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Jonathan Capehart

Journalist Jonathan Capehart was born on July 2, 1967 in Newark, New Jersey. He graduated from Saint Benedict's Preparatory School and received his B.A. degree in political science from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota in 1989.

Capehart first worked as assistant to the president of the WNYC Foundation. He then became a researcher for NBC's The Today Show. From 1993 to 2000, he served as a member of the New York Daily News’ editorial board. In 1999, the New York Daily News editorial team received a Pulitzer Prize for the paper’s series of editorials that helped save Harlem’s Apollo Theater. Capehart then went on to work as a national affairs columnist for Bloomberg News from 2000 to 2001, and later served as a policy advisor for Michael Bloomberg in his successful 2001 campaign for Mayor of New York City. In 2002, Capehart returned to the New York Daily News, where he worked as deputy editorial page editor until 2004, when he was hired as senior vice president and senior counselor of public affairs for Hill & Knowlton. In 2007, Capehart joined the staff of the Washington Post as a journalist and editorial board member. There, he wrote for the Washington Post's PostPartisan blog and served as a contributor for MSNBC. He also served as a substitute anchor on many MSNBC programs, including AM JoyThe CycleMartin Bashir, and Way Too Early, and appeared regularly on Hardball and other programs. Capehart has also been a member of the Reporters Roundtable on ABC News' This Week with George Stephanopoulos, as well as the host of America on the Line, a news and national call-in show about the 2018 midterm elections on WNYC New York Public Radio.

Capehart served as a moderator at the Aspen Ideas Festival and for the Aspen Institute, the Center for American Progress and at the Brussels Forum of the German Marshall Fund. He has also moderated sessions at the Atlantic’s Washington Ideas Forum and for the Connecticut Forum, and he was a fellow at the Georgetown Institute of Politics and Public Service in 2019.

Capehart has been recognized for his work in journalism. In 1999, he was on the editorial board at the New York Daily News that won a Pulitzer Prize. Capehart was also named an Esteem Honoree in 2011. In 2014, The Advocate magazine ranked Capehart nineth out of fifty of the most influential LGBT people in media. In December 2014, Mediaite named him one of the “Top Nine Rising Stars of Cable News.” Equality Forum made him a 2018 LGBT History Month Icon in October. In May 2018, the publisher of the Washington Post awarded him an “Outstanding Contribution Award” for his opinion writing and “Cape Up” podcast interviews.

Jonathan Capehart was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.145

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/16/2017 |and| 3/22/2018

Last Name

Capehart

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Carleton College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jonathan

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

CAP01

Favorite Season

The Next One

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Amalfi Coast, Italy

Favorite Quote

Child Please.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/2/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian

Short Description

Journalist Jonathan Capehart (1968- ) was a Washington Post editorial board member, and wrote for their PostPartisan blog. From 1993 to 2000, he was on New York Daily News’ editorial board, where he won the Pulitzer Prize for Best Editorial Writing.

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Alysia Tate

Journalist Alysia Diane Tate was born on August 7, 1972 in Denver, Colorado. Her mother, Tamra Tate, was a journalist; her father, George Tate, a counselor, professor and former minister. Tate grew up in Denver, Colorado where she attended Park Hill Elementary School, Smiley Middle School, and East High School. In 1994, she graduated from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois with her B.S. degree in journalism.

Upon graduation, Tate was hired as a reporter for the Daily Herald in Chicago, Illinois. Then, in 1998, she moved to The Chicago Reporter, where she worked as a reporter before being promoted to senior editor. In 2001, Tate was appointed editor and publisher of The Chicago Reporter, where she led the editorial, fundraising and marketing efforts of the publication. From 2008 to 2011, she served as chief operating officer of the Community Renewal Society, a faith-based, social justice organization that publishes two independent magazines, including The Chicago Reporter. In 2013, Tate was hired as a policy advisor and speechwriter for Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan. In addition, she has worked as a project and communications consultant, whose clients have included the Chicago Community Trust, the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation and the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Education.

Tate has been active in a number of civic organizations, including the Chicago Network, Leadership Greater Chicago, and Re-evaluation Counseling, an international, volunteer-based peer counseling and social change organization. She served on the board of DePaul University’s Institute for Business and Professional Ethics, and has served on the advisory board of Illinois Issues, a public affairs magazine published by the Center for State Policy and Leadership at the University of Illinois at Springfield. Tate also served on the Local School Council of the William H. Ray Elementary School in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood.

Tate has received recognition for her work including the Clarion Award from the National Association for Women in Communications; the Unity Award in Media from Lincoln University; and the Award of Excellence from the Chicago Association of Black Journalists. She was listed as one of Ebony magazine’s leaders to watch in 2008; was a Leadership Greater Chicago fellow in 2004; and was included in the 2002 “40 Under 40” listing in Crain’s Chicago Business. Tate also served as an Edgar Fellow in 2014, joining a bi-partisan group of emerging leaders exploring policy issues affecting the state of Illinois

Alysia Tate was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.252

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/21/2014 |and| 6/10/2018

Last Name

Tate

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Diane

Occupation
Schools

Park Hill Elementary School

McAuliffe International School

East High School

Northwestern University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Alysia

Birth City, State, Country

Denver

HM ID

TAT03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Colorado

Favorite Vacation Destination

Somewhere Warm

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/7/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chocolate

Short Description

Journalist Alysia Tate (1972 - ) was the editor and publisher of The Chicago Reporter. She also served as a policy advisor and speechwriter for Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan.

Employment

Office of the Illinois Attorney General

Community Renewal Society

The Chicago Reporter (a program of CBS)

The Chicago Reporter

Favorite Color

Teal

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Alysia Tate's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alysia Tate lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alysia Tate describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alysia Tate describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alysia Tate talks about her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Alysia Tate describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Alysia Tate talks about her parents' activism

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Alysia Tate talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Alysia Tate talks about her father's decision to leave the church

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alysia Tate describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alysia Tate describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alysia Tate describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alysia Tate remembers spending time with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alysia Tate describes the Park Hill neighborhood of Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Alysia Tate describes her early educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Alysia Tate talks about the development of her racial identity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Alysia Tate talks about her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Alysia Tate remembers her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alysia Tate talks about her experiences at East High School in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alysia Tate recalls her decision to attend Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alysia Tate describes the racial cliques at East High School in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alysia Tate talks about Malcolm X's impact on her life

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alysia Tate describes the African American student community at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Alysia Tate remembers the black faculty at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Alysia Tate talks about the racial politics at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Alysia Tate talks about her experiences in a white sorority at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Alysia Tate talks about her political activism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Alysia Tate remembers resigning from the Gamma Phi Beta Sorority

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Alysia Tate talks about the development of her feminism

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Alysia Tate talks about the problem of sexual assault at Northwestern University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Alysia Tate remembers being targeted in an investigation at Northwestern University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Alysia Tate talks about the discrimination against black women

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Alysia Tate remembers the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Alysia Tate remembers changing her major from theater to journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Alysia Tate remembers her internship at The Boston Globe

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Alysia Tate remember joining the staff of the Daily Herald

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Alysia Tate remembers accepting a position at the Chicago Reporter

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Alysia Tate remembers the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Alysia Tate remembers Barack Obama's political career in Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Alysia Tate talks about her introduction into city politics in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Alysia Tate talks about reporting on the murder of Ryan Harris

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Alysia Tate reflects upon the need for mental health reparations

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Alysia Tate talks about housing discrimination in Chicago, Illinois

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
Alysia Tate talks about her political activism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois
Alysia Tate remembers the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa
Transcript
This is what I call my militant phase (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So, this is a transition--I know when we first started talking about college, you said that you felt that you had to choose an allegiance--$$Yes.$$--and you volunteered to choose the black side of the coin because that's the way the political straddle and everything was set up at Northwestern [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois] and it was a good time to just go and make that transition.$$Yeah.$$But, it seems it's becoming--it's a more gradual change than just--you didn't just change when you got there, right?$$No, no. It was definitely--it was a number of factors. I mean, it was also, you know, being in Chicago [Illinois]. Well, I mean, I'm in Evanston [Illinois], but I'm, you know, surrounded by the City of Chicago. For the first time, I'm really getting close to my, my sister [Karen Tate Warner] who grew up on the South Side of Chicago and still lives at 84th [Street] and Michigan [Avenue].$$So, had you met her before?$$I had met her before. Now, we're fifteen years apart.$$Okay.$$So, she used to come to Denver [Colorado] to visit our dad when I was little and she was a teenager, but then she had her first child at age twenty. So, you know, I was in kindergarten when she had her first child. But, I, I remember, you know, visits with her from time to time, but we had never really been able to get close. So, now we're getting close, I'm taking the train, the Purple Line south until it turns into the Red Line south all the way to the South Side, and you know what happens when you see--you know, when you ride the CTA [Chicago Transit Authority] from the north to the south of Chicago, it just gets black and black and blacker until it's completely black. So, I'm--so I'm--this is the first time I'm in a city like this. This is the first time I'm in a metropolitan area with this kind of numbers of black people, with this kind of history of black leadership, you know, with Har- you know, the, the legacy of Harold Washington. So, it's--so, it's all of that, too, is happening while I'm at the school. I, I get involved in Re-evaluation Counseling, which is a peer counseling social change organization I'm still very involved with. But, but that organization is so much about challenging oppression and providing spaces and places for us to undo the effects of oppression, so I, I get connected through that through a group called Students Together Against Racial Tension, START, on campus. So, so I'm--you know, it's kind of--all these things build on each other. And, and yet, my family had no idea what to do with me. I mean, my white family had no idea what to do (laughter) with me 'cause I was--suddenly, I was angry and I was--you know, remember X--the X caps, the Malcolm X caps. You know, I had my Malcolm X stuff and like--they're like, "Who is this person? Like, what happened to her?" (Laughter) You know? So, but it was important for me to get to explore all of that and test that out and learn about that. And so I remember--you know, we had a march, the black students on campus after Rodney King. We just all dressed in black and we marched to the bursar's office and I don't know if we raised our fists in the air or if we just turned our back on the administration; I'm not sure what we did, but we were just, you know, showing our, our solidarity with Rodney King. It may have been after all of the unrest in Los Angeles [California] that we did that. I remember participating in anti-apartheid marches, you know, through Evanston and, you know, being someone involved in that--in that movement. So, all of this, this--these were just things I had never been exposed to before. And some of it was I was just at that age where you can start doing these kinds of things, but it was also the place I was in and the time--the time that I was in.$I want to ask about two things before we get you started at The Reporter [The Chicago Reporter].$$Okay.$$One is the conference in Durban, South Africa.$$Yeah, 2001?$$Yeah, the United Nations World Conference against Racism [World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance], which is a--how did you get involved in that and what happened there?$$That was through Re-evaluation Counseling. I mentioned the peer counseling social change organization I got involved with in college, that organization, we set up a project called United to End Racism and actually registered for that conference as an NGO [non-governmental organization] and sent a delegation of, of folks from our organization. So, so, Re-evaluation Counseling, RC, is a--pretty much a volunteer based group that has folks involved in--I think now we're--there are people in eighty some countries in the world, so it's an international, very grassroots kind of organization. But, from time to time, we've used this structure of United to End Racism to bring people together to share these tools and this information we have about how to heal from the effects of racism and other oppressions. So, it was a really amazing delegation of people from all over the world, different ages, different backgrounds, all kinds of things, and we did a whole series of different workshops, again, on, you know, recovering from the damage done by racism, for, for all these different groups. We even had workshops for white people on, you know, recovering from the damage done by racism 'cause we, we really put our thinking forward really around three different ways that racism affects people. I mean, one is the actual, you know--we don't believe in reverse racism and I personally don't believe in this thing called reverse racism, but I believe that, you know, there is an economic and--yeah, an economic exploitation of people, people of color around the world that's justified in the name of racism, that's one thing. Then, I believe, you know, there--that we as people of color internalize all of that and turn it against each other and ourselves, i.e., you know, black men killing each other in Chicago [Illinois]. And lastly, though, I think the humanity of white people is deeply, deeply affected by racism if you're taught to be an oppressor, if you're taught to perpetuate this horrible thing. If you're taught to believe its lies, that's deeply injurious to you as a human being and you have to actually tackle it on all those fronts for it to work. You can't do this like white people are evil thing or, you know, whatever. So, we did workshops--we did a series of workshops on all those different kind of flavors of racism with young people, with women, with, I don't know, Jews, gentiles, you know, how racism intersects with anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism was a huge issue at that conference, honestly. Anti-Semitism is used as a wedge issue always to, to grab our attention and get us focused on blaming a group of people, usually Jews, rather than working together to deal with issues, and it was very obvious at that conference how that was playing out. Anyway, so that was an amazing experience. It was amazing to be there. It was amazing to be part of it. It was amazing to see so many thousands of people around the world who really believe that not only must we end racism, but we can by working together that we can actually undo this, that it does not have to be a reality of life forever in perpetuity. So, that was--that was really incredible. It was very unfortunate that 9/11 [September 11, 2001] happened a week or two after that conference, and so the gains from that conference just got kind of, you know, swept under the rug and then we were into 9/11 and justif- using that to justify all kinds of horrible racist policies, you know, at home and abroad. But, that experience, being in Durban, again, was another thing that sort of shaped me in terms of my commitment to tackling racism and speaking out and being visible around it, you know, using The Reporter as a vehicle to do that and using my personal life as a vehicle to do that. You know, I began to really focus on a lot of efforts on building a local community of folks involved with Re-evaluation Counseling who were committed to that work. We've--and we've done really amazing work in, in building a community of people here in Chicago doing that together, a really multiracial, you know, mixed class, mixed generational group of people doing that. So, that conference really gave me a lot of hope and inspiration I think to really know that it was okay to dedicate a lot of my life to this work.

Edward Lewis

Magazine publisher and entrepreneur Edward Lewis was born on May 15, 1940, in the Bronx, New York. His father was a night shift janitor at City College; his mother a factory worker and beautician. Lewis attended De Witt Clinton High School, where he excelled academically and was a star fullback on the football team. Upon graduating from high school in 1958, he earned a football scholarship to the University of New Mexico. Lewis received his B.A. degree in political science in 1964 and his M.A. degree in political science and international relations in 1966, both from the University of New Mexico. He later graduated from Harvard University’s Small Business Management Program.

Lewis worked first as an administrative analyst for the City Manager’s Office in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1964 to 1965, and then as a financial analyst at First National City Bank in New York City from 1965 to 1969. In 1969, he co-founded Essence, a magazine specifically targeted to black women, and went on to serve as CEO and publisher of Essence Communications, Inc. for three decades. In the 1980s and 1990s, Lewis expanded Essence Communications to include a weekly television show, fashion line and mail order catalogue, as well as an annual awards show and Essence music festival. In 1992, Lewis acquired Income Opportunities from Davis Publishing; and, in 1995, he co-founded Latina magazine, a bilingual publication geared toward Hispanic women.

In 1997, Lewis became the first African American chairman of the Magazine Publishers of America. In October 2000, Lewis engineered a partnership with Time, Inc. and Essence Communications was sold to Time in 2005. He later joined the private equity firm Solera Capital as a senior adviser and published a memoir, The Man from Essence: Creating a Magazine for Black Women, in 2014.

Lewis has sat on the boards of TransAfrica, the Rheeland Foundation, New York City Partnership, the Central Park Conservancy, A&P, Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Teachers College of Columbia University, Spelman College, Tuskegee University and the Harlem Village Academy; and served as chairman of Latina Media Ventures. He also served on President Barack Obama’s Board of Advisors for the Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Essence magazine ranked seventh on Advertising Age’s 2003 “A-List,” which was the first time that an African American targeted publication received the honor. Lewis’s personal awards include the Entrepreneur of the Year Award for Publishing from Ernst & Young; the President’s Award from One Hundred Black Men of America, Inc.; the Frederick Douglass Award from the New York Urban League; the United Negro College Fund’s Lifetime Achievement Award; the American Advertising Federation Diversity Achievement Award; the Henry Johnson Fisher Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Henry Luce Lifetime Achievement Award. He was inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame in 2014.

Edward Lewis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.224

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/7/2014

Last Name

Lewis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

DeWitt Clinton High School

University of New Mexico

Georgetown University Law Center

P.S. 35 Stephen Decatur School

P.S. 2 Morrisania School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Edward

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

LEW20

Favorite Season

Thanksgiving

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bali, Indonesia

Favorite Quote

No Doubt About It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/15/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potato

Short Description

Magazine publishing chief executive and entrepreneur Edward Lewis (1940 - ) cofounded Essence Communications, Inc., where he served as the CEO and publisher of Essence magazine.

Employment

Solera Capital

Essence Communications, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:8058,82:9180,93:9588,98:10914,116:15708,214:16422,222:29136,416:29815,424:44994,705:95065,1324:96374,1344:98068,1377:102457,1444:107924,1526:158530,2181$0,0:300,3:700,8:12287,123:12691,128:18246,201:18953,209:19357,214:22412,250:34602,501:34894,506:60475,890:87458,1301:100991,1466:100481,1477:101017,1494:101553,1503:102022,1513:107918,1629:127357,1951:150944,2279:161648,2458:162043,2464:167336,2578:168363,2603:168916,2612:169627,2623:169943,2628:180990,2778:182270,2796:182830,2804:216717,3199:220480,3273:221502,3282:234955,3464:235175,3469:235670,3480:238640,3515:239207,3524:250164,3684:250822,3693:251950,3708:257496,3789:263341,3861:263852,3869:266283,3883:268303,3912:269010,3920:269717,3933:274460,3988:279860,4067:282470,4075
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Edward Lewis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis talks about his experiences as an only child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis talks about his maternal family members

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis talks about his maternal family's decision to move north

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Edward Lewis remembers his maternal aunt, Matilene Spencer Berryman

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Edward Lewis describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis remembers his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis describes the racial dynamics of the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis remembers his education in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis describes his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis talks about his mother's second marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis remembers caring for his paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis remembers visiting his maternal family in Farmville, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis describes his neighborhood in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis remembers DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis recalls his recruitment to the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis talks about adjusting to the University of New Mexico

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis remembers losing his college athletic scholarship

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis recalls his coursework in Russian history

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis describes his student activism

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis remembers his admission to Georgetown Law School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis talks about the careers of his football teammates at the University of New Mexico

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis talks about President Richard Nixon

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis recalls losing his scholarship to Georgetown Law School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis remembers his experiences at First National City Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis remembers the formation of The Hollingsworth Group, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis remembers the formation of The Hollingsworth Group, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis describes the initial structure of The Hollingsworth Group

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis remembers the first issue of Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis talks about the founding of Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis describes the early advertising in Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis recalls the overhead costs at Essence Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis remembers his mentors in the publishing industry

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis talks about the success of Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis talks about the early editors in chief of Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis remembers his former business partners' lawsuit

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis describes Essence's relationship with Playboy Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis remembers Marcia Ann Gillespie

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis recalls promoting Susan Taylor as the editor in chief of Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis talks about the magazine industry

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis describes the growth of Essence Communications, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis remembers creating the Essence Music Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis talks about the success of the Essence Music Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis talks about Black Enterprise magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis describes the advertising challenges at Essence Communications, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis remembers his business relationship with John H. Johnson

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis talks about Camille Cosby's board membership at Essence Communications, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Edward Lewis describes the negotiations between Essence Communications, Inc. and Time Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Edward Lewis describes his departure from Essence Communications, Inc., pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Edward Lewis talks about the future of Essence magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Edward Lewis describes his departure from Essence Communications, Inc., pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Edward Lewis talks about the title of his book, 'The Man from Essence'

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Edward Lewis talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Edward Lewis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Edward Lewis reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Edward Lewis describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Edward Lewis reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Edward Lewis talks about his second marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Edward Lewis describes his aspiration to become a blues singer

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

6$4

DATitle
Edward Lewis recalls his coursework in Russian history
Edward Lewis remembers creating the Essence Music Festival
Transcript
Well, you also took up Russian studies and?$$I was very--my curiosity in terms of reading, I read some of the great Russian novelists: Tolstoy [Leo Tolstoy], Dostoyevsky [Fyodor Dostoyevsky]; and I decided to take Russian history. And--I had already taken Russian civilization--that's required when you, in your first years at the university [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico]. But my interest in Russian history, the professor there was a man named Henry Tobias [Henry J. Tobias]. Henry was a graduate, from Paterson, New Jersey, went to Ohio; got his Ph.D. in Stanford [Stanford University, Stanford, California]. But he taught Russian history, and I took this course. And just--I just ate it up. And I did not know that Professor Tobias was interested in me; and I was on my way--I had gone to the student administration building. I was on my way to the student union to get some coffee, he was coming out, the professor, and he said, "Ed [HistoryMaker Edward Lewis], are you going to have some coffee?" And I said yes. He said, "Do you mind if I sit with you?" I said, "By all means, please." And we sat and he proceeded to--he and I proceeded, to talk for the next three and a half hours. I had never had anyone do that with me. And so as a result of that, this man just opened my head up intellectually; and then I took Russian history. He also taught Chinese history, so I took Chinese history. And so my background in terms of--I was a political science major, but I had an interest in international affairs--particularly, Russian and Chinese history. And so in my travels, I've gone to the Far East, I'm going to China, I've not been to Russia yet but I hope to go to Moscow [Russia] and St. Petersburg [Russia] at some point. But I have a, just a familiarity of Russia, in particularly how serfs, serfdom was portrayed, and how these Russians had to overcome that; and I compare that to how we as blacks had to live in a society in terms of how we had to overcome, too. So I just sort found some familiarity in things of--and when I looked at what happened to the people who were really slaves too and looked at what is happening to us.$So talk about how that came, came about 'cause--?$$That came about because--1994, I was having drinks with a legend in the jazz world, impresario, a man by the name of George Wein. He--George started Newport Jazz Festival, he has a New Orleans jazz festival [New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival]. And he and I were having drinks, and I was telling him about my upcoming, upcoming twenty-fifth anniversary of Essence [Essence Communications, Inc.]. And I'd like--and I, I said, "I'm gonna do the same thing, big party in New York [New York], thank all the advertisers and thank everyone," I said, "I'd like to do something a little bit different." He said to me, "Have you ever thought about doing a music festival in New Orleans [Louisiana] at the Superdome [Louisiana Superdome; Mercedes-Benz Superdome] over the 4th of July weekend?" I looked at him, "No, I had not thought about that." But there was a germ of a, of a, a synergistic opportunity. New Orleans, music, magazine--maybe there's something there. So I suggested he come to my office, make a presentation. He did to Clarence [Clarence Smith], Susan [HistoryMaker Susan Taylor] and my chief financial officer [Harry Dedyo]. Everyone was lukewarm. I listened and thought about it and decided to come to do it and he and I were partners. We were equal partners, 50/50 partners, and that's how we came together in 1995. Lo and behold we had about--roughly, about 100--between 100 and 145,000 people who came. And I can remember giving my speech to fifty thousand people at the Superdome, thanking everyone from the bottom of my heart. I was humble that people would come out and, and be supportive of Essence over its twenty-five years of being in business; and that's how it happened. And the very next year, however, I was about to pull the plug because the, the governor, the new governor of the State of Louisiana, Robert Foster [sic. Mike Foster], made the decision to eliminate all affirmative action programs for the State of Louisiana. I'm a big proponent of affirmative action; and, and, and the way we promoted the festival [Essence Music Festival] was through the magazine, and so word of mouth had gotten out that we may not be doing this, and as you can well imagine, that precipitated a reaction. Marc Morial [HistoryMaker Marc H. Morial], who is now leader of the Urban League [National Urban League] was mayor of, of, of New Orleans. I was--as I said, I was not going back, but then the lieutenant governor of Louisiana, Blanco [Kathleen Blanco], who ultimately became the governor called me and asked if I would be willing to meet with the governor of Louisiana and tell you a story. And I was open to that. And I was--and I also knew that the Urban League was going to hold its convention in New Orleans several weeks later. So I called Hugh, [HistoryMaker] Hugh Price, and told him what I was thinking: "Why don't you hold off doing the, doing the Urban League and you and I go together to Louisiana, Baton Rouge." We went and I explained to the governor why affirmative action is so important to me. I said there's one of our great entertainers, it was a man by the name of James Brown, he had some lyrics, one of his songs ['I Don't Want Nobody to Give Me Nothing'], open the door. And all I asked, in terms of how I define affirmative action, is to open the door. Once the door's open, you don't need to give me anything. I can compete with anybody, but what happens is that we don't even get a chance to open the door. And so if you don't open the door, I'm gonna fight you tooth and nail. And he listened, got him to modify his affirmative action edict enough for me to make the decision to go back in 1996. By the time I had decided to go back, word had gotten out that we were not coming back, we're not able to get the sponsors; I lost over a million dollars. And George Wein, who had been my partner decided that this was too onerous and so that's when I made another decision that Essence would do this on its own; and, and so the rest is really history.

Tai Beauchamp

Journalist and entrepreneur Tai Beauchamp was born on January 7, 1978 in Newark, New Jersey. She graduated from Spelman College in 2000 with her B.A. degree in English Literature and received a certificate in television production from New York University in 2003.

Beauchamp began her career as an intern for Good Housekeeping and Harper’s Bazaar magazines in 1998. In 2000, she was hired at O, The Oprah Magazine as a fashion and beauty assistant, but was soon named associate beauty editor. In 2003, Essence magazine/Time Inc. hired her to serve as the beauty editor of several prototypes that later became Suede magazine. In 2004, Beauchamp became the youngest and first African American appointed to the role of beauty and fitness director at Seventeen magazine.

In 2006, after briefly serving as deputy editor of VIBE Vixen magazine and consulting with The MCJ Foundation, Beauchamp launched and served as chief executive officer of BluePrint Group, LLC (Tai Life Media, LLC), a branding and marketing firm. She became a style contributor and correspondent for iVillage.com in 2008; and, in 2011, was hired as a national correspondent for InStyle magazine. Beauchamp was also appointed style and beauty correspondent for Proctor & Gamble’s My Black Is Beautiful campaign, and, in 2012, was named InStyle’s style ambassador.

Beauchamp has appeared as a style expert and personality on ABC, BET, CNN, NBC Today, TV One, E! and frequently contributed to The View, Wendy Williams Show, Bethenny, The Recording Academy, and other networks. She has also worked with Target, Macy’s, Dior Cosmetics, Nordstrom, AT&T, The Limited, MSL Group, Avon, Black Enterprise magazine, The Sundance Channel, and Universal Records.

Beauchamp has volunteered with Big Brothers Big Sisters, Dress for Success, and Step Up Women’s Network. She served on the advisory boards of WIE Network; Harlem's Fashion Row; St. Vincent Academy in Newark, New Jersey; and New Jersey Needs You. She also served on the women’s board of trustees of the New Jersey Performance Arts Center. Her awards include the Thurgood Marshall College Fund Prestige Award, which she received in 2009.

Tai Beauchamp was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.228

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/7/2014

Last Name

Beauchamp

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Spelman College

New York University

School No. 5

School No. 1

Our Lady of the Most Blessed Sacrament School

St. Mary School

Saint Vincent Academy

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Tai

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

BEA12

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bodrum, Turkey

Favorite Quote

Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Expected.$To Thine Own Self Be True.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/7/1978

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Kale

Short Description

Journalist and entrepreneur Tai Beauchamp (1978 - ) was the style ambassador of InStyle magazine and the CEO of Tai Life Media, LLC. She became the youngest and first African American beauty and fitness director at Seventeen magazine in 2004.

Employment

Good Housekeeping

Harper's Bazaar Fashion Magazine

O, The Oprah Magazine

Essence Magazine/Time Inc.

Seventeen Magazine

VIBE Vixen Magazine

The MCJ Foundation

BluePrint Group, LLC (Tai Life Media, LLC)

iVillage.com

InStyle Magazine

Procter & Gamble's "My Black is Beautiful" Campaign

Favorite Color

Black and Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1890,19:2520,26:5410,33:6866,57:7230,62:11765,128:20226,198:26020,292:32356,431:33316,442:33700,450:34276,459:43021,542:43567,550:43931,555:45478,577:49510,586:53074,642:53641,651:55585,684:55909,689:69737,915:75762,957:86526,1055:90950,1165:94505,1224:96480,1261:102287,1301:102675,1315:103936,1332:105682,1358:113345,1521:127042,1641:127386,1646:134820,1734:135140,1739:136260,1768:136580,1774:137220,1785:138820,1810:139460,1820:140260,1833:147940,1994:148500,2012:150100,2045:157374,2126:157658,2131:158794,2155:159078,2160:159930,2176:160214,2181:162628,2219:162912,2224:163267,2231:167448,2271:171930,2350:172345,2357:172677,2363:173009,2368:175914,2468:186610,2591:187042,2596:187798,2603:190174,2641:200383,2767:206774,2914:207159,2920:208083,2937:208699,2955:209084,2961:216922,3071:229290,3255:232350,3325:233700,3346:236400,3394:236760,3399:238830,3466:247190,3543:247622,3551:248126,3560:248486,3566:248918,3574:252374,3626:257994,3720:259530,3729$0,0:1869,24:2492,32:4687,64:5035,69:6862,100:9150,105:13780,219:14368,233:17308,282:18064,292:19744,320:21340,346:23020,384:28890,445:29440,451:30210,460:43120,607:53020,811:79490,1028:97742,1333:118760,1848:121060,1885:129855,2035:134784,2126:135156,2131:137574,2174:148745,2300:149157,2305:153380,2394:153895,2400:162022,2463:170692,2678:176066,2723:188600,2929:188952,2934:197142,3039:203262,3129:207954,3212:211919,3257:214964,3299:215747,3310:234365,3576:241380,3640
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Tai Beauchamp's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp remembers her paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her mother's professional background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp lists her extended family members

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Tai Beauchamp describes her maternal grandmother and great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her family's surname

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Tai Beauchamp describes her paternal grandparents' household

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her grandparents' nurturing spirit

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp remembers her maternal grandmother's home

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp talks about living in multiple households

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp recalls her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp describes her neighborhood in Linden, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her relationship with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Tai Beauchamp describes her early personality

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Tai Beauchamp recalls the influence of 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp describes her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her scholarship to attend Spellman College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp describes her early academic experiences at Spelman College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her social life at Spelman College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp remembers the faculty of Spelman College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp describes the sisterhood at Spelman College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Tai Beauchamp remembers her college internships

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her ability to adapt to her surroundings

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Tai Beauchamp recalls joining the staff of O, The Oprah Magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Tai Beauchamp remembers meeting Oprah Winfrey and Gayle King

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp describes her career at O, The Oprah Magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp recalls attending fashion events for O, The Oprah Magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp describes her early interest in fashion and hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her idea for a fashion magazine for young women of color

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp recalls joining the staff of Suede magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp remembers her transition to Seventeen magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Tai Beauchamp describes her experiences at Seventeen magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Tai Beauchamp recalls joining The MCJ Amelior Foundation in Morristown, New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Tai Beauchamp describes her role at The MCJ Amelior Foundation in Morristown, New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp describes her work on the RU Ready for Work program

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp recalls joining VIBE Vixen

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her impact at VIBE Vixen

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp recalls founding Tai Life Media, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp remembers writing for the iVillage blog

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her humanitarian work

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her accomplishments and plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her maternal grandmother's illness

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Tai Beauchamp remembers speaking at a conference in Nigeria

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Tai Beauchamp talks about working on the 'The High Life' web series

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Tai Beauchamp recalls working with InStyle magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her experiences as a media personality

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Tai Beauchamp talks about her decision to undergo oocyte cryopreservation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Tai Beauchamp reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Tai Beauchamp reflects upon her life

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Tai Beauchamp describes her experiences at Seventeen magazine
Tai Beauchamp talks about her decision to undergo oocyte cryopreservation
Transcript
And as, as you are moving along, does it ever cross your mind that, "I'm an African American woman pitching for this mainstream publication. Could that stand in my way?"$$(Shakes head) It didn't. That never dawned on me and I don't--I, I don't know if I ever--and I think, I think that's a really great question, Harriette [HistoryMaker Harriette Cole] because I think, you know obviously there are real barriers, there are real challenges that we face, no doubt. And--but had I thought about it that way, would I have created the barrier more so than anything. But I must also say that Atoosa Rubenstein who was the editor in chief, was also the founder of CosmoGirl. She was a very young editor. She founded CosmoGirl at Hearst [Hearst Communications] after leaving Cosmo [Cosmopolitan] at twenty-six. And so she was kind of legendary in her own right and respected within the Hearst family and the Hearst community. I, I also must credit her too because she as a--I think she's Armenian [sic. Iranian], I think she's Armenian--also I think has expressed in the past and I haven't had conversation with her in years, but had expressed in the past feeling other. And so I think to her credit, her feeling other is also what made her more welcoming to other. And--but that's what made that, that book and that opportunity also for me and for other girls so, so huge, which I didn't realize then. Like I said, until I started interacting with the young girls.$$And how long did you stay at Seventeen?$$I was at Seventeen for about a year. It was hell, to put it mildly.$$Because?$$It was, you know, everybody--so a whole new team came over with the new editor in chief, so Atoosa hired a whole new team. And it was just a very crazy environment. It was a very, very crazy environment of--which is often the case I think sometimes in magazines and in creative spaces, right. So when you're dealing with a lot of creatives, you know, do you want this, do you want this, do you want this, do you want that? Do you not want this? So that was one piece of it. And I think it was challenging for a number of us for that reason. But to make it very personal and to also realize my growth opportunity and you know what I learned on the other side of it, is you know being managed is one thing, but learning to manage up and down is, is, is also a very, very necessary skill. And quite frankly at twenty-five, you don't have it. So it's one of those things that I say to young people now who tell me that--they give me their business cards and you know they're very ambitious and very bright eyed, and I love that and I encourage that. But their cards that say CEO and mogul and I'm like darling, you don't have to, you don't have to crawl before you run that marathon, but you, you gotta, you gotta take some steps. And I have an appreciation for that now, 11 years later. And I actually I gained a great appreciation for that probably two years later as I started to learn business more as well. But I was there for about eleven and a half months, and I remember going to Ellen [Ellen Levine] and telling her that I didn't think I was gonna make it. I was working sixteen hour days and we were growing and doing very, very well, but the demands were great. You know I had to--I was doing television in the morning for six a.m. shoots and you know TV shoots and segments, and then going to shoots all day and then coming back and editing, and then having to go to events and then come back and close books and was managing a team of three or four, some of whom were older than me and had been trained by the same people that I had been trained by as well. So there were a lot of nuances, but a lot of learning.$Now you mentioned to me earlier that clearly you have been on a fast track professionally, which is what many young women are taught. I mean probably from Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia] days you're taught focus on your career. And at this stage in your life, you did something that many women have talked about, considered, not so many black women have done it I don't think, freezing your eggs.$$Um-hm.$$Can you, can you tell me about that and also why and what your reflection is?$$Absolutely. So I froze my eggs a year ago, August of 2013 at thirty-five. And I froze my eggs for several reasons. One, I had really great girlfriends who are a lot wiser and older than I was that told me you know in my thirties when they saw me on this fast track and saw Tai [HistoryMaker Tai Beauchamp] as only about work, she's no play, you know, freeze your eggs. And when they told me at thirty, I was like okay girls, no, I'm good. Like and I had broken an engagement. And so I had been in a relationship and all of that. And I decided to do it last year because I said if I hit thirty-five and was unattached and unmarried, I wanted to preserve my fertility. That's not to say I don't have any, thank god, as far as I know no challenges right now. But I know that I want a, I want a family. And I wanted to preserve that. And I also was diagnosed with fibroids, which is very prevalent in the black community, and my mother [Taiwanda Beauchamp Scott] and [maternal] grandmother [Mary Beauchamp] both had them and both of them had either a hysterectomy or a partial hysterectomy. My mother actually had her, her partial hysterectomy at thirty-six. So at my age right now she had her, her, her hysterectomy performed. And I just, I just knew that I wanted to preserve it. I really think, and you know I shared with Essence this story and they did an amazing job of writing about this journey and why I chose to do it. But I think that we really have to shift the dialogue for young women. Of young women of color especially because like in the case, in my case being raised by two single black women who were very independent, who were very driven and very hard working, and who valued education as we should. We're taught to focus on your career and not to necessarily put as much focus on our family lives. And I think that that's just a result of sometimes you know, their experiences, which have been challenging. And also historical experiences when you think back to slavery and what have you and the woman having to be there and to do it all. But I don't think we're meant to. And so I want younger women, you know, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, once you have some footing and you have some sense of who you are and some perspective of where you'd like to go professionally, to start to--if you want, and to just to start to think more realistically about who you are. Because who you are is not your career. Who you are is not you know, how much money you make or the clothes you wear. And a young lady that I said this to who also went to Spelman, last year I said this to her and she turned thirty. And she read the article and Janese Sills [ph.] is her name, and she's an executive. And she sent me an email and she said, "Tai, I realize you know what? I'm working so hard for my legacy, but if my legacy is not for my children, then who is my legacy for?" So it's not about us singularly. And so there's been a really hard lesson for me, that I'm grateful that I've learned. But I also wanna hope and--to, to really kind of teach other younger women to think differently about it going forward.

Robin Stone

Journalist Robin D. Stone was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1964. Her mother, Ora L. Hughes, worked for the U.S. Postal Service in Detroit. Her father, Lawrence R. Stone, was a building contractor. Stone graduated from Michigan State University with her B.A. degree in journalism in 1986. She is completing her M.A. degree in health arts and sciences at Goddard College in Vermont.

Stone first worked as a copy editor for The Oakland Press and the Detroit Free Press. She then served as layout-makeup/slot editor at The Boston Globe for one year, and then as a copy editor for The New York Times from 1990 to 1993. After briefly serving as special projects editor for Family Circle Magazine, Stone was named deputy living editor at The New York Times in 1994. As deputy living editor, she was integral in developing the prototype for the paper’s current Dining In/Dining Out section. In 1997, Stone joined Essence magazine, where she was first hired as a senior editor and eventually promoted to executive editor. Under her stewardship, the magazine earned awards from Folio, the National Association of Black Journalists, the New York Association of Black Journalists, and the Congressional Black Caucus, among other organizations. Stone became founding editor-in-chief of Essence.com in 2000, and, from 2005 to 2007, she served as deputy editor at Health magazine. After leaving Health in 2007, Stone worked as a freelance writer and editor, focusing primarily on issues related to health, parenting, and families. Her thesis work explores Black women, body image, weight, and self-care in the face of racism, sexism and other stressors.

Stone is the author of No Secrets, No Lies: How Black Families Can Heal from Sexual Abuse, which was published in 2004. She also edited and contributed the afterword to My Times in Black and White: Race and Power at the New York Times, the memoir by her late husband, Gerald M. Boyd, who was former managing editor of The New York Times. Stone’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, Essence magazine, Glamour magazine, The Boston Globe, and other publications.

From 2002 to 2003, Stone was a Kaiser Media Fellow, where she researched and reported on sexual abuse in Black families and other health issues. She has taught magazine editing and production at New York University, and advanced reporting at the City College of New York. She is a board member of Greenhope Services for Women, a residential drug treatment center for formerly incarcerated women, and a New York Alumnae member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Stone served as vice-president/print for the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and as president of NABJ's New York chapter. Her career and contributions to journalism garnered her an Outstanding Alumni Award from her alma mater, Michigan State University, in 2004.

Stone and her fiance, Rodney Pope, live in New York, New York. She has a teenage son, Zachary Boyd.

Robin Stone was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 6, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.220

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/6/2014 |and| 08/11/2016

Last Name

Stone

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Deneane

Occupation
Schools

Goddard College

Michigan State University

Renaissance High School

Luddington Magnet Middle School

Edgar A. Guest Elementary

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robin

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

STO07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/19/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chilean Seabass Over spinach

Short Description

Journalist Robin Stone (1964 - ) served as an editor for The Boston Globe, The New York Times, Health magazine and Essence magazine. She was founding editor-in-chief of Essence.com and the author of No Secrets, No Lies: How Black Families Can Heal from Sexual Abuse.

Employment

HealthJones LLC

Health Magazine

Essence Communications, Inc.

Essence Magazine

New York Times

Family Counseling

Favorite Color

Green and Coral

Charles W. Cherry II

Publisher, radio station manager and lawyer Charles W. Cherry II was born in 1956 in Daytona Beach, Florida to Julia T. Cherry and Charles W. Cherry, Sr., founder of the Daytona Times and Florida Courier newspapers. In 1978, Cherry received his B.A. degree in journalism from Morehouse College, where he also interned for WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia. He then went on to receive both his M.B.A. and J.D. degrees from the University of Florida in 1982.

Cherry had his own law firm for twenty-one years and served as a city prosecutor for Fort Lauderdale, Florida and as a state prosecutor in South Florida. He also served as general counsel for the Housing Authority of the City of Fort Lauderdale, where he worked closely with its former executive director, the late Dr. William H. Lindsay. In 1989, Cherry and his father purchased WPUL-AM 1590, a Daytona Beach-area radio station. From 1998 to 2000, he served as general manager of Greenville, South Carolina’s WCSZ-AM. In 2000, Cherry was named general manager of WPUL-AM and became host of the station’s Free Your Mind radio show.

In 2004, upon the death of his father, Cherry returned to journalism and newspaper publishing. In 2006, the Cherry family re-launched the Florida Courier as a statewide newspaper; Cherry became its publisher and his column, Straight, No Chaser appeared weekly. He also went on to write commentaries, editorials, and stories for his other family-owned newspaper, the Daytona Times. In addition, Cherry served as vice president, secretary and general counsel of his family’s Tama Broadcasting, Inc., as well as vice president of corporate communications for Global Health Professionals, Inc.

Cherry published Excellence Without Excuse: The Black Student's Guide to Academic Excellence (1994), which has been used as a textbook in college-preparation classes and seminars. He was elected to the board of directors of the National Newspaper Publishers Association in 2009, and served on the Government Affairs Committee of the Florida Press Association. He also founded the Florida Black-Owned Media Coalition, Inc., a trade association representing Florida mass media owned by African Americans.

Charles W. Cherry II was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.230

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/7/2014

Last Name

Cherry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

William

Schools

Campbell Elementary School

St Paul's Catholic School

Father Lopez Catholic High School

Seabreeze High School

Morehouse College

University of Florida

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Daytona Beach

HM ID

CHE08

Favorite Season

None

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

West Africa or the Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow, For the Kingdom of Heaven Is Within

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

8/6/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Lauderdale

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Scallops

Short Description

Publisher, radio station manager, and lawyer Charles W. Cherry II (1956 - ) is the publisher of the 'Florida Courier' newspaper. He also served as vice president, secretary and general counsel of Tama Broadcasting, Inc, and as a city and state prosecutor in South Florida. He is the author of Excellence Without Excuse: The Black Student's Guide to Academic Excellence.

Employment

City of Fort Lauderdale

State of Florida

Housing Authority of the City of Fort Lauderdale

WCSZ-AM

WPUL-AM

Florida Courier

Tama Broadcasting, Inc.

Global Health Professionals, Inc.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles W. Cherry II's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his maternal African ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his mother's childhood in Leslie, Georgia pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his maternal grandmother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his mother's childhood in Leslie, Georgia pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his mother's college experience at Morris Brown College and her career as a home economics teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the Barlow family, his father's maternal ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's education at Morehouse College and Alabama State University

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's various jobs and business ventures

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the two newspapers his father started, the Westside Rapper and the Daytona Times

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his likeness to his parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's entrepreneurship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the roles he and his siblings play in the family business

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Daytona Beach, Florida pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Daytona Beach, Florida pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the "wade-in" to integrate the beach in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the march his father planned to protest the Apollo space missions

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his family being threatened with violence

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the impact of school desegregation on the African American community in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his first grade teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about reading the World Book Encyclopedia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his lack of religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about having a father who was an entrepreneur

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience at Seabreeze Senior High School in Daytona Beach, Florida pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience at Seabreeze Senior High School in Daytona Beach, Florida pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about transferring out of Catholic school to Seabreeze High School in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the impact of racism on mental health

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his interest in journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about applying for college

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the night before his high school graduation

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's newspaper, the Westside Rapper, going out of print and where the word "rapper" came from

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his first semester at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his friend from Daytona Beach, Florida leaving Morehouse College due to sexual harassment

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his professor HistoryMaker Na'im Akbar at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his journalism internship at WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his experience studying journalism at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about earning his J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about receiving academic support from black students in graduate school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about becoming a state prosecutor in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the inspiration for his book, 'Excellence Without Excuses: The Black Student's Guide to Academics Excellence'

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his father's newspapers, the Daytona Times and Florida Courier

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being the outside counsel for the Fort Lauderdale Housing Authority pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being the outside counsel for the Fort Lauderdale Housing Authority pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about ways to create safe public housing

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about changing the way he dressed after visiting Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about what he learned from purchasing his first radio station, WPUL

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about being general manager of WPUL

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about small local radio stations being pushed out of the market

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Tama Broadcasting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his controversial radio talk show 'Free Your Mind'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the problems in Daytona Beach, Florida's black communities

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about production and distribution of his newspapers, the Florida Courier and Daytona Times

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about the content within the Florida Courier

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about HistoryMaker President Barack Obama's presidency

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about HistoryMaker U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about Florida's Stand Your Ground law

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about political trends in Florida's African American communities

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about adjusting his newspapers to the digital age and the books he is writing

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his business ventures in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Charles W. Cherry II reflects on what he would do differently in his career

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Charles W. Cherry II talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Charles W. Cherry II considers his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

10$3

DATitle
Charles W. Cherry II talks about his journalism internship at WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia
Charles W. Cherry II talks about what he learned from purchasing his first radio station, WPUL
Transcript
You were talking about your career trajectory in college you're majoring in journalism even though you were greatly influenced by psychology.$$Greatly influenced by, by psychology and [HM] Dr. [Na'im] Akbar but decided to go ahead and, and just make the media the main career and so we went over to Clark [later Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia]. All of, all of the media folks at, at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia] actually were taking classes at Clark. And which was a great thing because they had a top notch journalism, you know journalism and, and broadcast school there.$$Who was in charge of that? Or who was the main influence over there?$$My main influence was Nellie Dixon who was the, the journalism instructor and we had a, a Herb Eichelberger was over the, the, the broadcast school. And what happened was at that point in time, this was, this was, this was early in, in TV broadcast with regard to having black folks as part of, of, of there was a, there were issues in the TV in, in the TV industry in Atlanta [Georgia] because they had maybe one or two black, black reporters. And so we were told folks from--in journalism at the AU Center [Atlanta University Center, Atlanta, Georgia] so that was Morehouse, Clark, and Morris Brown [College, Atlanta, University] and Spelman [College, Atlanta, University]. We, they had a conference with those of us who were in journalism and broadcast and said, "all right we are going to take some of y'all 'cause and y'all gotta be top notch because we have told these white folk that we have some, some kids over here who can get the job done. We're gonna put, put some, we're gonna put some of y'all in some internships in some of these stations over here and here's what our expectations are of you. You will do well. If you can't do well, you know you're not gonna embarrass the AU Center, you're not gonna set this project back so tell us right now if you're not gonna be able to get it done." So I was one of those who volunteered and they, they gave me an internship at WAGA-TV which was Channel 5 in Atlanta for my last two and a half years at Morehouse. And that was, that was a great experience. I was a sports producer. On the weekends I did a certain part of the six o'clock news. So I wrote and produced small sections of the six o'clock news and 11 o'clock news on some week days and on the weekends. And they put me with Bill Hartman who was a guy who was a, a sports guy who's been there probably thirty years. And I, I functioned well. And [Bill] Hartman says I was the best intern that he had. He was hating to see me go but I tell you what happened?$$What?$$I decided to take the law school aptitude test my senior year did well on it. Again on a humbug decided to apply to the University of Florida. University of Florida came back with a full ride of, of grants not, not loans but grants and told me if I came that they, they'd make sure I got a grant as long as I could make it through the first year. So I decided to go to law school and not because, because of the money and at that point in time again, the University of Florida [Gainesville, Florida] was under the Consent Decree so they had to have black students. I knew I was gonna be coming back to Florida I figured that a law degree would probably be a pretty good thing. So I accepted that. But before I decided to actually go I had a conversation with the, the station manager because they offered me a job. So I, I was when I went to the meeting with the station manager, I expected that he was gonna say, "Well Charles you done a great job, you're, Bill Hartman, your boss likes you. You know the six o'clock news, the major producers like you. You know you done a great job. Gonna put you on salary X amount of dollars and you got a great career here." Well, he, what he told me was, "That what we're gonna do, we're gonna give you forty hours, but we're gonna extend that at the minimum wage that we're paying you as an intern right now." And I, I, I was flabbergasted. I was like, "I'm sorry, sir, but I worked here two and a half years. I done an excellent job as you, as you have told me and are you saying that I have a forty hour job but that even with a college degree and two and a half years of experience at this station, that I'm only gonna make minimum wage?" He said, "Yes." I was done. That was my media career.$Now let me go well, I'm gonna go to 1989 with the purchase of WPUL [-AM]. Your, your, your father [Charles Cherry, Sr.] and your brother [HM Dr. Glenn W. Cherry] were involved in this right?$$Yes, my father, my brother and a group, a group of my fraternity brothers from Omega Psi Phi fraternity at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, University] we had established a venture capital fund so we got funds from Morehouse's venture capital fund and we got, got some, some friends and some family put some money together and bought that station in Daytona [Beach, Florida] that dad ran in conjunction with the Daytona Times for a number of years.$$Okay. Now was this a station that was black-oriented at the time you purchased it?$$Country western. So it was a country western station. We made the biggest mistake that we, that we made as radio owners which is a rookie mistake which is to change the format from country western to black, basically R&B and all of our, our white clients just, they, they just left. You know we thought that it doesn't matter what the format is and, and it did matter. Because we lost every dollar from the little country western bars and the, the, the, the saddle stores and the, the, the shoe shops and all the rest of that, that had put money into this so. If we had to do it over again, we would have left it alone. But I think at that point in time we, we were just so happy in Daytona Beach [Florida] to have our own station that could play Earth, Wind and Fire and Teddy Pendergrass and all that 24/7 that we just--it was a big, it was sort of a big juke box for us when we, when we first started.$$Okay. But did the advertising come?$$No. Well advertising came but it didn't come from there. So we when you are in a black format and once--that's one thing we've learned along the way that you pay a, you, you pay a disproportionate penalty for targeting black people in almost any business because you sort of, you sort of pigeon hole that white owned businesses or traditional or mainstream businesses. You have to sort of prove to them that you'll bring value that, that black people do consume and, and, and it's, it's, it's an uphill struggle for the most part, particularly post--post-desegregation. Again black folks can take their money anywhere. And so you have to prove your value to both your black consumers as well as everybody else. And that's sort of a double standard that I think that a whole lot of, of black businesses deal with. But unfortunately that, that's just of sort of where we are right now.$$Okay. Okay. So, where does your advertising revenue come from now?$$Well it comes from, from folks who, who--well let me, let me back up. What we decided to do particularly when we started having multiple stations is that we have multiple formats. So you have, you have a chance to go to multiple customer, customer bases. So we have a--you have a R&B format, you're looking at people who are targeting a black/urban audience. You know you have a, a Hispanic format. You have a jazz format. You have a religious format. You have a top forty format. So when we, when we got, where we had eleven stations, we sort of run the--ran the gamut in terms of the number of formats and so you have a better chance of, of, of having a, a much broader consumer base that you can, that you can serve and then you have different formats that you can sell to, to an advertiser.$$So, so you started, well you started with WPUL was that sort of like a testing ground for what you would do with the rest of your stations? 'Cause the other stations were purchased from what I understand from 2000 to--from 1998 to 2000,--$$Right.$$--I guess?$$Yep, yep.$$Okay.$$Un huh. Well we--I think we learned how to be broadcasters at WPUL. You know we, we learned, we learned how to, how to tell time 'cause radio time is very exact. You learn what people respond to and what they don't. You learn how to, how to, how to carve expense. I mean the whole issue of revenue and expenses in radio is, is different from, from other kinds of industries. You know you learn, you learn, so you learn it and it wasn't something that I think we did consciously originally to go and get bigger, but when we--what we saw, when we saw how daddy was having fun and he was making money, we looked at it from a, from a financial perspective that radio has value and that there are stations out there that we can get and we learned enough about radio to turn it around and a sort of get stations that may be undervalued or that maybe, that may have too many, too much expenses and then from a business perspective put 'em in a--shape, pick a format and then move, move it forward.

Eric Deggans

Journalist Eric Deggans was born on November 6, 1965 in Washington, D.C. He was raised in Gary, Indiana and graduated from Andrean High School. In the 1980s, while attending Indiana University, Deggans worked as a professional drummer and toured with Motown recording artist The Voyage Band. He received his B.A. degree in political science and journalism from Indiana University in 1990.

Deggans first held municipal reporting positions at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania. He then served as the music critic for the Asbury Park Press newspaper in Neptune, New Jersey. In 1995, Deggans joined the Tampa Bay Times, then called the St. Petersburg Times, as its pop music critic. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as a TV critic for the Times, and, from 2004 to 2005, he sat on the paper’s editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. Deggans then returned to the Tampa Bay Times news desk, first as a media writer in 2005, then as the TV critic in 2006. In 2010, he made national headlines when he interviewed former USDA official Shirley Sherrod at the National Association of Black Journalists’ summer convention in San Diego, California. Deggans left the Tampa Bay Times in 2013 to take a job as NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans published his first book, Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, in 2012. He also contributed to the Poynter Institute’s The New Ethics of Journalism, which was published in August 2013. Deggans’ writing has appeared in The New York Times online, Salon magazine, CNN.com, The Washington Post, Village Voice, VIBE magazine, Chicago Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Sun-Times, The Seattle Times, Emmy magazine, Newsmax magazine, and Rolling Stone Online, among others. Deggans also taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, Loyola University, California State University, Indiana University, the University of Tampa, and Eckerd College, and has guest hosted CNN’s media analysis show Reliable Sources.

Deggans served as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, and sat on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists. In addition, he served on the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

Deggans was named as one of Ebony magazine's "Power 150" in 2009. In 2013, he was awarded the Florida Press Club’s first-ever Diversity Award, and the National Association of Black Journalists’ Arts & Entertainment Task Force Legacy Award. Deggans also received reporting and writing awards from the Society for Features Journalism, American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

Eric Deggans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.197

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2014

Last Name

Deggans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Charles

Occupation
Schools

Frederick Douglass Elementary School

Hebrew Academy of Northwest Indiana

Andrean High School

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Eric

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

DEG02

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

11/6/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

St. Petersburg

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist Eric Deggans (1965 - ) , NPR's first full-time TV critic, worked at the Tampa Bay Times for eighteen years as an entertainment critic and columnist. He also authored Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation.

Employment

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Pittsburgh Press

Asbury Park Press

Tampa Bay Times

NPR

Bea L. Hines

Journalist Beatrice “Bea” L. Hines was born in Williston, Florida in 1938. At a young age, her parents separated and she moved with her mother to Miami, Florida. Hines graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in 1956.

In 1966, Hines was hired as a file clerk in The Miami Herald’s library. A year later, in 1967, Hines enrolled at Miami-Dade Community College, where she studied journalism for three years. Then, in June of 1970, she was promoted to general assignment reporter at The Miami Herald, becoming the first African American woman to work as a reporter for the paper. Hines’s work was featured in the education and the “Living Today” sections of the Herald. From 1980 to 1985, she wrote an issues column for the newspaper that garnered much praise. She also wrote other columns for The Miami Herald, including ones entitled “Parenting Again” and “Neighbors in Religion.”

Hines has taught and led workshops at several universities, including Savannah State University, the University of California-Berkeley, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, and the University of Memphis. In 1981, her columns were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and, in 1985, she was recognized as one of the top five woman columnists in the country by Savvy magazine. In 1984, Hines was selected by the Washington, D.C., Spelman Alumni Chapter as one of four outstanding women in the country for community work. In 1985, The Miami Herald honored her work with the Service Among Us Award. She has also been honored by The Church of God Tabernacle in Miami, and appeared in the documentary Instruments of Change in 2013.

Hines was married to the late James Fredrick Hines. Their sons are Pastor James (Rick) F. Hines, Jr., who died September 14, 2013, and Shawn A. Hines, who lives in Rhode Island.

Bea L. Hines was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.201

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/11/2014

Last Name

Hines

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Middle Name

L.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Miami Dade College

Frederick R. Douglass Elementary

Phillis Wheatley Elementary School

Liberty City Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Beatrice

Birth City, State, Country

Williston

HM ID

HIN04

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Savannah, Georgia in the spring and the Caribbean in the summer

Favorite Quote

God Willing And The Creek Don't Rise

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

2/12/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken and Watermelon

Short Description

Journalist Bea L. Hines (1938 - ) became the first African American woman to work in a full-time position at The Miami Herald when she was hired as a general assignment reporter in 1970. Her columns for the Herald were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1981.

Employment

The Miami Herald

Favorite Color

Red, Yellow, Blue and Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:3174,62:3558,69:6768,87:7370,95:29564,391:31841,428:34121,524:43880,652:54996,836:56438,888:64426,990:64730,995:66706,1060:67086,1066:69746,1158:75841,1222:77689,1256:88324,1406:99946,1620:100954,1653:111336,1822:128980,2167:142548,2354:148679,2441:149064,2462:149449,2480:163821,2716:168826,2825:185731,3080:186096,3087:188140,3138:192228,3232:192739,3240:201360,3430:202890,3602:208330,3651:219146,3767:228244,3849:235946,3942:236356,3948:247380,4133:249123,4162:258066,4363:264734,4472:265086,4477:265438,4482:270454,4583:270806,4588:274848,4653:280266,4739:281212,4765:286226,4805:301290,5043:302073,5060:313130,5267:321160,5339$0,0:10130,101:10690,215:11330,224:15059,249:15806,260:16885,295:26858,396:27332,404:27885,413:29702,443:31361,483:34521,618:47682,856:70240,1060
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bea L. Hines' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks about her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines talks about her mother's jobs as a nurse and housekeeper

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines talks about her early marriage to James Hines in 1957

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines describes her maternal grandmother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines talks about her father's abusive relationship with her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines talks about establishing a relationship with her father as an adult

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bea L. Hines describes her memories of her father assaulting her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bea L. Hines talks about her relationship with her husband

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bea L. Hines talks about taking after her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Bea L. Hines talks about her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Bea L. Hines describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines describes the sights, sounds, and smells of Overtown in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines describes her childhood in Overtown, Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks briefly about Muhammad Ali's reputation in Overtown, Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines explains the etymology behind the name "Overtown"

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines lists the elementary and high schools she attended

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines describes her creative hobbies

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines talks about entering the Final Womanhood essay contest

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines describes reluctantly giving up a scholarship and singing in church

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines talks about concert pianist Ruth Greenfield and singing in Greenfield's Lunchtime Lively Arts Series

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines remembers working at Burdines Department Store

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks about the African American celebrity sightings in Miami, Florida in the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines explains how she met her husband, James Hines

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines talks about her creative writing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines talks about starting a family post-high school graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines describes her abusive marriage and her husband's death

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines talks about taking classes at Miami Dade Community College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bea L. Hines talks about Thirlee Smith, the first black reporter at The Miami Herald,

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bea L. Hines talks about her first job at The Miami Herald as a file clerk

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines talks about working for a Jewish family as a maid

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines describes experiencing discrimination as an employee at The Miami Herald

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks about the racist attitudes of her employers

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines talks about writing for Miami-Dade Community College's student newspaper, The Falcon Times

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines talks about being promoted to reporter at The Miami Herald

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines talks about her first story as a reporter on the 1970 riots in Liberty City, Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines talks about working undercover to report the 1970 riot in Liberty City, Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines describes being sent to cover bogus stories during her early days as a reporter for The Miami Herald

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bea L. Hines describes developing a reputation as a sensitive reporter and being assigned sensitive stories

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines talks about covering Miami schools as a feature reporter

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines talks about winning the School Bell Award

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks about the 1980 Riot in Liberty City, Miami, Florida following the murder of Arthur Lee McDuffie

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines explains the reason her column was discontinued in 1985 pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines explains the reason her column was discontinued in 1985 pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines talks about police brutality and profiling

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines talks about covering the funeral of Haitian refugee children who drowned on their way to Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines describes her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bea L. Hines describes columns written about the police's handling of rape victims and Haitian Vodou

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Bea L. Hines talks briefly about the emergence of Botox in the 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Bea L. Hines describes interviewing the Reverend Dr. James Cleveland

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines remembers interviewing Aretha Franklin

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines recalls some of her favorite interviews

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines talks about volunteer speaking to young girls in school

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines talks about the significance of 1972 at The Miami Herald

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines talks about community activist T. Willard Fair's significance in Miami, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines talks African American politicians in Miami, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines talks about her membership with the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines talks about Janet Cooke

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bea L. Hines talks about other black journalists at The Miami Herald

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Bea L. Hines talks about football player Ray Rice's physical abuse of his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Bea L. Hines talks about her own experience with domestic violence

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Bea L. Hines advocates the preservation of African American rights and history

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Bea L. Hines describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Bea L. Hines talks about the murder of Trayvon Martin

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bea L. Hines talks about her Sunday Friends and Neighbors column in The Miami Herald

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bea L. Hines considers what she might have done differently in her life

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bea L. Hines considers her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bea L. Hines talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bea L. Hines describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Bea L. Hines narrates her photographs pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Bea L. Hines narrates her photographs pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$2

DAStory

7$7

DATitle
Bea L. Hines talks about covering the funeral of Haitian refugee children who drowned on their way to Miami, Florida
Bea L. Hines talks about entering the Final Womanhood essay contest
Transcript
But prior to that, we talked about the Haitians and the Cuban people coming over. The Haitian people had it so tough. They would be smuggled over here and one story I did was when this, this, the man who smuggled him over made, when the [U.S.] Coast Guard was coming, he made a mother and her five children jump overboard and, of course, they drowned. So, I was sent out to interview the parents and everybody, you know, the family, and I'll never forget this editor who was scared of the editor who didn't like me. She said to me, and she wouldn't have sent me except it was Saturday and I was working and, "You know, you gotta write a good story because Sarah Rimer is going to cover the funeral," and Sarah Rimer was the young reporter who was having an affair with Gene Miller, our star reporter, and he practically rewrote her stories, you know. I shouldn't have called him the names, but I don't know where she is now but he's dead. But anyway, so I, I was so insulted when she said that. So I went out and I interviewed the paper and this is the first time I realized the difference in the cultures because you're black and I'm black, we don't have the same culture and I didn't realize that until then. So when I, I had a thing about black people. When I became a reporter, the only black women you saw on the covers, on the paper, would be the big fat women with head rags on, not really pretty, you know, and they were all called by their first name while the white women were called by their last name. So, when I would go on an assignment, I had to interview a black woman, I would say, "Okay, I'm coming with a photographer", I'd call or go by the house if they didn't have a phone, "and I want you to look nice" and I would tell them what to do and they would do it 'cause I didn't want that image always following us. So, this day I went to interview these Haitian women and the woman was sittin' on the front porch and she was just hollering and her hair was all, every which way and she had her bare, her feet were bare and her clothes were sort of hanging off and I said, "Well, you know, a reporter, our photographer is going to come to take your picture after a while. Do you think you want to go in and comb your hair and change your clothes?" And she says, "No, I want them to see my pain." I understood, I got it, and that was the picture they ran on the front page of the paper. But, while I was out, I found out, I learned that the children didn't have any clothes to be buried in. So before I went in to write my story, I went to the discount houses and I bought the prettiest little dresses and the hair ribbons and the underwear and the socks and then I had to go to Sears because the undertaker told me they needed gloves. And back then, gloves were not popular but I knew girls, Sears sold Girl Scout stuff and Girl Scouts wore white gloves 'cause I was a Girl Scout. So I went there and I got the little gloves for the little girls and the little boys, too, but I didn't buy their clothes, somebody else donated their clothing. So when I came in that day and I had written my story, that, that was a Friday, I wrote my story on a Friday, the funeral was on a Saturday, and Sarah was writing about the funeral and I heard Gene ask her, he was sitting there helping her, line for line, and I heard him ask her, "So what were they wearing?" And she said, "I don't know, I didn't see them." And so I said, "I know what they were wearing." I said, "The little girls had on pretty little frilly blue dresses and blue and white hair ribbons and white socks with lace on 'em and little white gloves that I, that came from Sears," I didn't say I bought 'em. And then he wanted to know, he looked, he says, "How do you know that?" And then I said, "'Cause I bought it," and he looked at me like, "You did that." And so when one of the, do you know who [HM] Francis Ward is?$$Yes.$$Francis was the first black columnist at The [Miami] Herald and Francis heard what I had done and he came over to my desk the next day, he said, "I'm going to give you fifty dollars 'cause I know you needed that money that you spent on those children."$$Yeah, a journalist, Francis Ward--$$Yeah.$$--whose wife [HM Val Gray Ward] founded the Kuumba Theatre in Chicago [Illinois].$$That's right, that's right.$$Right.$$And Francis gave me fifty dollars on the bill that I bought, the things that I bought for those children. So, but, I learned so much from that. I never, whenever I try to find out a person's background and their culture before I would do that again but if they had known I was trying to set up the pictures, they probably would have fired me (laughter) but I didn't want our women looking like that 'cause, you know, we have beautiful women and because you're heavy, you don't have to look like a Aunt Jemima, you know what I'm saying. You, I, our women are proud and beautiful women no matter what size. I was thin then but now I'm a fat woman, you know, and I like to look nice and I know all, down through the ages, all of our women always like to look beautiful. So I didn't like it the way they were doing us on the paper, in the newspaper. They would find the ugliest picture they could find to put in there and this is black women and it wasn't, that's what, that wasn't who we were.$Who were some of the other mentors in school?$$Mirian Chanin [ph.], who was my journalism teacher in high school [Booker T. Washington High School, Miami, Florida]. And I just sort of took that because I, it was a creative writing class and Marian always saw that I had some talent but back in that day, you had a lot of girls who were teacher's pets and I wasn't one of 'em, and so when it was time to write an essay for the Zeta Phi Betas, they give a Final Womanhood Award every year, Miriam said, Miriam Chanin said, I want you to write an essay for this contest and I said, why, 'cause they gonna give it to the same girls over and over again? And so I didn't go. I was in the auditorium practicing for the Seasons Spot-Ice. She sent for me and threatened to come up with a belt if I didn't come. So I did go. I didn't want to be embarrassed at that age. So I did, I wrote an essay, and to my surprise I won the award, The Final Womanhood Award. It was a hundred dollar award at that time.$$That's a good, that's a week's pay in those days.$$Yeah.

Leonard Burnett, Jr.

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and executive Leonard Burnett was born on April 18, 1964 in Shaker Heights, Ohio. His family was involved in franchising, which sparked his interest in entrepreneurship. After attending the University of Michigan for two years, Burnett went on to Florida A&M University, where he received his B.B.A. degree in business, management and marketing in 1986.

Burnett went into business with his classmate, Keith Clinkscales, to launch his first magazine, Urban Profile, in 1987, to fill a void in the media market. In 1992, Burnett and Clinkscales sold Urban Profile to Career Communications and got involved in the creation of Vibe magazine. From 1993 to 1999, Burnett served as a publisher and advertising director for the magazine. In 1999, he co-founded Vanguarde Media Group with Clinkscales. Burnett served as vice president and group publisher with Vanguarde and helped launch three successful urban magazines: Savoy, Honey, and Heart & Soul. In 2004, Burnett co-founded Uptown Media Group, or Uptown Ventures, publisher of Uptown magazine, where he served as the chief executive. The following year he helped Vibe magazine launch Vibe: Vixen. After Vibe reopened under new ownership in 2009, he served as the group publisher for the magazine until 2012.

In 2010, Burnett co-authored Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans. In 2013, he founded U Brands after re-purchasing Uptown magazine from InterMedia Partners and acquired Worldwide Electronic Publishing, the publisher of Hype Hair magazine. Burnett has successfully expanded the Uptown brand and reached underserved communities. He also has spoken at the ADCOLOR Awards and is considered an expert of African American buying power, brand-building, and marketing to both urban and affluent African American communities.

Burnett lives in New York City and has two children, Lenny Burnett III and Rani Burnett.

Leonard Burnett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 10, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.148

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/10/2014

Last Name

Burnett

Maker Category
Middle Name

Everett

Schools

Moreland Elementary School

Sterrett Elementary School

The Campus School Of Carlow University

Sacred Heart Elementary School

Shrine Catholic High School

University of Michigan

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

BUR24

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha’s Vineyard and St. Martin

Favorite Quote

If You Have To Say Who You Are, You Ain’t.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/18/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese, Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and magazine publishing chief executive Leonard Burnett, Jr. (1964 - ) was the cofounder of Vanguarde Media and cofounder and co-CEO of Uptown Ventures, the publisher of Uptown magazine. He was also author of Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans.

Employment

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Urban Profile

Vibe Ventures

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Uptown Media

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2208,13:3712,72:4088,77:14909,206:17237,240:21602,319:26840,429:28683,493:33145,574:33630,589:37995,685:45998,728:53152,822:53838,835:54524,840:57954,958:80720,1387:95292,1535:95884,1540:139450,2091:143779,2283:149896,2412:157067,2532:166190,2626$0,0:1748,31:4600,73:5704,88:20976,375:38862,546:45774,643:46530,651:47394,660:49554,679:51174,700:53118,726:55494,759:61738,820:62312,829:64280,872:69692,970:70266,981:71660,1025:74202,1084:74612,1090:75678,1113:76170,1121:76498,1126:77072,1136:77482,1142:83714,1294:85272,1326:88962,1417:89454,1424:90848,1472:102779,1581:105093,1638:124565,1945:129980,1996:133115,2175:140905,2294:153060,2378:157920,2479:170823,2696:180654,2942:187325,2988:187750,2994:188770,3009:189875,3027:192520,3060:193510,3098:194038,3112:194302,3122:195952,3177:196282,3183:199450,3276:199912,3284:204136,3408:210024,3447:218625,3540:219189,3549:220458,3585:221586,3599:224810,3607:226420,3633
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leonard Burnett, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his father's family background and early football career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's entrepreneurial career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his early interest in sports

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early career aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his family's frequent moves

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his early experiences of religion

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his decision to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers transferring to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his first impressions of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his growth at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the community at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls pledging the the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett reflects upon his formative development in college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early sales experiences at the Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers cofounding Urban Profile magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls operating Urban Profile magazine full time

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls joining the Career Communications Group, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls selling advertisements for Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the early staff of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the initial challenges at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls the ownership transition period at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett recalls leaving Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his attempts to buy XXL and Honey magazines

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his acquisition of Honey magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring magazines from BET

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the downfall of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the aftermath of Vanguarde Media's bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his inspiration to return to work

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his return to Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the changes in the magazine industry in the early 2000s

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the business plan for Uptown magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about Keith Clinkscales' career after the end of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the acquisition of Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls divesting from Vibe to focus on Uptown magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the U Brands company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about U Brands' projects

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his legacy and career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's opinion of his career path

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. shares his advice to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine
Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture
Transcript
And so doing that and then Keith [HistoryMaker Keith Clinkscales] got a call from Time Inc. They had--well back up. So Time Inc. had launched or did a test issue of this magazine called Vibe. And Vibe in their first little test issue had more ads than we had ever had in any, in all our combined issues. And so, but that sort of empowered us more. You know it was like you know, you know whoever is doing Vibe you know uncle time, you know they, they go had fund (unclear) and you know do this and we're just out here doing our own thing and we will make it happen, you know. We will just keep pushing, we're black owned, we're that. And so Keith got a call from, from Time Inc. from a friend, Lynne McDaniel who is now a friend of ours. And said hey, he said to him, "Hey if you notice Urban Profile--if you guys, what are you guys doing, you know? Are you happy?" Said, "Yeah, yeah," and you know, "Have you seen Vibe?" "Yeah, yeah, we've, we've seen it. It's cute you know." "Well we want to launch it and we were thinking about you and Len [HistoryMaker Leonard Burnett, Jr.] maybe coming up and help launching the magazine." And Keith's response was you know, "We all sort of both felt like okay that's, that's nice you know, but we're entrepreneurs, we're doing our own thing. We have our own autonomy you know, this is what I'm doing." "Okay well we're paying this much money." It was like, "Oh we'll be there tomorrow," (laughter). And so we, Keith went up in let's see, Keith went up in late '92 [1992] and I came down in February of '93 [1993] and just part of the team that launched the--$$And what was your role?$$I was the sales guy, I was account exec. So Keith was the president and CEO. I was account exec. A gentleman by the name of John Rollins you know technically hired, he hired me and I sold music advertising and had all the black agencies 'cause you know I was you know I was the black guy so I got all the black agencies. And, and so we were part of the team that launched Vibe. And you know great environment, met all sorts of people you know that, but, but the big thing was I'm back in New York City [New York, New York]. I cannot believe I'm back in New York. This was not what my life's plan was to be. Keith and I got a little studio apartment in Hell's Kitchen [New York, New York] you know while we were trying to figure out where we were gonna live you know but we were never there, we'd be in the office all the time. And we were you know all working hard trying to make this Vibe thing you know become a real business and a reality. And so that's how we got back.$So I wanna talk about what was going on culturally in America during the time that Vibe began and really had an incredible assent.$$Um-hm.$$What, you know, hip hop was just beginning. What--can you describe what was happening?$$Yeah. So you know hip hop you know it was beginning to become, be put on the map.$$Correct.$$You know 'cause it had, it had been there right, of course. And then the, but, but there was a sense of empowerment that was coming about from not the, the music. The music sort of drove everything, you know, culturally, politically, entrepreneur wise, fashion. Technically, it did, it drove all that and so what was quickly becoming known is, and Vibe really helped propel this, is our influence on American culture. We knew that, that the day was coming you know so we would talk. We would sell the idea hey when you grow up you'll listen to first music we listened to was pop music, you know. There are kids that were birthed around this time. The first music they're gonna listen to and the first radio station was gonna be a hip hop station. Their first athletes they're gonna fall in love with were black athletes basketball player. The, the, you know, the, the you know Serena [Serena Williams], the best black; the best tennis players were, were black. Golf champion [Tiger Woods] was black. And all this stuff was sort of happening. And was sort of turning America sort of upside down. This is it. And so what we knew at that time early on before we knew somehow was happening is that's where it was all going. No matter how much you didn't agree with it or what you didn't want to happen. What was going--what was happening was the browning of America not only from skin, but in terms of its aesthetic. And--$$Uh-huh.$$--and so you need--so the conversation was you can either jump in this conversation now and go for the ride or I'll see you later on down the road and it's gonna be a lot more expensive too, you know. And, and don't, and hope that no one else comes in along the way and jumps over you because they, they embraced it rather than fought it. And so, and so you know, and so everything was going on you know it's in the news. So there, there was a vibrance in a, and again empowerment. There were businesses being started in fashion or record labels being launched. And there were movies and movie companies coming out that were you know producing you know, black producers of movies. So obviously there was Spike Lee, but then you know the Hudlin brothers [HistoryMaker Reginald Hudlin and Warrington Hudlin], and you know, the, the whether it was just movies you know there, there were a plethora of movies were coming out that were about us and our culture and it start off very hip hop but then it grew into more of just our lifestyle, you know. So it wasn't all about gang banging and rap and it was about love. It was about family and all of our stories. And so there was a movement and I think there was a, again because of the music there was a sense of again going back to the idea of entre- being an entrepreneur, people didn't feel that they had to go work for Corporate America. There were other alternatives. There were other things that were going on whether it was going to work for a fashion company that was targeting our audience or whether it was starting your own business. I mean there was just a--there was a sense that you could do anything. And that was an exciting time, you know. And it, you know less to do about I think Vibe sort of told the stories but it's really the hip hop music and the culture that was making it happen.

Caroline Clarke

Journalist Caroline V. Clarke was born on Christmas Day, 1964 in New York City. As an infant, she was adopted and then raised in the Bronx, New York. Clarke later discovered that her biological mother was Carole "Cookie" Cole, the daughter of the famous musician Nat King Cole. She received her B.A. degree in English from Smith College, and then earned her M.S. degree with honors in journalism from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She also studied at Spelman College from 1983 to 1984.

In 1987, Clarke was hired as a reporter for the North Jersey Herald-News. She then joined the Connecticut Law Tribune in 1988, and became a staff writer for American Lawyer in 1989, where she was a contributing winner of a National Magazine Award for Outstanding Single Topic Issue. Then, in 1993, Black Enterprise magazine hired Clark as a senior editor. In 1998, she helped launch Black Enterprise Books, and served as its editorial director until 2003. During this time, she was promoted to editor-at-large of Black Enterprise magazine, and, in 2009, became Black Enterprise’s general manager of interactive media. In 2010, Clarke was named executive editor of Black Enterprise and became host of Black Enterprise Business Report. She also serves as editorial director of Black Enterprise’s Women of Power Summit, the nation's largest annual conference for African American women executives.

In 2001, Clarke, through Black Enterprise Books, published her first book, Take a Lesson: Today's Black Achievers on How They Made It and What They Learned along the Way. She also authored Postcards from Cookie: A Memoir of Motherhood, Miracles and a Whole Lot of Mail, which was published in 2014.

Clarke has served on the boards of Spence Chapin Family Services and the BE BRIDGE Foundation. She is married and has two children.

Caroline Clarke was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 9, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.250

Sex

Female

Interview Date

09/09/2014

Last Name

Clarke

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Smith College

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Spelman College

P.S. 121 Throop School

J.H.S. 144 Michelangelo School

Bronx High School of Science

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Caroline

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

CLA20

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

To Thine Own Self Be True

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/25/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Bread with Cheese or Butter

Short Description

Journalist Caroline Clarke (1964 - ) was the executive editor of Black Enterprise and host of the Black Enterprise Business Report. Her books included Take a Lesson and Postcards from Cookie.

Employment

North Jersey Herald-News

Connecticut Law Tribune

American Lawyer

Black Enterprise Magazine

Black Enterprise Books

Black Enterprise

Black Enterprise Business Report

Black Enterprise's Women of Power Summit

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Caroline Clarke's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Caroline Clarke lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Caroline Clarke describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Caroline Clarke describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Caroline Clarke remembers her early experiences in Liberia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Caroline Clarke describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Caroline Clarke recalls her parents' influence on her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Caroline Clarke describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Caroline Clarke talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Caroline Clarke talks about her adoption

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Caroline Clarke talks about her birth mother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Caroline Clarke talks about her birth mother's decision to place her for adoption

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Caroline Clarke describes her birth mother's acting career

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Caroline Clarke describes her birth mother's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Caroline Clarke talks about the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Caroline Clarke describes her adoptive parents' emphasis on etiquette

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Caroline Clarke describes her community in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Caroline Clarke talks about her schooling in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Caroline Clarke talks about her biological father

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Caroline Clarke remembers learning that her father was white, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Caroline Clarke remembers learning that her father was white, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Caroline Clarke talks about her racial identity, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Caroline Clarke talks about her racial identity, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Caroline Clarke remembers The Bronx High School of Science in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Caroline Clarke describes her decision to pursue a career in journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Caroline Clarke talks about her decision to attend Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Caroline Clarke describes her experiences at Smith College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Caroline Clarke talks about her year at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Caroline Clarke describes the start of her career in journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Caroline Clarke remembers meeting her husband, John C. Graves

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Caroline Clarke talks about her marriage to John C. Graves

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Caroline Clarke talks about working for Earl G. Graves, Sr.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Caroline Clarke describes the dress code at Black Enterprise

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Caroline Clarke talks about the Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Summit

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Caroline Clarke remembers the creation of the Women of Power Summit

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Caroline Clarke reflects upon her career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Caroline Clarke talks about her decision to pursue a career in journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Caroline Clarke reflects upon the state of the journalism industry

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Caroline Clarke talks about journalism in the digital age

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Caroline Clarke reflects upon the state of black media

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Caroline Clarke reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Caroline Clarke reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Caroline Clarke shares a message to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Caroline Clarke describes the start of her career in journalism
Caroline Clarke remembers the creation of the Women of Power Summit
Transcript
So, you graduate from Smith [Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts], you go to Columbia [Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, New York, New York] and--$$(Nods head).$$--and when do you start working?$$Right away. I got a job, a recruiter from a New Jersey paper came to Columbia, The North Jersey Herald and News, it was a competitor of The Bergen Record [The Record], although not much of a competitor. I have to say The Bergen Record was by and large the bigger paper. But they came and recruited and so I was recruited out of Columbia. I was not extremely ambitious in my, in my job search coming out of Columbia. I think I was very fearful that I was still very green. I did really well at Columbia. I graduated with honors but I felt because I had not had any experience going into Columbia which a lot of students had really even worked in journalism, I was hyper aware of how much I didn't know and I was not a big risk taker. So, I went to this little paper in North Jersey. I also wasn't really excited about going to you know another market, a small market. I wanted to stay close to New York [New York] and it was a great experience. I learned a lot. It was a daily newspaper. I definitely cut my teeth there and, and again I did well. I, I was lucky I found my calling in journalism. That was clearly what I was meant to do. And, and then after a little over a year there I went to a small trade paper in Stamford, Connecticut called the Connecticut Law Tribune. And my goal in going there was really to get to The American Lawyer, which was the flagship publication of that organization which was--although it was a trade, it was a very, very highly respected trade magazine in New York and it was a feeder for The Wall Street Journal and, and you know a lot of prestigious news organizations. And so, I figured you know I could get there through one of their subsidiary papers and that's what I did. So, I went from the Law Tribune to The American Lawyer magazine in New York.$But they kept asking and they kept asking. And so, ultimately we decided in 2005 to have a women's conference but we said we wouldn't make it about the entrepreneurs in our audience, we would make it about the corporate women. This way you know the entrepreneurs conference would be intact. And women came out in droves. State Farm was a title sponsor, it was in Phoenix [Arizona] and women just really came and it was that same, it was that same you know fire in them and hunger in them and you know there was something emotional that happened there. Women would come up to me and say, "You just don't know you know, I'm in Minnesota so this is like, you know, I feel like I've been dropped into heaven. I don't have this. I don't get this. I need this." And that was repeated you know all over. And we would do this conference and we would all leave there feeling like everything was possible you know. You just like, you be in your little silo throughout the year, you're doing your work, you're trying to raise kids, you've got parents, you've got this, you've got that. You're struggling, you're doing it but you get here and really truly decompress with women who are living the same kind of life, had the same sorts of dreams, wanted the same sorts of things and making it happen. And being together made you feel more strongly that it was doable and that it was worth it and that whatever you were going through or sacrificing to make it happen, it was worthwhile. So, the Women of Power Summit you know came into being and it's evolved and it's now going to be in its tenth year next which is phenomenal and amazing to me. But you know the women of Black Enterprise, the businesswoman, whether she is a small business person who has started her own company or inherited it from parents or started it with her significant other or whether she is you know clawing her way through corporate environments is so vital to this country and this culture and, and she's been really vital part of our audience.