The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon

Search Results

Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Bryan Monroe

Journalist Bryan Monroe was born on August 22, 1965 in Munich, Germany to MG (ret.) James W. Monroe and Charlyne Monroe. In 1987, Monroe earned his B.A. degree in communications from the University of Washington, where he was the first African American editor of the University of Washington Daily.

Monroe interned as a photojournalist at United Press International, The Roanoke Times, and The Seattle Times before becoming director of photography and graphics editor at Myrtle Sun Beach News. In 1989, Monroe directed Knight Ridder’s 25/43 Project, which aimed to revamp newspapers in order to appeal to a younger audience. In 1991, he served as deputy managing editor of Knight Ridder’s flagship paper, The San Jose Mercury News, until he became a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 2002. During his fellowship, Monroe examined leadership and creativity in the newsroom, and after the fellowship, he became assistant vice president of news at Knight Ridder. In 2006, Monroe led the team of journalists from Knight Ridder and the Biloxi Sun Herald who won the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service for coverage of Hurricane Katrina. Then, after Knight Ridder was sold to the McClatchy Company, Monroe went to work for the Johnson Publishing Company, where he served as vice president and editorial director of Ebony and Jet from 2006 to 2009, conducted the first interview with then President-elect Barack Obama following his November victory, and had the last interview with pop star Michael Jackson before he died. In 2011, Monroe became the editor of CNNPolitics.com and in 2014 was named the Washington Editor/Opinion for CNN.

Monroe served as the sixteenth president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) from 2005 to 2007. He has won numerous regional, national, and international journalism awards and lectured globally from Cape Town, South Africa to Sydney, Australia to Dubai, UAE. He was recognized by Presstime magazine as one of the “20 Under 40” — the 20 top American journalists under 40 years old; MediaWeek magazine as one of the nation's “Media Elite”; and San Francisco’s CityFlight as one of the “10 Most Influential African Americans in the Bay Area.”

Monroe lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland with his two children, Seanna and Jackson.

Bryan Monroe was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.138

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/18/2014

Last Name

Monroe

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

University of Washington

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Bryan

Birth City, State, Country

Munich

HM ID

MON09

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

8/22/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

Germany

Short Description

Journalist Bryan Monroe (1965 - ) was Washington Editor/Opinion for CNN, served as deputy managing editor of Knight Ridder’s flagship paper, The San Jose Mercury News, and was vice president and editorial director of Ebony and Jet magazines. Monroe led the team of journalists who won the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service in 2006. He also served as the president of the National Association of Black Journalists from 2005 to 2007.

Employment

The Roanoke Times

United Press International

The Seattle Times

Myrtle Sun Beach News

The San Jose Mercury News

Knight Ridder Newspapers

Johnson Publishing Company

CNNPolitics.com

CNN

George Davis

Journalist, educator and author George Bernard Davis was born on November 29, 1939 in Shepherdstown, West Virginia to Reverend Clarence and Winnie (Ross) Davis. He attended public schools in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia, and was among a handful of students who integrated Baltimore City College (high school), where he graduated in 1957. Davis then enrolled in Colgate University and spent the summer of his junior year with Operations Crossroads Africa in the Niger River Delta in Nigeria. He graduated from Colgate University with his B.A. degree in anthropology in 1961 and joined the United States Air Force, where he flew forty-seven combat missions during the Vietnam War and was promoted to captain.

Davis worked first for The Washington Post as a reporter and day city editor from 1968 to 1969. He then moved to The New York Times, where he served as an editor in the Sunday Department from 1969 to 1970. Davis earned his M.F.A. degree in creative writing from Columbia University in 1971, and was hired as an assistant professor at Bronx Community College of The City University of New York. In 1980, he was appointed as an assistant professor at the Newark campus of Rutgers University, and went on to be named professor emeritus. Davis has also held adjunct positions at Colgate University, Columbia University and the Yale School of Organization and Management. In addition, he has served as a contributing editor to Essence magazine and Black Enterprise magazine, writes The Modern Melting Pot blog at Psychology Today, and has contributed articles to The Huffington Post, The Washington Post and other online journalism websites. In the mid-1990s, Davis conducted the Spiritual Intelligence Action Research Project at Rutgers University; and in 2013, established The Bay is Dying – an Ecology Game.

Davis authored the novel Coming Home (1971), which was judged a Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times Book Review. Coming Home also supplied the story upon which the Academy Award-winning Jane Fonda anti-war film of the same name was based. Davis went on to publish many additional books, including Love, Black Love (1974); the national bestseller, Black Life in Corporate America: Swimming in the Mainstream (co-authored with Glegg Watson, 1982); Soul Vibrations: Astrology for African Americans (co-authored with Gilda Mathews, 1996); Love Lessons: African Americans and Sex, Romance, and Marriage in the Nineties (1998); Barack Obama America and the World (2011); The Melting Points – A Spiritual Spy Novel (2012); and Spiritual Intelligence (2012).

George Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 19, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/19/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Bernard

Organizations
Schools

Baltimore City College

Colgate University

Columbia University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Shepherdstown

HM ID

DAV32

Favorite Season

Spring

State

West Virginia

Favorite Quote

You Are Not In The World, The World Is In You, In Your Consciousness.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/29/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

Journalist, educator, and author George Davis (1939 - ) is a professor emeritus at Rutgers University and the author of numerous books, including the novel Coming Home, and the national bestseller, Black Life in Corporate America: Swimming in the Mainstream.

Employment

United States Air Force

The Washington Post

The New York Times

Bronx Community College, CUNY

Rutgers University

The Bay is Dying - an Ecology Game

Colgate University

Columbia University

Yale School of Organization and Management

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of George Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George Davis lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George Davis describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George Davis describes his mother, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George Davis describes his mother, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George Davis describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George Davis describes his father's ministry and his own childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George Davis talks about his parents' life in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George Davis talks about his father

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George Davis describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George Davis talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George Davis describes his parents' attitudes towards integration

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George Davis describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George Davis describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George Davis recalls elementary school in Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George Davis describes Wheeling High School in Wheeling, West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - George Davis recalls his childhood mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - George Davis describes his mother's feelings on integration and spirituality

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - George Davis describes integrating his high school at Baltimore City College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George Davis talks about his time in high school at Baltimore City College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George Davis talks about his college search and scholarships

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George Davis talks about his high school interests and activities at Baltimore City College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George Davis talks about his high school interests and activities at Baltimore City College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George Davis describes his transition to Colgate University in Hamilton, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George Davis describes his studies at Colgate University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George Davis describes the historical context in which he went to Nigeria as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George Davis reflects on what he learned while studying in West Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George Davis describes his experience with Operation Crossroads Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George Davis describes learning through Professor Sio at Colgate University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George Davis talks about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Savannah, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George Davis talks about his brief time at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George Davis continues to describe his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George Davis talks about joining the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George Davis recalls how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George Davis talks about his time in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - George Davis talks about his time in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - George Davis talks about his writings based on his time in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George Davis describes his final years in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George Davis describes his time working at the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George Davis describes double standards in journalism in his time reporting for the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George Davis describes his time working at the New York Times and race issues in journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George Davis talks about John Oliver Killens and his time at Columbia University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George Davis talks about his novel Coming Home

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George Davis talks about conflicts over the movie adaptation of his novel Coming Home

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George Davis talks about the spiritual world

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - George Davis describes how he began to study spirituality

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - George Davis describes his view of spirituality, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - George Davis describes his view of spirituality, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - George Davis describes his writing in relation to spirituality

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - George Davis describes books he authored

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - George Davis talks about corporate America and the South

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - George Davis describes the Spiritual Intelligence Action Project

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - George Davis describes his book and project Soul Vibrations: Astrology for African Americans

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - George Davis discusses astrology and his Soul Vibrations project

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - George Davis talks about his books Love Lessons and Love, Black Love

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - George Davis talks about his blog "Modern Melting Pot"

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - George Davis talks about his monograph Spiritual Intelligence and his time at Rutgers

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - George Davis talks about teaching writing and Walter Dean Myers

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - George Davis reflects on HistoryMaker and President Barack Obama, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - George Davis reflects on HistoryMaker and President Barack Obama, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - George Davis describes his recent projects, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - George Davis describes his recent projects, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - George Davis discusses his book Branches: From We Shall Overcome to Yes We Can, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - George Davis discusses his book, Branches: From We Shall Overcome to Yes We Can, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - George Davis describes his writing philosophy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - George Davis reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - George Davis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - George Davis talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - George Davis talks about how he would like to be remembered

Geoff Brown

Journalist Geoffrey (Geoff) Franklin Brown was born on October 30, 1952, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to George F. and Helen V. Brown. Brown attended the Episcopal Cathedral School in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and graduated from Greensburg-Salem (Pennsylvania) High School in 1970. He went on to receive his B.A. degree in English literature from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, in 1974.

Upon graduation, Brown returned to Pennsylvania where he was hired as a general assignment reporter for the Pittsburgh Press. He worked at the Pittsburgh Press from 1974 to 1975, and again from 1977 to 1978. He also had two stints at Jet magazine, from 1975 to 1977 and 1978 to 1980, where he held various positions, including entertainment writer, copy editor, co-managing editor and features editor. He was then hired by the Chicago Tribune in 1980 as a copy editor. Brown went on to serve as the Tribune’s national/foreign news editor, north suburban bureau chief, and entertainment editor. In 1998, he was promoted to associate managing editor for entertainment; in 2000, he became associate managing editor for lifestyle/features. In 2009, Brown returned to duty as the Chicago Tribune’s associate managing editor for entertainment, where he supervised the daily Arts & Entertainment, Dining, Movies and On The Town sections, plus the daily and Sunday Comics pages, and related online content. In April of 2015, Brown was named the Tribune’s operations and development editor.

Brown received the Chicago Tribune’s Jones-Beck Award for Outstanding Professional Performance in 1988, and was awarded a fellowship at Maynard’s Institute of Journalism Education in 1989. He was also honored by Chicago’s Bridge to Work program, a South Side welfare-to-work program that emphasized preparing people for getting a job as well as navigating the workplace.

Geoff Brown was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 25, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.121

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/25/2014

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Franklin

Occupation
Schools

School On The Hill

Episcopal Cathedral School

Greensburg-Salem High School

Bowdoin College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Geoffrey

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

BRO59

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Chicago, Illinois

Favorite Quote

Treat Others As You Want To Be Treated

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/30/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Snickerdoodle Cookies, Oatmeal Cookies

Short Description

Journalist Geoff Brown (1952 - ) was a managing editor of the Chicago Tribune, where he worked for over thirty years.

Employment

Chicago Tribune

Pittsburgh Press

Jet Magazine

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2780,13:3100,18:10737,164:11085,169:18566,240:23548,318:28178,353:29646,373:29986,379:31142,400:37445,461:47528,580:62104,763:62707,775:63377,786:64985,818:65521,827:65923,834:66660,848:67062,860:67732,871:69273,903:69943,915:71149,947:77980,1005:79580,1033:80140,1041:88250,1115:95466,1200:101780,1282:102746,1299:109020,1396:110900,1426:115767,1469:116460,1480:124498,1556:124794,1561:126052,1584:126496,1591:129900,1661:130492,1670:132046,1703:136350,1739:137150,1753:138350,1778:139070,1792:139390,1797:140190,1810:148580,1876:149120,1883:151690,1902:152544,1915:156326,2003:163092,2057:165220,2097:169856,2185:180020,2268:181980,2311:182610,2323:192681,2434:192989,2439:193990,2453:212469,2732:219138,2780:246856,3108:247321,3114:247693,3119:252100,3164$0,0:297,3:12200,124:12500,129:15350,181:16175,191:16625,198:17450,210:27404,309:39690,415:45220,506:45852,522:65846,824:67062,851:78180,996:81290,1002:81650,1007:85790,1065:86150,1070:87230,1077:87950,1086:101280,1171:101568,1176:103512,1203:117708,1462:118048,1468:118320,1476:119000,1493:119544,1502:119952,1510:120904,1526:133112,1660:133630,1712:133926,1717:137590,1753:138016,1760:149622,1975:152562,2020:157266,2103:166611,2166:168954,2203:169238,2211:169806,2220:179107,2383:179391,2388:195635,2522:197752,2586:212854,2765:213706,2779:214061,2785:215410,2808:216049,2820:216333,2825:216617,2830:217540,2845:218321,2858:218605,2863:226344,3014:226699,3020:238034,3113:239288,3139:254092,3314:259712,3381:260000,3386:260360,3392:261008,3403:262160,3423:269072,3580:269504,3587:269936,3594:287166,3785:295200,3896:299610,3990:313730,4143
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geoff Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown talks about his parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after the most

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geoff Brown describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geoff Brown remembers moving frequently for his father's career in journalism

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Geoff Brown describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Geoff Brown remembers moving from Puerto Rico to the mainland Unites States

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Geoff Brown talks about his father's career as a journalist, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Geoff Brown talks about his father's experiences of workplace discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown talks about his father's career as a journalist, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown talks about his early interest in journalism

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown remembers moving to Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown describes his experiences at Greensburg Salem High School in Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown recalls the start of his career in journalism

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown talks about the black community at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown describes the racial tensions in Brunswick, Maine

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geoff Brown remembers his mentor at Bowdoin College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Geoff Brown talks about his aspirations to attend graduate school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Geoff Brown talks about the development of his writing style

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown talks about his classmates at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown remembers his father's death

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown recalls his start at Jet magazine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown talks about his contemporaries at Jet magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown talks about his experiences as a managing editor at Jet magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown remembers John H. Johnson and Robert E. Johnson

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown remembers his decision to leave Jet magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown remembers Bill Berry

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown talks about meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown remembers hosting celebrities at Jet's executive lunchroom

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown remembers his interview with Gwen McCrae

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown talks about the Johnson Publishing Company's corporate counsel

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown describes the relationship between Jet and Ebony staff

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown talks about his work ethic

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Geoff Brown talks about his colleagues at the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Geoff Brown describes his experiences at the Chicago Tribune during Mayor Harold Washington's election

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Geoff Brown reflects upon his expereinces at the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Geoff Brown talks about the Chicago Tribune's reputation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown talks about his career path at the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown talks about his role as entertainment editor for the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown talks about covering the black community in the entertainment section of the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown talks about the comics section of the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown talks about the introduction of The Boondocks comic in the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown talks about the impact of the internet on print journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown talks about Sam Zell's leveraged buyout of the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Geoff Brown describes his role at the Chicago Tribune during the financial crisis of 2008

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown describes the aftermath of the Chicago Tribune's bankruptcy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown talks about the print side of the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown describes his plans for retirement

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown talks about the entertainment scene in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Geoff Brown talks about the entertainment scene in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Geoff Brown talks about the lack of funding for arts education

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Geoff Brown talks about his decisions to pull comics from the Chicago Tribune, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Geoff Brown talks about his decisions to pull comics from the Chicago Tribune, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Geoff Brown describes the Chicago Tribune's comic strip review committee

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Geoff Brown talks about his editorial philosophy for newspaper comics

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown talks about the future of print journalism

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Geoff Brown reflects upon his decision to pursue a career in journalism

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Geoff Brown reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Geoff Brown reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Geoff Brown narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
Geoff Brown talks about his experiences as a managing editor at Jet magazine
Geoff Brown talks about his career path at the Chicago Tribune
Transcript
And so where this story is headed is that opportunity at Johnson's [Johnson Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois] it came really quick, really quick. So that's a good thing, and it's a bad thing because if you're young and you get all of that all at once, then I've seen all of this, what else is there? You're not really striving to have a bunch of experiences that it takes people at mainstream newspapers years to get to. And I'm getting it all in these concentrated bursts, so that's--$$So you become managing editor in what year? Do you remember? How long had you been there?$$It wasn't--not long. It was--so I, I'm fairly certain the copy editor was '76 [1976]. So this would have been '77 [1977] or '78 [1978].$$Right, because I have you returning back to The Pittsburgh Press in '77 [1977]. So you're managing editor before you go back to The Pittsburgh Press. That's hu- do you think because you were anointed by your, you know your father [George Brown] and, and people? And then the other was you probably were working hard.$$Oh, yeah, it was working, yeah. Yeah you worked hard.$$Like how?$$Late hours. The--the amount of work--$$Give a typical day or week. I mean what was involved with even putting that publication together?$$So let's say leaving aside original stories that you did yourself. Well we had a box of clips from other newspapers 'cause Jet is a digest, first and foremost. So you'd rewrite these clips and lots of them. And then you'd make them--you know you'd make them fit in the design and--so just a lot of work every day and a lot of stress because you, you're trying to do what's right. Then you've got to do original work. So you know you'd do some travel and, and, and all that other work would be waiting for you. No one else would do your work for you while you were gone. So just--it was intense. But it wasn't, it wasn't fulfilling. That, that kind of work wasn't fulfilling me, so I needed--$$Now why was that? Because it's so short, the writing is so short?$$Yeah. It was, it was--once you master that. I mean once the game, the game is to be as much fun with it unless it's again, a tragedy or something, to have as much fun with it as you can. But it had to be dignified. So once you master that thing and what's there for you, okay to do longer form journalism. But I didn't want to be a reporter ultimately. I like writing, didn't like reporting. And I'm a very introspective person. And so I--rather than deny it and deny it, I just embraced it and said, okay I--$$So how long--so the format--'cause you know they have the--what is the play girl, play, play--the Beauty of the Week, the Beauty of the Week. They still have the Beauty of the Week.$$Yes they do.$$Even it, you know today.$$Right, back from the [HistoryMaker] Lamonte McLemore, who was the 'Up, Up and Away.'$$The 5th Dimension.$$Yeah, 5th Dimension. You know he used to shoot most of them.$$He did?$$For a long time. Yeah matter of fact, once I picked up a Jet after not having seen it a while, I said, "Oh, oh it's a new name in the Jet centerfold."$$I see, I never knew that. He did the--he shot them?$$Yes he did.$So when you, when you come--become the national foreign news editor, that seems like--that's a big deal.$$Right, and so, so what that is was a, was a heavy duty quality control. I wasn't, I wasn't determining what was going to go in the paper. News editor was sort of a you know I had to, I had to schedule people and I had to, you know I was responsible for accuracy and I was responsible for evaluations of the production side, the, the, the assigning editors and the--but the correspondence, they all reported to the national editor and the foreign editor. So you know we--and, and we had to get the newspaper in on time, so I was a--I had to crack the whip on deadlines and stuff like that. That's what that job was, not, not determining what went in the paper. That comes later.$$Comes later, okay. So tell, tell your, tell the rest of the things, 'cause I have you metro chief for Rosemont [Illinois], national foreign copy editor, overnight page editor. You know and in this time I think Jack Fuller takes, I mean--and he's, he's probably--I mean his name became somewhat legendary. I remember his--$$Yeah, he, he's a, he's a novelist too, right. So yeah it's about this time, to answer your question you asked a long time ago, so who's looking out for Geoff [HistoryMaker Geoff Brown]? So Howard Tyner who was the foreign editor, he took a liking to me because again, conscientious sense of humor and all that kind of stuff. And he was one of those kind of people who would actually take an interest in how things worked. So he wanted to know how the copy desk worked. So I told him, you know, and he'd praise our headlines when they were good and slam them when they were bad. But for the most part, I didn't take it personally. That's what derails a lot of people, that they can't take criticism so they you know, they bite back and whatnot. It's like, "Okay you didn't like it, tell me what you didn't like about it, okay." And you and--you don't repeat the, the--your mistake. Well he--and then he start--so he's sitting off like the side saying, "We ought to do something with this guy." Bless his heart. So one day he gets to be--I think he runs--he, he winds up going over to features because that was the, the track. So Jack Fuller had been executive editor of features, and then he became the editor and they were trying to groom Howard for the same thing. So he went over to features. Meanwhile, I'm out--they decide now I, I've gone to--when I was a news editor, they said, "Okay well we wanna see you become a manager and you know, to man the troops. So we're gone put you in Rosemont." That was--they cooked up that scheme for Geoff and so I wound up being a bureau chief, which is where I meet Jerry Thomas. And, and while I hated every single moment of it, I have to say that that experience was probably the most important in my development because as a bureau chief, you have to chase fire engines and you have to deploy the troops and you have to stay there all night until the story gets done. And, and if it's not done right, it's on you. Now what I didn't like about it was chasing fire engines. All the rest of it, I dug it, right. So I managed to talk myself into returning back downtown where national, I'm just on the national foreign desk. And then Howard says, "Why don't you come work in features?" And there was this thing called the overnight page, and that was the entertainment page. And funny moment, he says, "So I, I don't know if you're into this stuff." I said, "Well, you haven't seen my resume, but that's pretty much all I did before I came to the Tribune [Chicago Tribune]." So I had an affinity for it. So that's how I got--and I wasn't--here's the thing. I wasn't too ashamed to say I really--I'm getting depressed from doing this job. I hate this so much. So can I please be relieved of it? So they were able to do it without the--but you know a lot of people asked me, "Well then didn't you think that would derail your career?" Well when you hate something that much, you don't care. I wasn't a careerist, so I got, I keep getting promoted anyway.

Sheryl Hilliard Tucker

Magazine executive Sheryl Hilliard Tucker was born on July 13, 1956 in Passaic, New Jersey to Arthur and Audrey Hilliard. Interested in writing and journalism early in life, she wrote for the alternative newspaper in her hometown of Rutherford, New Jersey. In 1974, she graduated from Rutherford High School and attended Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, where she created two multicultural publications, Eclipse and Umoja Sasa, and received her B.A. degree in 1978. She then went on to attend Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and graduated with her M.A. degree in 1982.

In 1977, Tucker interned at Woman’s Day magazine and then was hired by CBS Special Interest Publications as an associate editor to work on a variety of themed publications such as Woman’s Day Guide To Working Woman. In 1982, she was hired as the personal finance associate editor at Black Enterprise, and was promoted to managing editor after a year and a half. Tucker left Black Enterprise in 1987 to work with her husband’s design and advertising firm, Hilliard Tucker Marketing Communications, where she worked for three years. She then returned to Black Enterprise as the magazine’s editor-in-chief and vice president in 1990.

Tucker moved to Money magazine in 1995, where she managed some of the publication’s most important franchises, including the annual Money Summit. She also created a partnership with the National Football League to develop the NFL Rookie Financial Bootcamp. In 2005, as executive editor, Tucker played a key role in the overhaul of Money’s design. In 2006, she was appointed executive editor of Time, Inc.; and, in 2009, became acting editor in chief of Essence magazine. One year later, Tucker transitioned her career into corporate responsibility and philanthropy and re-launched the Time Warner Foundation. In 2014, she was named director of development and marketing for AFS Intercultural Programs.

Tucker has edited several books, including Prime Time: African American Women’s Guide to Midlife Health and Wellness and The New MONEY Book of Personal Finance, and co-authored Tomorrow Begins Today: African-American Women as We Age.

Tucker has been honored by many organizations, including Glamour magazine, the New York City YWCA Academy of Women Achievers and 100 Black Men of America. She is a member of the Cornell University Board of Trustees, chair of the Gaston Porter Health Improvement Center, and former co-chair of the Time Warner Women’s Network.

She is married to Roger C. Tucker, a private art dealer and educator. They have two adult children, Ara and Alexis, who are both attorneys.

Sheryl Hilliard Tucker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 11, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.103

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/11/2014

Last Name

Hilliard-Tucker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Rutherford High School

Cornell University

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Passaic

HM ID

HIL17

State

New Jersey

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/13/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Short Description

Magazine publishing chief executive Sheryl Hilliard Tucker (1956 - ) was director of development and marketing for AFS Intercultural Programs. She served as editor-in-chief of Black Enterprise and Essence magazines, and as executive editor of Time, Inc.

Employment

Woman's Day Magazine

CBS Special Interest Publications

Black Enterprise

Hilliard Tucker Marketing Communications

Money Magazine

Time Inc.

Essence Magazine

Time Warner Foundation

AFS Intercultural Programs

A. Peter Bailey

Journalist and author A. Peter Bailey was born on February 24, 1938 in Columbus, Georgia to Upson and Alga Bailey. He was raised in Tuskegee, Alabama, and attended Tuskegee Institute High School, but graduated from Nuremberg American High School in Germany in 1955. Bailey served in the U.S. Army from 1956 to 1959, and went on to attend Howard University until 1961.

In 1962, Bailey moved to Harlem, New York City; and, in 1964, became a founding member of Malcolm X’s Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU), where he was editor of the OAAU newsletter, Blacklash. From 1968 to 1975, he worked as associate editor for Ebony magazine. From 1975 to 1981, Bailey served as associate director of the Black Theatre Alliance (BTA), where he also edited the BTA Newsletter. He has also contributed articles to numerous publications including Essence, Black Enterprise, Jet, The New York Times, the Negro Digest, Black World, The Black Collegian, and the New York Daily News. He also writes a bi-monthly column for the Trice-Edney Wire Service.

Bailey has lectured on Malcolm X at thirty-five colleges and universities, and taught as an adjunct professor at Hunter College, Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of the District of Columbia. In addition, he has written the play, Malcolm, Martin, Medgar, which has been presented at several staged readings. He is the author of Witnessing Brother Malcolm X, The Master Teacher: A Memoir; Harlem: Precious Memories, Great Expectations; co-author of Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey with Alvin Ailey; and co-author of Seventh Child: A Family Memoir of Malcolm X with Rodnell P. Collins.

Bailey served as president of the New York Association of Black Journalists from 1983 to 1985, and was a member of the Tony Awards Nominating Committee in the 1975-76 Broadway season. He also served on the board of the Bethune-DuBois Institute, and is a member of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Bailey has received several awards, including Lifetime Achievement awards from the National Newspaper Publishers Association and the New York Association of Black Journalists.

A. Peter Bailey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2014

Last Name

Bailey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Peter

Schools

St. Joseph Catholic School

Tuskegee Institute High School

Nurnberg American High School

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Alfonzo

Birth City, State, Country

Columbus

HM ID

BAI10

State

Georgia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/24/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Short Description

Journalist and author A. Peter Bailey (1938 - ) was a founding member of the Organization of Afro-American Unity and served as a longtime editor for Ebony magazine. He authored Witnessing Brother Malcolm X, The Master Teacher: A Memoir and Harlem: Precious Memories, Great Expectations; and co-author of Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey and Seventh Child: A Family Memoir of Malcolm X.

Employment

Ebony Magazine

The Black Theatre Alliance

Virginia Union University

Bethune-DuBois Institute

Derek Dingle

Publishing executive Derek T. Dingle was born on November 2, 1961 in New York City. He graduated from Norfolk State University with a B.A. in journalism and also completed the Magazine Management Program at New York University.

Dingle joined Black Enterprise magazine in 1983 as an assistant editor and was promoted six months later to associate editor. After he completed the New York University magazine management program in 1985, he was made a senior editor. In 1987, Dingle was promoted once again to managing editor, a position he held until 1990. He then joined the staff of Money magazine, where he wrote articles about mutual fund investment and served as senior writer and a member of the planning team for Money Special on Small Business. In 1991, Dingle co-founded Milestone Media Inc., the nation's largest black-owned comic book company, with childhood friends Denys Cowan, Dwayne McDuffue, Michael Davis and Christopher Priest. After resigning from Money magazine in 1992, he was named Milestone’s president and CEO. One Milestone character, Static Shock, was developed into an animated series that ran from 2000 to 2005 on the WB Network and the Cartoon Network. In December of 1999, Dingle returned to Black Enterprise magazine as editor-at-large. Within a year, he was promoted to vice president and executive editor, serving until July of 2008. That year, Dingle was appointed as the senior vice president and editor-in-chief of Black Enterprise magazine, where he was responsible for the strategic planning and editorial direction of the magazine. In 2014, Dingle was named a Chief Content Officer of Black Enterprise. In this capacity, he oversaw content development and strategy for the "Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Conference Expo," as well as other custom events, including the Black Enterprise/Walmart 20/20 Vision Forum on Supplier Diversity, the Black Enterprise/Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Education Symposium Series, the American black Film Festival, and the Baltimore African American Film Festival. In addition, Dingle had executive oversight of both Black Enterprise television shows: "Black Enterprise Business Report" and "Our World with Black Enterprise."

Dingle authored countless Black Enterprise magazine cover stories and editorials and appeared as a business expert on numerous television networks and radio programs, including CNN, CNBC, NBC's "Weekend Today," and National Public Radio. An award-winning editor, Dingle is the author of three books: Black Enterprise Titans of the B.E. 100s: Black CEOs Who Redefined and Conquered American Business (1999), Black Enterprise Lessons from the Top: Success Strategies from America’s Leading Black CEOs (2007), and First in the Field: Jackie Robinson, Baseball Hero (1998), which received a 1999 International Reading Association Award. Dingle serves as a general member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME). He also serves as a member of the board of directors for Norfolk State University's School of Communications, and on the advisory board for the New York Urban League’s Manhattan Chapter.

Dingle lives in Guttenberg, New Jersey.

Derek T. Dingle was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 20, 2014 and on December 14, 2016.

Accession Number

A2014.091

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/20/2014

12/14/2016

Last Name

Dingle

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Terrence

Schools

Norfolk State University

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Derek

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

DIN04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

mediterranean

Favorite Quote

Unbelievable.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/2/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Hamburger

Short Description

Magazine publishing chief executive and publishing executive Derek Dingle (1961 - ) co-founded and then served as president and CEO of Milestone Media Inc., the nation’s largest African American-owned comic book company, in 1992. In 2008, Dingle was appointed as the senior vice president and editor-in-chief of Black Enterprise magazine.

Employment

Black Enterprise

Money Magazine

Milestone Media

Favorite Color

Blue

Cheryl Smith

Journalist and publisher Cheryl Lynn Smith was born on June 20, 1958 in Newark, New Jersey to Joseph Smith and Earline Gadson. Smith attended public elementary schools in Newark and East Orange, New Jersey, and graduated from East Orange High School in 1976. She received her B.S. degree in journalism from Florida A&M University in 1980, and her M.S. degree in human relations and business from Amberton University in Dallas, Texas in 1986.

In 1980, Smith was hired as editor for Capital Outlook News in Tallahassee, Florida. From 1981 to 1984, she worked as a production coordinator for TV Watch in Dallas, Texas and JC Penney Life Insurance Company in Richardson, Texas. In 1987, Smith was hired at The Dallas Weekly, where she served as a staff writer, executive editor, editor-in-chief and columnist. Smith also worked for five years for Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price. From 1997 to 2000, she served as executive editor of Future Speak, a weekly newspaper produced by Dallas area high school and college students for the Dallas Examiner newspaper.

Smith worked as a producer and talk show host at KKDA-AM from 1990 until 2012, and as a show host of PAX-TV’s “The Ester Davis Show” from 2010 to 2012. She was also the host of Blog Talk Radio’s “Cheryl’s World,” and cable television’s “On the Dotted Line.” In 2011, Smith founded I Messenger Enterprises, where she serves as publisher and editor of I Messenger, The Garland Journal and Texas Metro News. In addition, she was an associate professor at Paul Quinn College from 1999 to 2010, and an adjunct professor at the University of North Texas from 2002 to 2009.

Smith has served as the president of the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Journalists and the Dallas-Fort Worth Florida A&M University National Alumni Association. She was a two-term National Association of Black Journalists regional director, and has served as president of the Dallas-Metroplex Council of Black Alumni Associations. In 1994, she became the first African American and female to chair the North Texas Health Facilities Corporation. Smith has also served on the boards of the Dallas Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Irving Cares and the Leslie K. Bedford Foundation. In 1995, she established the Don’t Believe the Hype Foundation.

Smith has won numerous awards, including the Messenger Award from National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Journalism Excellence Award from The Dallas Examiner, the Outstanding Journalist Award from Elite News, the Barry Bingham Sr. Award from the National Conference of Editorial Writers, as well as multiple awards from the Texas Publishers Association, the NNPA, the NAACP, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators. The National Civil Rights Museum awarded her the “Invisible Giant” Award, and in 2005, the Omicron Mu Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. presented her with the “Image Award.” In 2009, Smith was honored by the Journalism Educator’s Association. She also received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the Dallas-Metroplex Council of Black Alumni Associations and Woman of the Year award from the Women Empowering Women Foundation.

Since 1992, Smith has been raising her nephew and three nieces: Andre, Alayna, Annya and Ayanna.  

Cheryl Smith was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.096

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2014

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Chancellor Ave

Whitney E. Houston Acad

G. Washington Carver Institute

East Orange Campus High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Amberton University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

SMI30

State

New Jersey

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/20/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

USA

Short Description

Journalist and publisher Cheryl Smith (1958 - ) was the publisher of I Messenger, The Garland Journal and Texas Metro News. She also worked for The Dallas Weekly for over twenty-five years as a staff writer, executive editor, editor-in-chief and columnist.

Employment

IMessenger

Dallas Weekly

KKDA-AM

Ester Davis Show

University of North Texas

Paul Quinn College

Norma Adams-Wade

Journalist Norma Adams-Wade was born in Dallas, Texas to Frank and Nettie Adams. She attended public schools and graduated from Lincoln High School in South Dallas, Texas. Adams-Wade went on to graduate from the University of Texas at Austin in 1966 with her B.S. degree in journalism. She also pursued graduate studies at Amber University in Garland, Texas and completed the Institute for Journalism Education’s summer editor training program at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

In 1966, Adams-Wade was hired by Collins Radio Company as a copyeditor for technical equipment manuals in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Apollo Space Program. From 1968 to 1972, she worked for Bloom Advertising Agency as an advertising copywriter and production assistant. From 1972 until 1974, she served as a reporter and editor’s assistant at The Dallas Post Tribune. Then, in 1974, Adams-Wade was hired as the first African American full-time general reporter for The Dallas Morning News, where she has served as a senior staff writer and columnist. As a senior staff writer, she covered general assignments, federal courts, consumer affairs, ethnic affairs, and neighborhood news. Adams-Wade created The Dallas Morning News’ Black History Month series in 1985, and, in 1988, helped launch The News’ Metro South Bureau. She retired from her position in 2002, but has continued to work as a contract columnist.

Adams-Wade was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) in 1975. She was also the founding director of NABJ’s Region VII, a founding coordinator of Blacks in Mass Media of Dallas and Fort Worth, and served as scholarship chair for the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators. Adams-Wade is a lifelong member of Mt. Horeb Missionary Baptist Church in South Dallas, where she has served as a chair soloist, Sunday School and Baptist Training Union pianist, Junior Church director, and member of the church Scholarship Committee. She also founded the church’s Save the Children family organization that offers parent training seminars.

Adams-Wade’s many awards and honors include the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators’ Lifetime Achievement Award, the Bronze Heritage Award for preservation of African American history, Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas’ “She Knows Where She’s Going” Award, the NAACP Dallas Chapter’s Juanita Craft Award, the Dallas Urban League’s Legacy Award, The Dallas Morning News Joe Dealey Publisher’s Award, the Southeast Dallas Business and Professional Women’s Club’s “Dreammaker” Award, the Top Ladies of Distinction’s Humanitarian Award, the St. Phillip’s School and Community Center’s Destiny Award, and the Maurine F. Bailey Cultural Foundation’s first outstanding community service award.

Adams-Wade lives in Dallas, Texas.

Norma Adams-Wade was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2014 and March 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2014.083

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/6/2014

3/14/2017

Last Name

Adams-Wade

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

H S Thompson Elementary

Lincoln High School

University of Texas at Austin

University of North Texas

The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education

Amberton University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Norma

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

ADA13

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Country Setting

Favorite Quote

As you leave this place remember why you came

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/14/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Spaghetti and Cornbread

Short Description

Journalist Norma Adams-Wade (1944 - ) was the first African American full-time general reporter for The Dallas Morning News. She was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), as well as the founding director of NABJ’s Region VII.

Employment

The Dallas Morning News

Institute for Journalism Education

The Dallas Post Tribune

Bloom Advertising Agency

Collins Radio Co.

The Daily Texan Student Newspaper, U TX

Dallas Post Tribune

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:4214,27:10192,73:10894,85:11206,90:12610,118:17050,171:19515,204:21045,228:21555,235:22235,244:28015,322:30055,352:30565,360:35325,433:45584,464:55534,540:56371,550:56836,557:57580,566:80840,816:81650,824:83810,851:92998,920:107920,1042:127684,1231:128260,1241:137107,1337:157320,1559:157905,1571:160706,1589:163444,1605:167056,1655:167476,1661:171172,1710:171508,1715:176464,1766:177220,1777:178228,1791:178564,1796:186246,1826:186902,1835:187640,1847:188460,1858:192530,1885:193608,1907:198074,2004:198536,2012:206025,2114:206631,2122:212287,2188:222506,2294:240561,2447:249065,2556:252040,2608:252805,2618:259950,2681:260510,2690:261470,2712:267550,2828:272830,2914:273710,2928:279518,2983:283934,3054:288596,3079:288924,3084:292122,3135:293270,3153:297944,3232:299994,3253:310250,3329$0,0:4407,45:13360,175:14192,185:18913,242:19197,247:23486,279:32310,364:33010,372:33910,384:36510,420:46800,554:47520,564:47880,569:48420,576:55711,646:55995,651:58196,687:59474,709:59829,715:73445,876:73785,881:74805,899:75230,905:84183,1011:93678,1120:94231,1128:95416,1152:110792,1306:112616,1345:113300,1355:127990,1544:135896,1606:136400,1614:136688,1619:136976,1624:137264,1629:137912,1639:138416,1648:139064,1662:139856,1674:140432,1685:140864,1693:145472,1776:145832,1785:150944,1903:167190,2058:168100,2073:170410,2116:172790,2173:173350,2181:173770,2190:176640,2243:177550,2263:185797,2326:187337,2355:188800,2394:189416,2403:189955,2417:193343,2461:193651,2466:194190,2477:200480,2514:202929,2570:204588,2592:205141,2601:209091,2661:233160,2966
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Norma Adams-Wade's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her family's roots in East Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the Juneteenth tradition in Mexia, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the history and genealogy of black families in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the significance of the Juneteenth tradition

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her mother's upbringing, and the traditions of her mother's family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her mother's upbringing, and the traditions of her mother's family, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her mother's job at a beauty parlor in an affluent white neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade compares the personalities of her mother, aunts, and grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's opportunity to play baseball in the Negro League

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade gives a summary of her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's military service during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's education and career with the U.S. Postal Service after World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her sister, Doris Adams Serrell

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her childhood household

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her family moving out of her grandparents' home into their own home

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the role of the church in her community

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her experiences in elementary school, and early influences in literature and writing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about a pivotal moment that shaped her character and influenced her writing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about television shows in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about what influenced her to become a reporter and meeting her mentor, Julia Scott Reed, in the early 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her experiences at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade recounts running for Ms. Lincoln at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about a childhood friend who had polio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's reaction to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about race relations in Dallas, Texas and the arrest local civil rights leader Ernest McMillan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the black press in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about race relations and her experiences at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her decision to attend the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her experiences with integration at the University of Texas at Austin seeing Marian Anderson perform

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about being a black student at the University of Texas at Austin in the late 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the professors who influenced her at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade compares courses at the University of Texas at Austin with those at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her first attempt to work for 'The Dallas Morning News'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her summer internships at the 'The Dallas Post Tribune' and her first job at Collins Radio Company

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the Charles Whitman shooting at the University of Texas, Austin, and President Johnson speaking at her graduation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her personal philosophy as a reporter

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about working for The Sam Bloom Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about working at The Dallas Post Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the news article that got her hired at 'The Dallas Morning News'

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

1$9

DATitle
Norma Adams-Wade talks about the professors who influenced her at the University of Texas at Austin
Norma Adams-Wade talks about the news article that got her hired at 'The Dallas Morning News'
Transcript
Alright. Okay so you said that you were--who were some of your favorite teachers or role models at the University of Texas [Austin]?$$Well, the one that comes to mind is Professor Gardiner, I forget her last name but she was a former military person and that's the way she lived her life. Very, very authoritative and I remember one of her rules was that no matter how good your writing was, if you misspelled one word, you got an automatic F. She was a little person about my size, an Anglo but very authoritative. And boy she ran her classroom like a military operation and we were terrified of her and terrified of misspelling a word because nobody wanted to get an automatic F. And, so she really sticks out in my mind because it really taught me to be at my best and I was always a very perfectionist type person, that's a syndrome, I guess perfectionist syndrome. And I don't thing I ever got an F but I was terrified of getting an F and she's just a-professor Gardiner is just a real big memory. Now, oh gosh I'm embarrassed, I just forgot his name but one of the deans of the journalism school and I'm embarrassed that I've forgotten his name but he sticks out because he was a person I could--I went to, I guess, a couple of times and--for just kind of counsel on what to do about difficult subjects that I was wrestling with. I remember I wrestle with government and never made good grades but I managed to get out of government and--oh I'm embarrassed I can't remember his name.$$He was the dean of journalism?$$Right, and he was big in my life at the time and he was a very empathetic person, Anglo. But he was a good listener and he would just listen and he was not judgmental and he was very helpful to me and so I had an emotional tie to him because he helped me. I felt that he was a life line and I remember when it was graduation time, I wasn't sure, I was sweating one of those courses and it was something like a government course. I was sweating it and whether I would be able to graduate and I mean it was eleventh hour. My parents [Frank McLeod Adams and Nettie Ivory Adams] had come to town and my dad had told me, chief I don't know if I'd be able to economically do this--continue to do this. You're really going to have to come out and so I was sweating graduation. And, so they were already in town and I went to the dean and he did tell me that I made it and I remember going back to the co-op house and when I told my dad, he went out on the porch and he walked to the balcony of it and he looked up and I could just see him--my dad was not really a demonstrative religious person, my mom was. But I could tell that he was thanking God that his daughter was going to graduate and I just remember this scene of seeing him standing there, his back was turned to me and he just had his quiet time there on the porch. And I could tell that it was a load off his shoulders because I can imagine he was saying if she doesn't come out of here, what are we going to do. I guess whatever finances in the family were going on he knew that he just couldn't financially do it anymore. And so when I graduated, it was just a big relief and I remember the scene of him out there on the porch and I graduated. It was a close call but the dean was the one who gave me the news that I had made it.$Now Buster Haas who was he now?$$He was over hiring in the newsroom. He was an exec in the newsroom.$$This was in Dallas [Texas]?$$'The Dallas Morning News.' So there was a series of murders in the black community. Convenient store owners were being murdered and it was a big story. So this would have been the early '70s [1970s] and it was affecting the city because whites were being killed too but it was largely happening in a lot of stores in the black community but white store owners were being killed. 'The Morning News' wanted to cover the story and they needed someone within the community--they wanted to do a piece that told how this series of murders was affecting not only the city but the black community as well. Somehow Buster--I guess--well I had applied for it so Buster Haas knew of me and he really did have my interest at heart. Buster Haas was a good person. He was a great person. He reminded me of my dean back in school, same personality and I think he really did look for an opportunity to get me in. So anyway they wanted to do this story and so, you know, the story is opportunity doesn't knock on your door, you have to go out and get it. Opportunity came to my house, Buster Haas came to my house where I lived and knocked on my door and told me they wanted to do this piece and that I could do it as a freelance writer and I went out and interviewed a lot of people in the community, store owners and neighborhood people and put the story together and did it and submitted it and it ran banner across page one and I was hired that week and that's how I got hired because they were very impressed with the story and the perspective that I was able to bring to it. The value of being an African American reporter was that I could get into the community, I knew where the bodies--well not the literal bodies were buried, bad pun but I knew where all the players were and I could get to them and that's what I did. So they saw my value and I was hired and that's how I got on, that's how I got hired.$$Did the police ever solve the case?$$I don't remember who it was but the case was ultimately solved. That's a good question, I'd like to back and research that but it took--I remember it took awhile because when it was happening, I mean nobody had a clue and I did not do the final story, whoever did the final story I don't know it would be good to research that. But my story was to give the inside view, the view from inside the community which is what I did.$$Okay what did the community think about that?$$Everybody was terrified, mystified, baffled, terrified, scared. It was a scary situation because nobody knew where they would strike next. People were serious; they were killing the store owners, the clerks. They were killing clerks not store owners but the clerks. A lot of owners did clerk their own stores.$$Were they being robbed or just killed?$$They would rob them and shoot them, fatally shoot them.

The Honorable Steen Miles

Politician and journalist Steen Miles was born on August 20, 1946 in South Bend, Indiana to Rose and Austin Davis, a pastor. Miles graduated from Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, where she studied business education and English. She also attended Indiana University at South Bend, the University of Cincinnati, Georgia State University, and received certification from the University of South Carolina’s Daniel School of Management.

Miles began her journalism career in 1971, as a reporter/anchor for WNDU-TV in South Bend, Indiana. She then worked for WCKY Radio in Cincinnati, NBC’s WMAQ Radio in Chicago, and as news director for WBMX and WVON-WGCI in Chicago. From 1980 to 1984, she was State Broadcast Editor for United Press International in Atlanta, Georgia before joining WXIA-TV, the Atlanta NBC affiliate, where she served as assignment editor, managing editor and reporter-anchor from 1984 to 1999. In 2001, Miles was hired as chief media relations officer for Atlanta’s Metropolitan Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA), and served as the agency’s primary spokesperson. In 2003, she hosted the talk show “Faith in the City Forum,” a discussion of current events and public policy from diverse faith perspectives.

In 2005, Miles was elected to the Georgia State Senate serving District 43. While in the Senate, she wrote and/or co-sponsored seventy-one pieces of legislation and resolutions. Miles ran for Lieutenant Governor of Georgia in 2006, and in 2008, became a contributing columnist to The Champion Newspaper. She is a candidate in the 2014 elections for U.S. Senate.

During her esteemed career, Miles has been recognized with over 275 awards and honors from businesses, government, civic organizations, Greek organizations, churches, schools and universities. She has won three Emmy Awards and received four Emmy nominations. In 2012, Miles was awarded the 1st Place Editorial Writing Award by the Georgia Press Association, and in 2013, she was honored by 4th District Congressman Hank Johnson with an Outstanding Citizen Citation. In 1996, Miles was awarded the coveted Pioneer Journalist of the Year by the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists. She was an SCLC Women Mentor with the late Evelyn Lowery, and was featured in Who’s Who in Black Atlanta. Miles was invited twice to the White House as part of a select group of national journalists, and invited by the Speaker of the House to attend the ceremony where Nelson Mandela received the Congressional Gold Medal in 1998. In 2006, she was honored with the Keys to the City of South Bend, Indiana, her hometown.

Miles was a 2002 graduate of Leadership DeKalb and served on its board. She was also a 2005 graduate of the Regional Leadership Institute. In addition, Miles was an associate minister at the Greenforest Baptist Church in Decatur, Georgia. Her childhood memoir, Teenie: Newslady in Training, was published in 2007.

Miles lived in Decatur, and has two adult children, Kellie and Heather, and two grandchildren, William and Kellea.

Steen Miles was interviewed by The History Makers on February 17, 2014.

Miles passed away on March 29, 2017.

Accession Number

A2014.018

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/17/2014

2/21/2014

Last Name

Miles

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Franklin Elementary

James Whitcomb Riley

South Bend Central High School

Ball State University

Indiana University at South Bend

University of Cincinnati

Georgia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Steen

Birth City, State, Country

South Bend

HM ID

KIN19

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Trust In The Lord With All Thine Heart. Lean Not To Your Own Understanding. All Thy Ways Acknowledge Him And He Will Direct Your Path

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/20/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Shrimp and Grits

Death Date

3/29/2017

Short Description

Journalist The Honorable Steen Miles (1946 - 2017 ) , a former Georgia State Senator, was a managing editor and reporter/anchor at WXIA-TV, and served as the Georgia State Broadcast Editor for United Press International. She was the author of Teeny: Newslady In Training.

Employment

Champion Newspaper

Faith and the City Forum

Lt. Governor State of Georgia election

Georgia State Senate

Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA)

DeKalb County, Georgia

WXIA 11Alive (NBC Affiliate)

WXIA-TV

United Press International

WGCI (Gannett Corp)

WBMX Radio

WMAQ Radio (NBC owned and operated)

WNDU-TV

WCKY Radio

WNDU - AM&FM

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:466,8:698,13:1394,51:4814,65:5876,75:6466,82:7646,101:8944,113:11552,121:12620,127:12976,132:13599,140:15379,170:15735,175:16536,185:16981,191:21197,219:21473,224:22025,234:22301,239:23198,257:23819,267:24095,272:24440,278:25820,321:26372,330:27269,347:27545,352:28925,384:29477,392:30029,401:30581,410:38593,519:40067,547:40402,553:41072,565:41742,580:42278,589:42747,598:43082,604:43350,610:43685,616:45226,641:45896,655:46767,675:47035,680:47705,693:48308,703:53195,725:53670,730:54620,740:55855,756:61080,820:61935,830:62315,835:66530,855:69320,898:69770,905:72110,932:73640,959:74090,965:75260,983:75620,988:78230,1031:78950,1039:79850,1054:80570,1068:82280,1094:82730,1100:83180,1106:83810,1114:84890,1127:90700,1135:91862,1156:92775,1168:97838,1264:98170,1269:98502,1274:102237,1315:102569,1320:102984,1326:106510,1335$120,0:1432,30:1842,36:2252,42:2662,49:3400,55:6188,143:6680,150:7008,155:7336,160:8484,171:8894,177:10206,198:11026,213:11436,219:12174,229:16627,250:16982,256:18828,283:19183,289:19893,301:21455,327:21881,334:23727,360:24579,374:24863,379:25289,386:27064,425:28058,444:28839,459:29265,467:33682,485:34144,494:34474,501:34936,510:38104,585:38764,597:39556,612:40150,623:40612,631:41074,638:41404,644:43846,677:44704,701:48177,716:48809,727:49125,732:49678,740:53628,799:55840,842:56314,849:57736,869:78157,1117:79670,1143:83640,1156:84740,1168:85640,1178:86540,1188:87040,1194:88840,1214:89740,1235:90640,1245:91440,1255:98470,1334:99235,1344:101648,1355:106030,1397:110231,1456:122248,1592:126672,1697:126988,1702:127936,1717:128568,1727:137184,1812:137488,1820:138476,1836:139312,1849:139692,1855:140148,1862:143416,1949:143796,1955:144632,1970:145316,1978:145696,1984:146456,1996:147672,2017:147976,2022:148356,2033:149876,2059:150712,2072:151092,2078:157609,2121:158212,2131:159016,2152:159418,2160:161763,2205:162433,2217:162969,2229:163237,2234:163639,2241:165247,2271:165917,2283:166386,2292:167123,2309:167458,2316:169200,2349:170473,2376:175450,2396:176074,2405:177088,2421:177634,2431:177946,2436:180208,2463:180520,2468:181144,2478:181768,2488:182626,2508:182938,2513:183328,2519:183952,2528:186980,2541:187435,2550:187695,2555:188020,2561:189320,2588:192050,2630:192830,2639:194840,2646
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of the Honorable Steen Miles' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes her great-grandmother and grandfather's healing abilities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her maternal family's farming in Collins, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes the locations of Bassfield and Collins, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her parents' meeting, marriage, and move to South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen Miles considers her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles lists her siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles lists her siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls her earliest childhood memories in South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes her childhood in Southeast South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her early education in South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls wetting her pants after being ignored by a teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls sneaking to wear lipstick as a junior high school student

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen talks about her experience at South Bend Central High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls getting into fights as a high school student

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her high school activities and basketball players Mike Warren and Jimmy King

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls her goals as a high school senior

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her decision to attend Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about living in Cincinnati, Ohio after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about working at WNDU and her mentor Harry Kevorkian

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about how affirmative action has been beneficial to her

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about hosting 'Coffee Talk,' a public affairs television show at WNDU in South Bend, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Steen Miles remembers being recruited to work at WCKY radio in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about notable figures in broadcasting in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about being hired at WMAQ and abrupt firings at WMAQ radio in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls her mother's death in 1978

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about working for WBMX radio in Chicago, Illinois, Tom Joyner and reporting on stale milk sales

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls meeting President Jimmy Carter in 1979

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about radio in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls covering the mob as a reporter in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about Chicago politics and meeting Muhammad Ali

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her move to Atlanta, Georgia in 1981

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes her experience at United Press International

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about African Americans in Atlanta politics in the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about a change in an editor's perspective about her after she coordinated the UPI Broadcast Awards

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about being fired from UPI and working for WXIA-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her success as a reporter for WXIA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles lists awards she has received for her television reporting

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles recalls stories she covered for WXIA-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about interviewing Dent "Wildman" Myers in Kennesaw, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about visiting Dent "Wildman" Myers many years after their first meeting

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles remembers Nelson Mandela being awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1998

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about the removal of the news director at WXIA whose appointment caused her demotion

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes deciding to run for CEO of DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about becoming a state senator in Georgia in a landslide victory in 2004

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Steen Miles shares her accomplishments as a Georgia State Senator from 2004 to 2006

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about running for lieutenant governor and her recent activities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her memoir 'Teenie' and her writing plans

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her 2014 bid for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Steen Miles considers what she might have done differently

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - The Honorable Steen Miles considers her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - The Honorable Steen Miles talks about her daughters

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - The Honorable Steen Miles describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Steen Miles narrates her photographs

DASession

2$2

DATape

2$6

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
The Honorable Steen Miles describes her childhood in Southeast South Bend, Indiana
The Honorable Steen Miles talks about becoming a state senator in Georgia in a landslide victory in 2004
Transcript
Now did your neighborhood [in South Bend, Indiana] have a name?$$Southeast side I guess. And it was interesting because many, many African Americans lived on either the west side, the south side or the east side. But then there was this pocket called the southeast side where nobody lived (laughter). We called it the twilight zone or no-man's land because there weren't very many African American families there in the--in the '40s [1940s], '50s [1950s], and '60s [1960s]--early--no, '40s [1940s] and '50s [1950s], because by the '60s [1960s] urban renewal had begun. And so families from the south side, where they had, you know, torn down a lot of houses and whatnot, they moved to the southeast side. But I wouldn't take anything, anything in the world for the very diverse experiences and exposure I had at an early age with people. And it has absolutely shaped who I am today--who I am today, which is a love--a love of people, and I see you as a human being. I can see that you're European, and I can see that you're African American, or a Latino, or an Asian, but I see you as a human being without preconceived notions about who you are or stereotypes about who you are. You're either nice or you're a jerk, you know, and will, that determination will come along. But I wouldn't give anything for that early exposure.$Well, sitting in my den about three years later, after going to work for MARTA [Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority], they called and needed some help with their media relations, and I was hired as their media relations director. And I was fully intending, however, to run again against the individual who won, but I didn't want to run on any of his missteps that were highly publicized. I was going to run on the issues, and on the issues, he was doing a good job. So I'm back and forth, back and forth, back and forth. Should I run; should I not? I'm sitting in my den reading the newspaper, and there's an article that a young woman who was in District 43 was going to run for [U.S.] Congress. And that was a very crowded field of the Atlanta [Georgia] city council president, the former CEO of DeKalb County [Georgia]--two former senators were going against the venerable Cynthia McKinney. And I thought why is she doing that? And that little voice--that tap on the shoulder--said, "That's where you run." And I ran for, for, for senate--for [Georgia] State Senate--ran and had a runoff and won that and then won by a, a landslide in November to represent primarily white Republican Rockdale County [Georgia] and primarily black and Democrat DeKalb County [Georgia]. And that is how I came to be in, in, in the political arena.$$So this is--this election's in 2004, right?$$This was in 2004, yes.$$Okay, all right, all right, so, so what was your--it says here that you won 75 percent of the vote in the general e, e--election.$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Yes, yes.$$So is there--is that because of the, the organization here in DeKalb--I mean the--$$No, no.$$--Democratic organization?$$It's because of the service I believe, and I ran on the--on the slogan of a, a servant-leader. And because I have been in involved in the community at every level, from PTA [parent-teacher association] to Jack and Jill [of America, Inc.] president to being involved in my church, being involved in United Way, being on this board, and that board, serving in my community at every capacity, at every opportunity, it, it, it resonated with the voters that here is someone who has not only--I'm not toss--just talking the talk, but I have indeed have a proven track record of walking the walk and really trying to make a difference in my community. And it's not--for me it is not politics, it is not campaign rhetoric; it is life, and life experiences that--when you talk about the issues of education, when you talk about economic development, when you talk about transportation. These are issues that I know well, and it resonated with the voters.

Carolyn Glenn

Publisher and entrepreneur Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was born on June 28, 1947 in Greenesboro, Georgia to parents Flossie Hill and Albert Jernigan. In 1963, Glenn graduated from Carver High School at the age of sixteen. She went on to receive her B.S. degree in business education from Albany State University in Albany, Georgia in 1967. She then received two M.S. degrees from Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, one in business and vocational education in 1972, and one in in educational administration in 1985. She is also licensed to practice real estate in Georgia and Florida.

Glenn spent twenty years working in public education, as a secretary, business teacher, vocational coordinator, and high school administrator. In 1991, Glenn and her husband, Dr. Earl Glenn, established ACE III Communications and founded The Champion Newspaper with Glenn as publisher. The Champion is Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, and, since 1996, has been the most award-winning weekly among all newspapers in The Georgia Press Association. In 1999, they launched Atlanta Goodlife, a magazine focused on the lifestyles of African Americans in the Atlanta metropolitan area. In 2008, Glenn became the president of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation. Under the auspices of that foundation, she and her husband created Unconditional Love for Children, which provides opportunities for disadvantaged children to become empowered through educational enrichment programs, life skills training, athletics, and access to health services. She has been a log-time Foundation Board trustee and past chair at Georgia Perimeter College, and has endowed a perpetual scholarship for students at Albany State University.

Glenn has also been the recipient of numerous awards and honors. In 1994, she received the Benjamin Hooks Business Award from the DeKalb branch of the NAACP. In 1995, her newspaper won two Business of the Year Awards, one from the South DeKalb YMCA and another from 100 Black Men of DeKalb. That same year, Glenn was named Outstanding Entrepreneur by Success Guide. In 1996, she was named Businesswoman of the Year by the South DeKalb Business Association. The Atlanta Business League named her Businesswoman of the Year in 1997, and one of the 100 Top Black Woman of Influence from 1996 to 2014. She has also been named a Woman of Distinction by Living Word COGIC and listed among six influential Georgia women in Women Looking Ahead magazine. She won a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Humanitarian Award from Georgia Perimeter College in 2006, and a Trail Blazer Award from Congressman Hank Johnson in 2013.

Glenn lives in Stone Mountain, Georgia with her husband. They have one grown son, Christian.

Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 20, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.017

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/20/2014

Last Name

Glenn

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jernigan

Occupation
Schools

George Washington Carver Middle School

Albany State University

Georgia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Greensboro

HM ID

GLE03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

This Little Light Of Mine, I’m Going To Let It Shine.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/28/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Publisher Carolyn Glenn (1947 - ) founded Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, The Champion, which became the state's most award-winning weekly publication.

Employment

ACE III Communications, Inc.

The Champion Newspaper

Earl D, Glenn, DDS

DeKalb Schools, Gordon High

DeKalb Schools, Cedar Grove

Atlanta Schools, Murphy High

Dalton GA Schools, Dalton High

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2494,37:3096,46:5418,76:6020,85:13840,200:14665,215:15565,228:15940,234:17290,280:17740,287:23476,359:23752,364:24856,390:33896,517:34376,523:36296,549:36680,554:37448,564:41546,614:42059,625:43028,651:43484,661:45384,676:45724,682:46608,696:46948,702:50198,733:51350,754:55166,833:55454,838:55742,843:56102,851:59198,914:75421,1036:88832,1268:89208,1273:93760,1294:103180,1388:107188,1453:108364,1474:109540,1496:110226,1504:113950,1546:115318,1574:119723,1607:123924,1658:127128,1695:127785,1710:128953,1735:132092,1805:137719,1897:138146,1906:139793,1946:140830,1969:142843,2023:148560,2059:149400,2080:150210,2090$0,0:328,7:1230,25:2560,33:3088,43:3418,49:5295,64:5781,71:7725,151:10722,216:11370,227:16635,361:20624,375:21014,381:21482,388:24134,453:24836,466:25304,473:26942,523:31595,543:32195,555:33545,582:36545,651:39920,731:40670,742:47645,991:48095,998:50570,1047:50945,1053:61398,1167:61722,1172:62694,1180:63342,1197:64476,1214:65286,1226:66339,1242:66987,1251:69822,1335:70308,1342:76932,1391:79660,1423:80425,1439:81275,1455:81700,1461:83485,1491:84505,1506:84845,1511:92210,1595:92802,1604:93542,1616:95688,1672:96354,1678:98574,1718:99536,1735:100128,1744:103458,1811:105012,1848:105530,1857:105974,1864:119540,2019:120030,2028:120590,2038:121990,2068:130470,2283:130870,2288:131670,2298:135070,2346:143410,2439:143870,2445:146262,2482:155072,2599:155909,2613:161685,2675:165570,2743:173069,2835:173505,2840:174486,2862:175031,2868:175467,2873:178390,2883:180568,2909:182795,2938:183485,2955:184244,2970:184589,2976:195600,3146:198620,3165:199120,3172
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carolyn Glenn's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her maternal grandfather's work to rebuild the family wealth

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her maternal grandfather's charity to black sharecroppers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the challenges of integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her neighborhood in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her activities at George Washington Carver Elementary and High School in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' fears of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls witnessing President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's motorcade

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn recalls protesting against segregation at Rich's Department Store

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes segregation in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn remembers joining the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her mentors at Albany State College in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers teaching at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes the black community in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her success at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls teaching at J.C. Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn remembers mentoring a gay student at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her promotion to vocational coordinator at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her educational philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the growth of the black community in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences as a graduate student at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transition to vocational coordinator at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the highlights of her time at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her decision to leave the education profession

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes the founding of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the first issue of The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls founding ACE III Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers The Champion newspaper's financial challenges

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn recalls preparing The Champion to become the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the legal battle over The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers creating The Champion Free Press

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about Atlanta Goodlife magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the name of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the news coverage in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her civic activities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the coverage of President Barack Obama's election in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's digital platform

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers founding the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her philanthropy in Jamaica

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the funding of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her plans for the future of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

10$2

DATitle
Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion
Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College
Transcript
So between '88 [1988] and '91 [1991] when you found The Champion newspaper, what was going on? What was informing this process by which you established the, the newspaper?$$Remember, now this is the migration, you know, of all these people coming to Atlanta [Georgia]. A lot of people said, you know, "Yeah, I live in Atlanta now." Well, you know, you--we talk about, we really said--in terms of metro. But at that time, most of the people moving here were moving to DeKalb County [Georgia]. Because you had the great location, and you had the best values in homes. So in my husband's dental office, we were working in there, you know, all day, every day together. And we're seeing all of these people, all of these important people, accomplished people, moving to DeKalb County and living in DeKalb County, and we don't even know each other. Because when I used to, when I grew up in Monroe, Georgia, the only way to get to Atlanta was to come through DeKalb County because there were no expressways or what have you. We knew that it was 95 percent white. So, now you've got a Tuskegee Airman as a patient. You've got a gentleman who designed an official stamp for the UN [United Nations]. You've got movie stars, you've got top entertainers. You've got news anchors, you've got, just all kinds of people. Who was the president at that time? The gentleman who handled the security for the president of the United States. You've got top educators, you know, retirees. You've got college presidents. Just wonderful, accomplished people. But we didn't know each other. So in my family, my husband [Earl D. Glenn] is the visionary. He sees things way, way, way ahead. I'm the worker bee. I know how to--he does the research and he puts it together and then he--I figure it out. So he said, "Carol [HistoryMaker Carolyn Glenn]," we said to each other, "we need a way to get to know one another." And eventually after lots of talks and whatever, we came up with the idea that we needed a forum, and the newspaper may be that forum. So we started The Champion newspaper.$When I went home for the summer, after the first year, I was--a letter came from Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia]. So, you know, now in my house you don't open other folk's mail. But in that it was from Spelman, I just figured it was okay. So I opened it, and I saw where my mother [Flossie Etchison Hill] had paid on the tuition, but she had not completed the first year's tuition. So, now it's, you know, time for me to get ready to go back for the second year. And I'm looking--I've got five sisters and brothers. And, you know, she's working really hard. So I decided my--this aunt, my favorite aunt [Azalie Etchison Richardson] that I was telling you about--she was a--are you familiar, familiar with Jeanes curriculum directors?$$Yes.$$She was one (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) She was a Jeanes supervisor--$$She was a Jeanes super- she was just real special.$$James Jeanes funds [sic. Anna T. Jeanes Foundation], right?$$Yes, Anna Jeanes [Anna T. Jeanes], she was really special. So she was a Jeanes supervisor down in South Georgia. And, you know, I went to stay with her during the summer or something, a week or two. And we were just very close.$$They worked on a special grant to improve the teaching in the South in small, rural schools, right?$$Absolutely.$$So they were sent down into--$$They were almost like the black superintendent. They were called supervisors, but they were like regarded on the level of a--the black superintendent, even over the principals, in most cases. So she, and she was one, she and my aunt were one of the first to get their master's degrees way back, you know, in my hometown [Monroe, Georgia]. So I guess that was a part of her acceleration, in that she had her master's degree. But she was a Jeanes curriculum director down in Cordele, Georgia then in Sylvester [Georgia], which is thirty miles from Albany [Georgia]. And I called her, and I told her what I saw. And, so she and I strategized. And I went--she took me over--I went to visit, went out secretly, clandestinely, went to Albany State [Albany State College; Albany State University, Albany, Georgia]. The dean of students, she and the dean of students had been in, had gone to co- had gone to college together, so she knew everybody. And she just walked me through, and I'm now enrolled, you know, in two hours. And, so the dean said, "Well, you know, if this is your niece, I know what stock she comes from. So she's--she has a job in my office." And that was the plum job of the campus. I worked for him the whole time I was there. And, so I told my mother and my stepfather [Julius Hill, Sr.], I'm going to Albany State. My father cursed the whole way to Albany State. "I don't know why you want to go to the country, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." And my mother cried. And it was only about, I think it was about five years ago that I told her why I did that. And she said, "I'm so glad you told me because I have never understood why you changed from Spelman to Albany State."$$That was certainly a sign of maturity, I guess and--$$Yeah.$$--to be that considerate.$$Well, again, it was--I always, I loved my mother.