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EducationMakers include teachers, professors, education administrators, and education consultants, as well as museum and library professionals and historians. These HistoryMakers have each spent a significant portion of their careers advancing educational philosophies, teaching, advising, and mentoring students, breaking new ground in developing curricula, or sharing information through programming and exhibits.

John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was born on August 16, 1957 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Genester Millicent Nix and John Silvanus Wilson, Sr. He received his B.A. degree in business administration and management from Morehouse College in 1979. In 1981, Wilson earned his M.T.S. degree from Harvard Divinity School. He then attended the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he earned his Ed.M. degree in education in 1982, and his Ed.D. degree in education in 1985.

Wilson began his career in 1985 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he served as an associate in the analytical studies and planning group in the office of the president. In that role, he conducted research for a report on the experiences of African American students at MIT. He then shifted to financial management and fundraising, serving first in corporate development and, ultimately, as director of foundation relations by 1994. He was an officer in two major capital campaigns at MIT, with goals of $700 million and $2 billion. In 2001, he moved from MIT to The George Washington University in Washington D.C. During his eight-year career at there, Wilson served as senior assistant vice president from September to December 2001, executive dean of the Virginia campus from 2002 to 2006, and associate professor at the Graduate School of Education and Human Development from 2007 to 2009. He was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in 2009, where he remained until 2013. From January 2013 to April 2017, Wilson served as the eleventh president of Morehouse College. He moved to Harvard University as a president in residence at the School of Education, where he began research for a book about the future of American higher education, with an emphasis on HBCUs. In April 2018, Wilson was appointed as senior advisor and strategist to the president of Harvard University.

Wilson has served on multiple boards, including Spelman College and Harvard University. He has received various awards for his work in higher education, including the 1998 Bennie Leadership Award presented by Morehouse College, Ebony magazine’s Power 100 Award in 2014, and the Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 100 Most Influential Atlantans Award in 2015.

Wilson and his wife, Carol Espy-Wilson, have three adult children: twin daughters, Ayana and Ashia, and son, John Silvanus Wilson, III.

John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 27, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.096

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/27/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Silvanus

Schools

Morehouse College

Harvard Divinity School

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

WIL93

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Perspective Is Worth A Hundred Points of IQ and Signal To Noise Ratio Is Everything

Bio Photo
Birth Date

8/16/1957

Birth Place Term
Favorite Food

Mushroom Risotto

Short Description

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. (1957- ) was an academic administrator for twenty eight years before becoming the eleventh president of Morehouse College.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The George Washington University

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Morehouse College

Harvard University School of Education

Harvard University

Kellogg National Fellowship Program

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Program

Educational Testing Service

Rockefeller Foundation

Favorite Color

Black

Matthew Holden, Jr.

Political scientist Matthew Holden, Jr. was born on September 12, 1931 in Mound Bayou, Mississippi to Estell Holden and Matthew Holden, Sr. He received his B.A. degree in political science from Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois in 1954 and served in the U.S. Army from 1955 to 1957. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois in 1956 and 1961.

Holden joined the faculty at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan in 1961. In 1963, he was hired at the University of Pittsburgh. During this period, Holden also worked at Resources for the Future, Inc. in Washington, D.C. He returned to the faculty at Wayne State University in 1966, where he remained until 1969. Holden was then hired by the Washington, D.C. based independent think tank, the Urban Institute, and later became professor of political science and public policy administration at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, serving in that capacity until 1981. In 1973, Holden published The Politics of the Black Nation, followed by The White Man’s Burden in 1974. From 1975 to 1977, Holden was appointed by Wisconsin governor Pat Lucey to serve on the Wisconsin Public Service Commission. Holden later became the first African American appointee of President Jimmy Carter’s, where he served on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission from 1977 to 1981. In 1981, Holden was named the Henry L. and Grace M. Doherty Professor Emeritus of Politics at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, and served there until 2002. He later became the Wepner Distinguished Professor in political science at the University of Illinois, Springfield in 2009.

From 1969 to 1972, Holden served on the Social Science Research Council board and held a part-time position on the President’s Air Quality Advisory board in 1972. In 1974, Holden served as chairman of the Elections Committee for the American Political Science Association; and, from 1998 to 1999, he served as president of the American Political Science Association.

Holden also received an honorary L.L.D. degree from Tuskegee University in 1985, and the Otto Wirth Award from the Roosevelt University Alumni Association in 1998. Two years later, he was awarded an honorary L.H.D. degree from the Virginia Theological Seminary. In 2012, Holden’s biography was entered into the U.S. Congressional Record.

Matthew Holden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 24, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.031

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/24/2019

Last Name

Holden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Northwestern University

Roosevelt University

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

University of Chicago

First Name

Matthew

Birth City, State, Country

Mound Bayou

HM ID

HOL24

Favorite Season

None

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Mississippi

Birth Date

9/12/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Jackson

Favorite Food

Corn

Short Description

Political scientist Matthew Holden, Jr. (1931 - ) was the professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1969 to 1981, and the Henry L. and Grace M. Doherty Professor Emeritus of Politics at the University of Virginia from 1981 to 2002.

Employment

University of Virginia

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wayne State University

University of Pittsburgh

University of Illinois at Springfield

Cornell University

Jackson State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Jeh V. Johnson

Professor and architect Jeh Vincent Johnson was born on July 8, 1931 in Nashville, Tennessee to Marie Antionette Burgette and Charles Spurgeon Johnson. He graduated from Pearl High School in Nashville, Tennessee in 1949. Johnson received his A.B. degree from Columbia University in New York in 1953 before being drafted to serve in the Counter Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army until 1954. He then earned his M.A. degree in architecture in 1958 from Columbia University.

In 1956, Johnson was hired by Paul R. Williams as an architect and designer. After graduate school, he received the William Kinne Fellows Fellowship and traveled throughout Europe studying architecture. He later joined the architectural firm of Adams and Woodbridge Architects in 1958. In 1962, Johnson co-founded Gindele and Johnson, along with William Gindele, where the focus of their work was on single and multi-family housing, community centers, churches, and schools. Two years later, Johnson accepted a faculty position in architecture and design at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. In 1967, he was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson to serve on the National Commission on Urban Problems. He also served as chair of the National Committee on Housing for the American Institute of Architects (AIA). In Detroit in 1971, Johnson co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects along with several fellow members of AIA; and, in 1977, he was elected to the AIA’s college of fellows. Johnson later served as partner at the architectural and design firm of LeGendre, Johnson, McNeil Architects from 1980 to 1990. Johnson’s many architectural projects include the former Poughkeepsie Day School building, the Susan Stein Shiva Theater, the Poughkeepsie Catharine Street Center and Library, and the ALANA Center on the Vassar College campus. He retired from Vassar College in 2001 after thirty-nine years of teaching.

In 1997, Johnson was awarded a special citation from the New York chapter of the AIA for his advocacy on behalf of equal opportunity and housing issues.

Johnson and his wife, Norma Edelin Johnson, have two adult children, Jeh Charles Johnson and Marguerite Marie Johnson.

Jeh Vincent Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 8, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.028

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/8/2019

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Vincent

Occupation
Schools

Columbia University

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

St. Vincent School

First Name

Jeh

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

JOH56

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Goodness Gracious

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/8/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Fresh Fruit

Short Description

Professor and architect Jeh Vincent Johnson (1931 - ) served as a professor of architecture at Vassar College for thirty-nine years and co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects in 1971.

Employment

Vassar College

LeGendre, Johnson, McNeil Architects

Gindele and Johnson

Adams and Woodbridge, Architects

Paul R. Williams

Favorite Color

Dark Blue

David L. Evans

Academic administrator and electrical engineer David L. Evans was born on December 27, 1939 in Wabash, Arkansas to Letha Canada and William Evans. Evans received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State College in 1962, and his M.S.E. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1966.

In 1962, Evans joined the Boeing Company as an electrical engineer in Seattle, Washington. For six months, Evans served as an electrical engineer for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company in Huntsville, Alabama in 1964, and as a researcher in electrical engineering at RCA Sarnoff Laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey during the summer of 1965. From December 1967 to June 1968, he was part of a team of engineers sent from the Federal Systems Division of IBM to work on the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) at The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation in Bethpage, New York. Grumman was the prime contractor for building the LEM, and IBM built the Launch Vehicle Digital Computer and the Launch Vehicle Data Adapter, all a part of the Apollo 11 vehicle that landed on the moon in July 1969. Also during his time at IBM, Evans started a college recruiting and placement service for young African American students which gained the attention of college administrators. In 1970, Harvard invited him to join the Harvard College Admissions Office, where he served as the assistant director of admissions and freshman proctor. Two years later, became associate director of admissions and senior advisor of freshmen. Evans was promoted to senior admissions officer at Harvard in 1975. In 1981, Evans joined the board of advisors of the Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations.

From 1979 to 1981, Evans was on the five person Human Relations Committee of the National Association of College Admissions Counselors. He joined the advisory committee for the Dorothy Danforth Compton Fellowships in International Affairs in 1981, and the advisory committee for the Frances Emily Hunt Trust Fund in 1983. Evans has also been a trustee of St. George’s School and Roxbury Latin School, on the community advisory board of WGBH in Boston, Massachusetts, and on the board of directors of Harvard Student Agencies.

In 1970, Evans was nominated as the Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer in the United States. He was chosen as the Outstanding Alumnus of the Year of Tennessee State University in 1972, and received the Distinguished Alumni Award given by the Association of Black Princeton Alumni in 1987. In 1990, he was named the 311th of President George H.W. Bush’s “Thousand Points of Light” for his community service work in Boston. Evans also received Harvard University’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ top prize for Administrative Service in 2002. A year later, the Harvard Black alumni endowed the David L. Evans Scholarship Fund, which has raised over one million dollars. Evans was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame in 2005.

David L. Evans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.097

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/28/2019

Last Name

Evans

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Organizations
First Name

David

HM ID

EVA11

Favorite Season

Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

The Optimist Sees The Doughnut, The Pessimist Sees The Hole, The Hungry Person Observing Only Wants To Eat The Roll

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Fish or Fowl

Short Description

Academic administrator and electrical engineer David L. Evans (1939 - ) joined the Harvard College admissions office in 1970 and was promoted to senior admissions officer in 1975.

Favorite Color

Blue

Robert Stepto

Professor Robert Stepto was born October 28, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois to Dr. Robert and Anna Stepto. He attended the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, graduating in 1962. He then attended Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where he earned his B.A. degree in English in 1966. Stepto went on to attend Stanford University, where he received his M.A. degree in English literature in 1968, and his Ph.D. degree in English and American literature in 1974.

From 1971 to 1974, Stepto was an assistant professor of English and American civilization at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He was hired by Yale University in 1974 as an assistant professor of English, American studies, and African American studies. Stepto served as the first director of graduate studies in the African American studies department from 1978 until 1981. In 1984, he became a tenured professor in the English, American studies, and African American studies departments. His focus areas were American and African American autobiography, fiction, poetry and visual arts since 1840. Stepto also began teaching summer classes at Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College in Ripton, Vermont in 1990. He released his first book, From Behind the Veil: A Study of Afro-American Narrative in 1979. In 1998, he published his memoir, Blue as the Lake: A Personal Geography. From 2005 to 2008, Stepto chaired the African American studies department at Yale University. He later published a series of essays in 2010 that analyze works ranging from Frederick Douglass to W. E. B. Du Bois and Toni Morrison, which he titled A Home Elsewhere: Reading African American Classics in the Age of Obama. Stepto retired from Yale University after forty-five years.

Over the years, Stepto received numerous awards for his writings, which included: Notable American Essay of 2001 and Pushcart Prize nomination for “Greyhound Kind of Mood,” published by the New England Review; Notable American Essay of 1997 for "Hyde Park," published by Callaloo; Notable American Essay of 1996 for "Black Piano," published by Callaloo; and Notable American Essay of 1995 for "Woodlawn," published by the New England Review. Other awards included the Bread Loaf School of English’s Frank and Eleanor Griffiths Chair Professor of English in 2007 and 2017, as well as its Robert Frost Chair Professor of English in 1995. In 2018, Yale University named Stepto its John M. Schiff Professor of English. Trinity College also presented Stepto with its 175th Anniversary Alumni Award in 1999, and the Alumni Medal for Excellence in 1986.

Stepto resides in Connecticut with his wife, Michele L. Stepto. They had two children: Rafael Stepto and the late Gabriel Stepto.

Robert Stepto was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 24, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.095

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/24/2019

Last Name

Stepto

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Burns

Occupation
Schools

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Trinity College

Stanford University

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

STE24

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

You Won't Believe This

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

10/28/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New Haven

Favorite Food

Corn

Short Description

Professor Robert Stepto (1945- ) served as an English and African American studies professor at Yale University since 1974.

Employment

Yale University

Williams College

Favorite Color

Blue

Cecilia A. Conrad

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad was born on January 4, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri to Dr. Emmett James Conrad and Eleanor Nelson Conrad. She moved with her family to Dallas, Texas after her father was hired at St. Paul’s Hospital. Conrad went on to receive her B.A. degree in economics from Wellesley College in 1976 and her Ph.D. degree in economics from Stanford University in 1982.

Conrad began her career in academia in 1981 when she was hired as an assistant professor of economics at Duke University. From there, she taught at Barnard College and then Pomona College as a Stedman-Sumner professor of economics. In 2002, Conrad was named California’s Carnegie Professor of the Year. Two years later, she became associate dean of Pomona College. During her time as a college administrator, Conrad continued to publish on the issue of race and gender on economic status. After taking a two year hiatus to serve as interim vice president and dean of the faculty at Scripps College, Conrad returned to Pomona College as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college. In 2013, Conrad left Pomona to join the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation as the vice president of the MacArthur Fellows Program. After two years at the foundation, Conrad became the managing director of both the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change. In 2019, Conrad became chief executive officer of Lever for Change, an affiliate of the MacArthur Foundation focused on high impact philanthropic opportunities.

Conrad served as editor of The Review of Black Political Economy and an associate editor of Feminist Economics. She has published articles on economics, liberal arts education, and philanthropy in peer-reviewed journals and popular media. While working at Pomona College, Conrad also directed the American Economic Association’s “Pipeline Mentoring Program,” matching students enrolled in a Ph.D. program in economics with mentors in the field. In 2007, Conrad became the president of the International Association for Feminist Economics. She is on the board of trustees at Muhlenberg College, Bryn Mawr College, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Conrad has received numerous awards for her work. Her co-edited collection of essays, African Americans in the US Economy, was named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2005. Three years later, she received the National Urban League’s 2008 Woman of Power Award. She has also received honorary doctorates from Claremont Graduate University and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Conrad and her husband, Llewellyn Miller, have one child: Conrad Miller.

Cecilia Conrad was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/12/2019

Last Name

Conrad

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A

Schools

Wellesley College

Stanford Graduate School of Business

First Name

Cecilia

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

CON08

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/4/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad (1955 - ) served as managing director of the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change before becoming chief executive officer of Lever for Change.

Employment

Pomona College

Scripps College

American Economic Association

Barnard College, Columbia University

Duke University

The Review of Black Political Economy

Feminist Economics

MacArthur Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

David Wilson

College president and academic administrator David Wilson was born on November 2, 1954 in McKinley, Alabama to Minnie and Henry Wilson. He graduated from Marengo County Training School in Thomaston, Alabama and went on to attend the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama where he received his B.S. degree and M.Ed. degree in 1977 and 1979. He later received another M.Ed. degree and his Ed.D. degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1984 and 1987.

In 1984, Wilson served as director of the Office of Minority Programs and as a program officer at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. He then became a Woodrow Wilson Foundation Administrative Fellow, serving as an executive assistant to the vice president for business affairs and finance at Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky. After graduate school, Wilson became associate provost at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and was later promoted to assistant provost in 1990. In 1995, Wilson became the first African American vice president for university outreach and associate provost at Auburn University. He was also the first African American to hold a senior administrative appointment at a predominantly white university in the State of Alabama. In 2006, Wilson was hired as the chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges, as the first person in Wisconsin to serve as chancellor of two statewide institutions simultaneously. In 2010, Wilson was appointed the tenth president of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. In 2013, Wilson helped launch Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication. He also oversaw the completion of the University’s Earl G. Graves School of Business and Management Building in 2016. In 2018, Wilson announced Morgan State University’s collaboration with The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Wilson to serve on the President’s Board of Advisors on HBCUs. Wilson also served on the Hall of Records Commission, the Maryland Longitudinal Data System Center Governing Board, Greater Baltimore Committee, United Way of Central Maryland, Inc., the Northeast Maryland Higher Education Advisory Board, the Student Transfer Advisory Committee, the Association of American Colleges and Universities; and, in 2018, Wilson was elected to the board of directors for the Lumina Foundation.

Wilson is the recipient of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation National Fellowship and was named one of the nation’s top 100 leaders in higher education by the American Association of Higher Education in 1998. In 2010, the reading room at UW Center for Civic Engagement at UW-Marathon County was named in his honor. He was also selected as one of The Daily Record newspaper’s Influential Marylanders and was honored by the University of Alabama with an award for outstanding leadership in engaged scholarship in 2011. In 2018, Wilson received the First Citizen Award by the Maryland Senate.

Wilson has one son, Nyere.

David Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Tuskegee University

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Uniontown Negro Elementary School

Amelia L. Johnson High School

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

McKinley

HM ID

WIL89

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Beach

Favorite Quote

In the Vernacular

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

11/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

College president and academic administrator David Wilson (1954 - ) was chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges, before serving as the tenth president of Morgan State University.

Employment

Kentucky State University

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Auburn University

University of Wisconsin-Extension

Morgan State University

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Rutgers University

Favorite Color

Blue

Louis E. Wilson

Professor Louis E. Wilson was born on March 1, 1939 in Longview, Texas. Wilson earned his B.A. degree from California State University. He went on to receive his M.A. degree and Ph.D. degree in 1980 from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Wilson joined the faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder in 1980. During his term, he was also a senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana, Legon. In 1989, he was named chair of the Afro-American and African Studies Department at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. There, he also served as associate professor, and later was appointed professor of African and African American history. In 1991, Wilson authored The Krobo People of Ghana to 1892: A Political and Social History and later co-authored the textbooks, America Will Be: Houghton Mifflin Social Studies in 1997, and This Is My Country. In 1999, Wilson served as a senior Fulbright history professor and researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He then co-authored The Americans: Reconstruction Through the 20th Century and The Americans in 2002. In 2012, Wilson was a co-author for the History Channel History Education and History Classroom programs in partnership with textbook publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He was also the author of Genealogical and Militia Data on Blacks, Indians, and Mustees from Military American Revolutionary War Records in 2003, and a book entitled Forgotten Patriots: African Americans and Native Americans in the American Revolution from Rhode Island. In 2017, Wilson was named professor and chair of the Africana studies department at Smith College. The following year, The Louis Wilson collection of maps of Africa from 1665 to 1906, were housed in the Five College Archives and Manuscript Collection at Smith College.

Wilson served as a visiting professor of American Studies at the University of Hamburg in Germany. He was also a member of the board of trustees of the Museum of African American History in Boston, Massachusetts. Wilson received The Blackwell Fellowship and Prize as Outstanding Black New England Scholar from the American Library Association in 1991.

Louis E. Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 7, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.227

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/07/2018

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Edward

Organizations
First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Long View

HM ID

WIL88

Favorite Season

N/A

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Different Places

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/1/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

BBQ

Short Description

Professor Louis E. Wilson (1939- ) served as professor and chair of the Africana studies department at Smith College and authored The Krobo People of Ghana to 1892.

Favorite Color

Blue

Paula Giddings

Professor Paula Giddings was born on November 16, 1947 in Yonkers, New York to Virginia Iola Stokes and Curtis Gulliver Giddings. She received her B.A. degree in English from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1969, where she served as editor of the university’s literary magazine, The Promethean.

In 1969, Giddings worked as an editorial assistant for Random House and later as a copy editor until 1972. She then became an associate book editor for the Howard University Press. Giddings then moved to Paris, France in 1975 where she served as the Paris bureau chief for Encore America/Worldwide News. In 1977, she was transferred to the New York office and served as an associate editor until 1979. Giddings published her first book, When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America, in 1984. The following year, she served as a contributing editor and book review editor for Essence magazine. She then became a distinguished United Negro College Fund (UNCF) scholar at Spelman College. In 1988, she published In Search of Sisterhood, and subsequently joined the faculty of Douglass College at Rutgers University where she held the the Blanche, Edith, and Irving Laurie Chair in Women's Studies from 1989 to 1991. Giddings also served as a visiting professor at Princeton University and Duke University. In 2001, Giddings joined Smith College as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor of Africana Studies. She also served as the editor of Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism a peer-reviewed feminist, interdisciplinary journal. She then became Smith College department chair and honors thesis advisor for the department of Africana studies. In 2002, she edited Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race 1866-2002; and, in 2008, she published Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Giddings retired from Smith College in 2017.

Giddings has also written extensively on international and national issues and has been published by the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), The Nation, and Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, among other publications.

In 1982, she received a Ford Foundation Grant; and, in 1985, Giddings was the recipient of the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. That same year, she received the Alumni Award from Howard University; and, the following year, Giddings won the Westchester Black Women’s Political Caucus Award and the Building Brick Award from the New York Urban League. In 1990, she received the Anna Julia Cooper Award from Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, and an honorary doctorate degree in humane letters from Bennett College. In 2008, her book Ida, A Sword Among Lions won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award.

Paula Giddings was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 8, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.226

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/8/2018

Last Name

Giddings

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Yonkers

HM ID

PAU01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Short Description

Professor Paula Giddings (1947- ) served as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita of Africana Studies at Smith College and authored When and Where I Enter, In Search of Sisterhood, and Ida, A Sword Among Lions.

Favorite Color

Blue

Thomas A. Parham

College president and academic administrator Thomas A. Parham was born on October 2, 1954 in Queens, New York to William and Sadie Parham. In 1970, he graduated from Daniel Murphy High School, in Los Angeles, California. He went on to earn his B.A. degree in social ecology in 1977 from University of California Irvine, and his M.A. degree in counseling psychology in 1978 from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1982, Parham received his Ph.D. degree in counseling psychology from Southern Illinois University, in Carbondale, Illinois.

Parham served as assistant professor at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, from 1982 to 1985. He joined the faculty at the University of California Irvine in 1985 and held several positions over thirty-three years including: assistant vice chancellor for counseling and health services, counseling center director, career and life planning center director, and vice chancellor for student affairs. In 1986, he was appointed to the City of Irvine’s Human Relations Committee, and helped draft the city’s first human rights ordinance, which was passed by the city council. He also served as chair of UCI’s Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium for ten years. Parham was appointed the eleventh president of California State University Dominguez Hills in 2018.

Parham has served as a licensed psychologist for more than thirty-five years as a scholar and practitioner, with a research focus in the area of psychological negrescence, African psychology, and multicultural counseling. In addition to writing over forty-five journal articles and/or book chapters, he authored Psychological Storms: The African American Struggle for Identity in 1997 and Counseling Persons of African Descent: Raising the Bar of Practitioner Competence in 2002. He co-authored Culturally Adaptive Counseling Skills: Demonstrations of Evidence-Based Practices in 2011 and The Psychology of Blacks: Centering Our Perspectives in the African Consciousness in 2011.

Parham, an alumnus of the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program, has fellow status in divisions seventeen and forty-five of the APA and also with the American Counseling Association. He has held the title of distinguished psychologist in the Association of Black Psychologists. Parham served as president of the National Association of Black Psychologists and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (an ACA division). He served on the editorial board for the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development for five years, completed a term on the editorial board of the Journal of Counseling and Development, and served as an ad hoc reviewer for the Journal of Black Psychology. Parham has also served as a treating clinician for the NFL substance abuse program.

He was the recipient of the 2018 Illustrious Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program.

Thomas A. Parham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 14, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/14/2018

Last Name

Parham

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Organizations
First Name

Thomas

Birth City, State, Country

St. Albans, Queens

HM ID

PAR13

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Life at it's Best is a Creative Synthesis

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

College president and academic administrator Thomas A. Parham (1954- ) served as vice chancellor at University of California, Irvine, before serving as president of California State University, Dominguez Hills.

Favorite Color

Blue