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Audrey M. Edmonson

Audrey M. Edmonson was born on January 27, 1953 in Miami, Florida. She graduated from Miami Jackson Senior High School in Miami, Florida in 1971. Edmonson earned her A.A. degree in psychology from Miami Dade College in 1991, and her B.A. degree in psychology from Florida International University in 1994. Edmonson received her dual M.S. degree in marriage family therapy and mental health counseling from Barry University in 1997.

In 1997, she was elected as a councilperson to the Village of El Portal City Council in Florida. In 1999, she was elected mayor of the Village of El Portal, Florida and became the city’s second African American mayor. During the same year, Edmonson began working as a trust specialist in the Miami Dade Public School system. Edmonson was re-elected three successive terms and became the municipality's first mayor to be elected by residents rather than by the members of the Village Council. Under her leadership, the Village hired its first Village Manager. In 2005, when she was elected as commissioner for the 3rd District on the Miami-Dade County Commission. She was re-elected three more times and in 2010 and 2016, she was elected to serve as vice chair. In 2018, Edmonson was elected to serve as president of the Miami-Dade County Commission.

Edmonson was chairwoman of the Housing and Social Services Committee and the Building Safer Neighborhoods Sub-Committee. She also served as vice chairwoman of the Transportation and Public Works Committee and the Chairman’s Policy Council, and as a member of the Youth Crime Task Force. She served as the vice chairwoman of the Miami Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) Board of Directors. Edmonson was appointed to the Miami-Dade County HIV/AIDS “Getting to Zero” Task Force and served as Chairwoman of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) I-395 Signature Bridge-Aesthetic Steering Committee. She also serves on the Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust and the Public Health Trust nominating councils, the Public Health Trust/Miami-Dade Annual Operating Agreement Committee, the Jackson Health System Obligation Bond Citizens’ Advisory Committee and the County Advisory Task Force for the Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program Planning and Implementation Project which is referred locally as Project PEACE: People Engaged and Advocating for Community Empowerment. Vice Chairwoman Edmonson serves as the Vice Chair of the International Trade Consortium Board.

In addition to her work as a city commissioner, Edmonson was also involved in many different community organizations. She was a member of the Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc. and the Links, Incorporated. She also helped create the Miami Children’s Initiative in 2006, where she served as a board member. Edmonson served as a board member for the Frost Science Museum, the JMH Citizen’s Advisory Board, and the JMH Nominating Committee. Edmonson was recognized for her community work by South Florida Magazine, which named her one of “South Florida’s 50 Most Powerful Black Professionals.”

Edmonson has two children, Dr. Ebony Nicole Dunn and Louis Ivory Edmonson and three grandchildren.

Audrey M. Edmonson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 10, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.035

Sex

Female

Interview Date

03/10/2017

Last Name

Edmonson

Maker Category
Schools

Barry University

Florida International University

Miami Dade College

Miami Jackson Senior High School

Georgia Jones-Ayers Middle School

Lenora Braynon Smith Elementary School

Liberty City Elementary School

First Name

Audrey

Birth City, State, Country

Miami

HM ID

EDM05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

It's Not That You Can't Do Something It's How You Can Get It Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

1/27/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Snapper

Short Description

Mayor and city commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson (1953 - ) was mayor of the Village of El Portal for six years before serving the Miami Dade Board of Commissioners for twelve years.

Employment

Miami Dade County

Village of El Portal

Miami Dade Schools

AT Services

Eastern Airlines

New Horizons Community Mental Health Center

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Audrey M. Edmonson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Audrey M. Edmonson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about her mother's family in Nassau, Bahamas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about her mother's marriages

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Audrey M. Edmonson remembers her early neighborhood of Liberty City in Miami, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about attending church and completing chores on the weekends

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Audrey M. Edmonson lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Audrey M. Edmonson remembers transferring between elementary schools in Miami, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls moving from Liberty City to a majority white neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Audrey M. Edmonson remembers attending Allapattah Junior High School in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls staging a sit-in to integrate her high school cheerleading team

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her high school extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls becoming one of the first African American flight attendants at Eastern Air Lines

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes the process to become a flight attendant

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls her experiences with racism as a flight attendant, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls her experiences with racism as a flight attendant, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about her career at Eastern Air Lines

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about the social dynamics of being a flight attendant

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Audrey M. Edmonson remembers meeting her former husband, Louis Edmonson

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her children

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about the changes in reglations for a flight attendant at Eastern Air Lines

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Audrey M. Edmonson recalls starting her cleaning company, AT Services

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about adopting her second child, Louis Ivory Edmonson

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her college education

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Audrey M. Edmonson talks about her first involvement in political campaigns

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Audrey M. Edmonson describes her work with the New Horizons Community Mental Health Center in Miami, Florida

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Audrey M. Edmonson recalls staging a sit-in to integrate her high school cheerleading team
Audrey M. Edmonson describes the process to become a flight attendant
Transcript
So, you say it was because of Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] that they weren't allowed to do these things?$$No. It was because of Dr. King that we finally did something about this at Miami Edison High School [Miami Edison Senior High School, Miami, Florida]. We--$$This is after you moved to that school?$$Yeah. Only--I was at Edison for a year.$$Okay.$$Ninth grade.$$Okay.$$I'm in ninth grade now.$$Okay. Got it.$$So, I'm growing up a little bit.$$That's fine.$$(Laughter) So, what we did--$$And, this is the predominately white school--$$Yes.$$--where they're not allowing the girls to--$$Correct.$$--to participate.$$The boys were allowed to play in the sports.$$Okay.$$The girls were allowed to play sports. But, they did not choose any blacks who were--and we had a lot that went out for the cheerleaders and the, the Raiderettes, which are the swingettes or whatever you call them. And, it was another group of girls. So, we, we had to meet, they--how, I don't know how we pulled this off, you know, we were kids. We, it was secretly going out, a meeting was gonna be, and they gave us the address. And, I remember the, the girl's last name was White [ph.]. And, we went over to her home that night, and the word was, "Don't come unless you bring your parents with you." And, I was afraid but I knew I wanted to go to this meeting. So, I finally approached my mom [Florence Smith Downs] and I said, "Mom, they gonna have a meeting at a house tonight" (laughter). I say, "And, they say we can't come unless we bring our parents." And, she asked me, what was it about? And, I told her, you know, that--they didn't put any young ladies on the cheerleader squad, they didn't put any--and she says, "And, you're gonna meet over there about that?" She said, "That can be trouble." And, I said, "I know, but I wanna go. And, I can't go unless you go." She said no more. We got in the car later on that evening and we drove over there and I was shocked. She gave me my permission to do a sit-in. And, we did a sit-in the next day and it took the school by surprise. And, the media was there. So, they placed one, one young lady. They didn't have another, no type of competitive thing. They placed one young lady on the cheerleaders, one on the Raiderettes and one on the, the other group.$$So it worked.$$It worked. And, we sat there on the floor quietly. And, I remember (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) For how long?$$--the, the young lady's father was a doctor, and he's the one that really facilitated everything. And, he told us, no matter what, just sit there, don't open our mouths, and do not use any profane language, don't talk back, just sit there. And, that what we did.$$Do you remember how long you sat there?$$We had to have sat there for at least two hours because I think the superintendent, everybody came at--to the school. So, it was a big thing. It was in the news.$$They couldn't believe you were doing that.$$They couldn't believe we did that.$$Even though these things were happening across the country--$$And, we sat there and we blocked the office door, right in the hallway.$$And, how many of you were there?$$It had to be a good--because, now when we were at the house, it was only about thirty or forty of us. But, somehow when we did the sit-in, it had to have been a good fifty, sixty, I mean, it was triple the amount of us that were at the house.$$And, was everybody black?$$Um-hm, all black. I think the word got around. And, if you were black you came, and you sat.$$Were you afraid?$$No. I enjoyed it. You know, I was young. You know, nothing could happen to me. I was invincible.$Was that part of the interview process [for Eastern Air Lines], just your comfort on a plane?$$That could've been because that was discussed. They gave me a test. I took the test. That was, you know, the test I took, I couldn't believe the test, you know, it was, "Would you rather be a bishop or, or a cardinal?" And, you know, I remember things like that on this test that I took. And, I just took the test and then my last interview was before a panel and as they--at the end one of them said, "Audrey [HistoryMaker Audrey M. Edmonson], we think we're gonna take you on." And, back then, the things they did they wouldn't dare to now. Because the first interview I had to walk from one side of the room to the other side. So, they could see me walk. And, they asked me to stoop down. But, I did remember from home ec [home economics], you never bend (laughter). So, I did do it at the knees (laughter). So, I did remember some things.$$So, so it was, because, I mean, the original stewardesses as we, you know, see in movies and everything are (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Skinny.$$--skinny, fashionable--$$They weighed us every time we came in.$$Right. They did?$$Yeah. They had the scale right to the door.$$And, what did you have to (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And, if you were on probation, you got weighed every trip.$$Why would you be on probation?$$Because you had a six months probationary period when you first started out.$$And, what did you have to weigh (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) They could just let you go for no reason.$$What was the weight requirement?$$When I started, I was 5'7". I had to keep my weight under 126. I could not go over 126 pounds.$$And, were you, was that easy or difficult for you (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) It was difficult. Because when they hired me I was 132 pounds. And, she asked me if I thought I could lose the weight by that very last interview. I wanted that job. I even--I used to even bite my nails. I stopped biting my nails. I lost the weight, and I was about 124 at that last interview.$$Just in the process of the interview. And, this is across what period of time?$$About a three month period.$$So, they needed, you needed to get to the 126 in order for them to hire you?$$Um-hm. I guess they wanted to see how motivated I was. Or, how much motivation I had. And, I had it.$$And, at this time it didn't, it didn't bother you that there were these kinds of requirements?$$No. Well, I didn't know any better. I even had to dye my hair because on my first interview, I think it was my first and second interview, I wore an Afro wig. So, at that time, and you'll see that (laughter), when you look at my pictures, at one point in time I was blonde (laughter). My hair was blonde underneath. So, they had no idea. So, when I came to, I think the second interview, I told her, I says, "Now, my hair is kind of blonde-ish." And, she was surprised 'cause she thought the wig was my hair. She says, "Well, what do you mean, blonde-ish?" And, I kind of did that little number to her. And, she says, "Well, are you willing to dye it black?" (Laughter) And I said, I said, "Yes, I'll dye it." I wanted this job. And, she says, "Now, what if we don't hire you? What if they decide they're not gonna hire you in the next interview?" I says, "Well, that's okay, I'll just dye it back blonde," (laughter). And, she gave a little chuckle and--$$So, for the third interview, you'd lost the weight, dyed you hair (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Third interview, lost the weight, stopped biting my nails, and dyed my hair.$$And, how were you wearing it? 'Cause now, you're not having on an Afro wig, what style are you wearing it?$$Shorter Afro.$$Okay. So, it was--so, they didn't mind the Afro?$$No. They did mind the Afros. Let me tell you what they did. As a matter of fact, in the class that I was in there were, we had three blacks. One was really not in the class, she was in the class ahead of us but she got sick so she finished out in our class. But, there were, we had two blacks in my class that went through. And, they brought us from all over the country. Both of us had Afros. For some reason they kind of liked her Afro. They didn't like mine. So, at the end of the class when they see that they're actually going to graduate you, they sent all of us to the, the beauty parlor. So, I'm sitting up there, I'm telling the girl how I want my hair. She says, "But, that's not what it says on the paper." And, this is, we were the first class that they actually sent to a black salon. They had been sending (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, you're at a black salon, okay.$$--the black girls to the white salons. We were the first. They sent us to Supreme Wig and Beauty Supply [sic. Supreme Wig and Beauty Salon, Miami, Florida]. And, the girl stands there, and she's looking at it (laughter), she says, "Well, this is not what I'm supposed to do." I said, "What do you mean, this is not what you're supposed to be?" She says, "I'm supposed to relax your hair and cut it into a bob." And, that's what she did. She put a relaxer on my head.$$Had you ever had a relaxer?$$Yeah, I did have a relaxer back when I was in high school. I took up cosmetology. So, I played around--that's how I got the blonde hair, just playing around with my hair.$$So, again, you wanted the job. So, you're like--$$Yeah.$$I'll do it.$$I did it.

Gloria Scott

Gloria Dean Randle Scott was the eleventh president of Bennett College located in Greensboro, North Carolina. She was the second female chief administrator at Bennett College. Scott was born on April 14, 1938 in Houston, Texas to Juanita and Freeman Randle. She attended Blackshear Elementary School and Jack Yates Secondary School where she graduated from in 1955. A scholarship fund afforded Scott the opportunity to attend Indiana University. She received her B.A. degree and M.A. degree in zoology in 1959 and 1960, respectively, and her Ph.D. in higher education in 1965.

In 1961, Scott’s career began as a research associate in genetics and embryology at Indiana University Institution for Psychiatric Research. During this time, she worked as a biology instructor at Marion College until 1965, making her the first African American instructor at a predominately white college in Indianapolis, Indiana at the time. Scott held the positions as Dean of Students and Deputy Director of Upward Bound at Knoxville College in 1965 and as the Special Assistant to the President and Educational Research Planning Director at North Carolina A&T University in 1967. During her ten year tenure, Scott continued to make history by becoming the first African American National President of the Girl Scouts in 1975. She then served as the Institutional Research Planning Director at Texas Southern University for a year before becoming Vice President at Clark College in Atlanta in 1977.

After ten years at Clark College, Scott became the President of Bennett College in 1987, thus fulfilling her life’s mission to educate African American women.

Scott is the recipient of three honorary doctorate degrees. She has been featured in several publications such as Who’s Who Among American Women, Famous Texas Women and Essence magazine.

Scott is married to Dr. Will B. Scott, a professor of sociology.

Scott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 8, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/8/2007

Last Name

Scott

Maker Category
Middle Name

Dean Randle

Occupation
Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

Jack Yates High School

Indiana University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

SCO05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any. Especially teens.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Any. Especially teens.
Special Interest: Women's groups, education, girl scouts, defense groups, religious groups, and social action groups,.

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

We Must Do And Not Just Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

4/14/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Corpus Christi

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Peach Cobbler

Short Description

College president Gloria Scott (1938 - ) was the president of Benedict College and was the first African American national president of the Girl Scouts of America.

Employment

Indiana University Institute for Psychiatric Research

Marian College

Knoxville College

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Texas Southern University

Clark College

Bennett College

Girl Scouts USA

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Scott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about her older siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott talks about her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her younger sister

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls attending kindergarten at the Fourth Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers enrolling at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her father's interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers her baptism

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her experiences of color discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers her paper route

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott remembers her experiences as a Girl Scout

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott describes her aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott remembers attending the prom at Jack Yates Senior High School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers Bernie Harper

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her decision to attend Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers William S. Holland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls her arrival at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her studies at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the delay of her marriage license

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her early career in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls being hired as a dean at Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott recalls her civil rights activism with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes Stokely Carmichael's visit to Knoxville College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about school desegregation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls the accreditation of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott recalls working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her vice presidency of Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott talks about Johnnetta B. Cole and Niara Sudarkasa

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about the accreditation of historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers promoting diversity in Girl Scouting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her presidency of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls leading the National Urban League's education committee

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her conflict with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott talks about the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott talks about her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls the St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas
Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts
Transcript
So now we're in elementary school [Blackshear Elementary School, Houston, Texas].$$Okay. Um-hm.$$What type of student were you?$$Um-hm.$$Well I should say what type of child were you? We know you were a good student.$$Um-hm. Well, I really was a child, I guess that you would probably call square, because, and then again, the early adults to whom I was exposed, starting I guess with kindergarten and my parents [Juanita Bell Randle and Freeman Randle] and the people around us, all were about having you do right and I attributed a lot of my development as the person to my church. I said, I was for a while, I was the only person in my house who went to church. This is before my sister [Greta Randle] and brother [Billy Randle] came back and before the other children were born, I was staying alone with my parents. And Rose Hill [Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church, Houston, Texas] was right across the street and as later life, I would describe that I was a high energy child, I used up a lot of peoples energies, I mean I was like a sponge and I was attracted to the church and I, I said it many days, the church probably helped keep me out of a lot of trouble, because I would, I would go over--this is the truth and this sounds weird to people when they say, when I say this. I think on Monday night may- maybe they had prayer meeting, I would go over and sit in the back of the church for prayer meeting. On Tuesday night, they had something else, I would go over. On Wednesday night they had Christian benevolence meeting. Now, I learned probably as a very young girl what a benevolence fund was, how people in the church would put their money together so that when people needed loans and things, benevolence and I, 'cause I asked, what the word was, I, I was inquisitive like that. If there was something I didn't really know, I'd ask. And Mr. Milligan [ph.], the husband of the ma- of the woman I was telling who'd take--I would go home with them on Sundays he worked for the post office, he was the person in charge of that, then I'd go to choir rehearsal and then Sunday school teacher, teachers' meeting on Friday night, I would go over and sit and listen. So, the church, a lot of that and then the people there would take us on field trips and we always had six weeks of summer bible school, you know, it isn't like now days, it's two days or whatever? We would have six weeks and it was great for the children, because we had nothing else really to do. And so that kind of helped to shape me to be the kind of person that I was and to really learn. And when I was seven, we were practicing for the Easter play. We had Easter, churches, you know, used to have Easter programs on Easter Sunday, and we were doing the, going to reenact the crucifixion and so we were practicing on Friday evening, Good Friday before Sunday and this, the girls were playing Mary Magdalene and all the others and the boy had the cross on his shoulder and, you know, the--the various things and so we were going down the aisle and so the girls were crying and we were, and so our, our director said, "Okay, you all can stop, that was good, we're all ready for Sunday." And so I remember sitting down and I was crying, I sat in the chair and I was crying, and so she came over she said, "Gloria [HistoryMaker Gloria Scott], you can stop crying now. It's all over, it's good. You all are doing good," and I said to her, "Did they really kill him just because he was doing good?" And she said, in later years, again as an adult, she said, that you can't imagine, "I said, 'What, what--if, I said, yes?'" And I said, "Well, if that's the truth, I want to be like him and I want to be a Christian, so I want to be baptized Sunday." They always baptize on Easter Sunday, and she told us later, she said, "I said, 'Oh girl, unh-uh, your mama, no you can't just decide you wanna be baptized. No you--I have to go and ask.'" I said, "Well, will you go and ask my mother?" She said, "I have to go and ask your mother." Well, we lived right across the street. So we went over to my house and again at this time my mother was not in church, nobody in my family was in church so she told my mother that I had said that I wanted to be baptized. So my mother said, "Girl, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, I wanna be like Jesus." And she said, "Oh, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, yes I do, I do want to be like Jesus, I want to do good; I want to do the right things." So eventually she relinquished and so she had to get a dress, get a white dress for me for Sunday to be baptized. So I was baptized on Sund- Easter Sunday morning, and nobody in my family was there.$Now, s- stepping out of the academic arena--$$Um-hm.$$--we need to talk a little bit about your involvement with the Girl Scouts [Girl Scouts of the United States of America].$$All right, sure. I was a girl, Girl Scout here in Houston [Texas] in San Jacinto Girl Scout Council and I think a little bit earlier I told you about that, about going to Oklahoma and all that. So, when I went away to college [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana] I was not involved and at my job at Knoxville [Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee] as dean of students, at that time that was in 1965, a Dr. Jeanne L. Noble who was on the board of Girl Scouts, national board, who was one of my mentors, she had been president of Delta Sigma Theta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] when I was the second vice president and they had gotten Girl Scouting to try out a new program, called Campus Gold, to try to look at young women who had gone, who'd graduated and had gone to college who were Girl Scouts and to see could we not get them as volunteers to learn to be troop leaders and so forth. And so, she called up and ha- had the Girl Scouts ask me if I would have a Campus Gold group on Knoxville's campus and we did. So we created that Girl Scout group and we sponsored three troops for girls, Brownies, Juniors and ca- two, two Brownies and a Junior troop in the low income neighborhood right around Knoxville College. And it was a fantastic thing for the college girls as well as the students so. And in Girl Scouting once you start doing something as a volunteer, they keep, you know they keep rolling over and so, the next thing I knew I was asked to serve on a regional committee and that to help select kids for international opportunities, and I said I would do that because also, I wanted to always try to make sure that things are equal and the girls, black girls had a acqu- equal access to those. So I served on that group and then we moved to North Carolina to Greensboro at A&T [Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University], and while I, when I went there, Girl Scouting was just undergoing kind of a realignment like it's doing right now nationally, and council coverage and a new council had been created and I was asked to serve on a committee to help set up the personnel policies and all for that council and to help them recruit the first executive director. So I did and I did another volunteer job.