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Howard W. French

Journalist and professor Howard W. French was born on October 14, 1957 in Washington, D.C. to Carolyn Alverda Howard French and David Marshall French, a doctor. French received his B.A. degree from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst in 1979.

French first worked as a translator in Abidjan, Ivory Coast in the early 1980s, and taught English literature at the University of Ivory Coast until 1982. From 1982 to 1986, he worked as a freelance reporter for The Washington Post and several other publications in West Africa, including Africa News and African Business. He was then hired by The New York Times in 1986, and worked as a metropolitan reporter in New York City for three years. From 1990 to 2008, French reported for The New York Times as a bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China in Shanghai.

From 1998 to 1999, French was a visiting scholar at the University of Hawaii, and in the spring of 1999, was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center, in Honolulu. While working at The New York Times, he also served as a weekly columnist on global affairs for the International Herald Tribune from 2005 to 2008. In 2008, French left The New York Times and became an associate professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He went on to serve as a 2011 fellow of the Open Society Foundations.

In 2004, French published A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa, which was named non-fiction book of the year by several newspapers, and won the 2005 American Library Association Black Caucus Award for Non-Fiction. He later authored China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa, published in 2014. Also a documentary photographer, French co-authored and contributed photographs to the 2012 book, Disappearing Shanghai: Images and Poems of an Intimate Way of Life. His work as a journalist has been published in The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The Nation, Rolling Stone, Transition, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Crisis, and Travel and Leisure.

French was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and was twice a recipient of an Overseas Press Club Award. He won the Grantham Environmental Award, and received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Maryland. In addition, The New York Times awarded French its highest prize, the Publisher's Award, six times. French also served as a board member of the Columbia Journalism Review.

French lives in New York City. He and his wife, Agnes, have two sons.

Howard W. French was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.193

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/28/2014

Last Name

French

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Occupation
Schools

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Howard

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

FRE08

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist and professor Howard W. French (1957 - ) was an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He worked at The New York Times for over twenty years as a bureau chief in Central America, the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan, the Koreas, and China, and authored three books: A Continent for the Taking; Disappearing Shanghai; and China’s Second Continent.

Employment

University of Ivory Coast

The Washington Post

Africa News

African Business

The New York Times

University of Hawaii

International Herald Tribune

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Michaela Angela Davis

Magazine editor, activist, and writer Michaela Angela Davis was born in 1964 in Germany. When she was young, Davis and her family moved to Washington, D.C., where she attended the Duke Ellington School for the Arts. Upon graduation, Davis enrolled in New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts before being accepted to the Stella Adler Acting Conservatory in 1983. She gained fashion experience by apprenticing with her aunt, a former stylist for Harper’s Bazaar, and photographer Richard Avedon.

In 1991, Davis was hired as an associate fashion editor for Essence magazine. She then became the founding fashion director for Vibe magazine in 1993. In 2002, Davis worked as a stylist for the film Paid in Full, before becoming editor-in-chief of Honey magazine in 2003. Davis also published an essay titled “The Beautiful Ones” for the anthology Everything but the Burden: What White People are Taking from Black Culture in 2003.

In 2004, Davis returned to Essence as the executive Fashion and Beauty editor while simultaneously directing the Culture section. She launched the “Take Back the Music” campaign along with Essence in 2005 and appeared on VH1 News Presents: Hip Hop Videos – Sexploitation on the Set. That same year, Davis authored a gift book entitled Beloved Baby: A Baby’s Scrapbook and Journal. In 2008, she was featured in the documentary The Souls of Black Girls, as well as the BET special, Hip Hop vs. America II: Where Did the Love Go? Davis went on to become the chief creative consultant and editorial brand manager for the rebranding of BET. She appeared in Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness in 2011 with an essay titled “Resistance.” Also that year, she launched a community conversation project called MAD Free: Liberating Conversations About Our Image, Beauty and Power as well as “BuryTheRatchet: The Revolutionary Pro Sisterhood Campaign” the following year.

The New York Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People recognized Davis as a “Phenomenal Woman” in 2011, and the President of the Borough of Manhattan presented her with a “Trailblazer Award.” In 2013, she was honored with two separate “Empowerment” awards from BLACK STREET and the Feminist Press.

Davis lives in Brooklyn and has one daughter, Elenni Davis-Knight.

Michaela Angela Davis was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on August 15, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.219

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/15/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Angela

Schools

Takoma Education Campus

Duke Ellington School Of The Arts

New York University

The New School for Social Research

Stella Adler Studio of Acting

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michaela

Birth City, State, Country

Landstuhl

HM ID

DAV35

Favorite Season

Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Africa

Favorite Quote

This Is The Day The Lord Had Made, Let Us Rejoice And Be Glad In It.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/31/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Germany

Favorite Food

Okra

Short Description

Magazine editor, activist, and writer Michaela Angela Davis (1964 - ) was the founding fashion director of Vibe magazine and a former editor of Honey and Essence magazines.

Employment

BET/Centric

Freelance

Essence Magazine

Honey Magazine

Vibe Magazine

CNN/Time Warner

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michaela Angela Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her father's acceptance into the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her upbringing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis recalls her experiences of racial discrimination in Woodbury, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her early awareness of skin color, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her early awareness of skin color, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her neighborhood friends in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her childhood best friend

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the music of her youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the death of her brother, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the death of her brother, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her acting experiences at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her experiences at the Stella Adler Conservatory in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role as an assistant stylist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the start of her career in fashion

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the New York City club scene of the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her fashion career in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to work for Essence magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to work for Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the influence of hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the early covers of Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the evolution of hip hop culture

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her reasons for leaving Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers meeting Polly Allen Mellen

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis recalls the founding of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the founders of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to be editor in chief of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role as editor in chief of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her return to Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about Essence's Take Back the Music campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her early speaking engagements

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she became a commentator on CNN

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers how she became a commentator for 'Anderson Cooper 360'

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the next generation of black fashion activists

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the MAD Free project

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role in the rebranding of BET, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role in the rebranding of BET, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her current projects

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Michaela Angela Davis talks about the evolution of hip hop culture
Michaela Angela Davis remembers how she became a commentator for 'Anderson Cooper 360'
Transcript
How long did you work at Vibe?$$Just a year. So I worked the first year cycle and this is when my activism began. I challenged--something very scary started happening in hip hop, 'cause again, we're so excited by this culture, by being a part of hip hop, being a part of defining, this defining culture was very powerful. But by the time we got to '92 [1992], '93 [1993], you started to see this very disturbing wave of--$$That's okay.$$They were talking upstairs. Wave of, the plethora of voices because we had all kinds of hip hop. Whether it was you know Biggie [Biggie Smalls; The Notorious B.I.G.] who was this like so talented but kind of nasty and talking about, you know, shooting people and all kinds of crazy sex, but his lyricism was amazing. To you know Wu-Tang [Wu-Tang Clan] to Pharcyde [The Pharcyde] to sort of what people consider conscious rap. And all these, you know Monie Love and Queen Latifah and MC Lyte, you had all these different voices. And then what you started to see happen was the voices were beginning--very narrow very, very quick, very, very quickly. And you saw women's voices just dropping off and the, the men's voices--and this is in mainstream and the records that they were selling and promoting were getting hyper violent. And what, I don't--what some people called gangsta rap, we never, we never called it that in, internally, inside. But it was, it was a very disturbing, disturbing quick trend of hyper violent images with hypersexual images of women. And then all these women's voices going, falling away and the only ones left standing were Lil' Kim and Foxy Brown, Lauryn [Lauryn Hill] came later. And they were really playing on the hypersexuality, which we didn't mind before when they were all these other voices too. Like that's, that's a voice, that's real, but we saw that what was happening to the music, or the music that we were being asked to cover and sell and promote, was so narrow and it was--it's like that's that kind of the opposite of what we came here to do, right? So, I got into very clear philosophical--I resigned because I remember one of the older white executives from Time Warner [Time Warner, Inc.] coming in and, at the photo editing, was like going, "Yeah, like show the picture of him peeing on the wall." And like, "Yeah that's like, you wanna see the dirty shit, let's see the dirty shit," and I was just like, who are you that--you old man in a suit like. I was like this is it--we came here to tell our story, right, like if this is--and, and it was something very significant. I saw--our editor in chief was a very smart, white gay man, right? I remember this same executive was at Martha Stewart [Martha Stewart Living] and I heard Martha Stewart in the hallway like letting him have it. She was like--'cause what had happened is both these magazines were hot, right? No one was paying attention to us 'til we got hot. Then it's like. "Ooh, I'm gonna come down and play with the hot magazines from my little office." I heard Martha Stewart saying, "The day that you know how to cook and," and blah, blah, blah. She's like, "This is my culture, either you give me this magazine or you get out." Like she defended her--she's like, "You don't live in Connecticut, you don't know about--," like she was like (makes sound), she defended her, her brand. But he's, I don't know what he was telling her to do, but she was literally out in the hallway. And I was like nobody's defending us, nobody's going, "Why are you--what's happening to this magazine [Vibe] that was supposed to be about this big bright culture, or breadth of the culture?" Not to say that those rappers didn't exist, but to silence the others was problematic.$Wait before you get there, I just wanna point out that you started being honored for your activism.$$Yes.$$Like people started noticing you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$--and--$$Yes.$$--just, just to make a point, you know the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] acknowledged your work in 2011 with the phenomenal woman award. And then you, you were featured in a number of anthologies--$$Right (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) so Rebecca Walker's ['Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness,' ed. Rebecca Walker] was another--$$And this is all after--so this point is critical 'cause all that came after, and there's very interesting (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Really? Came after what?$$The--what I'm about to tell you why, how I got to 'Anderson Cooper' ['Anderson Cooper 360'].$$Okay.$$How I got to 'Anderson Cooper' was I challenged Essence, that--$$I didn't realize it came after, okay.$$And I was, I was being recognized, I wasn't being honored, but I was being, I was becoming a voice particularly on these campuses, right? I was talking about image, image activism and, and being empowered and challenging images and, and being, having media literacy, particularly as it came to women and how they perceive themselves and how the world perceives them. Because they were being treated based on these music videos, and that's what we were finding when talking to girls that traveled, people thought--would solicit them for sex when they're in Italy as a scholar, because they think that their video--so we understood something was happening in the culture, and I was helping to facilitate those conversations and giving us tools to deal with them. When--and this--at this critical moment too, I discovered the power of Facebook. So Essence magazine had a new editor in chief for a while, who had hired a white fashion director. And I had had that, this job and I knew what a fashion director was. A fashion director was someone that didn't just pick out dresses, for Essence particularly because it was the only magazine for black women, the fashion director was in the community. The fashion director spoke on behalf of the community; the fashion director would be you know if H&M [H and M Hennes and Mauritz A.B.] opened in Harlem [New York, New York], or a MAC store [MAC Cosmetics] opened in downtown Detroit [Michigan], the fashion director of Essence was supposed to be there. The fashion director at Essence sits at the front row at the fashion shows with all the other fashion directors. So when a white woman was chosen for that one spot, I, I was appalled, but I didn't act until a group of young women--I had started, I started to have mentees by this point, right? Young women that I was nurturing and were talking to me and I was talking to them, I started to host salons in my home with young women, mentoring them. And a group of young women called me and they were crying, they, they said to me, "What does this mean to us?" And they were, they were all fashion professionals, one just finished fashion history at NYU [New York University, New York, New York], blah, blah, blah. And they're like, "So if Essence doesn't think that we can do this, where do we go, what does this mean to us?" And they were crying and I was talking to--and that's--I didn't act until I felt the hurt and I wrote on my Facebook page, "Essence magazine has hired a white fashion director. I feel like I lost my best girlfriend," right, something to that effect. Hundreds of comments later, in an hour or two Clutch magazine had written a blog.$$Which is an online (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) An online magazine, a popular mag- online website for this audience. So be clear that the first people that covered this story were the young women who were being most affected. So Clutch did it first, then, then New York Magazine picked it up from Clutch. Then from New York Magazine it went viral. Twenty-four hours later, I was on 'Anderson Cooper,' right? I had no idea Facebook was like that, I was really naive, I was really new, I was having like these conversations that I thought were very contained with like couple thousand friends and, I was talking to young women, most I would ask ques- and what I realized that my Facebook page was, was the open for some news stories I was like OMG. So I learned a lot by then, but so what hap- so it's very challenging and very interesting and very full circle to be in this moment where you are challenging home, 'cause Essence was home to me. But I, I had gotten the blessings from my mentor like this--'cause I called, I guess it's okay to say now--$$Um-hm.$$--in public. I called Susan [HistoryMaker Susan Taylor] before I accepted that interview, and I said, "Look, I'm getting calls from the media, and what do you think?" Because I knew I was gonna--this was basically going to war with Essence. I didn't know how big it was gonna be, I didn't know it was gonna be this thing. And I got, I got, she told me, she said, "Michaela [HistoryMaker Michaela Angela Davis] you're my hero," and that's, I said that's all. So if my mentor says that it was something--and I had all these young women, and, and they were like nobody stands up for us. And I didn't have anything to lose; I wasn't trying to get that job--like, so I felt like they couldn't do it, because they might want that job one day. They're new in their career, I understood that, so I felt like I could speak for them, and I wasn't afraid.

Ozier Muhammad

Photojournalist Ozier Muhammad was born in 1950. His grandfather was Elijah Muhammad, a founder and leader of the Nation of Islam. Muhammad was raised in Chicago, Illinois and received his B.A. degree in photography from Columbia College Chicago in 1972.

Muhammad was first hired as a photographer for Ebony magazine in the early 1970s. He then worked at The Charlotte Observer from 1978 to 1980, and at Newsday from 1980 to 1992. While at Newsday, he shared the 1985 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting with Josh Friedman and Dennis Bell, for a series of reports titled “Africa, The Desperate Continent.” In 1992, Muhammad was hired as a staff photographer for The New York Times, where he took iconic photographs of President Barack Obama’s campaign, Haiti after the earthquake, New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and the Nato Protest in Chicago. He has also written articles for the The New York Times photojournalism blog “Lens.”

Muhammad was selected as a contributing photographer for the 1990 Songs of My People, a book, exhibition and multimedia project that attempted to record African American life through the eyes of prominent African American photographers. In addition, his photography was showcased in the 2000 book, One Hundred Jobs: A Panorama of Work in the American City, by Ron Howell.

Besides winning the Pulitzer Prize, Muhammad received the George Polk Award for News Photography in 1984, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from Columbia College Chicago in 1998. He served as a Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University from 1986 to 1987, and a Peter Jennings Fellow at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia in 2007.

Muhammad lives in New York City, and is the father of two children. His son, Khalil, is the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City. His daughter, Pilar, is in high school.

Ozier Muhammad was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 9, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.223

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/15/2014

Last Name

Muhammad

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Columbia College Chicago

Sister Clara Muhammad School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ozier

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

MUH01

State

Illinois

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/8/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Photojournalist Ozier Muhammad (1950 - ) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for The New York Times.

Employment

New York Times

Newsday

Charlotte Observer

Johnson Publishing

George Chinsee

Photographer George Leroy Chinsee was born on June 18, 1955 in Saint Andrew, Jamaica to Melvin Chinsee and Olga Buchanan, a healthcare worker. He has one sibling, Gwyneth Shick, who was also born in Jamaica. Chinsee graduated from the High School of Art and Design in New York City in 1973. He went on to attend New York’s School of Visual Arts, where he received his B.F.A. degree in photography in 1977.

In May of 1982, Chinsee was hired as a staff photographer for Fairchild Publications (Condé Nast Publications), where he has worked since. As a photographer, his primary focus has been in the fashion and beauty industry. Chinsee’s photographs have been seen in several publications, including Women's Wear Daily and W magazine.

Chinsee was selected as a contributing photographer for the 1992 Songs of My People, a book, exhibition and multimedia project that recorded African American life through the eyes of prominent African American photographers. He also contributed photographs to Harriette Cole’s Jumping the Broom: The African-American Wedding Planner and Vows: The African American Couples' Guide to Designing a Sacred Ceremony.

Chinsee lives and works in New York City. He is married to Harriette Cole and has one daughter: Carrie.

George Chinsee was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 14, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.234

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/14/2014

Last Name

Chinsee

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Leroy

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

High School of Art and Design

School of Visual Arts

Search Occupation Category
First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Saint Andrew Parish

HM ID

CHI04

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/18/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Short Description

Photographer George Chinsee (1955 - ) served as a staff photographer for Fairchild Fashion Media.

Employment

Fairchild Publications

Sheila Robinson

Marketing chief executive and publisher Sheila A. Robinson was born on September 20, 1961 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She graduated from Parkland Senior High School in Winston-Salem in 1979, and went on to receive her B.A. degree in pre-law/political science from North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina in 1986. Robinson later received her Masters of Entrepreneurship (M.S.E.) degree from Western Carolina University in 2011, as well as a Chief Learning Officer Certificate from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. In 2012, she entered the Chief Learning Officer Ed.D. program at the University of Pennsylvania. She has also completed Stanford University’s Professional Publishing Program.

From 1987 to 1989, Robinson worked for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company as a market research assistant. In 1990, she was hired by DuPont, where she went on to serve as a marketing director with the company’s apparel division. When her division at DuPont was sold in 2004, Robinson established Robinson & Associates Communications, LLC and became founder and publisher of North Carolina Career Network magazine. In 2007, Robinson expanded Career Network nationally and launched Diversity Woman magazine, where she served as chief executive officer and publisher. Robinson also hosted the Diversity Women's Business Conference and founded Iamaleader.org, the nonprofit extension of Diversity Woman in 2012.

In 2009, Robinson was honored with a Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Image Award for her career achievements and for being a positive role model for young women. She was named in 2009 as one of the Top 50 Women in Magazine Publishing by Publishing Executive. Robinson was also the keynote speaker at the 2008 wives luncheon at the NFL Pro Bowl, and was honored as the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce Minority Business Person of the Year in 2011. Her Diversity Woman magazine was nominated for The 2011 North Carolina Small Business of The Year.

Robinson is a member of the National Association for Female Executives and the National Association for Women Business Owners, and serves on the boards of Women in Periodical Publishing and Business and Professional Women. She is the author of Lead By Example: An Insiders Look at How to Successfully Lead in Corporate America and Entrepreneurship, which was published in 2014.

Sheila Robinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 15, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.180

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/15/2014

Last Name

Robinson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Annette

Schools

Parkland Sr. High

Hill High

Griffith Elementary

Diggs Elementary

Mineral Springs Elementary

North Carolina Central University

Western Carolina University

University of Pennsylvania

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

Winston-Salem

HM ID

ROB27

Favorite Season

Fall

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near The Ocean

Favorite Quote

What Someone Else Says Or Does, Is A Reflection Of Who They Are And What You Say Or Do, Is A Reflection Of Who You Are.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

9/20/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Burlington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Marketing chief executive and publisher Sheila Robinson (1961 - ) was the founder, publisher and CEO of Diversity Woman magazine and author of the book Lead By Example: An Insiders Look at How to Successfully Lead in Corporate America and Entrepreneurship.

Employment

R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

DuPont Company

Robinson & Associates Communications, LLC

North Carolina Career Network Magazine

Diversity Woman Magazine

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheila Robinson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson talks about how her parents met and their personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson remembers her neighborhood in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson recalls Jefferson Davis Diggs Elementary School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson remembers her favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson remembers her favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson lists the high schools she attended

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson remembers joining her high school cheerleading team

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson recalls facing discrimination on the cheerleading team, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson recalls facing discrimination on the cheerleading team, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson describes her social activities at Parkland Senior High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson remembers her early career aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson recalls attending North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson describes her first impressions of North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson recalls her experiences at North Carolina Central University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson remembers her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson talks about the decline of the tobacco industry

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson recalls her transition to the textile industry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson talks about her work with E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson remembers her challenges at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson recalls her transition to the marketing department of DuPont Textiles and Interiors

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson describes her experiences as marketing assistant at DuPont Textiles and Interiors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson recalls leaving E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson talks about the highlights of her career at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson remembers her mentors and opportunities at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson recalls founding the North Carolina Career Network magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson remembers rebranding her magazine as Diversity Woman

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson describes the mission of Diversity Woman magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson talks about the success of Diversity Woman magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sheila Robinson recalls founding the I Am A Leader organization

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sheila Robinson recalls pursuing a doctorate at the Wharton School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sheila Robinson describes her book, 'Lead By Example'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheila Robinson describes her public speaking career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheila Robinson shares her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheila Robinson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheila Robinson reflects upon her professional legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheila Robinson describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheila Robinson talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheila Robinson describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Sheila Robinson recalls founding the North Carolina Career Network magazine
Sheila Robinson describes her public speaking career
Transcript
Now in 2005, you founded Robinson and Associates Communications, LLC?$$Yes.$$And tell us what that, what you intended to do?$$Well, I, it, it came about, I had never thought I would ever try to have my own business. It came about after numerous rejections. I had an incredible load of experience from DuPont [E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company] and I went out to all of these organizations. I can remember the president of the division I was in, a $6.5 billion industry, was used, as a reference. I had the greatest references, I had fascinating interviews but I was not given an opportunity, particularly in the area that I was living in and the last time that I was told, "You have a boatload of experience and more marketing and brand marketing that we could ever need at this organization but I'm concerned you're not the right fit," you know. I knew then that I was no longer going to go job hunting, that I needed a break, I was going to do something different, I needed to explore. I don't know if I'm going to explore going back to school, explore relocating to another area, explore, you know, just, I had to just stop because the rejection was just more than, two years of rejection, it just seemed like it, I had been out there two years looking for a job because I had started looking in advance when they told us we would be laid off, and I had this vision when I was at DuPont to start a magazine to support women in business. It's sort of like an Essence and a Black Enterprise but for women and then I thought, well, you know, I want to help anyone with their careers because there was something I had always been known for, if someone asked me how to do their resume or practice for an interview and I've always had this love, love affair with magazines and I took my passion for magazine journalism to, and my passion for helping others advance in their careers. I brought it to one and I had designed the template and the idea before I left DuPont and one of my friends told me that I should explore that vision I had for the publication and I told her, you know, there was no way that I had any funding to do that and she said, "Well I didn't tell you to do it, I just told you to explore it," and I did. I, at that time, I thought it was a great shift going on in North Carolina, we were shifting from becoming a tobacco and a textile industry, the two industries I had just gotten laid off from, to a biochemistry, biotechnology and a logistics and I thought, why not come up with a North Carolina career publication and talk about all of these different industries and opportunities that are taking place in my state. And so that's what I was passionate about. I was, I wanted to bring awareness to how our industries had shifted in this area and put it into a magazine and help people that had been laid off, significant layoffs like I had been in the textile and tobacco industry, and help them get jobs in other industries and long story short, North Carolina Career Network was in the market in 2005 and it was just a little small regional publication that got a lot of attention, including being on the newsstands and Borders bookstores [Borders Group, Inc.] and Barnes and Noble bookstores [Barnes and Noble Booksellers, Inc.].$$Okay, okay. So, so did you distribute any in the black churches or the, or any of the other, well, black colleges [historically black colleges and universities (HBCUS)] or--$$No, because it, at that time, it was not a, it was not just for African Americans. It was for anyone in the State of North Carolina, men and women, and so I distributed it at the chamber of commerce [North Carolina Chamber]. I started, I knew from having events at DuPont, how successful I could be if I had an event. So I had an event and I distributed it there because I knew how to create promotional events from my experience there and that was the way I got it out.$Well tell us about your public speaking career.$$Well my public speaking career took off unexpectedly. It actually started at DuPont [E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company], a funny story where I was at a PR [public relations] event and the agency we were working with said, "Sheila [HistoryMaker Sheila Robinson]," and this was an event I was doing with Queen Latifah in front of Bloomingdale [Bloomingdale's] store and E! Entertainment was there and she said, "I have an opportunity to get you on camera," and normally they just want the celebrities and the stars but I know where she was like, "You got a chance to plug Lycra, you know. This is how you do it," and I was like, "Okay." So they put the mic to my phone, to my mouth and all I could see is Queen Latifah, lights, cameras, paparazzi and I freeze. I freeze, and the next day they, my boss, enrolls me in a course for public speaking, ten thousand dollars. They fly me to New York [New York], and I'll tell you how this fascinating career was I had at DuPont and I started doing public speaking, being a spokesperson for the company at DuPont. That's how I had the opportunity to do the on air interview with Sara Blakely of Spanx [Spanx, Inc.], and in, rolled over into entrepreneurship. Schools started asking me to come speak to the students and college students and then as my business grew, organizations have asked me to speak. And so one of the things I learned, when the publishing industry, anyone that is in publishing that, that, that's watching this now or even any consumer will know that this industry, the print industry, has hit a fall and one thing that I learned at Stanford University [Stanford, California] was, if you're going to stay in publishing, then you have to have multiple streams of revenue. So, it was an idea to create an additional arm to my business and at that time, I worked with a very small agency on creating a packet and sending it out and we sent it out to the NFL [National Football League] in New York and I got hired to speak at the Pro Bowl in Hawaii and it was just awesome. I was interviewed, I was hired by the vice president of the NFL, out of New York, and I was the keynote luncheon speaker for the wives doing the Pro Bowl and they had asked me to speak on entrepreneurship and how, at that time, women, entrepreneurship for women was very, very good and I think the league was really wanting to inspire and support any spouse or mate that had access to this disposable income and to put it and invest it in someone, where they could pay off in the future and it was great thinking on their part because so many times you hear about, you know, they blew their money and had, you know, millions of dollars gone down the drain but, you know, they had programs in place to help the players and their spouses invest for the future. So, speaking engagements such as that, as well as corporations that have diversity programs or women's conferences and I continue to do that today.

John X. Miller

Journalist John Xavier Miller, Jr. was born on September 11, 1955 in Henderson, North Carolina to John Miller, Sr. and Betty Faison. Miller was raised in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where he graduated from R.J. Reynolds High School in 1973. He went on to receive his B.A. degree in journalism from Washington and Lee University in 1977.

Miller began his career with an internship at the Twin City Sentinel in the 1970s. From 1978 to 1982, he worked as a copy editor for The Roanoke Times & World News and as a sports copy editor for the Charlotte Observer. Miller then became an original staff member of USA Today when he was hired as the newspaper’s sports copy desk chief in 1982. In 1991, he was named executive editor of The Reporter in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. In 1996, he was appointed as the managing editor of The Sun News in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. From 1999 to 2007, Miller worked at the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit Media Partnership (DMP), first as the Free Press’ public editor, then as the DMP’s director of community affairs.

In December of 2007, Miller was named chief executive officer of The Heat and Warmth Fund, a Detroit, Michigan-based nonprofit organization. Three years later, in 2010, he moved to the Hickory Daily Record, where he served as editor. In August of 2013, Miller became the first African American managing editor of the Winston-Salem Journal.

Miller has served on numerous boards including the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, the Pew Center for Civic Journalism, the Michigan Humanities Council, and various American Society of News Editors and Associated Press Media Editors boards and committees. He was a founding member of the National Association of Minority Media Executives and former board chairman of ARISE Detroit!. He has been a Pulitzer Prize Juror, a facilitator at the American Press Institute in Reston, Virginia, and was the first Donald W. Reynolds Distinguished Visiting Professor of Journalism at Washington and Lee University in 2005. Miller received the Order of the Arrow Vigil Honor from the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) in 1973 and the Spark Plug Award from the Chicora District BSA in 1997.

John X. Miller was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 13, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.236

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/13/2014

Last Name

Miller

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Xavier

Occupation
Schools

St. Benedict The Moor

Wiley Middle School

R.J. Reynolds High School

Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University School of Law

Greater Dimensions College of Theology

Search Occupation Category
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Henderson

HM ID

MIL11

State

North Carolina

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

9/11/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Winston-Salem

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist John X. Miller (1955 - ) , managing editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, has served as an editor for several newspapers, including The Reporter, The Sun News, the Detroit Free Press, and the Hickory Daily Record. He was also one of the original staff members of USA Today, and served as CEO of The Heat and Warmth Fund.

Employment

Winston-Salem Journal

Hickory Daily Record

The Heat And Warmth Fund

Detroit Media Partnership, L.P.

Detroit Free Press Charities

Washington and Lee University

Detroit Free Press

The Sun News

The Reporter

USA Today

Charlotte Observer

The Roanoke Times & World-News

Howard University

Keith Clinkscales

Media executive and magazine publishing entrepreneur Keith T. Clinkscales was born on January 7, 1964 in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He received his B.S. degree in accounting and finance from Florida A&M University in 1986, and his M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1990.

In 1988, Clinkscales co-founded Urban Profile magazine and served as publisher and editor-in-chief until 1992, when he sold the publication to Career Communications Group. He then helped Quincy Jones establish Vibe magazine in 1993 and was named president and chief executive officer. He also founded the publication's digital counterpart, Vibe.com, in 1994, and helped launch Vibe’s Blaze magazine in 1998. From 1999 to 2003, Clinkscales co-founded and served as chairman and chief executive officer of Vanguarde Media, publisher of Honey, Heart & Soul and Savoy magazines.

In 2005, Clinkscales was hired to work for ESPN as senior vice president and general manager of ESPN Publishing. In 2007, he was named ESPN’s senior vice president of content development and enterprises, where he served as executive producer for ESPN Films’ documentaries, and scripted and unscripted projects including the 2011 launched Year of the Quarter Back; the acclaimed and Emmy-nominated 30 for 30 documentary series, Black Magic; Ali Rap; Kobe Doin’ Work; Renee; Catching Hell; A Race Story: Wendell Scott; The Tribeca Sports Film Festival; Elite 24; and the highest rated documentary in ESPN’s history, The Fab Five. Clinkscales was co-creator of ESPN’s award-winning TV magazine show E:60, the Homecoming with Rick Reilly show, and the adapted SportsNation show. He also oversaw the ESPN Classic network, ESPN Books, the ESPYs, and the X Games.

In 2011, Clinkscales founded and became chief executive officer of Shadow League Digital, a multi-platform sports news organization in partnership with ESPN. Under Shadow League Digital, he developed Shadow League Films and co-produced the 2012 Muhammad Ali 70 Special which aired on ESPN, as well as executive produced the ESPN documentary Benji. In 2013, Clinkscales was named chief executive officer of Sean “Diddy” Combs’ REVOLT Media.

His honors include two National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Excellence in Journalism Awards, two Peabody Awards, the National Magazine Award, and an Emmy nomination. In 2008, he was named one of Diversity MBA Magazine’s “Top 100 under 50 Diverse Corporate Executives.” In 2007 and 2009, Clinkscales was listed among the “Top 50 Minorities in Cable” by Cableworld Magazine; in 2014, he appeared on the CableFax Magazine “Top 100 Executives in Cable” list. Clinkscales has served as treasurer of the Apollo Theater Foundation Board of Trustees, as a member of PepsiCo’s Multicultural Advisory Board, and a member of the Advisory Board at UrbanWorld Media, Inc. Since 2012, he has served on the Board of Directors for Florida A&M University (FAMU) Foundation and the Board of Visitors for Howard University’s School of Communications.

Keith Clinkscales was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.150

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/18/2014

Last Name

Clinkscales

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Terrence

Schools

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Harvard Business School

Hillcrest Middle School

Center School

St Joseph High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Keith

Birth City, State, Country

Bridgeport

HM ID

CLI05

State

Connecticut

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/7/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and media executive Keith Clinkscales (1964 - ) , CEO of REVOLT Media & TV and Shadow League Digital, co-founded Urban Profile magazine in 1988 and Vanguarde Media, publisher of Honey, Heart & Soul and Savoy magazines, in 1999. He also helped establish Vibe magazine, serving as president and CEO of Vibe Ventures from 1993 to 1999.

Employment

Urban Profile

Vibe Magazine

KTC Ventures

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

ESPN, Inc.

The Shadow League

Revolt TV

Reverend Julie Johnson Staples

Journalist, corporate executive and minister Reverend Julie Johnson Staples was born and raised in Des Moines, Iowa. In 1978, she received her B.S. degree in journalism from the William Allen White School of Journalism and Public Information at the University of Kansas.

Johnson Staples was first hired as a reporter for regional newspapers including the Orlando Sentinel and the Baltimore Sun, where she was a White House correspondent. In the late 1980s, Johnson Staples was appointed as a White House correspondent for The New York Times. A few years later she left The New York Times to work as the Supreme Court correspondent for TIME magazine, and then as the Justice Department correspondent for ABC News.

In 1994, Johnson Staples received her J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center. Also in the 1990s, she worked as a visiting professor in the School of Communication, Information and Library Studies at Rutgers University. In addition, she was a guest speaker and lecturer at such prestigious institutions as Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, Massachusetts.

In 1998, Johnson Staples was named senior managing director and director of the U.S. Media Services practice for Hill and Knowlton. In the early 2000s, she joined the private equity firm of Warburg Pincus as a vice president. She was then promoted to managing director in 2003, and was later named the first African American woman partner at Warburg Pincus.

After almost a decade at Warburg Pincus, Johnson Staples returned to school and received her M.Div. degree in Biblical Studies/Hebrew Bible from the Union Theological Seminary in 2011 and was ordained as a Congregational minister at Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York. In 2012, she received her Th.M. degree in Religion, Literature and Culture at Harvard Divinity School and was named interim minister for education at The Riverside Church in New York City.

Johnson Staples serves as moderator of the New York-New Jersey Regional Association of the National Association of Congregational Christian Churches (NACCC), and is a member of the NACCC national ambassador team, executive committee and board of directors. She was a fellow of the Congregational Foundation for Theological Studies and has served on the Georgetown University Law Center board of visitors; the University of Kansas Journalism School's board of trustees; the board of the Congregational Library of the Congregational Christian Historical Society in Boston, Massachusetts; and the Peace Action of New York State board of directors. Johnson Staples is also former chair of the board of directors of healthywomen.org and Changing Women's Health Naturally (P.B).

Johnson Staples is married, lives in Brooklyn, New York, and has one son.

Reverend Julie Johnson Staples was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 16, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.240

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/16/2014

Last Name

Staples

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Johnson

Schools

University of Kansas

Georgetown University Law Center

Union Theological Seminary

Harvard Divinity School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Julie

Birth City, State, Country

Des Moines

HM ID

STA12

State

Iowa

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/11/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist, corporate executive, and minister Reverend Julie Johnson Staples (1957 - ) is the minister for education at The Riverside Church in New York City. Prior to being ordained a minister in 2011, she was a managing director and partner at Warburg Pincus and senior managing director for Hill and Knowlton. From 1978 to 1998, she worked as a correspondent for the Baltimore Sun, The New York Times, TIME magazine and ABC News.

Employment

Orlando Sentinel

Baltimore Sun

The New York Times

TIME Magazine

ABC News

Rutgers University

Hill and Knowlton

Warburg Pincus

Riverside Church

Emil Wilbekin

Journalist and magazine executive Emil Kraig Wilbekin was born on September 16, 1967 in Cleveland, Ohio. His father, Harvey, was a lawyer and structural engineer; his mother, Cleota, a law judge and sociologist. In 1989, Wilbekin graduated with his B.S. degree in Mass Media Arts from Hampton University, where he was also editor of the Hampton Script. He went on to receive his M.S. degree in journalism from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in 1990.

Upon graduation, Wilbekin remained in New York City and worked as an in-house editorial assistant at Metropolitan Home and freelanced for a number of publications, including People Magazine, Chicago Tribune, Associated Press, and The New York Times. In 1992, Wilbekin became a founding editor of Vibe magazine. He went on to serve as Vibe’s associate editor and style editor, and then as fashion director; in 1999, he was named editor-in-chief. In 2002, under Wilbekin’s leadership, Vibe won the coveted National Magazine Award for General Excellence from the American Society of Magazine Editors. Then, in 2003, he became vice president of brand development for Vibe Ventures, where he oversaw Vibe.com, mobile, books, and Vibe TV, and executive produced the first Vibe Awards.

In 2004, Wilbekin left Vibe and was hired as vice president of brand development for Marc Ecko Enterprises and became a contributor and editorial board member of Complex magazine. He then went on to serve as a reporter for AOL Black Voices; a freelance writer for Out magazine; a consultant for Microsoft; and a consultant for Epiphany Media, where he worked in writing, curation and brand development. In 2008, Wilbekin was named editor-in-chief of Giant magazine and Giantmag.com, and in 2009, was made managing editor of Essence.com. He was then appointed as editor-at-large of Essence magazine in 2012. Wilbekin resigned in 2014 and became an independent consultant and editorial content executive.

Wilbekin has served on the boards of LIFEbeat - The Music Industry Fights AIDS, The Stonewall Foundation, the American Society of Magazine Editors, the Design Industries Fighting AIDS (DIFFA), and the Black AIDS Institute. His honors include the Pratt Institute’s Creative Spirit Award, the Howard University Entertainment, Sports, and Law Club Media Award, The Anti Violence Project’s Courage Award, and The Hetrick Martin Institute’s Emory Award. Out magazine named Wilbekin as one of 100 most influential gay people in America in 2002, and he was inducted into the Hampton University Mass Media Arts Hall of Fame in 2007.

Emil Wilbekin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 16, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.204

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/16/2014 |and| 8/12/2014

Last Name

Wilbekin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Kraig

Schools

Our Redeemer Lutheran School

Walnut Hills High School

Hampton University

Columbia University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Emil

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

WIL72

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Stay In Your Lane and Always Be Your Best Self

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/16/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

West Indian Food

Short Description

Journalist and magazine executive Emil Wilbekin (1967 - ) was a founding editor of Vibe magazine and served as its editor-in-chief from 1999 to 2003. He has also worked as vice president of brand development for Vibe Ventures and Marc Ecko Enterprises, editor-in-chief of Giant magazine, managing editor of Essence.com, and editor-at-large of Essence magazine.

Employment

EW Consulting

Essence

Giant/Interactive One

MSN

Marc Ecko

Vibe

Metropolitan Home

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Emil Wilbekin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin lists his favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin lists his favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his paternal family's Crucian heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin talks about being adopted

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his mother's membership on an all-white tennis team

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Emil Wilbekins talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Emil Wilbekin describes his childhood home in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Emil Wilbekin describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Emil Wilbekins describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Emil Wilbekins describes the music played in his home as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin describes his childhood neighborhood, Kennedy Heights in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about similarities between African American and West Indian culture

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin describes his relationship with his elder brother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about managing a learning disability as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin describes coming to terms with his sexual identity while studying abroad in London, England

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin describes his first impression of Hampton University and his desire to start a magazine and be a millionaire

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin describes his extracurricular activities at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia and his involvement with Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin talks about beginning to understand his sexual identity and being 'in the closet' at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin describes coming out to his parents

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about influential professor Lottie Knight and being editor of the student newspaper at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin describes his summer internships at the Cincinnati Inquirer

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin talks about applying to magazine jobs and journalism school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin describes his summer internship at Company magazine in London, England

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin talks about studying at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin talks about getting his first job with Metropolitan Home magazine and being openly gay at work

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin describes his social life as a young journalist

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin talks about freelance writing while working at Metropolitan Home magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Metropolitan Home magazine's partnership with Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA)

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about joining the Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA) board

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin describes the development of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin remembers creating the test issue of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about being editor of the new talent "Next" column in Vibe magazine, including interviewing Mary J. Blige

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his relationship with HistoryMaker Quincy Jones and his father, Harvey Wilbekin's, sudden passing in 1997

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin describes his first fashion week in Milan, Italy as fashion director of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin remembers the night he was asked to be editor-in-chief of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin describes some of his most memorable photo shoots as fashion director of Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Bevy Smith

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about HistoryMakers Keith Clinkscales and Leonard Burnett, Jr. and also Johnathan Van Meter, Vibe's first editor-in-chief

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin describes the reputation of Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about the murder of Biggie Smalls (Notorious B.I.G.) outside a Vibe after party

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin talks about the sale of Vibe magazine from Time Warner to Miller Publishing

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin talks about managing Vibe magazine's fashion budget

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin describes his vision for Vibe magazine as editor-in-chief

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Vibe magazine winning an American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) award in 2002

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his involvement with HIV/AIDS literacy organizations and LGBT media

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Vibe's December 2001 issue commemorating 9/11 and transitioning out of his role as editor-in-chief

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Emil Wilbekin talks about working for Marc Ecko

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about leaving Vibe and blogging about LeBron James' life off the basketball court

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about working at GIANT magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin talks about being recruited to run Essence.com

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin describes his experience as editor-at-large of Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin recalls the controversy surrounding Essence magazine in 2010 when Elliana Placas was hired as fashion director

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin considers his future plans at the time of the interview

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin considers what his father would think of his career and describes his mother's compassion

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin describes his mother's personality and accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his mother's quilting

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin describes spending time with his parents as a child

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his childhood social activities

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his well-known extended family members

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin remembers his family reunions

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his maternal and paternal family ancestry

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin recalls being babysat by HistoryMaker Nikki Giovanni

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his involvement in Jack and Jill of America, Inc., pt.1

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his involvement in Jack and Jill of America, Inc., pt.2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his involvement in Jack and Jill of American Inc., pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his social circle in New York, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin talks about the Coffee Shop eatery in Union Square and discovering new talent as editor of the Vibe column "Next"

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Nicola Vassell

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin describes moving upward in the ranks in Vibe's fashion department

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin explains how the jobs of celebrity stylists and fashion editors intersect

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin talks about high fashion in Vibe magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin talks about tension between high fashion and hip hop culture

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Emil Wilbekin describes watching the ascent of Sean "Diddy" Combs' career

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin talks about mediating tense situations at Vibe as editor-in-chief

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin describes balancing the editorial and business sides of Vibe

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin talks about maintaining journalistic integrity amidst blurred lines between celebrity and journalism

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about iconic Vibe magazine celebrity covers

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin describes directing photo shoots as editor-in-chief of Vibe

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin explains how Vibe developed alongside hip hop culture

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin talks about how Vibe changed after the departure of HistoryMakers Keith Clinkscales and Leonard Burnett, Jr.

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Emil Wilbekin talks about his online arts and culture curating and sharing platform "WOW," World of Wilbekin

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Emil Wilbekin reflects on hip hop's appeal to upper-middle class African Americans

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Emil Wilbekin talks about negative aspects of hip hop culture

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Emil Wilbekin talks about Vibe magazine's role as an interpreter of hip hop culture

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Emil Wilbekin talks about fashion trends that emerged from hip hop culture

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Emil Wilbekin reflects over the legacy of hip hop culture

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Emil Wilbekin explains his digital platform "WOW" the World of Wilbekin

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Emil Wilbekin narrates his photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$9

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Emil Wilbekin talks about influential professor Lottie Knight and being editor of the student newspaper at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia
Emil Wilbekin describes balancing the editorial and business sides of Vibe
Transcript
At Hampton [University, Hampton, Virginia]--$$Emm-hmm.$$--when you were studying mass media arts--is that what it's called? Who, who were your teachers? Who were your great influences?$$My really great influence at Hampton was a professor; her name is Lottie Knight, and Lottie Knight was the hardest professor I had had to date in my career--she was not the last. And Lottie Knight was--I mean you had to turn in something that was spectacular; like if you did not do your best in your work, you were gonna re-do it until you got it right. She would call you out in class, she would read your stuff in front of people in class, and she was just tough; like she didn't--she didn't care, and she was a really, really, I think, powerful influence on me because I would have to say that a part of my editing and management style would come from her, which is the--the motto at Hampton is the standard of excellence. And so that is something that I carry with me, that is something that I reference a lot because I have had the privilege to work with a lot of other Hamptonians, and so Lottie represented--Mrs. Knight represented the standard of excellence, and she was phenomenal; she was a big influence. The other things that I remember about Hampton was studying French, and what was unique about studying French at Hampton was that we learned French by learning about the French-speaking parts of Africa and so that was really brilliant. The other part which is important to mention is as the editor of the school newspaper; I was very controversial because I would actually take the administration to task about student rights and things that were going on, and in fact, several times, funding for the school paper would miraculously be pulled, and I can remember having to drive to Williamsburg [Virginia], which is about forty-five minutes north of Hampton, to pick up the papers from the printer because there was no way to get them back and forth and going, and they were like, "Oh, the paper is not ready because the school didn't pay," and I was just, you know, just--and so that riled me up even more.$When were you editor-in-chief [of Vibe]?$$I was editor-in-chief from 1999 until 2002.$$And who owned the magazine when you were editor-in-chief?$$When I was editor-in-chief, Bob Miller, who used to high-up at Time Inc. and helped launch Vibe with Time Inc. Ventures, and Warner Brothers had bought the magazine from Time Inc., so he was the owner at that time.$$So, [HM] Keith [Clinkscales] and Len [HM Leonard Burnett, Jr.] never owned Vibe.$$No.$$They, they just--they had--$$Right.$$--their, their (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Publisher and CEO [chief executive officer].$$So, as a business--now, obviously you're on the editorial side but you see the, the business--how the business is working. What--because Vibe told stories differently than other so-called black magazines, I mean they, they told it all in a way that was completely atypical of traditional black magazines.$$Emm-hmm.$$Did--was there ever conflict between the business side and the editorial side based upon the kinds of stories that you were telling and cover subjects that you selected?$$We always had conflict with editorial versus publishing and business. I mean I think that that is the very nature of magazines, and especially a magazine that was born out of Time Inc., which is so about church and state, and at a time where that ethos was really, really upheld. I think the lines are very blurred now because we live in a very different world and people need money. So--but there was a lotta challenges about, you know, business decisions versus editorial decisions. We did a story about MTV and literally were black-balled from anything MTV for years because we basically said that they were kind of racist and not necessarily uplifting people in their programming, and no VMAs [MTV Video Music Awards] for us. So these types of things happen, and it happened across the board; and you also have to realize that when you have high-profile people who are on the publishing side and the editorial side, the lines were often blurred to the outside world about who was in charge of what. It was like, "Oh, you're all Vibe." But outside people don't know that--well, in our construct, business doesn't dictate editorial, and editorial should do what it wants to do but does have to sway in certain times. So it was--there was a lotta that, and I think the other thing to keep in mind about Vibe was it was a very young staff. Most people that worked at Vibe, that was their first job outta school. So, you have a whole--like a majority of a staff that's never worked anywhere and suddenly they're working in this corporate structure that--and you want the kids that were into music and knew hip hop and knew the difference between the different genres of rap music and stuff like that. They're not gonna be great with doing their T&E [travel and expenses], they're not gonna be great in protocol and meetings. So a lotta the work that I would say the editors did at Vibe was mentorship because there was a lotta teaching and grooming. Of course, Keith and Len had gone to business school, of course I went to Columbia J. School [Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, New York, New York]. I mean we had people there that had higher education obviously, but most people hadn't worked anywhere else; a lotta people had worked at the Village Voice and other places, but many of the young staff never worked anywhere else before, so that also made it challenging.

Robert Bogle

Newspaper chief executive Robert Bogle was born to John Bogle, a vice president and advertising director at The Philadelphia Tribune, and Roslyn Woods Bogle, an advocate and activist throughout the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. In 1973, he graduated from Cheyney State College with his B.A. degree in urban studies and attended the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and Finance to study marketing and economics.

Bogle was first hired at The Philadelphia Tribune in 1970, and was named advertising director in 1973. He served in that position until 1977, when he became director of marketing. From 1981 to 1989, Bogle worked as executive vice president and treasurer for the Tribune and was then promoted to president and chief executive officer. In 1991, Bogle was appointed president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), where he served two terms. Among his achievements as president of the NNPA were the dedication of the new national headquarters in Washington, D.C., the introduction of the NNPA’s national wire service, and the establishment of new and enhanced relationships with major national advertisers, including Toys R Us, Procter & Gamble, U.S. Air, K-Mart, and Walt Disney World Company.

Bogle has served on the boards of U.S. Airways Group, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, United Way of America, the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, the Workforce Investment Board, and the African American Chamber of Commerce. In addition, in 2009, Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter appointed Bogle to the Independence Blue Cross board of directors.

Bogle is chairman of the Hospitals and Higher Education Facilities Authority of Philadelphia and serves as a commissioner of the Delaware River Port Authority. He has served as chairman of the council of trustees of Cheyney University and is an advisor to the United Negro College Fund, a member of the executive committee of the Boy Scouts of America, and a life member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. He is also a founding member and president of the African American News and Information Consortium, a group of premier Black newspapers in some of the largest markets in the United States of America.

In 1993, Bogle was named one of Ebony magazine’s 100 most influential black Americans. In 1995, 1997 and 1999, the NNPA honored Bogle with the Russwurm Award, the highest honor to the “Best Newspaper in America.” Bogle received an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree from Drexel University in 2000.

Robert Bogle was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 11, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.151

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/13/2014

Last Name

Bogle

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Schools

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

BOG02

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Maarten

Favorite Quote

Never To Your Friends Your Secrets Tell, For One Day Your Friend May Be Your Foe And Out Into The World Your Secrets Will Go.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Oxtail Stew, Pig's Feet. Chitlins, Roast and Turkey

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Robert Bogle ( - ) is the president and chief executive officer of The Philadelphia Tribune. He also served as president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association from 1991 to 1995.

Employment

The Philadelphia Tribune

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Bogle's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother's academic abilities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about his father and his parents' views of race and character

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle talks about how his parents met, his likeness to them and lessons from his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Bogle talks about his brother, HistoryMaker Donald Bogle, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle talks about his brother, HistoryMaker Donald Bogle, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about growing up in Darby, Pennsylvania where he attended integrated schools

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle talks about the lessons he learned from his father

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle states his elementary school and recalls his elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle talks about meeting influential African Americans as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert Bogle talks about growing up knowing that he would have to choose between education, work, and the military after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Bogle talks about South Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and black-owned theaters across the country

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle claims Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as the birthplace of the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about working as a newsboy, his educational experience, and moving to Yeadon, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about attending Yeadon High School in Yeadon, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about attending Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle lists his instructors at Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about how he came to work at the Philadelphia Tribune

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle talks about his studies at Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania and working at the Philadelphia Tribune

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle talks about participating in the student union at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in Cheyney, Pennsylvania