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Bert Mitchell

Accountant Bert Mitchell was born on April 12, 1938 in Manchester, Jamaica to Joseph and Edith Mitchell. He grew up on his family’s farm in Jamaica, and excelled as a straight-A student at Kingston Technical High School. In 1958, Mitchell immigrated with his parents and six siblings to New York City. There, he worked as a full-time clerk at a local Teamster labor union while taking night classes at Baruch College, CUNY. Mitchell earned his B.B.A. degree in accounting in 1963.

Mitchell was the 100th African American CPA in U.S. history and began his career in accounting as the first African American CPA at J.K. Lasser & Company in 1963. In 1965, Mitchell became the CFO of Intra-American Life Corporation, a life insurance company founded by civil rights leader and lawyer Clarence B. Jones. Mitchell began working with the Ford Foundation in 1966. While there, he earned his M.B.A. degree at Baruch College in 1968; and the following year, he conducted a survey of African Americans CPAs, reporting that out of 100,000 CPAs in the U.S., fewer than 150 were African American. Later, in 1975, Mitchell published a follow-up study that indicated the number of African American CPAs had tripled to 450.

In 1969, Mitchell became a partner at Lucas, Tucker & Company, the oldest African American owned CPA firm in the U.S. and remained there until 1972 when he started an independent accounting firm with James L. Tatum, Jr. Mitchell then partnered with Robert P. Titus to found Mitchell & Titus LLP later that year, which became the largest minority-owned accounting firm in the U.S. He served as chairman and CEO of the firm, whose clients include such organizations as the NAACP, the Dance Theatre of Harlem, the Jackie Robinson Foundation and the A. Philip Randolph Institute. To expand their business, Mitchell & Titus LLP entered joint venture agreements with major accounting firms like Peat Marwick and Ernst & Young. They also acquired other minority firms such as Stewart, Benjamin & Brown and Frye Williams & Company. After serving as CEO of Mitchell & Titus LLP for thirty-six years, Mitchell retired in 2008.

Mitchell helped found the National Association of Minority CPA Firms in 1971. In 1977, he was elected to the board of directors of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, becoming the first African American to serve on the board. He also served as chair of the board of trustees of Ariel Mutual Funds. In 1987, Mitchell became president of the New York State Society of CPAs (NYSSCPA), the largest CPA Society in the United States. During his tenure, the NYSSCPA launched the Career Opportunities in the Accounting Profession (COAP) program whose focus was to increase the number of minorities in the profession.

In 2012, the Journal of Accountancy, in celebration of its 125 years of existence in America, listed Bert Mitchell among the 125 CPAs of most impact in the accounting profession.

Mitchell and his wife, Carole Mitchell, have three children: Tracey, Robbin, and Ronald.

Bert Mitchell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 29, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.136

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/29/2018

Last Name

Mitchell

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Bert

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

MIT16

Favorite Season

Anytime but Winter

State

Jamaica

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/12/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Jamaican Food - Curried Goat

Short Description

Accountant Bert Mitchell (1938 - ) was the co-founder of Mitchell & Titus LLP, one of the most successful minority accounting firms in the United States.

Favorite Color

Blue

Errol B. Taylor

Lawyer Errol B. Taylor was born on November 24, 1955 in Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies, and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Brooklyn Technical High School, received his B.A. degree in biology in 1977 from State University of New York at Oswego, and his J.D. degree in 1987 from New York Law School, in New York City.

Admitted to the New York State Bar in 1988, Taylor was also admitted to the bars of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the United States Supreme Court. He became a registered patent attorney with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in 1996, and a member of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York in 1997. He served as a patent litigation attorney, partner and member of the executive committee at the intellectual property law firm Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto, in New York City from 1987 to 2003. Taylor joined as partner of the New York law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP in 2003, where he led the firm’s biopharma patent litigation practice and served as chair of Milbank’s Diversity Committee.

Taylor represented biopharmaceutical companies in patent litigation regarding some of the world’s most prescribed medicines and was selected by The National Law Journal as one of the nation's top trial lawyers in 2003. He received an honorary Ph.D. degree (doctor of laws) from the State University of New York at Oswego in 2006. He was elected chairman of the board of trustees in 2004 for the Trenton, New Jersey-based Young Scholars’ Institute, a nonprofit learning center, which serves students in pre-K through 12th grade, and was President of the Princeton Chapin School Board of Trustees from 2008 to 2011. Taylor was named one of Savoy magazine’s Most Influential Black Lawyers in 2015, which features the top partners from leading law firms and corporate counsels from Fortune 1000 companies. He was recognized in Lawdragon’s 2018 guide of the 500 Leading Lawyers in America. The annual guide is the company’s highest distinction, recognizing top practitioners across various practice areas. He was the recipient of the New York Law School Alumni Award in 2018.

Included in his affiliations and memberships: American Intellectual Property Law Association and Federal Circuit Bar Association. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha and Sigma Pi Phi Fraternities. Taylor has served as trustee on numerous boards, including the Board of Trustees of Clark Atlanta University and New York Law School, where co-chaired the advisory board for the Innovation Center for Law and Technology.

Errol B. Taylor was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 27, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.086

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/27/2018

Last Name

Taylor

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Occupation
Schools

Brooklyn Technical High School

State University of New York at Oswego

New York Law School

First Name

Errol

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

TAY18

Favorite Season

Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

Costa Rica

Favorite Quote

An Empty Barrel Makes The Most Noise.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/24/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Caribbean

Short Description

Lawyer Errol B. Taylor (1955- ) named partner at the New York law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy in 2003, previously served as a patent attorney and partner at the corporate and securities law firm Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto, in New York City from 1999 to 2003.

Employment

Squibb Corporation

Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper and Schinto

Milbank, Tweed, Hadley and McCloy LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Garth Fagan

Choreographer Garth Fagan was born on May 3, 1940 in Kingston, Jamaica to Louise Walker and S.W. Fagan, a chief education officer of Jamaica. As a teenager, Fagan studied dance with Ivy Baxter and the Jamaica National Dance Company. He attended Excelsior High School in St. Andrews, Jamaica, and performed at the inauguration ceremony for Cuban President Fidel Castro in 1959. After moving to Detroit, Michigan in 1960, Fagan danced with the Detroit Contemporary Dance Company and the Dance Theater of Detroit, where he studied with Jose Limon, Mary Hinkson, Alvin Ailey, Lavinia Williams, and Katherine Dunham. In 1968, Fagan received his B.A. degree from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He later earned his D.F.A. degree from the University of Rochester in 1986.

Upon graduating from Wayne State University, Fagan moved to Rochester, New York, where he was hired as a dance teacher and choreographer at the educational opportunities center. In 1969, Fagan began teaching at SUNY Brockport; and in 1970, he founded his own dance company, originally called The Bottom of the Bucket, But…Dance Theater. The name was later changed to Garth Fagan Dance. Fagan produced a number of successful pieces through his dance company, including From Before in 1978, Prelude in 1981, and Never Top 40 (Jukebox) in 1985. Fagan choreographed the first fully staged production of the Duke Ellington street opera, Queenie Pie, in 1986. He then opened the Garth Fagan Dance School in 1990. The following year, Fagan collaborated with musician Wynton Marsalis and sculptor Martin Puryear for the production of Griot New York. In 1997, Fagan became the choreographer of the Broadway musical production of The Lion King, for which he won a Tony Award for best choreography. Over the next two decades, Fagan continued to choreograph notable pieces like Trips and Trysts in 2000, —ING in 2004, and Mudan 175/39, which was named by The New York Times as the third of the top six dance watching moments of 2009. He also developed the Fagan Technique, a unique and evolving vocabulary, which fuses the weight of modern dance, the vitality of Afro-Caribbean movement, and the speed and precision of ballet with the risk-taking experimentation of post modernism.

Fagan received numerous awards and honors for his choreography. In addition to his Tony Award for his work in The Lion King, Fagan also received a Laurence Olivier award for Best theater Choroegrapher in 2000, Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Choreography, and an Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Choreography for the production. In 1998, Fagan was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Choreography Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Fagan was honored with the Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001; and in 2012, Dance Heritage Collection named Fagan among “America’s 100 Irreplaceable Dance Treasures.” Fagan received honorary degrees from Juilliard School, Hobart College, William Smith College, and Nazareth College. In 2017, Fagan received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Dance Guild.

Garth Fagan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 18, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.068

Sex

Male

Interview Date

04/18/2018

Last Name

Fagan

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Garth

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

FAG01

Favorite Season

Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Discipline Is Freedom.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/30/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Rochester

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Oxtail

Short Description

Choreographer Garth Fagan (1940 - ) founded the Garth Fagan Dance company, and choreographed the Tony award winning musical The Lion King.

Favorite Color

Blue

Peter Blair Henry

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry was born on July 30, 1969 in Kingston, Jamaica to George Henry and Caroll Henry. After moving to Wilmette, Illinois with his family at age nine, Henry attended New Trier High School. He earned his B.A. degree with distinction and highest honors in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1991. A Rhodes Scholar, Henry graduated from Oxford University with his B.A. degree in mathematics in 1993, and went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997.

Henry worked as a consultant to the Governor of The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank in 1994. The following year, he worked as a consultant to the Governor of the Bank of Jamaica. In 1997, Henry became an assistant professor of economics at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was promoted to associate professor of economics with tenure in 2005, becoming the first tenured African American professor at the Graduate School of Business. He obtained a full professorship in 2007, and was named the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of International Economics in 2008. That same year, he led the external economic advisory group for then-Senator Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. After the election, Henry served on President Obama’s transition team as leader of the review of international lending agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and was appointed to the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships the following year. In 2010, Henry became the first African American dean, and the youngest dean, of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He served in the position for eight years, becoming Dean Emeritus in 2018 and continuing as William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Finance.

In 2013, Henry released his first book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. Henry also published numerous articles on international economics, including “Debt Relief,” with Serkan Arslanalp, in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (2006); “Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation” in the Journal of Economic Literature (2007); and “Institutions vs. Policies: A Tale of Two Islands,” with Conrad Miller, in the American Economic Review (2009). Henry was named to the Citigroup Board of Directors in 2015 and the Board of Directors of Nike in 2018. He also served on the Board of Directors of General Electric from 2016 to 2018.

In 2014, with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Henry established the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program designed to address underrepresentation in economics by mentoring exceptional students of color interested in pursuing doctoral studies in the field.

Henry and his wife, Lisa J. Nelson, have four children.

Peter Blair Henry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2016 and January 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2016 |and| 1/18/2017

Last Name

Henry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Blair

Schools

Avoca West Elementary School

Marie Murphy School

New Trier Township High School

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Oxford

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Peter

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

HEN07

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spain - Andalusia, Ghana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/30/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Jerk pork

Short Description

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry (1969 - ) served on President Barack Obama’s 2008 transition team, and on the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships. In 2010, he became the youngest and first African American dean of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Employment

New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business

Stanford University, School of Humanities and Sciences

Favorite Color

Blue

Dr. Julius W. Garvey

Surgeon and medical professor Dr. Julius W. Garvey was born on September 17, 1933 in Kingston, Jamaica to United Negro Improvement Association founder Marcus Garvey and activist Amy Jacques Garvey. The younger of two sons, Garvey was raised in Jamaica. He graduated from Wolmer's Trust High School for Boys in Kingston in 1950; and then earned his B.S. degree from McGill University in Montréal, Canada in 1957, and his M.D., C.M. degree from McGill University Faculty of Medicine in 1961.

Garvey began his medical career by interning at The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montréal in 1961. In 1962, he began his first residency in surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital of New York, completing his residency in 1965. Garvey also completed residencies in surgery at the Harlem Hospital Center in 1968, and in thoracic & cardiovascular surgery at the University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland in 1970.Garvey became an instructor in surgery at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1971. The following year, he joined the Albert Einstein College of Medicine as an instructor in surgery, later becoming an assistant professor of surgery. While teaching at Columbia University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Garvey also served as an attending surgeon in cardiothoracic surgery at the Harlem Hospital Center and Montefiore Hospital, as well as associate attending and head of thoracic surgery at the Montefiore Morrisania Affiliate. In 1974, Garvey was named attending-in-charge of thoracic surgery at Queens Hospital Center, in addition to serving as an attending surgeon in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center. Garvey became the Long Island Jewish Medical Center’s acting program director for the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery from 1980 to 1982, and assistant professor of surgery at State University of New York at Stony Brook from 1978 to 1988. Garvey also started his own private practice in 1983. Garvey served as chief of thoracic and vascular surgery at Queens Hospital Center from 1993 to 2006, and chief of vascular and thoracic surgery at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center from 2000 to 2004. In addition to his other medical appointments, Garvey served as an attending surgeon at North Shore University Hospital, Franklin General Hospital, Massapequa General Hospital, Catholic Medical Centers, and Little Neck Community Hospital.

Garvey was a certified fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, the American College of Surgeons, the International College of Surgeons, and the American College of Chest Physicians, as well as a diplomate of the Board of Cardiothoracic & Vascular Surgery, the American Board of Surgery, the American Academy of Wound Management, and the American College of Phlebology.

Garvey and his wife, Constance Lynch Garvey, have three children: Nzinga, Makeda, and Paul.

Dr. Julius W. Garvey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 8, 2016 and March 13, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.108

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/08/2016 |and| 04/13/2017

Last Name

Garvey

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Winston

Schools

Jonathan Robinson High School

McGill University

First Name

Julius

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

GAR04

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica, Europe

Favorite Quote

No problem mon. (with Jamaican accent)

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/16/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Aki and sawfish

Short Description

Surgeon and medical professor Dr. Julius W. Garvey (1933 - ), son of Marcus Garvey, practiced thoracic and vascular surgery in greater New York, and was chief of thoracic and vascular surgery at Queens Hospital Center and at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center.

Employment

Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

State University of New York

University of Maryland Hospital

Harlem Hospital Center

The Mount Sinai Hospital of New York

Montefiore Hospital

Montefiore Morrisania Affiliate

Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Queens Hospital Center

Little Neck Community Hospital

Catholic Medical Centers

Massapequa General Hospital

Franklin General Hospital

Wyckoff Heights Medical Center

North Shore University Hospital

Garvey Vascular Specialists

Favorite Color

Blue

Michel du Cille

Photojournalist Michel du Cille was born in 1956 in Kingston, Jamaica. His initial interest in photography is credited to his father, a pastor-minister, who worked as a newspaper reporter both in Jamaica and in the United States. Du Cille began his career in photojournalism while in high school working at The Gainesville (GA) Times. In 1985, he received his B.S. degree in journalism from Indiana University. Du Cille also received his M.S. degree in journalism from Ohio University in 1994.

While studying at Indiana University, du Cille was a photographer and picture editor at the Indiana Daily Student. He then worked as an intern at The Louisville Courier Journal/Times in 1979 and at The Miami Herald in 1980. Du Cille joined The Miami Herald's photography staff in 1981. In 1988, he was hired as a picture editor for The Washington Post. In 2005, du Cille became associate editor, and was named assistant managing editor of photography in 2007. Then, in 2009, when The Washington Post newsroom was re-organized and combined with washingtonpost.com, du Cille's title went from assistant managing editor of photography to director of photography. In 2012, he again became an associate editor for photography.

Du Cille has won three Pulitzer Prizes. He shared the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography with fellow Miami Herald staff photographer, Carol Guzy, for their coverage of the November 1985 eruption of Colombia's Nevado del Ruiz volcano. Du Cille won the 1988 Feature Photography Pulitzer for a photo essay on crack cocaine addicts in a Miami housing project. In 2008, he shared the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service with Washington Post reporters, Dana Priest and Anne Hull, for exposing mistreatment of wounded veterans at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. In addition, du Cille led a team of editors that assembled the photographs shot by Nikki Kahn, Carol Guzy, and Ricky Carioti into the essay that won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News photography for their coverage of the Haitian earthquake and its aftermath.

Du Cille has been active in the National Press Photographers Association (NPPF) in various committee and leadership roles, including serving as the executive committee board representative in 2000, as well as on the organization's finance committee in the early 2000s. Du Cille served on the Pulitzer Prize jury in the photography categories, and as a University of Missouri School of Journalism Pictures of the Year International judge.

Du Cille passed away on December 11, 2014 at the age of 58. He was married to Washington Post photojournalist Nikki Khan, also a Pulitzer Prize winner.

Michel du Cille was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 27, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/27/2014

Last Name

duCille

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Everard

Occupation
Schools

Gainesville High School

Indiana University

Ohio University

Valdosta State University

Indiana University Southeast

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michel

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

DUC01

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

I’m Just A Regular Guy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/24/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Jamaican Food

Death Date

12/11/2014

Short Description

Photojournalist Michel du Cille (1956 - 2014 ) was the director of photography at The Washington Post and a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner.

Employment

Gainesville Times

Indiana Daily Student

Louisville Courier-Journal

Miami Herald

The Washington Post

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michel du Cille's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille talks about his mother's Syrian and Indian ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille remembers his mother's chronic illness

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille remembers his family's immigration to the United States

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille talks about his parents' elopement

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille talks about his interest in Rastafarianism

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michel du Cille remembers the popular culture of Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michel du Cille describes his schooling in Jamaica

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille remembers his early exposure to photography

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille recalls the start of his photography training

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille describes his experiences of school integration

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille describes his favorite subjects in school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille remembers his brothers' schooling

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille talks about his photographic influences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille remembers his early photography assignments

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michel du Cille recalls his conflicts with the principal at Gainesville High School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Michel du Cille recalls his rejection from the University of Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Michel du Cille remembers transferring to Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille describes his experiences at the Indiana University School of Journalism in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille remembers developing his photography portfolio

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille talks about his internship at the Miami Herald

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille remembers his early cameras

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille remembers joining the staff of the Miami Herald

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille talks about the Miami Herald's coverage of the riots in 1980

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille talks about the African American leadership in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Michel du Cille talks about the Pulitzer Prize winning black photographers

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Michel du Cille remembers photographing the eruption of Nevado del Ruiz

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille remembers winning a Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille talks about his Pulitzer Prize in Feature Photography

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille talks about the prevalence of crack cocaine use

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille remembers joining The Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille recalls his recognition from the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille talks about the risks of photojournalism

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille remembers integrating a restaurant in South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michel du Cille talks about the conflict between the African National Congress and the Inkatha Freedom Party

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Michel du Cille remembers his master's degree from the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille describes his master's degree thesis

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille talks about the use of photography in The Washington Post

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille describes his career at The Washington Post

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille talks about his second marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille talks about the photography department at The Washington Post

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille reflects upon the difference between writers and photojournalists

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Michel du Cille describes his involvement with the National Press Photographers Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Michel du Cille talks about the opportunities for aspiring photojournalists

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Michel du Cille describes his philosophy of photography

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Michel du Cille talks about his favorite photographers

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Michel du Cille describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Michel du Cille reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Michel du Cille talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Michel du Cille reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Michel du Cille describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Michel du Cille recalls the start of his photography training
Michel du Cille remembers winning a Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography
Transcript
Did he shoot anything for The Gleaner?$$No, he didn't, which, which was part--the part that I missed at that age. I didn't really--so when my dad [Frank du Cille, Sr.] started working for the newspaper in Georgia [The Times], I, again, started to go into the photo department. 'Cause my dad would take me to the newspaper with him, and I would go and ask a lot of questions of the photographer for the staff, and ask him to let me come with him on assignments. And he really did teach me a lot. And, and to this day, I can't remember that guy's name, but he was a very patient man. I remember him telling me one day, 'cause I--he was going to a shoot and he, he said that I could come with him, but I wasn't dressed properly. And he, he took me home to change before we went to the assignment because he wanted me to look presentable (laughter). But the photographer for the paper did teach me a lot of stuff. And then I took--I took a photo course from the local recreation center, and it happened to be the same guy teaching the photo course that was my math teacher at the high school. And he insisted that we learn not from 35mm or 2 1/4, but from 4x5. First we have to build the pinhole camera, then we had to learn to use the large format 4x5 camera, which is a Speed Graphic. He had--he had a Speed Graphic that he taught us to use--taught us to, to, to--he said he felt that composition--you have to learn composition with a large negative. (Pause) And--but I--I--that was my first photo course.$$So this is at, at Gainesville (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) In Gainesville [Georgia]--$$--High School [Gainesville High School]?$$In Gainesville. Yes.$So you were talking off camera maybe about the pictures and the photos and that you shot of the volcano [Nevado del Ruiz]--I mean eruption--$$Yeah. So, I, I called into the office to say that I really wanted to go to this assignment. It was my turn to go. I felt that I was ready to go. And I could tell that my boss wasn't 100 percent, you know, in tune with that. But then they came up with the idea of let's send Michel [HistoryMaker Michel du Cille] and Carol [Carol Guzy]. Let's send the two of those together because they would work well together. They knew that we had a good friendship and that we would, you know, work well together. And so, so Carol and I actually went--we, we, along with two other news organizations, chartered a, a, a jet to fly from Miami [Florida] to Colombia. And we, we didn't land in Bogota [Colombia]. We landed in--at the airstrip that was only like, you know, maybe about eight or nine, ten kilometers from the eruption. So what we did was we kept the jet on the runway and told the guys to stay there so that we could come back and bring film to them so that they could fly back with the film. I mean, back then the only other option would have been to use the AP [Associated Press] to send on the drum, you know. And back then I think color was just beginning for the--to be going over the wire, but it wasn't great. So we really wanted that color film to get back. And we were shooting--we were--we were photographing with slides. We were use--shooting Ektachrome and Fujichrome, so it had to be, you know processed special process. So it was a brilliant move for us to keep the jet on the runway, and, and say, "Okay you're, you're bring it back to Miami." And that's how we were able to get good, brilliant color pictures in the paper [Miami Herald]. You know, and of course they ran the young girl underwater on the front page. And I think later on, you know, that the helicopter picture--I can show them to you on my--on my laptop. But, you know, Carol and I worked very well together, and so to our surprise, our story won the Pulitzer Prize [Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography] in 1986 from work that was done in November of '85 [1985].

Winston Anderson

Biomedical scientist and research director Winston A. Anderson was born on July 26, 1940 in Kingston, Jamaica. In 1959, Anderson graduated from Calabar High School in Kingston and received his Higher Schools Certificate. At the age of seventeen, he immigrated to the United States and enrolled at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Anderson went on to earn his B.S. degree in zoology and his M.S. degree in zoology from Howard University in 1962 and 1963, respectively. In 1966, he graduated from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island with his Ph.D. degree in biomedical sciences.

Anderson was appointed as chair of the Howard University Department of Zoology in 1975. He served in that position until 1983 and remained on the faculty as a professor of biomedical science. In 2006, with a $1 million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Anderson started the Howard Hughes Medical Research Scholars program. This program has been supported by the National Science Foundation’s Research Careers for Minority Scholars program and the National Institute of Health Biomedical Research Support program for minority students at Howard University. In addition to research and mentoring, Anderson co-founded the Sandy Spring Museum and African Art Gallery in1988 and serves as the curator.

Anderson is a founding member of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) and was the first African American scientist elected to serve on the ASCB Council. While at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Anderson received the Anne Langer Award for Cancer Research and the Distinguished Teacher Award at the Pritzker School of Medicine. In 1992, Brown University bestowed on Anderson its Outstanding Graduate Alumnus Award, and Howard University’s Division of Academic Affairs honored him for establishing the distinguished lecture series, “Brilliant Encounters in Science.” In 2011, Anderson received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring.

Winston A. Anderson lives in Silver Springs, Maryland with his wife, Carol Anderson. They have three children: Laura, Lea, and Michael.

Winston A. Anderson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers February 17, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.053

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/17/2013

Last Name

Anderson

Maker Category
Middle Name

A

Schools

Calabar High School

Brown University

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Winston

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

AND14

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ocho Rios, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Hang in there.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/26/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Ackee, Saltfish

Short Description

Biomedical scientist Winston Anderson (1940 - ) , a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Professor, was awarded the 2011 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, Engineering Mentoring.

Employment

University of Paris

Harvard University Medical School

University of Chicago

Howard University

Sandy Spring Slave Museum and African Art Gallery

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Winston Anderson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson describes his parent's personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Winston Anderson talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Winston Anderson talks about growing up in his family's household

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Winston Anderson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson describes the music he listened to growing up in Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson talks about his elementary schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson talks about his high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson talks about his influential high school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson describes being on the track team in his high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson talks about his time at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson describes the transition from Jamaica to the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson describes working as a switchboard operator while at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson talks about the faculty at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson remembers going with Stokely Carmichael to boycott restaurants in North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson talks about his mentors at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson describes his decision to attend Brown University for his doctoral degree

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Winston Anderson describes his time at Brown University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson describes his doctoral dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson talks about his spermatology research at the University of Paris

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson describes his mentors while he was at a post-doctoral position at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson describes teaching at the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson describes his research on endochondral ossification

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson describes his research on estrogen-induced peroxidase

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Winston Anderson describes how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Winston Anderson describes leaving University of Chicago to teach at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson describes the challenges he faced as head of the Biology Department at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson describes the grants he obtained for Howard University pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson describes the grants he obtained for Howard University pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson talks about the Ernest Everett Just

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson describes the growth of the Biology Department at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson describes current research at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Winston Anderson reflects on his legacy pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson reflects on his legacy pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Winston Anderson describes the interdepartmental projects at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Winston Anderson reflects on his life

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Winston Anderson talks about the Sandy Springs Slave Museum and African Art Gallery pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Winston Anderson talks about the Sandy Springs Slave Museum and African Art Gallery pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Winston Anderson talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Winston Anderson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Winston Anderson talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Winston Anderson describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Winston Anderson talks about his spermatology research at the University of Paris
Winston Anderson describes the transition from Jamaica to the United States
Transcript
Now, before we get away from Brown [University, Providence, Rhode Island], tell us about Elizabeth LaDuke?$$Right, you know, Brown allowed you to have many mentors, Richard Ellis, Richard Goss, Elizabeth LaDuke. She was the, the product of a professor there called J. Walter Wilson. A building is named after J. Walter Wilson. She was a great cancer biologist, and she would spend every summer at labs in France called Village Reef in France. And she was the person that said, "Winston, what do--would you like to go to France and continue your research?" I said, "Why not?" You know, I didn't have anything else to do at the time. So I got an American Cancer Society fellowship to go to France to work with, at her recommendation, work with a fellow named John Andre. John Andre was the most charismatic scientist you could ever find and a good scientist. And at that time, he was involved in identifying mitochondrial DNA in different protozoa and in different plants. And he was one of the first to isolate the mitochondrial DNA and look at it as single DNA particles, isolated from the cell. So it was really wonderful. But John Andre was a generalist as a cell biologist. And again, just like Brown [University], they allowed you to work on what you wanted to work. So he knew that I was interested, as I told you earlier on in the manchette, those microtubules that have formed heads of sperm. And then we took off, and we became, founded a society there called Society for Spermatology, International Society for Spermatology, groups from Italy, from Sweden, Europe, all over and the United States. And with one prime person, his name is Don Fawcett who was to become one of my most important mentors, Don Fawcett. Now--$$Now, what year is the society formed?$$This is '66 [1966].$$In '66 [1966], okay.$$'66, we're dealing with now, '66 [1966] to '68 [1968]. At the University of Paris [Paris, France] I think I came out with about twelve publications on spermatology, structure, function of sperm. On stuff dealing with mitochondrial metamorphosis, during spermiogenisis, the differentiation of sperm and identifying things like DNA in the sperm mitochondria of different animals and looking at the impregnation of the egg with sperm. In other words, use the electron-microscope to watch where the sperm binds with surface of the egg, how it gets incorporated. That's important because not only could you--the question was, does the sperm DNA in their, in their mitochondrial, contribute to the differentiation of the egg and the embryonic system? In most systems, it seems like the sperm DNA just breaks down. But in our system of the sea urchins that we looked, we found that the sperm mitochondria with its DNA fused with the egg mitochondria with its DNA and was carried on into the embryo. So we believe that the sperm or paternal mitochondrial DNA had something to do--or just not eliminated. It may have had something to do with the differentiation of the embryo.$$Okay.$$So those were interesting years. You met some of the great scientists of the world, and made the best connections that you could ever have.$$Now, you mentioned John Andre--$$John Andre, yeah.$$Now, what about Emanuel Foray, Ferme--$$Fremiet.$$Fremiet.$$Fora--Fremiet was one of the protozoologist of the time, and he worked very closely with John Andre. He was an old man, so he used John Andre's laboratories and really sort of one of the great advisors of the area.$$Okay, and what about--there's a person called "Person"--$$Paul Personne.$$Personne?$$Personne, he was a student of Andre. And he and I specialized in a very unique spermatozoan. This spermatozoan, and most sperm have the head, where you have the nucleus and the DNA. And then they have a body that just contains mitochondria, and the mitochondria provides the energy for the motility of the sperm. But this unique sperm had in its body a compartment that contained glycogen. And it used that glycogen to make ATP or energy for the sperm, and the difference of the mitochondria for the sperm to move. So it was a very, very unique thing, and you know, and it was time where we would develop techniques. Very few people knew how to demonstrate the presence of glycogen. We found glycogen everywhere in these cells, in the flagella, in the mitochondria, all over. So we hypothesized that they were, this was a source of glycolytic ATP. In addition to the ATP coming from mitochondria for the propulsion and movement of these sperm. And that was fun.$I just wanted to go back and have you describe your, how you made the transition from--$$Okay.$$--you know, Calabar [High School, Kingston, Jamaica]?$$Right.$$When you were on the verge of graduating from high school at Calabar--$$Yes, yes.$$--did you have college counseling from anyone?$$Nothing, nothing like that. I, you had two choices, people in my situation. My brother [Abraham St. Aubyn Anderson] was already in the United States. My sister [Shirley Payne Anderson] had gone to London [England, United Kingdom], and there was no money to really do much with me. So after Calabar, I worked one year in Jamaica at a job at the mail office, pulling bags of mail. Then my uncle got me a little job in new accounts at the bank, and I think just fouled up a lot of people's bank books (laughter), because I didn't, wasn't very good at it. But then, I had a choice. My type of person in this family setting would either be a teacher or a preacher. And they're all ready to send me to the Methodist Man School to become a Methodist minister. And my mother [Ruth Elizabeth Gray] made the mistake of asking me, "What did you want to do?" And I said I wanted to come to the United States to be a dentist, to prepare to become a dentist. And that was a ploy that we all used because at that time, the island needed dentists, and you could only get off if you said you wanted to be a dentist. And so I used that ploy, but you had to show some monies to back it up, and so my mother and her sister and a couple friends of mine, the Livermore's, got enough money to let me get to the United States.$$Okay.$$Okay, and I came here, and I remember, it was on the old BOAC [British Overseas Airways Corporation] airplanes. And I remember my father [Laurel Charles] didn't see me off, and that was the last time I saw my father. But on the plane, I saw him driving a little truck, coming to the airport. It was too late. And my mother gave me two things. She said, "Here is a little bible, and here's fifty dollars. Go see your uncle in Wilmington [North Carolina]" and then to my older brother in Washington [D.C.]. So I still have the bible.$$Okay, now, this is in 1958?$$1958.$$Okay, all right.$$Seventeen years old, going on towards eighteen.$$Okay.$$And so that's the transition.

Wayne M. Hewett

Corporate executive Wayne Hewett was born on October 28, 1964 in Kingston, Jamaica. Hewett grew up in a house of educated professionals; his father, Audley Maylor Hewett, was a chief executive officer, and his mother, Lorna Shelly Hewett, was a registered nurse and business owner. In the 1970s, the family moved to Miami, Florida where in 1981, Hewett received his diploma from Palmetto High School. He entered Stanford University that same year where he received his B.S. degree in industrial engineering in 1985 and continued his studies to earn his M.S. degree in industrial engineering in 1986.

Hewett began his career working as a member of the Manufacturing Management Program with assignments at GE Simulation & Control Systems and GE Aircraft Engines. In 1988, he graduated from the program and joined GE Corporate Audit Staff as a staff auditor. During the 1990s, he was promoted to Executive Audit Manager of GE Corporate in 1992, and then joined GE Power Generation as manager of Engineering Design Systems in 1993. In 1994, he moved to GE Silicones as Manager of Materials and Logistics, and in 1995, he moved again to GE Plastics as General Manager of Petrochemicals and Global Sourcing.

In 2001, Hewett was named Vice President of General Electric Company and served as president of GE Plastics Pacific, located in Shanghai, China, and President and CEO of GE Toshiba Silicones, located in Tokyo, Japan. Here, he led his teams and divisions to double-digit growth. In 2006, Hewett became the president and chief executive officer of Apollo Management, a private investment firm. He is a member of several organizations including the American Foundation for The University of the West Indies and the Special Olympics of New York.

Hewett resides in Connecticut with his wife and family.

Hewett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 3, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.001

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/3/2007

Last Name

Hewett

Maker Category
Middle Name

M.

Schools

Stanford University

Miami Palmetto Senior High School

Mona Preparatory School

First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

HEW02

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Egypt, Malaysia

Favorite Quote

Tough But Fair.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Japan

Birth Date

10/28/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Tokyo

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Thai Food

Short Description

Corporate chief executive Wayne M. Hewett (1964 - ) was the Vice President and CEO of Momentive Performance Management for the General Electric Company.

Employment

General Electric

GENERAL ELECTRIC SILICONES

G.E. Toshiba Silicones

Momentive Performance Materials, Inc.

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wayne M. Hewett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his father's decision to move to the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wayne M. Hewett describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wayne M. Hewett describes the emphasis on athletics in Jamaica

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the public education in Jamaica

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his father's reputation in Jamaica

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers the impact of his father's reputation

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wayne M. Hewett describes the class system in Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his parents' views on religion

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers moving with his family to Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett describes the changes in his racial and national identity

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his motivations for attending college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls his interest in engineering

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers searching for a Jamaican community in Stanford, California

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Wayne M. Hewett describes the differences in Jamaican and American culture

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his social life at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his parents' occupations in the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about his siblings' careers

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls his activities at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about losing his Jamaican accent

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls his mentors at Stanford University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls joining the staff of General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls his membership in engineering organizations at Stanford University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls his influential teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers learning about interview techniques

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Wayne M. Hewett shares his philosophy of self-improvement

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about his perspective on race

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers his interview with General Electric

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls working for Schlumberger

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls the manufacturing management program at General Electric

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett describes the increase in diversity at General Electric

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers Jack Welch

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls becoming GE's first black executive audit manager

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls being promoted by Dave Calhoun

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls working at General Electric Industrial Systems

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls working for General Electric Silicones

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers Jack Welch's advice

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers living in Tokyo, Japan

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers working for General Electric in Asia

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the African population in China

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the driving culture in China

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers moving General Electric Plastics to China

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett recalls adjusting to life in China

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the African American leaders of multinational corporations

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his success in the Asian market

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers Lloyd G. Trotter's mentorship

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Wayne M. Hewett describes Arthur H. Harper's mentorship

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the African American executives of General Electric

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his role as CEO of Momentive Performance Materials, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Wayne M. Hewett talks about the mentorship of Robert Wood

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his hopes for the African American business community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Wayne M. Hewett remembers conversations with his children about race

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Wayne M. Hewett reflects upon his racial identity

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Wayne M. Hewett describes his plans for the future

Veronica Airey-Wilson

City council member Veronica Airey-Wilson, former deputy mayor of Hartford, Connecticut, was born on August 4, 1953, in Kingston, Jamaica, to Narciso and Clariana Airey. Moving to Hartford in 1960, Airey-Wilson attended both Brackett Elementary School and Arsenal Elementary School. Airey-Wilson was a member of the National Honor Society and captain of the cheerleading team at Weaver High School from which she graduated in 1972. Attending Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York on a full scholarship, Airey-Wilson graduated in 1975.

In 1976, Airey-Wilson was hired by Aetna where she rose from claims adjuster to equal employment opportunity counselor. Leaving Aetna in 1985, Airey-Wilson started her own business, Verjen Boutique, in Hartford’s Richardson Mall; she later returned to the insurance business by opening an AllState Insurance Company franchise, which eventually became the Airey-Wilson Insurance Group, a full service financial agency.

In 1994, Airey-Wilson was elected to the Hartford Court of Common Council, where she was the first Jamaican to serve as the city’s deputy mayor; in 2003, she served as co-chair of the Youth Workforce Development Task Force. Airey-Wilson has served as an executive member of the Capital Region Council of Government Joint Policy Steering Committee; chair of the Republican State Convention; and an executive member of the Capital Region Council of Government Joint Policy Board. Airey-Wilson was vice president of the Association of Caribbean American Leaders and a member of the NAACP. In addition to her professional activities, Airey-Wilson has raised two children.

Accession Number

A2005.052

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/17/2005

Last Name

Airey-Wilson

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Weaver High School

Brackett Elementary School

Arsenal Elementary School

Ithaca College

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Veronica

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

AIR01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Youth, Teens, Adults, Seniors

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Depends on audience - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Youth, Teens, Adults, Seniors
Honorarium Specifics: Depends on audience

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

8/4/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hartford

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Peas (Stewed)

Short Description

City council member Veronica Airey-Wilson (1953 - ) sits on the Hartford, Connecticut Court of Common Council, where she was the first Jamaican to serve as the city's deputy mayor. She is also the owner of the Airey-Wilson Insurance Group, a full service financial agency.

Employment

Aetna, Inc.

Hartford Court of Common Council

Allstate Insurance

Verjen Boutique

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Veronica Airey-Wilson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her father's ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes the community of her childhood neighborhood in Kingston, Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about moving from Jamaica to Connecticut during elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the challenges West Indians faced in immigrating to Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the role of church while she was growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson recalls the immigrant work ethic of her Jamaican parents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about how her family saved for and purchased their first home in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes how her drive to attend college led to her success as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her favorite subject during elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson recalls her favorite and least favorite teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her rebelliousness toward her parents

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about traveling to Greece while attending Weaver High School in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her activities and ambitions during her high school years at Weaver High School in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her experiences at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the influential professors she encountered while at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about beginning her career at Aetna Life and Casualty in Hartford, Connecticut in 1976

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson details the career lessons she learned during her tenure at Aetna Life Insurance Company in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about running her own jewelry boutique, Verjen Boutique

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her tenure as the operator of an Allstate insurance franchise

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about how her roots in her community enhanced her business success

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson relates how she was drafted into running for office in Hartford, Connecticut in 1991

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson recalls joining the Republican Party in order to run for the Hartford City Council in 1991

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Veronica Airey-Wilson reflects on why African Americans left the Republican Party in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson outlines her beliefs on the welfare programs of the late twentieth century

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes the political climate of Hartford, Connecticut at the time of her election to city council in 1991

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the political history of Hartford, Connecticut from 1993 to 2005

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson details her platform as a councilwoman in the City of Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about the programs she advanced as chair of the Housing Committee for the Hartford Court of Common Council

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about crime and safety issues during the 1990s in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her continuing involvement in Connecticut politics during the 2000s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about belonging to the Independent United Order of Mechanics

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her continuing involvement in Connecticut politics during the 2000s

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Veronica Airey-Wilson reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Veronica Airey-Wilson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Veronica Airey-Wilson talks about her mother's support for her political career

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Veronica Airey-Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Veronica Airey-Wilson describes the community of her childhood neighborhood in Kingston, Jamaica
Veronica Airey-Wilson relates how she was drafted into running for office in Hartford, Connecticut in 1991
Transcript
The experience in our neighborhood [Barbican, Kingston, Jamaica] being a rural type experience. Even though it was in the city, it was a part of the city that was not overly developed and still had lots of trees and forestry. Fruits and vegetables were very easily accessible on the property where we lived. My grandmother had a house there, and we also had a separate house on the same property. And we actually didn't own the land, we leased the land and then we built--my mother [Clariana Knight-Airey] leased the land, and then we actually built my grandmother's home and our home on that land. And interestingly enough, when my mother decided to move, relocate to the United States, our home was built in a way that her brother could come and take it apart and move the wood and the different pieces someplace else to create his own home and he did that with my grandmother's house and my mother's house. But again, the community was one where everyone lived really in close proximity to each other, so you had our, what we call our yard with the two houses, but you could go next door and find a couple other houses on a different property. And everyone--it was like everyone was related somehow and was family, and even though they weren't related by blood, they were kind of all responsible for us because my mom was away again, as I explained, selling her fruits and vegetables in the market. And that would require that she would leave home like five o'clock in the morning, and if it was towards the end of the week, she never actually came home every night. So if she left at five o'clock on a Thursday morning, she never came back home until Saturday evening, when everything was all sold. So it was the community who kind of watched out for all of us and made sure that if we did anything that wasn't right, by the time my mom got home on Saturday night, she was going to hear about it. And in the meantime, she would have a relative from the country who was older, who would live in the house with us and made sure that our needs were taken care of, in terms of food in the evening, that our clothes was washed, and that we had a chance to go to school. So one of the things you'll find in the Caribbean island that even families that didn't have a lot, in terms of money and resources, there was always someone else who was less fortunate than that family. So you always had a relative who was going to come from some country place, who they called helpers, who did all the washing and cleaning. So it's interesting that my mother, who would be probably considered a laborer herself, she wasn't a wealthy woman, but she was able to have one or two people who were relatives from the country who actually came and did all the cleaning and cooking, while she was away selling these products. And so you'll find that that's kind of like the lifestyle in many of the Caribbean islands.$How did you get involved in politics (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Oh, boy.$$How did you--yeah.$$That's a interesting story in itself. When I--as you heard, I came back to the--I grew up in the Hartford [Connecticut] community, I came back to the Harford community, built my career here. Just around the time that I started the Allstate [Corporation] business, a group of leaders in the Caribbean community got together, and even though the bulk of the people were of West Indian descent, there were other individuals of African American descent who joined that group, with the concern that the population of the Caribbean community was evolving and growing, yet, many of these individuals who had substantial influence in the community was not involved politically. The schools, board of education, had no representation and neither did the Hartford city council [Court of Common Council]. So this--at the time we're talking about maybe sixty thousand Caribbean folks and their des--and their offsprings that lived in the greater Hartford community.$$And Hartford's a--what, about a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Hartford--the City of Hartford--$$--hundred and something?$$--is 130,000 people and so--$$So that's a substantial--$$--the African American--$$Yeah.$$--community out of that is like one-third, so maybe about 33,000 and out of that 33,000, I would venture to say that maybe 40 percent of that 33,000, in the City of Hartford, but in the larger community, into Bloomfield [Connecticut] and Windsor [Connecticut], there's well over sixty thousand. So no one was being represented on the board of education in any of these towns or on the town councils. So this group got together, and I was the youngest person in the group, and our role was to try to identify someone to run, mainly for the board of education, but with some consideration for the town council. So we would meet week after week over a period of about six months and each time we would identify a name, it would be the responsibility of someone on this committee to go talk to the person about running of the office, board of education or the city council. And each time we would approach these individuals they would say no, they're busy, they have a family that they're raising, they just got a new career, they just couldn't do it. And after about six months they turned to me and they said, "[HistoryMaker] Veronica [Airey-Wilson], well, why don't you do it?" I'm like, "Oh, no. I just started a business and I have a young family and I got to prepare to get them to college," and so my response was no. And they kept coming back month after month until they wore me down. And I just simply said to my--the Reverend Collin [B.] Bennett, who later became my mentor that "Okay, I'll do it," with the intention that I would run, I'm a novice, I know nothing about politics, I would lose, and that would be the end of it, but I would have at least fulfilled the obligation I felt to represent the community. So--$$Now this is about 1995 or--$$This is 1991.$$Ninety-one [1991]. Okay.$$Yeah, yeah, yeah.$$Okay.$$The election was going to be November of '91 [1991]. So I decided that I would run and the Reverend Collin Bennett sat me down. Now, Collin Bennett was the first Jamaican to serve on the Hartford city council back in 1960, which was a very unique role for him, at that time, because the Caribbean community was nowhere where it is today, in terms of numbers. But he opted to run, not only was that a major accomplishment, but he also ran as a Republican, which was also a major accomplishment in the city that's currently is probably 80 percent Democrats. But--$$That is odd.$$He told me--$$How did he--$$Yeah. He told me how he did it and he instructed me what to do--

Geraldine McCullough

Renowned sculptor and painter Geraldine McCollough was born Geraldine Hamilton on December 1, 1917 in Kingston, Arkansas, and raised in Chicago from the time she was three years old. McCullough attended the Art Institute of Chicago for undergraduate and graduate studies, receiving her B.A. degree in 1948 and her M.A. degree in art education in 1955. As a student, she earned a John D. Standecker Scholarship, a Memorial Scholarship and a Figure Painting Citation.

After completing her graduate studies, McCullough taught art at Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago. She also began exhibiting her paintings at various national galleries, receiving first prize in 1961 at the Art Exhibit of Atlanta University. With help from her husband, Lester McCullough, she took up welded sculpture and made her sculpting debut in 1963 at the Century of Negro Progress Exposition in Chicago. She received the George D. Widener Gold Medal for Sculpture in 1965 for her steel and copper structure, Phoenix.

In 1967, she became the chairperson of the Art Department at Rosary College (later Dominican University) in River Forest, Illinois. Upon her retirement from the school in 1989, she was given an honorary doctorate.

McCullough’s various works were informed by African ritual art to European and American influences. She was a distinguished guest artist of the Russian government and her work was exhibited at such respected institutions as the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. and the National Woman’s Museum.

McCullough passed away on December 15, 2008 at the age of 91.

McCullough was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2002.

Accession Number

A2003.052

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/20/2003

Last Name

McCullough

Maker Category
Organizations
Search Occupation Category
First Name

Geraldine

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

MCC02

Favorite Season

May

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

The Dao That Has Been Spoken Is Not The Dao.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/1/1917

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Death Date

12/15/2008

Short Description

Art professor, painter, and sculptor Geraldine McCullough (1917 - 2008 ) was an award winning sculptor and painter whose works were informed by African ritual art and European and American influences. From 1967-1989, McCollough was the chairperson of the Art Department at Rosary College (later Dominican University) in Chicago.

Employment

Wendell Phillips High School

Rosary College

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:160240,1605$0,0:188200,1337
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geraldine McCullough's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geraldine McCullough lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geraldine McCullough describes her grandfather, Jesse C. Duke

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geraldine McCullough talks about her grandfather, Jesse C. Duke, escaping the Ku Klux Klan

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geraldine McCullough talks about her mother's education and her parents' migration to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geraldine McCullough describes her uncle Charles S. Duke's contribution to architecture in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geraldine McCullough describes visiting the Field Museum of Natural History

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geraldine McCullough describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geraldine McCullough describes her father, Hugh Hamilton

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geraldine McCullough describes her father's occupation and his personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geraldine McCullough talks about moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geraldine McCullough describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up on Chicago's South Side

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geraldine McCullough describes her personality and interest in drawing as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geraldine McCullough remembers her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geraldine McCullough describes attending Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geraldine McCullough shares her views on religion

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geraldine McCullough talks about the Baptist church she attended as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geraldine McCullough describes her art teacher at Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geraldine McCullough talks about getting married

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geraldine McCullough describes attending the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geraldine McCullough describes teaching art at Phillips High School in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geraldine McCullough talks about becoming a sculptor

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geraldine McCullough talks about learning to weld

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geraldine McCullough talks about learning to make jewelry

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Geraldine McCullough describes leaving Rosary College to become a full-time artist

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Geraldine McCullough talks about winning the Widener Gold Medal in 1965

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Geraldine McCullough describes the symbolism of the Phoenix in her artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Geraldine McCullough talks about drawing inspiration from non-Western art

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Geraldine McCullough talks about dream and reality in her artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Geraldine McCullough describes the unconscious organization of space in her art

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Geraldine McCullough talks about abstract art and realism in her art

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Geraldine McCullough talks about her artistic process

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Geraldine McCullough talks about the interpretation of her artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Geraldine McCullough talks about the Black Aesthetic

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Geraldine McCullough describes her art piece "Echo"

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Geraldine McCullough describes the art business

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Geraldine McCullough talks about governmental support of the arts

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Geraldine McCullough talks about her friend, Margot McMahon Burke

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Geraldine McCullough talks about art training

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Geraldine McCullough gives advice to young artists

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Geraldine McCullough talks about her public art

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Geraldine McCullough describes her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Geraldine McCullough describes her favorite sculptures

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Geraldine McCullough reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Geraldine McCullough describes how she would like to be remembered and her family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Geraldine McCullough narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Geraldine McCullough talks about becoming a sculptor
Geraldine McCullough talks about drawing inspiration from non-Western art
Transcript
So now, how did you become a sculptor?$$Well, my paintings began to get third-dimensional and I started doing little tiny sculptures. I have a friend that lived in St. Charles of Aurora [Illinois]; we had met at a camp I used to go to all the time, Silver Pines Camp, and they had--and she was an artist, a painter, and we were up at camp together. I--we both had taught in their craft shop, and so she invited me out to meet this scout that was going around looking at various works to come out and have--had all my little paintings together. And I had been working on these little soldered sculptures--just fascinated with it, but the solder had acid in it, and all my fingers--I had little patches on each finger (laughter); acid just would not get--anyway, I took three of these little--just pick--I was almost outta the door when I went back and got them, and so the scout was there and I showed him the works and--all right--and I said, "And also I have these little--three little pieces of sculpture." "Hey, we'll take all you have." It was a Proctor Mons (ph.)--Proctor Monson (ph.) Museum [Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute] in Ithaca, New York. And for a while, I was (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Can you spell that?$$(Laughter)--I can't hardly say it (laughter); you embarrass me (laughter). But that (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--It begins with a P, right?$$Hmm?$$It starts with a P at least, right?$$Proc--that part I know--Proctor--Will--it's three (simultaneous)--$$Proctor or something.$$Proctor Williams. But it's a very well-known art institute in Ithaca, New York.$Tell me, what other themes have inspired art work from you?$$Well, I guess at Sepik River [in Papua New Guinea]--let's see--$$And why that particular one--Sepik River? I know we discussed it before we started taping, but--$$Oh, well, I had almost all I could take with western art--of four years of it at the Art Institute, and very, very little with oceanic art or, or with (unclear) primitive art which I might object to. And there were other into art--Vastic (ph.), Mayan; we had a little--two sentences like put everything on, on the bulk (ph.)--I meant on the western concept of, of art where they had began to make things very realistic. And they--at first, like with children, man began to--when they started to illustrate paint, it was a flat second-dimensional, and then as we all know--painting-wise, not sculpture--because Greeks and the Romans had done that. But their religion was that God was a perfect-lookin' human being, you know, and he had all the proportions he had set out, the beauty--had to be this tall and that way--this and that. And then I'd look at Benin art; that would be so powerful, you know, African art and Mayans--how they could tell a story--it's a symbolism; and then I started reading and found that art is not reality, it has its own reality; it's like a dream, it isn't there and it is there.