. He is a true WYSIWYG, "what you see is what you get." And I remember asking him, I was like, you know, what was, as he looked back on his presidency, you know, what was the thing that's really troubled him the most. And he talked to me about, you know, staying up at night during the Iran Contra hype--hostage situation [Iran Hostage Crisis 1979 - 1981] and not being able to resolve that, because, you know, it was his failure to resolve that, the hostage crises that led to [Ronald] Reagan's election, and what happened after that. But I got to cover Reagan. That was back in the day when the White House would do regional media visits. And this was very early in my career, and it was in the early term of the Reagan presidency. And they would invite regional media to come up and participate in a White House news conference. And I knew that President Reagan's favorite color was red, because Helen Thomas would always be sitting on the front row with her red suit, and I got to go and I put on my red suit and got to stand up and go, "Mr. President, Mr. President." And it was--$$So you did your homework.$$I did. I did my homework. And the only thing was I still messed up though, because there was another regional reporter there who managed to get President Reagan to say, "You know, when I am in Nashville [Tennessee], I listen to W dot dot dot." And she got it, she fed it down the line, and the radio station in Nashville turned it into a promo on a company hour I.D., and they said, "Why didn't you get him to do that? 'Cause he's not supposed to do that." And they got--it ran, maybe, three or four hours before--of course, they got a cease and desist from the White House that says the President doesn't do promos. So, but I did. I got to ask--I asked Reagan a question. I was--actually rode in a presidential motorcade. I was pool reporter when Bush Forty-One [George H.W. Bush] came to Atlanta for the first observation of the [Reverend Dr.] Martin Luther King [Jr.] federal holiday. And we went out. We met Air Force One up at Dobbins [Air Reserve Base]. I've never driven that fast, and there's never been as little traffic on the Atlanta interstates as when there's a presidential motorcade riding through the city; and did that; came to the King Center, met Bill Clinton through my work with the NABJ [National Association of Black Journalists]. And really, the only president I haven't either interviewed or met is [HM] President [Barack] Obama. But I think I've got a few more years to perhaps make that happen.$Is there any--what program today do you think comes closer to representing the interests of the African American community?$$(Pause). I think to the extent that there are those who want to put the African American community in one box, there probably is not one program. Because in 2014, I don't think that the color is necessarily black or white, or brown or white. The color is, and for many years now, has always been green. So you are going to have your church-going conservative African-Americans who are going to gravitate to the likes of a Herman Cain and other personalities on the Fox News Channel. Then you are going to have more progressive African-Americans who are going to gravitate to the message of [HM] the Reverend Jesse Jackson or [HM] Reverend Al Sharpton on MSNBC. And then you're going to have, yet, another group of African Americans who believe that I can make an opinion on my own; I don't need to have your opinion to tell me what to think. And they're gonna read and choose CNN and do some of those other things and just gather the information and make decisions for themselves. We got a lot of great black journalists out there, and many of them are my friends. I love [HM] Roland Martin and what he's doing over at TV One. I love [HM] Tavis Smiley. He's a terrific interviewer. I love what he's doing over at PBS. But, again, even in that arena they still each bring a certain point of view and a certain amount of their personality to the journalism that they do in order to attract, again, a very well-researched audience.$$Okay.$$It's very niche now, I think it is.$$Yeah. I'm going to raise a contradiction here. This is something that--I think that the only place where you see a balance of black conservatives and black liberals is on television, 'cause you don't see it in real life. You don't see half black people conservative and half progressive or--you know, you just don't see that in real life. Even conservative black church-goers tend to not be really supporters of the conservatives--you know, of the conservative mindset, even though they have Herman Cain or (simultaneous) (unclear)--$$Maybe on some issues. Not on all of the issues, but certainly on some issues. I can see that.$$Yeah. It seems like the media has more of them gathered than they, you know, represent--than are represented in terms of votes and that sort of thing in the real world. But, would you (simultaneous) (unclear)--$$Oh, well, there's a reason why President Obama [HM President Barack Obama] has a 89 to a 90 percent approval rating among African Americans. I mean, clearly, African Americans are--you know, I don't want to say that we--I don't think we as a people, you know, vote in the lockstep. I think there is certainly a certain significance, the fact that, that he's the President of the United States, that he--a reelected President of the United States for a second term, which means the first term was not an accident as some people perhaps would like to say. But I think to the extent that some people might suggest, especially people who are not black, that all black people think alike. I think that's definitely not true.

Sidmel Estes

Media consultant and executive television producer Sidmel Estes was born on November 27, 1954 in Marysville, California, to Emellen Estes and Sidney Estes. Estes attended elementary and high school at public schools in Atlanta. She earned her B.S.J. degree in 1976, and her M.S.J. degree in 1977, both from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1979, Estes returned to Atlanta and was hired at WAGA-TV/Fox 5, where she served as the executive producer of numerous programs. She was the co-creator and executive producer of Good Day Atlanta, which became the number one show in its market, and won seven Emmy Awards under her direction. In 2006 Estes left WAGA-TV in order to found and serve as CEO of BreakThrough Inc., a media consulting firm whose clients include the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation, the McCormick Tribune Fellows Foundation, the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation and the Atlanta Center for Creative Inquiry. She has also taught as an adjunct professor at Emory University and Clark Atlanta University.

In 1991, Estes was elected the first woman president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Under her leadership NABJ increased its membership to over 2,000 journalists and was included in Ebony’s list of Top 100 Black Organizations. In 1994, she was a leader and co-creator of the first Unity Conference, an alliance of journalists of color, and was instrumental in the release of their report Kerner Plus 25: A Call For Action, which outlined steps the media industry should take to improve racial diversity.

During her prolific career in television and journalism, Estes has been recognized numerous times. Atlanta’s Mayor Andrew Young proclaimed “Sidmel Estes-Sumpter Day” on November 18, 1988 after she was named Media Woman of the Year by the Atlanta Chapter of the National Association of Media Women. She was featured in Ebony’s 100 Most Influential Black Americans in 1993, and in More Magazine’s book 50 Over 50. Estes was honored with the Silver Circle Award from the Television Academy and has won several Emmy Awards. She received Northwestern University’s Alumni Service Award after being elected as president of the Northwestern Black Alumni Association in 2004.

Estes married B. Garnett Sumpter in 1983, and they had two children, Joshua and Sidney.

Sidmel Estes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 17, 2014.

Sidmel Estes passed away on October 6, 2015.

Accession Number

A2014.065

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/17/2014

Last Name

Estes-Sumpter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Karen

Schools

M. Agnes Jones Elementary

Northside High School

Northwestern University

Frank L. Stanton Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sidmel

Birth City, State, Country

Marysville

HM ID

EST02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans, Louisiana; Miami, Florida; Beaufort, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Everybody Needs A Breakthrough

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/27/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Honey Baked Ham

Death Date

10/6/2015

Short Description

Media consultant and television producer Sidmel Estes (1954 - 2015 ) was the founder and CEO of BreakThrough Inc. and the first woman president of the National Association of Black Journalists. She worked as an executive producer at WAGA-TV, where she created Good Day Atlanta.

Employment

BreakThrough, Inc.

WAGA-TV (Television station: Atlanta,Ga.)

KUAM-TV

Chicago Daily News

Chicago Defender

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663615">Tape: 1 Slating of Sidmel Estes' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663616">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663617">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663618">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes remembers her maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663619">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes talks about the Collier Heights neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663620">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes describes her mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663621">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes remembers her first experience of racial discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663622">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663623">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes lists her siblings, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663624">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes describes her likeness to her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663625">Tape: 1 Sidmel Estes lists her siblings, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663626">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes talks about her siblings' professions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663627">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663628">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes talks about her early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663629">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes remembers the advice of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663630">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes talks about the community organized busing in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663631">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes recalls her decision to become a journalist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663632">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes describes the community on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663633">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663634">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes recalls her decision to attend Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663635">Tape: 2 Sidmel Estes remembers the student activism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663636">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes talks about her internship at the Chicago Defender</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663637">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes remembers prominent black journalists from the start of her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663638">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes recalls her experiences as an intern at the Chicago Defender</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663639">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes remembers her internship at the Chicago Daily News</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663640">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes describes her experiences at the Medill School of Journalism in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663641">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes remembers becoming a television reporter in Guam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663642">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes describes her experiences at KUAM-TV in Guam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663643">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes remembers joining WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663644">Tape: 3 Sidmel Estes talks about the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663645">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes talks about the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663646">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes talks about the changes in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663647">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes describes her reaction to the Janet Cooke scandal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663648">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes remembers meeting her former husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663649">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes talks about her involvement in the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663650">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes talks about her civic engagement in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663651">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes recalls the major events of the late 1980s in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663652">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes talks about the FOX takeover of WAGA-TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663653">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes remembers developing the 'Good Day Atlanta' morning news show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663654">Tape: 4 Sidmel Estes remembers her election as president of the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663655">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes describes her tenure as president of the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663656">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes talks about FOX's management of WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663657">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes talks about Paula Walker Madison</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663658">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes remembers founding BreakThrough Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663659">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes describes her book projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663660">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes talks about the future of journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663661">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes describes the services offered at BreakThrough, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663662">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes talks about her teaching activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663663">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes describes the documentary 'Kerner Plus 40: Change or Challenge'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663664">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes describes her hopes and concerns for African American journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663665">Tape: 5 Sidmel Estes remembers her proposal to buy Ebony and Jet</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663666">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes talks about the UNITY: Journalists of Color organization</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663667">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663668">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663669">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663670">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663671">Tape: 6 Sidmel Estes describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663672">Tape: 7 Sidmel Estes narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663673">Tape: 7 Sidmel Estes narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Sidmel Estes remembers the advice of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Sidmel Estes describes her tenure as president of the National Association of Black Journalists
Transcript
Now, you had an incident when y- when you were in, I guess the third grade [at M. Agnes Jones Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia], when you were eight?$$Um-hm.$$You took ballet--$$Um-hm.$$--with Yoki King [Yolanda King], you were telling us.$$Right.$$There's an historic moment that you experienced here. Tell us what happened.$$Well, like I said, Yoki and I were both sort of the little chunky girls in ballet, because they like you to be (gesture) this thin, being a ballerina. But to Atlanta Ballet's credit, they were trying to reach out to the community. So, they would send their top teachers. And I will never forget, a woman named Madame Hildegarde [Hildegarde Bennett Tornow] would always come to Spelman College [Atlanta, Georgia] to teach. And so, we were taking ballet. Like I said, we did 'The Nutcracker' [Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky] every Christmas. But these little skinny girls decided to make fun of me, and they pulled a chair out from up under me. And fortunately, we were practicing in the gym, so it was a wooden floor, not a concrete floor. So, I wasn't seriously hurt, but my feelings were hurt more. So, Yoki and I after class were outside waiting on our ride. And here drives up Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] in a, I will never forget it, a black, big black car. And when he--I sat in the back seat, and I was just crying, crying. He said, "Child, what's wrong with you?" And I told him what had happened. And to this day, I will never forget. He said, "Child, if that's the worst thing that's going to ever happen to you, you are a blessed child." And I never forgot that. And I had--my tears went away then, because I just sat there and I would think about it: that wasn't really that bad, especially some of the things that I have faced later on in life. But he was being prophetic to me then, at eight years old, that I was going to go through stuff in life, and I had to get used to it.$$Hm, okay. So, what kind of car did he have? Do you remember?$$It was a Buick. I remember the big, black Buick.$$Now, this is 1962, I guess, right, when you were eight?$$Yeah, something like '61 [1961], '62 [1962].$$Did he have a new car, or it was an old, older car?$$It was sort of used, it wasn't brand new. It wasn't fancy. It wasn't huge. You know, it was a regular old car.$$Okay, okay. And do you remember the color? I'm just, I'm just thinking--$$Black.$$Black, okay. I'm thinking it was black in my head, but I don't--$$Um-hm, um-hm. Yeah, black on black. I will never forget that (laughter).$$Well, that's something. So, that's, that is--now he's picking her up himself from--$$Yeah, and that was the only time I ever remember him picking her up. And very rarely did he make our recitals. Because we're now talking, you know, the height of the Civil Rights Movement. So, he was never there.$$Yeah, things really got--$$Yeah, '62 [1962], '63 [1963] (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) involved. Yeah, '63 [1963], Birmingham [Alabama], '64 [1964] was, you know, leading into Selma [Selma to Montgomery March] and all that.$$He was never home, never home.$$Yeah, the March on Washington was the next year.$$Right, right.$$So, he was very busy. And, did your parents [Emellen Mitchell Estes and Sidney Estes] know him, I mean, know Dr. King?$$They knew him cursorily, they were not close to him. But they trusted him enough to pick up their daughter and get me home. And then we did, you know, vice versa. So, I guess it's a mutual trust society going on there.$Well, tell us. What was your agenda as president of the National Association of Black Journalists, what--in 1991? What--where were you going to take the organization?$$Well, people tease me. The night I was inaugurated and they announced that I had won and tears were just streaming down my face, I stood up and I told the industry, I said, "You have never dealt with a black woman from the South before." And I meant that, you know, because sometimes they would take advantage of NABJ, a lot of these big news organizations. So, my agenda--$$In what way? What do you mean?$$Well, people who were supposed to get promoted weren't getting promoted.$$Okay.$$Our numbers were not very high at the time (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Not organizationally, but as individual black people working in the--$$Right, in the newsroom.$$The members of NABJ.$$Now, remember I had from two to three thousand members across the country. It started out at two thousand. By the time I finished, it was up to three thousand. But one thing I did do, we had what we call the Pierre summit. And it was at The Pierre hotel in New York City [New York, New York]. And it was me and every president of journalists of color organizations. There was four of us. And I'm the only woman. But we sat down with the CEOs of every major media company and told them what we had--from Knight Ridder, to the president of the Newspaper Association of America [News Media Alliance], to you know, the Tribune Company [Tribune Media Company], to the Gannett Company [Gannett Company, Inc.], to The New York Times, Washington Post [The Washington Post]. These guys came to that meeting. And for two very long days, and very difficult days, we sat down and we told them why we have a problem in the industry--how the stories aren't being told properly--because your people don't know how to go into these communities. So, that was a major accomplishment. I also think that we did have a significant number of people who entered the business. I even have people now who run up and tell me, kind of embarrasses me, and say, "I remember you when I was in college, and you came to speak. And you inspired me so much." I was like, "Thank you." And now, they're in--they're working journalists, or they're on the air, and doing things like this. So, that was number one, was jobs. Number two was justice in terms of telling the story like it is. And number three was fair representation of the community, because that was not being shown. Merv Aubespin [Mervin Aubespin] used to say that, "Unless people see themselves in the newspaper, they can't use it." And most newspapers, you don't see yourself, you don't see your neighbors, you don't see people of achievement out there. So, people aren't going to buy the papers. And they wonder why there's a problem. So, and we were very, very successful. People were scared, as they put it, of Sidmel [HistoryMaker Sidmel Estes].$$Okay, okay. So, did you get, you know, compliance generally from--I mean were they, did things change any?$$Yeah, it changed. And it--and we did have--even though it was a different administration--we did have the power of the law. You know, the fairness doctrine was still very strong. Equal opportunity and equal hiring was still very strong. People were actually talking about racial issues in the community. And so, that's what I think made the big difference from then, and as--instead of right now.$$Okay. So, anything else from your tenure? Did--as president?$$Well, we created the Ethel Payne scholarship [Ethel Payne Fellowship], which is a scholarship where journalists can go to Africa and spend time there and follow stories from there. And that was a big accomplishment. We su- supported and strengthened the Ida B. Wells Award, which is still being given out to- today. We also put the organization--not only in terms of the number of members, but the--our financial position was tremendous. We were giving out scholarship money right and left. I remember we did one at The Kennedy Center [The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C.], where we gave out scholarships. So, the fact that--and we started both broadcast short courses during my administration--one at FAMU [Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, Florida] and the other one at North Carolina A and T [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina]. And those two programs just celebrated their twentieth anniversary. I'm very proud of that.$$Okay, okay. So, you were president from '91 [1991] until--$$Ninety-three [1993].$$Okay.$$And then I was the immediate past president. I was on their board longer than (laughter) than I ever knew.