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Darrell Jackson

Business executive Darrell Jackson was born on April 6, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois to Carolyn and Erwin Jackson. Jackson graduated from Mendel Catholic High School in 1976, and went on to earn his B.A. degree in mass communication and media studies from Saint Xavier University in 1981. During college, Jackson worked in the mail room of South Shore Bank, which sparked his interest in banking. He later earned his M.B.A. degree from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management in 2000.

Jackson began his career at BMO Harris Bank in Chicago in 1981, where he completed their commercial banking training program. Jackson went on to become vice president of Harris Bank. In 1995, Jackson became the vice president of personal financial services for Illinois for Northern Trust Corporation. He was promoted to chief executive officer of the Northern Trust Company's Illinois West Suburban Region, and later served as senior vice president and head of the private banking division. In 2010, he was promoted to executive vice president and president of Northern Trust’s Wealth Management business in Illinois. Jackson worked at Northern Trust until 2014, when he was named president and chief executive officer of Seaway Bank and Trust Company, the third largest African American owned commercial bank in the country. During his fifteen month tenure there, Jackson restructured the bank’s balance sheets, increased its liquidity position, and improved its tier one leverage ratio to an acceptable regulatory level. In 2015, Jackson became the first African American chair of the Illinois Bankers Association.

He was on the board of directors of Seaway Bank and Trust Company in addition to being president and CEO, The Delaware Place Bank, The Morton Arboretum, the Illinois Bankers Association, the 100 Club of Chicago and the Kellogg Alumni Council of Northwestern University. Jackson became the first African American chairman of the board for the Illinois Bankers Association, The Morton Arboretum and the 100 Club of Chicago. He also served on the CEO advisory board of Visage International, and served on the boards of The Chicago Child Care Society, and the Children’s Inner City Educational Fund. Jackson was a member of the Illinois BancService Corp Board and Strategic Planning Committee. Jackson was voted one of the forty leaders of color by Chicago United in 2003; and was given the 2004 Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award by the Boys and Girls Club of Chicago. In 2014, he received the Father John Phelps Humanitarian of the Year Award from Life Directions. Jackson is also a member of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity.

Jackson and his wife, Valencia Ray, have two children, Lindsay and Tyler.

Darrell Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 6, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.066

Sex

Male

Interview Date

04/06/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Middle Name

B.

Schools

Holy Name of Mary School

Mendel Catholic Preparatory High School

Northwestern University

First Name

Darrell

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

JAC42

Favorite Season

Football season - Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Barcelona - Madrid, Spain

Favorite Quote

As A Man Thinketh, So Is He.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

4/6/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Favorite Food

Fish - Catfish

Short Description

Bank executive Darrell Jackson (1958 - ) was the president and chief executive officer of Seaway Bank and Trust Company, and the first African American chairperson of the Illinois Banker Association.

Employment

South Shore Bank

Harris Bank

Northern Trust Company

Seaway National Bank

Favorite Color

Purple

Scott Syphax

Business executive Scott Syphax was born on July 13, 1963 in Detroit, Michigan to Vernettia Gilmore Syphax and Charles Syphax. Raised in Sacramento, California, Syphax graduated from John F. Kennedy High School in 1981, and became the manager of The Vortex, a nightclub in downtown Sacramento. After working as an executive fellow with the public policy and leadership training program at the Coro Foundation, Syphax then earned his B.S. degree in business administration, real estate development, and land use planning from California State University, Sacramento in 1992.

From 1992 to 1994, Syphax worked as a senior policy consultant for California State Senator Robert Presley. He then served as chief executive officer of the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences for one year, before accepting a position as senior lobbyist for the California Medical Association. From 1999 to 2001, Syphax worked as the manager of public affairs for the pharmaceutical company, Eli Lilly and Company; and then in 2001, Syphax became the president and chief executive officer of the Nehemiah Corporation of America, a real estate and community development company. In 2009, Syphax founded the Nehemiah Emerging Leaders Program; and the following year, he launched the Neighborhood Restoration Program and the Roofs for Troops program. He was also a developer for the Township Nine project, a sixty-five acre mixed-use development project in Sacramento’s River District. In 2011, Syphax became the producer and host of the PBS KVIE public television show Studio Sacramento, which won an Emmy Award in 2013 for an episode on human trafficking. After leaving the Nehemiah Corporation of America in 2017, Syphax founded Syphax Strategic Solution.

Syphax received numerous awards for his professional accomplishments, including the 2011 Exemplary Leader Award from the American Leadership Forum, the Economic Trailblazer Award from the Sacramento Black Chamber of Commerce, the Al Geiger Award from the Sacramento Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce and the Excellence in Broadcasting Award from the American Council on Arab Islamic Relations, all in 2013. Syphax was also the recipient of the Urban League’s 2016 Community Empowerment Award and the Congressman Robert T. Matsui Community Service Award from The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee in 2017. Syphax served on the board of Sutter Health San Sierra, Homeaid America, the California Medical Association Foundation, Valley Vision, and the Bay Area Council. Syphax was also a member of the California Department Insurance Task Force on Board Governance and Supplier Diversity.

Scott Syphax was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 3, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.060

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/3/2018

Last Name

Syphax

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Organizations
Schools

Atkinson Elementary School

John F. Kennedy High School

California State University, Sacramento

First Name

Scott

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

SYP01

Favorite Season

Thanksgiving

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

In The Land Of The Blind The One-eyed Man Is King.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/13/1963

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Sacramento

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Business executive Scott Syphax (1963 - ) was the president and chief executive officer of the Nehemiah Corporation of America, the founder of Syphax Strategic Solutions, and the host and producer of the television show Studio Sacramento.

Favorite Color

Red

Shellye Archambeau

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau was born on July 6, 1962 in Washington, D.C. to Mera Archambeau and Lester Archambeau II. In 1980, she graduated from Montville High School in Montville, New Jersey, and received her B.S. degree in marketing and decision science in 1984 from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Archambeau started her career with the IBM Corporation, where she served in several roles including general manager of direct marketing in the Asia Pacific Division. In 1999, Archambeau was promoted to vice president of public sector industries in the Asia Pacific Division, making her the first African American woman to take on an international executive role at IBM. In 1999, she joined Blockbuster Inc. as senior vice president of their nascent e-commerce division, Blockbuster.com. In 2000, she was named executive vice president and chief marketing officer of NorthPoint Communications. In 2001, she served as chief marketing officer and executive vice president for LoudCloud, Inc. In 2002, Archambeau became the chief executive officer of Zaplet, Inc., overseeing the company’s merger with MetricStream in 2004. In 2018, Archambeau stepped down as CEO.

Archambeau received many awards for her business leadership, including the JEM Luminary Award from the C200 organization, the NCWIT Symons Innovator Award from the National Center for Women & Information Technology, the Game Changer Award from the Digital Diversity Network and the Spirit of Excellence Award from the Silicon Valley Black Charter of Women. She serves on the board of directors for Arbitron, Inc., Verizon Communications, Inc., Nordstrom Inc., the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and the IT Senior Management Forum. Also a member of the Forum of Women Entrepreneurs and the Women's Council to the Board of Trustees for the University of Pennsylvania, she served on the Council on Foreign Relations, and has been inducted into the National Hall of Fame of the Negro Business and Professional Women's Club. In 2016, Archambeau co-authored the business book Marketing That Works: How Entrepreneurial Marketing Can Add Sustainable Value to Any Sized Company .

Shellye Archambeau was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.208

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/29/2017

Last Name

Archambeau

Maker Category
First Name

Shellye

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ARC13

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Dorothy Terrell

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Someplace I've Never Been That Has Great History

Favorite Quote

Everybody's a Package

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/6/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Palo Alto

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau (1962 - ) held leadership positions at IBM Corporation, Blockbuster, Inc., NorthPoint Communications, and LoudCloud Inc. before serving as the chief executive officer of MetricStream from 2002 to 2018.

Employment

IBM

Blockbuster

Northpoint

Loudcloud

Metric Stream

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Lloyd Dean

Chief executive officer Lloyd Dean was born in Alabama on June 24,1950 to Susie Tripp Dean, a homemaker, and Floyd Dean, Sr., a foundry worker. Dean grew up in Muskegon, Michigan. In 1969, he enrolled at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where he earned his B.S. degree in sociology, and his and M.A. degree in education. Dean then went on to graduate from Pennsylvania State University's Executive Management program.

Between 1972 and 1978, Dean worked as a junior high school teacher and paralegal assistant. He taught communications courses at Western Michigan University, and served as a news anchor for WOTV in Battle Creek, Michigan. In 1978, he met a pharmaceutical executive named Lawrence Hoff, who recruited him to work at his company, Upjohn. Dean worked at Upjohn Company, where he rose from assistant regional manager in the health care services division to Executive Vice President of Marketing and Operations, until 1990. He then moved to Illinois, where he worked at Consumer Health Service, EHS Healthcare, and Advocate Healthcare. In 2000, he was recruited to join Catholic Healthcare West, now known as Dignity Health, where he served as president and chief executive officer.

Dean served on the boards of Wells Fargo & Company, McDonald's Corp., Navigant Consulting Inc, and Cytori Therapeutics, Inc.. He was also the board chair for the Committee on JOBS, an organization that brings employment to the San Francisco Bay area.

Dean has been a strong supporter of the Affordable Care Act. He was a 2014 recipient of the CEO Humanitarian of the Year Award from the American Red Cross Bay Area Chapter. In 2014, Dean was also named among the Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare. He was recognized by the San Francisco Business Times for Excellence in Leadership and received multiple awards from 100 Black Men of the Bay Area, Inc. Dean also received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the University of San Francisco.

Dean lives in Half Moon Bay, California with his wife, Suzanne Dean. They have two children, Nathan and Nicole.

Lloyd Dean was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 18, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.010

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/18/2015

Last Name

Dean

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

H.

Organizations
Schools

Western Michigan University

First Name

Lloyd

HM ID

DEA01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui

Favorite Quote

My Only Limitation Is My Imagination.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/24/1950

Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Meatloaf

Short Description

Chief executive officer and chief executive officer Lloyd Dean (1950 - ) served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Dignity Health, the fifth largest healthcare system in the U.S., starting in June 2000.

Employment

Upjohn Company

WOTV News

Advocate Health Care

Dignity Healthcare

McDonald's Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3534,37:3906,42:6231,81:8928,114:9672,123:10137,129:11253,153:11811,161:16360,204:16820,210:17464,218:18384,272:20868,289:21420,296:21788,301:26112,400:26848,411:27308,417:28412,430:29608,444:30252,452:36640,499:37392,511:50940,661:51480,668:52830,684:54090,695:57870,765:59850,786:61020,801:61830,812:62370,819:64620,847:69091,854:74180,911:80500,1016:80980,1023:94456,1131:95518,1141:95990,1147:96462,1152:101086,1171:101542,1176:102568,1192:112144,1306:113170,1316:129300,1459:129664,1464:131393,1489:132030,1498:132394,1503:133213,1513:137406,1518:137952,1525:140136,1556:142047,1587:144750,1593:145175,1600:145770,1608:147385,1641:147895,1652:149000,1666:150020,1678:152995,1730:153845,1743:154440,1751:155120,1760:155630,1767:161100,1810:164740,1860:165286,1867:167925,1917:168289,1922:173021,1985:175751,2065:177207,2082:177662,2088:178026,2093:183304,2098:183808,2106:184732,2119:186160,2138:187000,2161:187924,2173:188344,2179:190024,2202:190612,2210:192124,2230:193216,2248:193888,2259:195484,2288:202776,2334:203462,2343:207430,2373$0,0:432,8:936,17:2016,56:5328,187:9144,272:17502,358:18318,365:22534,425:26186,457:27132,471:27820,481:30400,577:31002,585:31776,596:33840,625:34700,643:35646,656:36678,672:41930,703:43680,737:44240,747:44520,752:46620,805:51240,939:51800,948:52290,957:53060,975:53550,983:63207,1074:64512,1093:66513,1126:67035,1133:67905,1144:68340,1151:68949,1160:69645,1169:70689,1184:71211,1191:72690,1221:76344,1277:77214,1290:82900,1328:85789,1377:86324,1383:100250,1541:100670,1553:101160,1562:115188,1746:120430,1797:121980,1809:126452,1903:129158,1940:135544,2001:143308,2107:148158,2179:148740,2186:154851,2296:155627,2306:159495,2324:159843,2329:169326,2520:171501,2576:176010,2585:180098,2703:190135,2857:191495,2878:193875,2931:196255,2985:197190,2998:198890,3020:199485,3027:200250,3040:201695,3060:207428,3121:209166,3154:210272,3169:210983,3180:212642,3214:213037,3220:215565,3265:222640,3294:223414,3305:232186,3457:236368,3515:241162,3621:241978,3630:248300,3679:248816,3686:249160,3691:250794,3736:251396,3749:254578,3846:254922,3851:261398,3963:262108,3988:262676,3997:263812,4023:264451,4036:264948,4043:268220,4066
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lloyd Dean's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lloyd Dean lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lloyd Dean describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lloyd Dean describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lloyd Dean describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lloyd Dean lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lloyd Dean remembers moving to Muskegon, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lloyd Dean remembers the community of Twin Lake, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Lloyd Dean describes the sights, sounds and smell of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Lloyd Dean recalls the Calvary Baptist Church in Muskegon, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Lloyd Dean talks about his early commitment to education

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Lloyd Dean recalls his father's illnesses

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Lloyd Dean describes his parents' home remedies

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Lloyd Dean remembers his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Lloyd Dean describes his relationship with his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lloyd Dean talks about the impact of busing

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lloyd Dean remembers his teachers' encouragement

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lloyd Dean remembers leaving for college

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lloyd Dean recalls his decision to attend Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lloyd Dean describes his college experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lloyd Dean remembers being harassed for associating with whites

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lloyd Dean describes Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lloyd Dean talks about his work experiences while in college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lloyd Dean remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Lloyd Dean describes his extracurricular activities at Western Michigan University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Lloyd Dean describes his early career

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Lloyd Dean remembers joining the Upjohn Pharmaceutical Company

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

8$12

DATitle
Lloyd Dean remembers the community of Twin Lake, Michigan
Lloyd Dean remembers joining the Upjohn Pharmaceutical Company
Transcript
Where I lived is, is out kind of in, we'd like to say in the sticks. But it was like this little community maybe thirteen miles from what I'll call the City of Muskegon [Michigan]. And there were maybe three hundred people in my community.$$And what was the name of the community?$$It's called Twin Lakes [sic. Twin Lake, Michigan]. But there's two Twin Lakes, Blue Lake Township [Michigan]. And this was a small community of predominantly African Americans and I was bused about eight miles to school.$$So would you say it was rural or a small--I mean was it a rural or a small town?$$It was it, it--there was really no sense of town because there were no public buildings. The only store that we ever had in my community my father [Floyd Dean, Sr.], when my brother passed away, opened. So it really was just a community of dwelling where people lived.$$And can you describe, can you take yourself back there and describe the street, you know, that you lived on. Can you do that for me?$$Yes. I lived on a street called White Lake Drive. And that sounds elegant, it sounds like it's on a lake, but it's not and it was a street of very, very small homes, very, very small home. An example, there were nine--nine of us and we had nine kids and two adults, and we had a three-bedroom home. These were like manufactured homes and it was a very poor community.$$Now, let's--I'd like you to, but how--were the neighbors in close vicinity?$$Yes. Yeah, even though it was out in the country, your neighbors were pretty close. But it was in a wooded area. I mean this section was never like a planned community, it's just kind of one house grew there. Other people told people about it in the South, they came there. And this one guy started building houses because there was this demand from African Americans in the--in the South.$$So were you as a family unit, were you pretty internal? Would you--would your activities occur with just the nine of you or were you playing with other neighborhood kids (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, a lot of the activities of my early life were with my brothers and sisters. But also with my, my [paternal] grandmother lived like out the backdoor, because again, she moved up there. And peop- kids in my community, but you know, not like in an urban environment. So a lot of my time was spent with my--with my family.$Now was that the person who you were talking about, was that Lawrence Hoff [Lawrence C. Hoff] (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes, very good, Larry Hoff, Larry Hoff.$$Okay, okay, Lar- so what did he see in you, that's what I, I mean, I didn't quite understand how?$$Yeah, Larry, Larry--$$So he saw you where?$$Oh he heard me--he her--he saw me present. The Upjohn family kind of dominated Kalamazoo [Michigan], because they were the largest employer. So, because I was active in college [Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan], there were Upjohn executives on the various boards and committees, and they were on anything that was important in Kalamazoo. And because I was so active in the university, a lot of times I'd be called to talk about what's going on at the university, or what are students thinking, you know, what are some of their challenges. How can the Upjohn Company [Upjohn Pharmaceutical Company] be better partners with the university from a student perspective, because I, you know, was one of the top student government people. And also, because of the six hundred class, a lot--there were Upjohn executives that I would be teaching them how to do public speaking and how to deal with press conferences and that kind of thing. And one day, Larry was at some meeting and he said, "I've heard about you, I wanna talk to you, I've seen you at these meetings," and he said, "I want you to come out and have lunch with me." And so I did. And I was so blown away and at the end of the lunch they said, "We'd like you to come and work for us." And I said, "Oh no, no, no, no. I love what I'm doing and having a lot of fun teaching and I like it." And they said, "How much do you make?" And I said, "Twenty-one thousand dollars," and they said, "Well what if we offered you thirty thousand dollars?" And I said, "Oh no, you--," I meant to say no you don't have to do that and they said, "Well what about forty thousand dollars." And I said, "No it's not about the money." They said, "What about sixty thousand dollars?" And I said, "Well I'm gonna need to think about that (laughter)," 'cause I knew--I knew twenty-one times three gets you pretty close to sixty-three--gets you to sixty-three thousand dollars. And I said, "I--you know, it's not about the money. I just, you know, I love what I do and you know, I just, you know, this is a whole new thing and I appreciate that you have the confidence in me." And so I went back and I talked to one of my professors, two--Chuck Warfield [Charles Warfield], Dr. Warfield who's African American professor, and I talked to Dr. Gene Booker [Gene S. Booker] who was the head of the business department 'cause I took classes in the business department for my master's [degree]. And both of them looked at me and they said like, "Are you a fool, you should've took it at thirty, let alone at sixty." And they said, "You get your butt out there tomorrow and you tell them yes. Do you know how many thousands of people in--around the United States wanna work for the Upjohn Company? Do you know how difficult it is to get in? Do you know how--this is one of the top pharmaceutical companies, excuse me, in, in, in, in, in the world right now. Are you like--is something wrong with you?" And so I did and became the youngest executive vice president to ever receive the Upjohn Award of Excellence [W.E. Upjohn Award] in the history of the company. It was a nonfamily member for operations, for you know, you know growing the company, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. So, and that's how I got into healthcare, and then I was there fourteen years. I got recruited to, what is now Advocate Health Care system, a smaller healthcare system, kind of like Dignity Health [San Francisco, California] and was about to become the president there and CEO. And got this call about this company called Catholic Healthcare West [Dignity Health]. But I was--had been reading about it because they were in the national news about one of the top companies in United States having problems.

Bernard J. Tyson

Chief executive officer Bernard J. Tyson was born on January 20, 1959 in Vallejo, California to Billie Tyson, a homemaker, and Moses Tyson, a minister. After graduating from Vallejo High School in 1977, Tyson enrolled at Golden Gate University. While still in college, Tyson worked as an administrative analyst for Vallejo General Hospital. He earned his B.S. degree in health service management in 1982, and went on to receive his M.B.A. degree from Golden Gate University in 1984.

In 1984, Tyson accepted a six-month internship at Kaiser Permanente and was then hired full-time in an administrative position. Tyson remained at Kaiser Permanente and in 1992, he was named chief executive officer of the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in Santa Rosa, California. In 1999, he was promoted to senior vice president and chief operating officer for regions outside of California and for Kaiser’s brand strategy. In 2004, the organization launched its “Thrive” advertising campaign under Tyson’s leadership. In 2006, Tyson was promoted to senior vice president for Health Plan and Hospital Operations, during which time Kaiser opened four new hospitals. In 2010, he was promoted to president and chief operating officer of Kaiser Permanente. As president, he was vocal in his support of the Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law in 2010 and faced significant hurdles. In 2013, he became the company’s first African American chairman and chief executive officer.

Tyson served as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Health Governors Community. He also served on the boards of the American Heart Association, America’s Health Insurance Plans, and the International Federation of Health Plans. He was an American Heart Association CEO Roundtable Member and past chairman of the Executive Leadership Council.

Tyson also received many awards and honors over the course of his career. He was a recipient of the NAACP Freedom Act Award in 2001 and was named Golden Gate University's Alumnus of the Year in 2007. He was named among the Most Influential Healthcare Leaders in both 2014 and 2015, and was a recipient of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s 2014 National Equal Justice Award. In 2010, Tyson was named among the Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare and Top 25 Most Influential African Americans.

Bernard Tyson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 17, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.005

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/17/2015

Last Name

Tyson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

J.

Organizations
Schools

Farragut Elementary School

Vallejo Middle School

Vallejo High School

Golden Gate University

Springstowne Junior High School

First Name

Bernard

Birth City, State, Country

Vallejo

HM ID

TYS02

Favorite Season

Thanksgiving

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

God Bless America

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

1/20/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Chief executive officer and chief executive officer Bernard J. Tyson (1959 - ) was the first African American CEO of the $60 billion healthcare organization, Kaiser Permanente.

Employment

Kaiser Permanente

Vallejo General Hospital

Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
0,0:1680,23:2184,30:19322,184:23634,270:24614,281:27330,289:30642,367:30918,374:31815,388:32505,428:34920,541:35610,558:46346,720:69630,962:70390,977:73810,1035:85274,1220:93506,1353:93926,1359:102451,1421:126130,1860:131146,1907:135490,1944:135766,1949:138524,1983:139042,1991:139560,2000:142298,2054:144222,2088:144814,2100:145258,2108:147182,2150:150364,2212:158100,2294:161060,2345:174018,2529:179058,2657:179346,2662:189130,2816:197180,2975:211968,3150:227432,3344:235957,3443:236431,3451:236747,3456:237142,3462:240030,3475$0,0:1065,17:6745,199:10792,304:11076,309:18508,414:18856,420:19465,429:25468,516:27730,548:28687,565:31297,603:36158,646:38449,682:39002,690:42478,767:47850,858:57047,981:61187,1086:65051,1149:73522,1251:73817,1260:83252,1423:84734,1447:85904,1469:88244,1521:91754,1586:92066,1592:98256,1633:100840,1667:101980,1685:102284,1690:106692,1783:109352,1852:112772,1910:113076,1918:122094,2005:122605,2013:123554,2026:123992,2033:124795,2051:128664,2129:133555,2248:151850,2514:160336,2607:161126,2624:161521,2630:163575,2662:163970,2668:164286,2673:165155,2686:165471,2691:165787,2696:166340,2706:167762,2727:169105,2746:170685,2780:171870,2805:178506,2927:187672,3068:190706,3126:203620,3335:204010,3341:205414,3374:209695,3435:213970,3484:214635,3493:215015,3498:217010,3522:227737,3652:229192,3668:237922,3787:238310,3792:242810,3797
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernard J. Tyson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers his family's storytelling

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson reflects upon his relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers his early experiences in the Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bernard J. Tyson describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bernard J. Tyson lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his father's work as a carpenter

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers his father's work as a builder

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his father's love of cars

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his childhood home

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about the importance of music in his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers attending Farragut Elementary School in Vallejo, California

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his experiences at Springstowne Junior High School in Vallejo, California

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers the influence of attorney Lewis G. Brown

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his middle school and high school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his personality in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers experiencing racial harassment

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his relationship with his father in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his relationship with his cousin, Sly Stone

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his decision to enroll at Golden Gate University in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers staying with Sly Stone's family in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers Sly Stone's career

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his internship at Vallejo General Hospital in Vallejo, California

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his trajectory to Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his transition from resident to manager at Kaiser Pernamente

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his first experiences as a hospital manager

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson describes how Kaiser Permanente differs from other medical systems

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls the administrative positions leading to his appointment as a hospital administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers the African American administrators who preceded him at Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his experiences as a hospital administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers restructuring the Northern California region of Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about the emergence of health maintenance organizations in the 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about Kaiser Permanente's financial situation in the 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls Kaiser Permanente's challenges outside of California

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his experiences with Kaiser Permanente on the East Coast

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his responsibilities as regional president of Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers the creation of an electronic records system at Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson describes Kaiser Permanente's approach to advertising

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson recalls his engagement with federal policymakers in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about what he learned from his time in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bernard J. Tyson describes Kaiser Permanente's influence on the Clinton healthcare initiative

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about developing Kaiser Permanente's brand image

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bernard J. Tyson remembers his transition to being vice president of Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bernard J. Tyson talks about his relationship with George Halvorson

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bernard J. Tyson reflects upon his appointment to CEO of Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bernard J. Tyson describes his vision as the CEO of Kaiser Permanente

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bernard J. Tyson reflects upon his legacy as a CEO

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bernard J. Tyson reflects upon his personal legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Bernard J. Tyson recalls his decision to enroll at Golden Gate University in San Francisco, California
Bernard J. Tyson talks about his first experiences as a hospital manager
Transcript
How is it decided when you're going to col- you know, where you're going to go to college? And, and is that a, a definite thing? Immediately?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Yeah. In fact, I decided where, and I picked Golden Gate University [San Francisco, California], because I was absolutely certain that I wanted to be a hospital administrator.$$Which is, where does that come from?$$Because I--my mother [Billie Haynes Tyson] was in the hospital a lot when we were growing up.$$Because she had diabetes (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Diabetes.$$But this is interes- because it was hereditary, right, because her--your grandmother [Tyson's maternal great-aunt, Rosie Haynes Garrett] had had it, right?$$Right. And so, my mother spent a lot of time on health and health care. So, my mother had a great set of doctors who were just passionate about her, at least from my view, and therefore, us. So, I had this imagery growing up, that, you know, doctors in white coats were wonderful people, because of how they attended after my mother, and also with us as a result of that. So when we were growing up, there were several times my mother--many times, but not many, many, many--but several times my mother would end up in the hospital. And I remember going into that environment and the doctors were, you know, providing care, and there was obviously such a great respect for them, and I grew up wanting to be like that. And then later on, clearly I began to, you know, gravitate in my own mind that I'm going to run my hospital, and I learned that from understanding what a hospital administrator did. And so when I got to high school [Vallejo Senior High School; Vallejo High School, Vallejo, California] I was looking at going to colleges, and Golden Gate University came up, and I honestly don't even remember how it came up. I started to do research, and I learned that the uniqueness of that particular school was that many of the students were already in the profession. And I thought that was like a godsend that--you know, I didn't want to go to college, you know, to hang out at college. I went to college on the mission of, you will go to school, and so I saw the benefit, in my mind, of being around people who did this every single day. And whether or not that had anything to do with how I was oriented, I don't know, but it made sense to me. And so I wasn't even sure that I would be able to get in, because I didn't have that experience. So, I went through the whole process and then they accepted me into the school.$$And that--there were, as I had read, there're a lot of older students there, right?$$Right.$$Okay.$$Right.$$And people were saying you shouldn't go there?$$Right.$$Did the--okay.$$Yeah, yeah, yeah, people were saying, "You shouldn't go there." My father [Moses Tyson, Sr.] was encouraging, so he was just proud, as it turned out. And, you know, I had people saying, "No, you shouldn't go there. You should go to a junior college or a university." And, and I, you know, I don't want to say I rejected that. I think I viewed the whole decision of going to school--you know, I obviously got help from a lot of people, but it's sort of like, I did it, you know. I felt like I had put myself in school. And I hold to this day that that was a great--that was a great decision. And I was scared and I was young, and, and I guess I was ambitious, but, you know, it, I had to get used to it, because there were so many older people there.$So, tell me then what you do then as manager [at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California]. And you said you were assessing? How do you even know what to assess at that point? Were you just--you know, I know you had said you had learned to look at data. But were you just observing, you know, how to (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, yeah, everything. I was observing, you know, what the workers were doing. I looked at a lot of data, you know. So, for example, they had a problem with--obviously this is thirty something years ago, but it's pretty accurate. They had a problem with--during that time, every lab slip had to be filed into medical records, so they had stacks of lab slips and they were behind. And it was a frustration for the physician, because you get the medical records and not all the medical information was in there. And so, that was one of the areas that I studied. And so I studied--I did a numbers count: how many of these slips do you have? And I did a people count: how many people are here? And then I worked with the lab techs--I mean the filers, and I would like at how many can they get done in an eight hour day? And so I started to do the analysis, and then I came up with the recommendation that two things were broken: one, the whole system was broken. Because why put the lab slip in the department when somehow you can match it to the record when the slip is available. So, you're just in time; that was my thought process. But the second one, more importantly, was I just did a number count, and said, every day, in essence, at that time, the manpower available times the time that each of them will spend, times how many they can get done against how many are coming--I can tell you what the backlog is going to be. And so, and Alva [Alva Wheatley] loved that work and that thinking, and so that was just one of maybe four or five areas. So, I put together those kinds of recommendations and said, you know, the workers needed to be better allocated, if you will, in the areas of the file room. So, instead of having someone going all over the file room, you pre-sort the lab slips into sections and you give Bernard [HistoryMaker Bernard J. Tyson] this area, because they're all numbered. And so I used to put those things together, and I put together the recommendations. And she said, "These are great. Now, you go and do it." And I was like, "It'll be very hard as a resident." So, then they hired me on as the manager, and that was the start. And then I turned that department around, and to this day, thirty something years later, I still go visit. And I still have employees in that area that were there when I was the manager, and every promotion that I've gotten in the organization, I would go into that department. And I have to say, those individuals are so proud of me, and I'm proud of them. In fact, I was in there when--after I became chairman and CEO [of Kaiser Permanente]. I went in there and we took pictures and selfies and everything. And I told them, I said, "As long as I'm here, you can--you are guaranteed that we're going to all leave together. So, nothing's going to happen to you while I'm here." You know, we had jokes like that, and they were wonderful. You know, and that's when I really had my first experience in quote (air quotes) managing people. And it was a great experience, and I had a great department, you know. And, and here was a group of what they called unmotivated people and everything, and they were fantastic; I mean they were fantastic. And I challenged them and we had fun, and we got the work done. You know, we had meetings, I informed them what was going on. It was just, you know, a very good time, and, and I got the work done.

Otis L. Story, Sr.

Healthcare chief executive Otis Leon Story, Sr. was born on November 17, 1951 in Anniston, Alabama to Martha Lou and Tom Elbert Story, Sr. Story earned his B.A. degree in the social sciences from Cornell University in 1976 and his M.A degree at the University of Chicago in 1977. Story continued his education at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he earned his second M.A. degree in hospital and health administration.

Story began his career at Ochsner Foundation Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he was appointed as the first African American administrator in the hospital's history. From 1985 to 1990, he worked as an administrator at the University of Alabama at Birmingham-University Hospital; and, in 1990, became the chief operating officer at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of Newark, New Jersey. From 1996 to 1998, Story served as the associate executive officer of The Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati. Then, Story began working as the executive vice president and chief operating officer for the Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah, Georgia. Appointed by the board of directors, Story was named interim president and chief executive officer at Shands Jacksonville Medical Center in 2001. From there, Story served as the vice president of operations of the Cooper Health System in Camden, New Jersey. In 2003, he was hired as the executive director at St. Vincent Catholic Medical Center in New York City, and worked to amend the center’s bankruptcy status. Story was appointed as the president and chief executive officer of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia in 2007. In 2012, the Jefferson County Commission in Birmingham, Alabama hired Story to reorganize Cooper Green Mercy Hospital. From 2015 to 2017, Story served as the chief executive officer of East Orange General Hospital in East Orange, New Jersey.

In addition to his other accomplishments, Story also completed a fellowship with the National Association of Public Hospitals. He served as a member of the Regional Policy Boards at the American Hospital Association as well as The Sovereign Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Knight Hospitaller.

Story lives with his wife, Ava, in Hoover, Alabama. They have three children together: Jasmyn, Avana, and Prince James.

Otis L. Story, Sr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2007, March 20, 2012 and March 27, 2017.

Accession Number

A2007.256

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2007 |and| 3/20/2012 |and| 03/27/2017

Last Name

Story

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

University of Chicago

Cornell University

University of Alabama at Birmingham

South Highland Elementary School

John Bowne High School

First Name

Otis

Birth City, State, Country

Anniston

HM ID

STO05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

Thou Shall Have No Other Lord. Thou Shall Love Thy the Lord With All Thy Heart, And With All Thy Mind And All Thy Soul. And The Second is Like Unto It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

11/17/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Englewood

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Chief executive officer Otis L. Story, Sr. (1951 - ) was president and CEO of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia.

Employment

Shands Jacksonville Medical Center.

St. Vincent Catholic Medical Center

Ochsner Foundation Hospital

Playland

University of Alabama at Birmingham

University of Chicago Office of Special Programs

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey

Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati

Quorum Health Resources

The Endeavor Group

Grady Health System

Azul Health Group

Tampa General Hospital

Prospect Medical Holdings, Inc.

East Orange General Hospital

Favorite Color

Burgundy, Gold

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Otis L. Story, Sr.'s interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his mother's upbringing in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his maternal uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers meeting his white relatives

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his maternal grandmother's professions

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his paternal uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the community of Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the major industries in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his family's landlord in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his neighbors in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his early interest in sports

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his childhood illness

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his parents' side jobs

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his upbringing in a working class community

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Otis L. Story, Sr.'s interview, session 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his experiences at South Highland Elementary School in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls the racial tensions in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers being chased by dogs in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes segregation in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls the Freedom Rider bus bombing in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the attack on Nat King Cole by Klansmen from Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the attacks on his father in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his early aspirations

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers P.S. 142, Shimer Junior High School in Queens, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the integration of New York City's schools

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his experiences at John Bowne High School in Queens, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his introduction to basketball in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his high school basketball career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his coursework at John Bowne High School in Queens, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his mentors at John Bowne High School

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his college aspirations

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the New York City teachers' strike of 1968

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his involvement in the New York City teachers' strike of 1968

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls the New York City Board of Education summer retreat

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his graduation from John Bowne High School in Queens, New York

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his summer basketball league in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers working at the Playland arcade in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his father's hospitalization

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls the denial of medical treatment to black patients at Queens General Hospital

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the trip to Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his experiences at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers Professor William Keeton

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his freshmen orientation at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his freshman roommate at Cornell University

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the black basketball players' strike at Cornell University

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the aftermath of the basketball team's strike at Cornell University

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his final two years at Cornell University

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his father's death

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his admission to the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers meeting his second wife

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the role of his wife's family in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his enrollment at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls working under Larry Hawkins at the University of Chicago

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the political climate at the University of Chicago

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his decision to attend the University of Alabama at Birmingham

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his residency at the Ochsner Foundation Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers the political leaders of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the role and responsibilities of a hospital administrator

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his philosophy of service as a hospital administrator

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls a lesson from a nun at St. Vincent's Hospital in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his sister's kidney transplant

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about New Jersey's politics

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Slating of Otis L. Story, Sr.'s interview, session 3

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his second marriage

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the increase in HIV/AIDS and crack cocaine addiction in New Jersey

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the racial bias in legislative responses to drug addiction

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. recalls his work at the University Hospital in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his transition to the University Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his role in the Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his position at Quorum Health Resources, LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his position at Quorum Health Resources, LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers the preparations for Y2K

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the lack of legislative concern for illnesses in the African American community

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers his move to Jacksonville, Florida

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his consulting work for The Endeavor Group

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his philosophy of hospital economics

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about healthcare reform proposals

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his tenure as CEO of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his tenure as CEO of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes his article, 'Preparing Safety Net Hospitals for Healthcare Reform'

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the closure of the Cooper Green Hospital in Birmingham, Alabama, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes the closure of the Cooper Green Hospital in Birmingham, Alabama, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes how he came to be CEO of the East Orange General Hospital in East Orange, New Jersey

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers the lack of women's health facilities in East Orange, New Jersey

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the need for gynecological care for older women

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his behavioral health initiatives

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about the closure of hospitals in poor communities

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. reflects upon the future of healthcare reform

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Otis L. Story, Sr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Otis L. Story, Sr. reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Otis L. Story, Sr. reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Otis L. Story, Sr. reflects upon his accomplishments at the University Hospital in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Otis L. Story, Sr. remembers establishing a partnership with the FBI

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Otis L. Story, Sr. talks about his family

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 1

Tape: 14 Story: 7 - Otis L. Story, Sr. describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 2

DASession

2$2

DATape

7$8

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Otis L. Story describes the black basketball players' strike at Cornell University
Otis L. Story recalls his aspiration to become a doctor
Transcript
There's a story about the basketball team that we cannot fail to tell. Now, there was a strike. You all--the black basketball players went on a strike and--$$Yeah, we boycotted the--$$Boycotted the--now what happened, what happened?$$When I was a sophomore, I was part of a great team. I thought we had a great team. And out of the fifteen players, I believe eight were probably black. And there were, out of those eight there were five individuals of African ancestry who were capable of starting, excuse me. The first game, the coach started four of the eight blacks that weekend. And subsequently what happened, was that he got so many telephone calls from the alumni complaining about the fact that he had started four black basketball players at Cornell University [Ithaca, New York], that the pressure continued to mount over the week on him. We learned that his job, his job was placed at risk, and that if he ever put four blacks, if he ever started four blacks again, he would probably lose his job. That's what we heard. And once we found that out, we sort of, we started to watch his rotation, substitution pattern, and even the number of blacks he started. He never started four blacks again. And sort of, the problem came to a head when he started a sophomore, who was my roommate, Lynn Loncki, ahead of the black senior, Tom Sparks [Thomas Sparks]. And we knew, and Lynn knew, that he was not a better ballplayer at that time than Tom Sparks. Tom was a senior, and he was the leader of not only the black ballplayers, he was the leader of the team, he was the captain. How do you sit your captain down who's a senior, and start a sophomore who's still trying to coordinate his hands and his feet? So, he did that because he could start three blacks and still win, because Tom was not the best of the four blacks that he started. And we all knew that. Tom was a senior, and deserved to start. He was good enough to start, but he was not better than the other three blacks. One was, two were juniors and one was a sophomore. And that--once we found that out, we obviously confronted our coach, Jerry Lace. And Coach Lace was a very humble man, and he found himself in a very, very precarious situation, and we realized that. And he, he said in no uncertain terms that he was not in control of this team anymore. Now he coached the rest of the year, but he, it was the chairman, it was the athletic director, and the alumni who were actually calling the shots. And they never did start four blacks during my tenure, which was short lived (laughter), ever again at Cornell. And we walked out, and we, we wanted to support our teammates, the white teammates. And we would travel to games that were close by. And one in particular was to Syracuse University [Syracuse, New York]. And we showed up to support, and people wanted to know, "Well if you want to support your team, why don't you dress out?" We said, "Well, we couldn't do that, because that was a contradiction. Because here was a coach saying that he couldn't support starting black players at Cornell." And we said, "Well, if he couldn't support all of his players," meaning blacks and whites equally, "we couldn't go out there and represent and support Cornell. Why should we do that?" You know, once again, we're trying to break these bonds, you know, the slavery mentality--that we need to serve the master while the master is exploiting us as a people. And so, we refused to do it; we refused to do it.$Okay, so after graduation [from Cornell University, Ithaca, New York] now, what were your plans? Did you plan to--well, you said earlier you planned to become a doctor, right?$$Yeah, my interest was in medicine. I was interested in being an endocrinologist because of the diabetes. My father [Tom Story, Sr.] was, all of my life, you know, he was disabled. And it was something that was a perplexing disease for me as a child when I was in Alabama--as an eight year old child, to hear somebody had sugar. And I couldn't understand how something as sweet as sugar could be so debilitating. Because that was a big thing then in Alabama, because we'd get some sugar and put it in lemonade and--and my dad suffered. He looked normal the first ten years when he was affected by the disease. It was in the last five years of his life when he started--his sight was affected, his mobility was affected. And then the last nine months of his life his foot was amputated and his leg was amputated, and he passed. So, my dad, the last fifteen years of his life, he suffered. And I wanted to go to school to become a doctor, because I wanted to be able to do research, R and D [research and development], to help figure out how do you deal with this twelve carbon chain of sugar? You know, how do you break this thing up? How do you figure out--how do you get one of these glucose--one's ability to metabolize, you know, glucose so that, you know, you had this engine, you know, that supports one's body. And I was just, literally, it was a way of honoring my father and a service to mankind. I always was committed to doing something in the service to mankind. My mother [Martha Wilson Story] wanted me to be a preacher. You know, I wanted to be a doctor, and I came--and ultimately I decided upon hospital administration. I became a healthcare executive, which is all of that. You know, as a healthcare professional, I'm a part of the healing team. Part of what I do, in terms of human relationships with my colleagues that I work with inside of hospitals and health systems, is to minister. And I'm always committed to the community in which the hospital I work in is located. So, I'm a service to the community, a service to my colleagues, my fellow colleagues, and to the patients and the families we serve. So I think I sort of satisfied, to some degree, all of my aspirations as a young teenager, you know, in terms of what my mother wanted me to do, what I wanted to do, and what I ultimately have done over the last twenty-five years--$$Okay. Now (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) in healthcare.

Anthony G. Wagner

Health care administrator Anthony Gerald Wagner was born on June 7, 1942, in Alton, Illinois, to Clementine Nolan and Albert Irvin Wagner. Wagner grew up in his neighborhood in Alton surrounded by his school teachers as neighbors. He began to learn to play the piano at the age of six and served as his church’s organist for fifteen years until he left his hometown to pursue his education. Wagner attended Dunbar and Douglas Elementary Schools, Elijah P. Lovejoy Middle School, West Junior High School and Alton Senior High School, all segregated except for his senior high school. Wagner went on to earn his B.A. degree in zoology from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. In 1966, he was drafted and served as a chaplain assistant and organist for the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Wagner conducted research on local lizards he found in Vietnam and sent his reports back to Southern Illlinois University. Wagner returned from his term in the service and got married in January of 1971.

Wagner started his career as a pharmaceutical sales representative for the Upjohn Company. He then decided to continue his education and earned his masters degree in hospital and health care administration from the University of Minnesota. While pursuing his masters degree, Wagner moved to California for his residency at the University of California at San Francisco. He was hired by the Health Care Financing Administration and remained there for fifteen years. Wagner left the organization as deputy associate. He then became executive administrator of Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco from 1988 to 1998. From 1998 to 2001, Wagner served as chief executive Officer of Community Health Network of San Francisco. In 2001, Wagner became the chief executive officer of the Hospital Systems of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. He served as CEO for two years. In 2005, Wagner became the vice president of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Wagner is a member of the Board of Directors of the Longs Drugs Stores Corporation and serves as vice president for the Institute on Aging. In 2003, the City of San Francisco declared Anthony Wagner Day.

Wagner is married and has two sons. He lives in San Francisco and is an avid hiker.

Accession Number

A2005.241

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/12/2005

Last Name

Wagner

Maker Category
Middle Name

G.

Organizations
Schools

Douglas Elementary School

Dunbar Elementary School

Elijah P. Lovejoy Middle School

West Junior High School

Alton High School

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Alton

HM ID

WAG01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

The Room That Is Never Filled Is The Room For Improvement.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/7/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish (Fried River)

Short Description

Chief executive officer Anthony G. Wagner (1942 - ) is the former CEO of the Hospital Systems of the San Francisco Department of Public Health, and serves as vice president of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:480,10:2960,69:5680,130:6000,135:7920,179:8720,193:9040,198:11040,241:24138,416:24430,421:25233,436:25890,446:26766,463:27058,468:27569,477:33770,538:35792,557:36320,567:36716,575:40374,626:40744,633:45406,726:45702,731:58830,887:59280,893:59910,902:60720,913:71298,1076:71626,1081:73922,1122:79833,1155:80271,1161:80709,1168:81001,1173:82388,1203:82899,1212:83264,1218:83556,1223:84140,1233:86110,1239:86462,1244:86990,1251:88134,1276:88486,1281:93502,1378:100829,1425:101368,1433:101676,1438:102061,1444:103293,1463:114304,1683:114689,1689:115151,1697:131310,1885$0,0:6285,111:7363,136:7748,142:11521,216:11906,222:21875,338:22540,346:25521,366:27849,402:37922,511:39040,530:49126,671:58062,800:59449,829:59814,835:60106,840:66710,935:69729,974:70282,982:72211,990:79595,1134:82009,1197:82506,1205:106148,1613:106578,1619:107180,1627:112910,1677:113170,1682:114535,1716:115380,1745:115640,1750:115900,1755:116355,1764:117850,1791:118500,1808:132902,1926:135718,2009:136550,2020:136806,2025:140056,2087:141330,2106:147477,2164:148065,2169:149388,2183:157636,2284:159940,2332:161380,2359:161740,2365:164010,2374:165982,2420:166254,2425:168566,2474:169314,2492:169586,2497:169858,2502:171490,2538:176034,2573:176496,2582:179130,2622:182678,2662:182906,2667:183248,2675:184331,2702:184673,2710:188400,2757:189780,2783:191130,2790
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Anthony G. Wagner's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Anthony G. Wagner lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his mother's childhood in Arkansas and in Alton, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers his maternal great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his mother's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about developing a relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Anthony G. Wagner speaks about the death of his father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Anthony G. Wagner talks briefly about the land his paternal grandfather owned in Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers visiting his father's extended family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers his formative years with his maternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers his childhood neighborhood in Alton, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his relationship with his older sister

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers his childhood neighborhood in Alton, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Anthony G. Wagner describes the sights, sounds, and smells in Alton, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his elementary, middle school, and high school experiences, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his elementary, middle school, and high school experiences, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his experience at Alton Senior High School in Alton, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his childhood interests and extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers wanting to be a biologist and zoologist

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his experience at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Illinois, and dropping out to design a church

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner describes working as a radio isotope technician at Alton Memorial hospital and being drafted into the U.S. Military in 1966

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Anthony Wagner describes his experience in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers being attacked in the Tet Offensive at the Nha Trang, Vietnam U.S. Army Base

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Anthony G. Wagner talks briefly about civil rights activity in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about completing his studies at Southern Illinois University, working for the P.D. George Company, and meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Anthony G. Wagner describes his wedding and relocating to Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Anthony G. Wagner describes the hospital administration training program at the University of Minnesota Hospitals and Clinics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Anthony Wagner explains Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco, California

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner explains the role as a hospital administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner describes working as an administrator at Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco, California

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about "Anthony Wagner Day" in San Francisco, California

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about budgeting and having to make tough decisions as a hospital administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Anthony G. Wagner remembers an employee's retirement

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Anthony Wagner the philosophy of the Labor Management Partnership management

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Anthony G. Wagner explains the origin of the HMO healthcare plan and the Kaiser Family Foundation's entry into the healthcare business

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Anthony Wagner describe joining the Kaiser Family Foundation as vice president of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about working to eliminate disparities in healthcare in African American communities, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about working to eliminate disparities in healthcare in African American communities, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his involvement in civic organizations and professional groups

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Anthony G. Wagner describes what he does to relax

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about spending time with his sons, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about spending time with his sons, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Anthony G. Wagner talks about building a home and travel plans in the future

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Anthony G. Wagner talks more about his maternal family ancestry

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Anthony G. Wagner talks briefly about the influence of the Christian church in his childhood

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Anthony G. Wagner describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$7

DATitle
Anthony G. Wagner remembers being attacked in the Tet Offensive at the Nha Trang, Vietnam U.S. Army Base
Anthony G. Wagner talks about budgeting and having to make tough decisions as a hospital administrator
Transcript
--The one downside of it was during the Tet Offensive [Vietnam War], because we were at the core headquarters, we, we hardly ever were attacked, you could maybe hear it once in a while, but we were attacked and the--and a lot of people were like me, they had been drafted, they were in college, you know, we weren't gung ho soldiers and we heard, you know, we'd hear about, we, we knew they were falsifying the, the body counts of, for political reasons and we'd come back and talk about all this foolishness that was going on. But that night, and, and it would get down to about 90 degrees at night and you'd be cold, you'd need a blanket, y--you know, everything is relative, 'cause in the day it would be 120 degrees, but that night we were in our, in our Quonset huts and it's, I guess about twenty guys in a hut, you know, it, it was two rows and it's and an aisle going, an aisle going down the center and your bunks going end to end, you could see the tracers outside going by and, and we hadn't been accustomed to a war, so you know we got under our bunks, we didn't know what to do and we had our M16s, but--and then the rock group which is the South Korean Army which they were really tough, that the whole unit which was about five blocks from us, you s--they all were killed, it was about fifty-four of them were killed in that unit, so it was tough, and so sh--so this was like, I think January 28th and it was getting very close time for me to, to come home and I said, "God are you gonna let me stay here this long and, and let me get killed? (Laughter). Get me home." So I got an early out because you can get a ninety day early out, if you're going, if you were going back to college to finish your degree and so I did.$$That's a wonderful story, thanks for sharing that. About this, this was like '67 [1967]? Right?$$'67 [1967] to '68 [1968], is when I got out.$But, so that's an--$$And the budget.$$--accomplishment.$$Yes, and you had that--$$Going back to the budget, we really had gotten to the point where we would cut everything around the clinical services and we weren't going there 'cause that's where the care was involved, but then I sat down with my director of nursing, who I, I have the highest regard for her, her passion, for her, her craft and her profession, she, she had a tenacious, she was tenacious about getting resources and, and eking them out when there seemed to be nothing in that turnip, she would get some blood out of it and she had been, if you can imagine this, the director of nursing for forty-four years, before she retired. So she had been there and she is a very opinionated person, and very protective of her service and I went to her and said, you've gotta make some cuts and where I would make the cuts, it's here, here, and here, it was in administrative functions because that's where the big dollars were, I said I'm not gonna be cutting this, the CNAs 'cause who really gives, provides the most--$$A CNA is a?$$The certified nursing assistants, or in some places, they're called nurses aides [nursing aides], in a nursing facility and that's what Laguna Honda [Hospital, San Francisco, California] is, that's who provides most of the care, I said so, it doesn't make sense to cut them, you cou--you could double up on how you're doing your administrative stuff, "Oh, I can't cut anything." she was gonna cut a few LVNs [licensed vocational nurse] I said, no, that's who delivers the care. So the way Laguna Honda was organized is forty nursing units and each nursing unit has a head nurse, but they were across from each other like, this, there's a single aisle that goes down the hallway and over here is a nursing unit and here's one, all the way down with these thirty patients in each unit. So I said, why don't you cut a head nurse, and double up the head nurses and these people wouldn't lose their jobs, actually they would bump into something else. She didn't wanna do that. I said, look, the decision has to be made and if you don't make it, I will. So I did. It was very difficult. I hated to have done it, but I, I didn't, I didn't think I had any choice to do it so, in a way it's a difficulty and in another way I think it was an accomplishment. In it's a tough decision that an administrator had to make, 'cause all your decisions as an administrator aren't pats on the back, you have to make some decisions that you think are in the best interest for everyone and not just one group of people and you have to look at things as broadly as you can with input from lots of folks, but ultimately, you have to make a decision. So that was, that was another thing that happened in my career.

Alyce Faye Wattleton

Alyce Faye Wattleton was born on July 8, 1943, in St. Louis, Missouri; her mother was a traveling preacher and her father was a construction worker. While her mother traveled, Wattleton spent each school year in the care of church members in different states; before entering high school, she had not attended the same school two years in a row. In 1959, at the age of sixteen, Wattleton earned her high school diploma from Calhoun High School in Port Lavaca, Texas, where she was active in the band, the thespian club, and the basketball team.

Wattleton received her B.S. degree in nursing from Ohio State University in 1964 and went on to earn her M.S. degree in midwifery and maternal and infant health from Columbia University in 1967. Wattleton began her nursing career as an instructor at Miami-Dade Hospital in Ohio, teaching nursing obstetrics and labor and delivery; in 1970 she was named executive director of the Dayton-Miami Valley chapter of Planned Parenthood.

In 1978, Wattleton became the youngest individual at the time, and the first African American woman, to serve as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA). During Wattleton’s fourteen-year tenure, PPFA became one of the nation’s largest charitable organizations. Under Wattleton’s leadership, the organization secured federal funding for birth control and prenatal programs, fought against efforts to restrict legal abortions, and legalized the sale of RU-486 (a French-made birth control pill which terminates pregnancies) in the United States.

After her resignation from the PPFA in 1992, Wattleton hosted a Chicago-based television talk show. In 1995, Wattleton became president of the Center for the Advancement of Women, an independent, nonpartisan non-profit research and education institution dedicated to advocating for the advancement of women.

Wattleton has received numerous awards and honors, including the American Humanist Award; the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Humanitarian Award; the American Nurses Association’s Women's Honor in Public Service; the Jefferson Award for the Greatest Public Service performed by a Private Citizen; the Fries Prize, for service to improving public health; and the PPFA’s Margaret Sanger Award. Throughout her career, Wattleton has been awarded fourteen honorary degrees. In 1993 Wattleton was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, and in 1996, published her memoir Life on the Line.

Accession Number

A2005.037

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/4/2005

Last Name

Wattleton

Maker Category
Middle Name

Faye

Organizations
Schools

Calhoun High School

The Ohio State University

Columbia University

Washington Elementary School

Tougaloo College Preparatory School

First Name

Alyce

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

WAT05

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Winston and Strawn LLC

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Thailand

Favorite Quote

Can You Believe That?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/8/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive and chief executive officer Alyce Faye Wattleton (1943 - ) was the first African American woman to serve as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Wattleton also serves as president of the Center for the Advancement of Women.

Employment

Planned Parenthood Federation of America

Center for the Advancement of Women

Nationwide Children's Hospital

Miami Valley Hospital

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:2584,164:10032,343:10716,352:16948,468:17632,478:19304,532:39092,909:39561,916:48498,1066:48850,1072:57650,1210:58178,1221:60818,1279:62578,1311:63018,1317:67330,1383:73640,1410:74000,1415:74990,1428:75440,1434:76700,1455:77150,1461:82370,1538:89328,1589:89644,1594:91777,1620:94068,1663:95174,1680:95806,1689:96754,1710:97623,1726:99045,1744:100151,1761:100862,1771:101573,1782:107509,1836:108481,1859:110020,1882:110506,1889:111397,1902:112369,1920:113341,1935:113989,1944:114556,1953:116014,1991:118201,2027:118930,2039:122980,2102:130188,2173:133760,2224:135734,2252:136580,2262:143990,2357:148948,2458:153536,2535:154424,2548:154942,2557:161604,2628:163579,2669:167292,2764:168003,2775:168477,2792:169820,2820:174410,2880:174938,2889:175268,2895:176720,2925:177182,2933:178040,2948:178304,2953:179492,2974:179888,2981:184904,3075:185432,3084:186224,3097:189950,3104:190388,3111:190972,3120:191337,3126:191775,3133:192578,3146:195425,3183:196593,3202:197396,3221:197907,3229:198564,3240:199513,3256:200170,3266:203382,3329:203674,3335:203966,3340:204477,3374:209514,3441:217035,3494:218385,3513:218985,3523:222510,3578:225810,3615:226935,3641:227835,3654:232620,3672:233349,3684:238209,3766:239181,3781:239748,3790:240963,3810:243879,3865:246309,3911:247443,3934:247848,3940:248334,3948:253200,3962:253816,3972:258744,4054:259360,4063:259668,4068:264596,4163:265828,4180:266290,4187:268985,4227:271220,4243:272004,4253:273180,4268:273572,4273:274160,4280:276996,4337:277326,4344:277854,4353:278316,4362:278778,4371:285750,4495:286390,4504:288470,4541:289030,4550:301229,4766:303920,4810:304610,4825:305024,4833:305369,4842:305990,4859:306680,4870:309550,4880$0,0:237,8:711,16:1027,21:1659,30:5530,119:7663,155:8058,164:8927,175:9322,183:10349,199:13509,241:15879,274:16906,289:17854,302:18407,310:18881,318:19987,339:26403,358:27113,369:27894,382:32154,465:36982,558:41952,654:42449,662:43230,679:43727,733:44650,752:44934,757:45218,762:46070,781:46425,787:54160,832:55642,852:59308,915:60010,923:61570,954:63442,983:65080,1009:66250,1027:76906,1184:77858,1201:78334,1212:78878,1219:80510,1256:80986,1264:82754,1307:84318,1332:84794,1341:85066,1346:85882,1362:86494,1373:87310,1386:87786,1394:91910,1423:92218,1428:92988,1440:96222,1514:97916,1543:98917,1559:100226,1580:102459,1618:102921,1626:103460,1635:104384,1675:106848,1722:108003,1740:108465,1747:109466,1761:109774,1766:114680,1773:115768,1795:116244,1808:116856,1818:118080,1834:120460,1876:120936,1884:123792,1936:126036,1982:127600,2015:128620,2032:129844,2056:131272,2078:132496,2113:133312,2127:133788,2136:141600,2195:142987,2231:143425,2238:146680,2291
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Alyce Faye Wattleton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alyce Faye Wattleton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her mother's personality and ministry

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls moving often during her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers her grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her maternal grandparents' family backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls holidays in her childhood home in St. Louis

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers her childhood neighborhood in St. Louis

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers Washington Montessori Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes moving among church members' homes in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls moving to Columbus, Nebraska with her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers moving to Franklin, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls her influences as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers Tougaloo Preparatory School and Calhoun High School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recounts her decision to attend The Ohio State University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers her social life at The Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls her decision to attend Columbia University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her family's civil rights' activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers working at the Miami Valley Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers her abortion

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alyce Faye Wattleton remembers working at Harlem Hospital and the Dayton Public Health Department

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes the Dayton affiliate of Planned Parenthood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her mother's opposition to her career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recalls Planned Parenthoods' challenges in the late 1970s and early 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Alyce Faye Wattleton recounts the impact of U.S. Supreme Court cases on Planned Parenthood

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes issues surrounding minority women's access to abortions

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her decision to leave Planned Parenthood

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Alyce Faye Wattleton reflects upon her life

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$1

DAStory

6$8

DATitle
Alyce Faye Wattleton describes the Dayton affiliate of Planned Parenthood
Alyce Faye Wattleton describes her earliest childhood memory
Transcript
And when did you become the director of, of the Dayton [Ohio] chapter [Planned Parenthood of Miami Valley Foundation, Dayton, Ohio] (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) About, well I became the executive director of the Dayton affiliate of Planned Parenthood [Planned Parenthood Federation of America] in 1970, but that was after I had been on the board of directors for about a year and a half. And the executive director left and they asked if I'd be willing to join as executive director and, and I said, sure. I, I actually wasn't that straightforward. I was on the search committee to find a new executive director for the affiliate and one of the members; well actually, the chairman of the search committee turned to me one day and said, "Well, why don't you take the job?" And it was like one of those situations where it never occurred to you. I mean, you know, why don't you become president of the United States? Would you ever think that you would be? And, and I didn't think about it and I thought well, you know, I, could I do that job? I mean, you know, that's, that's really something. And they, they coaxed and they said we'll support you and so I took the plunge and so at twenty-seven I became the executive director of Planned Parenthood of Dayton, Ohio, which was Planned Parenthood of Miami Valley, which was located in Dayton, Ohio, which was a six-county organization. I served in that position for seven years. And, and the fifth year that I was the executive director, by that time the affiliate had grown tremendously. And by the fifth year that I was in that position I was elected to represent all Planned Parenthood executive directors on the national board. I became the chairman of the local, of, of the local affiliated executive directors' council. And that's sort of a funny story because by that time I had gotten married and I'd, I had become pregnant and while I was being elected to the national board in Seattle [Washington], I was in Dayton having my daughter. So that was in October, on October 20th 1975, I was elected to the board of the, national board of Planned Parenthood and I gave birth to, to Felicia Gordon, my daughter, who is now twenty-nine.$$And what was it like for you in 1973 as the executive director of the Miami Valley Chapter of Planned Parenthood when Roe v. Wade [1973] came down?$$Well, it was, it was you know, it was, I was a very young executive director and it was a really big challenge for me to take on this responsibility and I, I, I, I, I entered an organization that was especially hostile to me. The staff were not, did not welcome me with open arms because they thought I was too young and too inexperienced to do the job that, that needed to be done. And I think there was probably a person there who wanted the job, but was not selected. So it was really trying to learn so much, it was learning about government grants because the federal government had just entered the field of family planning and was making huge amounts of money available under Title X and under the Office of Economic Opportunity, making family planning funds widely available to Planned Parenthoods and anti-poverty organizations. So learning the whole federal system and learning how to implement services for expanding. When I took over the affiliate we had tiny, tiny offices over, on the second floor over a real estate office; moving the, the affiliate out to bigger quarters and adding services really was a, was a big challenge and so I can't say that I was really as conscious of what, what, what was going on around Roe v. Wade. I knew that there was the clergy consultation service in Dayton that helped women to go to, to Puerto Rico and Mexico to get abortions. These were ministers that counseled women to help them to get to locations with safe abortions. But we as an affiliate were not at all involved in abortions. And I can't say that I had a great deal of consciousness about the movement for the reform of abortions. But when '73 [1973] came down and, and the decision came down in '73 [1973] there was believe it or not, and I, you know these days with abortion being characterized as widely available and anyone can have abortions right up to the moment of birth, we were very deeply concerned that the court [U.S. Supreme Court] had handed down a decision that was going to continue to be very restrictive on the ability of women to terminate their pregnancy. We considered it a very conservative position that left the decision mainly in the hands of physicians and we knew that physicians have always been conservative, as a matter-of-fact it was the AMA [American Medical Association] that was the driving force behind the illegality of abortion. So we, we had no hope that this was really a reformation for women in being able to make the choice to end an unintended pregnancy.$Tell me what is your earliest memory of growing up? What's one of the earliest things you remember?$$Well my earliest memory is riding my tricycle up and down the street and break-, carrying a milk bottle. I loved cold milk and I remember that in those years the milk man delivered milk every day or several times a week and put it in a small box that was presumably insulated to keep it cold until it could be transferred to the icebox, because there were still icebox, iceboxes in the early '40s [1940s]. So I remember once grabbing the milk bottle and dropping it and cutting my, my arm, a scar that is still with me to this day, but also that was another time in which my parents [Ozie Garrett Wattleton and George Wattleton] were, and my aunts were just completely out, at their wits end with me. But I, but, but my, I had transportation. My tricycle was my transportation. And so I had freedom. I took freedom early on and I took off and my imagination was-, I was only limited by imagine, by my imagination as to where I would go. I mean it was always in the neighborhood [in St. Louis, Missouri]. But I was not--I never saw my world as limited to my yard. And their challenge was to somehow to always keep an eye on me for safety's sake, because even in the '40s [1940s] it was not a safe proposition for a two or three or four year old to run around the neighborhood without supervision. And I was also very creative in listening to adult conversation around me. And so I had--I remember with great enjoyment that I would often mimic the conversations that I heard among the, the women in my--who came to visit my mother [Ozie Garrett Wattleton] and her sisters and my aunts. And I would--they would sometimes hear me having conversations with myself playing the different parts of the different women. I loved having pocketbooks. And that's, that's a quality that has, has been with me through my adulthood. I would, I would very often carry around an old pocketbook and go throughout the house picking up items and, and stuffing them in my purse as I called it. So if my mother missed something she would go first to my purse to find out if it was there because very often, if it was something that was pretty nice I had already spotted it and put it in my cache.

Dr. James Gavin, III

Researcher and medical school president Dr. James R. Gavin III was born on November 23, 1945, in Mobile, Alabama. Gavin attended Livingstone College, graduating magna cum laude in 1966. From there he attended Emory University in Atlanta, earning a Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1970 and earned his M.D. from Duke University in 1975.

Gavin's impressive career in the healthcare industry began in 1971, when he went to work as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Public Health Service, a position he held until 1973. Today, he still serves as a reserve officer. After earning his M.D., Gavin worked as a pathologist at Duke University Hospital. The Washington University School of Medicine hired Gavin in 1979, where he served as an associate professor of medicine until 1986. After Washington University, Gavin went to the University of Oklahoma, where he worked on diabetes research. In 1991, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) hired Gavin as its senior scientific officer, and in 2000, he was promoted to the director of HHMI-National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program. Morehouse College School of Medicine named Gavin its president in 2002.

Gavin is an active member of numerous organizations, having served as president of the American Diabetes Association and on the editorial board of The American Journal of Physiology. He is a recipient of the Emory University Medal for Distinguished Achievement, the Banting Medal for Distinguished Service from the American Diabetes Association and the Internist of the Year from the National Medical Association. He currently serves on the board of directors of Baxter International and is outspoken in his support of affirmative action. Gavin and his wife of thirty-two years, Annie, have two sons.

Accession Number

A2003.102

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/8/2003 |and| 8/15/2003 |and| 8/11/2003

Last Name

Gavin

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

W H Council Traditional School

Central High School

Dunbar Creative Performing Arts

Livingstone College

Emory University

Duke University School of Medicine

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

GAV01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

We Are A Small Medical School With Outrageous Ambition.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

11/23/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Medical school president, chief executive officer, and healthcare executive Dr. James Gavin, III (1945 - ) leads the Morehouse University Medical School. Gavin served as president of the American Diabetes Association and on the editorial board of The American Journal of Physiology.

Employment

United States Public Health Service

Duke University Hospital

Washington University in St. Louis

University of Oklahoma

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Morehouse College School of Medicine

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:7137,77:7599,84:13913,198:14221,203:14837,209:15915,224:17301,249:27531,308:29475,330:32958,363:34821,391:47802,558:48306,566:49458,583:55002,670:55506,678:57234,704:57666,711:59466,739:60978,755:61338,761:64794,821:65586,834:71320,859:76945,949:77620,959:78070,966:78745,977:80395,998:80695,1003:81520,1017:82270,1029:83845,1043:84370,1051:90078,1093:94588,1149:97130,1182:98360,1201:99098,1211:99672,1220:100082,1226:102296,1246:105904,1272:111074,1295:111592,1304:112036,1312:113220,1325:113590,1331:114996,1352:115366,1358:116328,1371:123358,1483:123654,1488:124690,1504:126466,1538:143131,1698:143536,1704:148394,1744:150088,1782:156049,1841:161520,1905:185876,2196:203150,2388:203710,2396:208350,2454:210430,2478:215401,2492:215669,2497:215937,2502:216406,2511:217143,2523:217813,2534:218550,2544:218818,2549:219153,2555:220426,2573:222704,2613:223441,2626:224044,2638:224446,2645:230176,2687:231078,2699:247880,2918$0,0:20206,272:20586,278:21422,291:27274,370:33758,412:34128,418:36052,455:36422,461:36866,468:47670,648:48484,660:53107,687:55153,713:56269,726:56641,731:64630,783:84480,1108:90255,1204:96156,1226:96480,1231:96966,1239:99558,1283:108387,1440:108873,1447:122200,1535:137540,1684:138260,1695:140100,1724:151442,1856:153458,1889:161450,1959
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. James Gavin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. James Gavin describes his great grandfather, Seborn Gavin

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. James Gavin describes his paternal grandmother, Maggie Gavin

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his father, James Gavin, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. James Gavin talks about racial discrimination and desegregation in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. James Gavin continues to talk about his father, James Gavin, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. James Gavin describes his maternal grandmother, Nona Smoke

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. James Gavin describes his mother, Bessie Smoke Gavin

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. James Gavin talks about how his parents met and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. James Gavin describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood in Mobile, Alabama, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. James Gavin describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood in Mobile, Alabama, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. James Gavin describes his childhood personality and his father's high expectations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. James Gavin describes his teachers at W. H. Council Traditional School in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. James Gavin remembers his childhood misadventures

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. James Gavin describes his activities at Central High School in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. James Gavin describes Mr. White and Mr. Thomas, two influential teachers at Central High School in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. James Gavin describes his social life in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his experience at Big Zion A.M.E. Church in Mobile, Alabama and his decision to become a minister

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. James Gavin describes his decision to attend Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin describes his experience at Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. James Gavin shares about his graduate school experience at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. James Gavin describes co-founding a chapter of the Black Student Alliance (BSA) at Emory University in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. James Gavin remembers the impact of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. James Gavin talks about H. Rap Brown

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. James Gavin describes his decision to attend Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. James Gavin describes how he became a leading expert in the field of diabetes

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. James Gavin talks about the early years of his medical career

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his work with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his work at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. James Gavin describes his tenure at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his philosophy of management

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Second slating of Dr. James Gavin's interview

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin recalls the scientific discoveries he oversaw as a senior administrator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. James Gavin describes the HHMI-NIH Research Scholars Program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. James Gavin describes increasing opportunities for black medical students

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. James Gavin talks about the distortion of affirmative action the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. James Gavin talks about the future of affirmative action

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. James Gavin talks about his appointment as the president of Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. James Gavin explains why Morehouse School of Medicine does not benefit from contributions to Morehouse College

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. James Gavin talks about the challenges of being a president and his management style

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. James Gavin talks about the need for fiscal stability in predominantly black medical schools

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. James Gavin talks about socialized medicine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. James Gavin describes health concerns in the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. James Gavin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. James Gavin talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. James Gavin's personal photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Dr. James Gavin describes his great grandfather, Seborn Gavin
Dr. James Gavin shares about his graduate school experience at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia
Transcript
Okay. Let me ask you about your family history. How far can you trace your family back?$$Well actually I can trace my family back to the former slave who was considered to be the patriarch of the East Coast Gavin clan and that was a fellow by the name of Seborn. That's S-E-B-O-R-N, Seborn Gavin, who was actually a slave in a plantation in Macon County, in a little town called Noxubee, Mississippi. My cousin, who is a--$$Can you spell that town for us?$$N-O-X-U-B-I-E [sic, N-O-X-U-B-E-E], I believe is the way it's spelled. I have a cousin who is a retired psychiatrist who lives in Williamsburg, Virginia, his name is Dr. James Baker. And Jim decided when he retired that he was going to do a little work on genealogy and so he looked into the Gavin family tree and he has been diligent in his pursuits and we actually now have an annual reunion. Every other year, the reunion goes back to Mississippi but in the off years, it's held in different cities around the country. And so for that reason we can actually go back for some several generations to Seborn's time. Seborn was called the "Black Mayor of Noxubee" because when he was finally freed, he was one of the people who used to negotiate with the local white people to get things done for the local black community and he would do this in exchange for being able to convince the black people to do things that the white people wanted done. And so he would always win a trade-off and he was, in fact, credited with negotiating the first brick schoolhouse for black children in that part of the country. So there's a lot of lore associated with that part of the Gavin genealogy.$$Is Noxubee, Mississippi in Macon County?$$In Macon County.$$In Mississippi.$$Yeah.$$Now is that a--near the Gulf or is it--$$No, it's up in the Delta.$$Okay, all right. Now are there any stories from the 19th Century that are passed down through your family? Now, when did your--did Seborn Gavin live?$$Seborn lived in the late 1800s. He was in the 1860s and in that part of time.$$So during the reconstruction?$$Yes, he was a Reconstruction Era, freed slave.$$Okay, well that was a good story about the schoolhouse but are there any other stories about the slavery period itself or any stories that are passed down, you know throughout--$$There weren't many stories of that time that were passed down with the exception of sort of general descriptions of how--how cagey and how wily Seborn was in terms of his ability to negotiate and come away from the negotiating table with something that could benefit the black community. He was a strong believer in education so most of the things that he fought for had to do with winning educational opportunities for the local black populace although clearly they were still very much in farming types of activities.$$And he was a great grandfather on your--on which side?$$On my father's side.$$On your father's side.$Okay, all right. So, well, you went on to graduate school, right?$$Yes, I left Livingstone and came here to Atlanta [Georgia], to Emory [University]. A very different kind of experience. In 1966, the height of the civil rights struggle, Emory was not a place ready for black students, in general. It was trying to make a move in that direction but it was--it was an uneasy fit, at best. As one of the first black students admitted to the Division of Basic Health Sciences, especially for a Ph.D. program, I had some--some pretty testy experiences at Emory, including a professor who did not believe that I wrote a paper that I submitted for a course once because the quality of the writing was too good. He said this is high quality stuff. Who wrote this? And, of course, at that time I was not the man you see before you now. I was a dashiki wearing, Afro wearing, militant, well not militant, but activist. I founded the Black Student Alliance at Emory. I was a co-founder with another person and I was--I was a pretty outspoken guy. So that was not a good encounter for me. In fact, I didn't think I was going to make it through Emory. The good side of it was that there some supportive people there and with that kind of support, it was possible to get through and having the West Side of Atlanta, the AU [Atlanta University] Center, and the church, I was going to an A.M.E. Zion church here in Atlanta, all of those were places that served as a kind of a safe haven--safe haven, sort of a harbor of respite and that allowed me to get through. Then later, my girlfriend [Ann Gavin], who by then was out of college and came here to work, she moved to Atlanta and it worked out just fine. I'm happy to say that over the years Emory has changed a lot. I've really developed a far different relationship with Emory and I actually can look back on those bitter days with a little bit more sanguinity. Very interesting times though. Exciting.

Renee J. Amoore

Health care advocate Renee J. Amoore was born on January 24, 1953 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania to Juanita Ramsey, a domestic worker and nurse, and John Ramsey, a school bus driver. Amoore has earned a reputation for her innovative approaches to treating mental illness and other disorders.

Amoore (then Ramsey) was trained at the Harlem School of Nursing and served as head emergency room nurse at New York's Harlem Hospital. While working as evening and night program coordinator at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, Amoore earned a bachelor's degree at Antioch College in 1979. Antioch University granted her a master's degree in administration in 1982. By that time, Amoore was already working as a supervisor of Wordsworth Academy's hospital program in Pennsylvania. In 1986, the Philadelphia Center for Developmental Services, Inc. hired her as a program director. Growth Horizons, Inc., an organization running group homes for people with mental illness and substance abuse problems, employed Amoore in 1988 where she worked until 1996, becoming its vice president and chief operating officer.

In 1995, Renee Amoore founded a health care management and consulting firm called the Amoore Group in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. The company includes Amoore Health Systems, Inc., a local service provider and health care consultant; 521 Management Group, Inc., a public relations and governmental liaison business; and Ramsey Educational and Development Institute, Inc., which provides programs focusing on job creation and workplace diversity. Amoore's political connections serve her well. In 1992, she was elected to Pennsylvania's Republican State Committee and became the deputy chair in 1996.

Amoore has taught as an adjunct professor at Drexel University, Antioch University and Lincoln University. Her civic commitments include membership in the NAACP, the American Legion Auxiliary and the African American Museum of Philadelphia's Advisory Board. She serves as a deacon at Saints Memorial Baptist Church and a guest host on a WHAT-AM community talk show. Honors Amoore has received include the Artemis Award from the Euro-American Women's Council in Greece, the Evelyn McPhail Award for Republican Activist of the Year, the NAACP Award for Community Services in Education and the Madam C.J. Walker Award from the Coalition of 100 Black Women. She and her husband, Joseph Amoore, have one daughter, Cherie.

Renee J. Amoore was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 10, 2002.

Accession Number

A2002.179

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

9/10/2002

Last Name

Amoore

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

J.

Organizations
Schools

Haverford High School

Coopertown El Sch

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Renee`

Birth City, State, Country

Bryn Mawr

HM ID

AMO01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Whatever she qualifies for.

Favorite Season

Winter

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Whatever she qualifies for.

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Cut Through The Chase. What's The Bottom Line?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

1/24/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Potato Chips

Short Description

Chief executive officer, healthcare executive, and nurse Renee J. Amoore (1953 - ) is a home health care entrepreneur and has served as the vice chair of the Republican Party of Pennsylvania.

Employment

Wordsworth Academy

Philadelphia Center for Developmental Services

Growth Horizons

Amoore Group

Republican Party of Pennsylvania

Drexel University

Antioch College

Lincoln University

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:5508,202:7956,250:10200,300:10540,306:14756,386:25093,519:25435,526:30793,635:31021,640:31363,648:32047,668:32332,689:33415,712:33814,720:35638,772:37063,802:42454,849:43158,861:57808,1169:58424,1211:79926,1561:80707,1576:116038,2188:116542,2197:117235,2210:117550,2216:119944,2268:120574,2279:121771,2307:122401,2318:125362,2377:133065,2446:141552,2676:142725,2699:143139,2706:144864,2750:152589,2835:152991,2842:158552,2923:160227,2957:163242,3009:167999,3125:169339,3154:174270,3160:175760,3180$177,0:5841,105:6136,111:12685,306:13629,320:13924,326:18696,348:19006,354:20122,379:21176,391:21610,399:21858,404:22230,411:22788,422:23098,428:28430,550:28864,558:31158,623:34940,710:39660,739:41284,776:41748,793:43488,843:43720,849:46794,923:47084,929:47548,942:48708,965:50622,1008:51028,1022:51608,1034:51898,1040:53000,1070:53232,1075:54682,1110:60210,1155:61185,1175:62550,1204:63460,1221:65020,1251:65475,1261:67165,1302:67490,1309:68465,1322:68985,1335:69375,1347:72560,1424:74055,1456:74900,1477:81655,1556:84460,1633:86770,1682:88365,1716:88585,1721:91720,1807:93810,1860:104309,2002:105163,2034:108213,2090:108579,2097:108884,2103:109128,2109:109494,2116:111873,2188:114801,2253:115289,2266:120898,2331:121813,2352:124924,2417:125229,2423:125900,2434:126388,2443:126815,2456:127486,2467:133586,2596:134684,2620:135294,2635:137185,2673:137673,2682:142686,2721:145934,2807:146398,2816:147442,2841:152372,2979:152894,2991:154518,3031:155330,3049:155852,3061:156142,3067:157592,3100:157824,3105:158868,3134:169634,3332:170382,3352:171198,3366:172286,3391:190902,3700:191888,3731:192178,3737:192584,3745:193164,3758:195310,3793:196818,3842:197166,3850:199022,3900:200878,3945:201284,3954:201574,3960:207456,4001:207720,4006:208116,4013:209700,4041:212208,4096:212802,4107:213858,4126:215508,4165:217554,4212:223030,4261
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Renee Amoore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Renee Amoore lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Renee Amoore talks about her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Renee Amoore talks about her mother, Juanita Ramsey

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Renee Amoore describes her father, John Ramsey

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Renee Amoore describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Renee Amoore describes her childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Renee Amoore talks about an experience with racial discrimination in middle school that led to changes in the school

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Renee Amoore talks about her grades

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Renee Amoore talks about her childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Renee Amoore talks about the demographics of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Renee Amoore describes her experience at Haverford High School

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Renee Amoore talks about her mentors and activities at Saints Memorial Baptist Church in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Renee Amoore talks about high school gang activity

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Renee Amoore talks about her high school band and its covers of songs by Aretha Franklin and Dionne Warwick

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Renee Amoore talks about applying to nursing school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Renee Amoore describes her first day in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Renee Amoore describes learning about the black experience as a student in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Renee Amoore talks about becoming accepted by other students at Harlem Hospital

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Renee Amoore describes her hands-on experience at Harlem Hospital

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Renee Amoore describes learning about discipline as a student nurse at Harlem Hospital

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Renee Amoore talks about an influential teacher at Harlem Hospital, Ms. Renee Johnson

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Renee Amoore describes the positive aspects of Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Renee Amoore talks about working as a nurse in the South Bronx

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Renee Amoore describes her career as a nurse

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Renee Amoore talks about the founding of Amoore Health Systems, Inc., 521 Management Group, and the Ramsey Educational Development Institute (REDI)

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Renee Amoore describes the different arms of the Amoore Group, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Renee Amoore talks about the Amoore Group's work in South Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Renee Amoore describes her decision to run for the school board director in Upper Merion Township in Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Renee Amoore talks about running for the school board in Upper Merion Township in Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Renee Amoore talks about her transition from local to state to national political levels

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Renee Amoore talks about her role in the 2000 Republican National Convention

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Renee Amoore describes important Republican issues

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Renee Amoore talks about other black Republicans including HistoryMaker General Colin L. Powell, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, and Condoleeza Rice

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Renee Amoore talks about Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Renee Amoore discusses reparations

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Renee Amoore talks about President Bill Clinton

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Renee Amoore talks about Mayor John Street's administration in Philadelphia Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Renee Amoore describes working on Tom Ridge's gubernatorial campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Renee Amoore talks about Tom Ridge and the Department of Homeland Security

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Renee Amoore describes her hopes and concerns for the African American Community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Renee Amoore contemplates running for public office

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Renee Amoore reflects on her mother's pride in her

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Renee Amoore reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Renee Amoore talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Renee Amoore narrates her photographs, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Renee Amoore narrates her photographs, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Renee Amoore narrates her photographs, pt.3

DASession

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DATitle
Renee Amoore talks about the founding of Amoore Health Systems, Inc., 521 Management Group, and the Ramsey Educational Development Institute (REDI)
Renee Amoore talks about her transition from local to state to national political levels
Transcript
So, you start out--you started a company [Amoore Health Systems, Inc.] just to, with yourself as your only employee?$$Um-hum, absolutely. I just was gonna do managed health care, go and consult, teach people how to set up managed health care 'cause that was like the big buzz word, you know, six or seven years ago, how to do it, we can help you with your billing or I can come in and train your group on diversity, you know, or I could, you know, train your group on universal precautions, you know, all these little things that different group homes in particular wanted or different agencies. So, that's where we were and then we were called, like I said, by the state [Pennsylvania] about the ex-offenders program because they knew of my background. We were called from labor and industry about working with people with disabilities and then just things started moving, so we went with one staff and now we're up to 100 staff and we have about eight or nine different offices and we're also in South Africa. We'll be duping this in South Africa.$$I'm sorry now when did you come back to Pennsylvania--(unclear)--$$In--when I was in Cha,--(unclear)-- Guidance. That was probably '74 [1974], '75 [1975], probably like in the mid, late '70s [1970s].$$Okay, okay, but you didn't start the business until about--(simultaneous)--$$Nineteen-ninety--you know we start, yeah, the six or seven years. We started about--Amoore Health Systems was a shell for about a year. Late Decem--November 1996 we actually had our first, you know, client. You know, it was just still me, myself, and I, and so in '96 [1996] we had Amoore Health Systems. In '97 [1997], we started 521 Management Group, which is our PR government relations firm which in Pennsylvania we're the only certified African American lobbyist in the state, which we're really proud about. That means we're registered, you know, we have other lobbyists those type of things. We have offices in Washington, D.C. and in Harrisburg [Pennsylvania]. We lobby internationally and nationally and also local and state. And then in 1998, we started REDI, Ramsey Educational Developmental Institute, which is our not-for-profit for children services and adult services where we train welfare-to-work recipients, dislocated workers, but we also have a children's program where we go in the home and actually do home-based programming and it's something I came up with because a lot of folks that have children that are sick can't get out the house also. So, we actually bring in PTs [physical therapists] and OTs [occupational therapists], speech therapists and we actually do the work in the home for them, which was a pilot program that the county asked us to come up with something for kids with early intervention from birth to three. And so we came up with this innovative really good program and they said you can only have about 50 kids and we have about 175 children in that program now from birth to three and a waiting list. It's an amazing program. A lot of kids that have autism, behavioral health problems and you kind of sit there and say how can kids from birth to three have all these issues, but they do.$While I was on the school board, the Republican Party came to me and said we have no blacks in this area state committee, will you run for state committee? I ran for state committee and won. State committee as you know probably is that you're, you're on the state level now, so I'm going all of a sudden from local to state politics, which was a whole different thing and real challenging because when you're always the first black you have this stuff on your shoulder that you gotta carry everything and everybody's issues. And you have to be so careful with that. You know you have to learn how to balance and juggle those things. I mean, when I was on the school board we actually had to get two lines because we would get so many complaints especially from people of color, you know, about how their kids were being treated and blah, blah, blah, and it kind of went all over the southeastern region that I was the first black on the school board, so other school boards were calling too. So, I was going out and speaking to other school boards, and then I was also chairing the Vutek (ph.) board and also the IU, which is working with kids with disabilities in the school district. So, it was really a lot, an awesome position and a lot of work, you know, and I think I was out probably six days a week between meetings and things like that, and our meetings would go to 1 and 2 in the morning you know, fighting about different issues. But, I learned a lot and it really helped me to be strong so that when I was on the state level I became a committee person. You were called a committee person and you represent your area. Again, I represented this area Montgomery County. When I went there, I was very upset 'cause when I looked up on the dais there was no African Americans or no one of color. I said this is ridiculous. This is why they call the Republican Party mean-spirited. This is why they call the Republican Party white men, bald-headed white men, you know, rich people, that kind of stuff. We have to have some more diversity. For a year and a half I just fought about that, talked about that, and then they were like well if you're that interested, you know, oh what do you want to run for? I said I'll be the deputy chair of the party, second-in-ommand. I didn't want to go for the chair that looked a little, you know, and I still had to learn a lot. I was appointed to deputy chair within two years of being in the Republican Party. So, people know me now on the state level. So, at this point I'm on the state level, which spun into the national level because again you don't have blacks in leadership in our party. So, as your building that you can see how your business can build too 'cause your developing relationships, you're meeting people, you're meeting business people. That's why it's important to use those relationships in a positive way and, and that's why I think we've built, we've grown. And I know I've taken you a long way to explain, but I think it's important for people to know we have to use those things in a positive way and you also cross the line, we cross the line. It doesn't matter if you're R or D [Republican or Democrat]; it's about business. You know, it's about a seat at the table, so we make a lot of policy decisions in this state and that's how people know me. We make a lot of decisions now nationally because since the Republican [National] Convention. You know, again I never thought that I would have an audience with the Bushes or Barbara Bush would introduce me, you know, at an event, those type of things, or make comments or meet Laura Bush or do those things and be able to go to a State Dinner. I'm like oh my God, and you know I can't believe this is me. Today, I spoke with a group of 150 women in Chester County. There was a line for a half an hour for autographs or whatever. I'm saying it's just Renee Amoore, what's the big deal. But when you think about it, it's somebody that has crossed some racial barriers, somebody that has crossed party barriers, and then I started seeing what people are hearing and seeing from me. So, whatever I can do to put that information and insight out and mentor to people. That's what I'm going to continue to do.