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Katherine Bennett

Women’s sports pioneer and educator Katherine Howard Bennett was born on October 17, 1922 in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. She was raised by a single mother who worked as a sorter and mender in a laundry. In 1940, Bennett earned her high school diploma from P.W. Moore High School, where she was a member of the debate team, band and drama club.

From 1940 until 1944, Bennett attended North Carolina A & T University where she encountered her first female athlete. Intrigued by the world of sports she immersed herself in athletics. Bennett, along with twins Mable and Inez Scott, were A & T’s first majorette team. She was also a member of the drama club, band, debate team, volleyball, tennis and gymnastics teams. Bennett also joined the Women’s Athletic Association and participated in “National Sports Day,” a weekend of sports for black, female college students. In 1944, Bennett earned her B.S. degree in English and health & physical education. She later returned to school, receiving her master’s degree in health education in 1947 from New York University and earning her doctorate in 1977 in physical education from Virginia Polytechnic University.

After earning her B.A. degree, Bennett taught physical education at Rosenwald School in South Mills, North Carolina. From 1947 until 1953, she worked as a health and physical education professor at Hampton Institute. In addition to teaching, Bennett also coordinated the women’s athletics program. In 1953, her husband was hired as the head football coach at Virginia State University; she followed him and began working as a professor of health and physical education. That same year Bennett created and established the Officiating Board and Women’s Officials at VSU. In the late 1950s, Bennett created guidelines that would ultimately lead to incorporating women’s athletics into to the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association or CIAA. In 1968, Bennett coached the first competitive women’s basketball team at VSU, and in 1975 she directed the first CIAA women’s basketball tournament at Virginia State. In 1977, Bennett was appointed chairperson of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation at VSU, the first woman to hold this post. That same year, Bennett became the first coordinator for women’s sports at Virginia State. In 1989 she was inducted in the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. Bennett retired from Virginia State in 1992.

Bennett passed away on December 20, 2009 at age 87.

Accession Number

A2004.200

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/13/2004

Last Name

Bennett

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Howard

Schools

P.W. Moore High School

Northeastern High School

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Katherine

Birth City, State, Country

Elizabeth City

HM ID

BEN03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

10/17/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Ettrick

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

12/20/2009

Short Description

Academic administrator and college basketball coach Katherine Bennett (1922 - 2009 ) was a pioneer in women’s athletics, coaching the first competitive women’s basketball game, integrating women’s athletics into the CIAA and becoming the first female chair of the department. She was recognized by the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame for her accomplishments in women's sports.

Employment

Rosenwald School - South Mills, North Carolina

Hampton Institute

Virginia State University

Favorite Color

Pink, Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Katherine Bennett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett talks about living with her extended family while growing up in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes childhood memories from Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett recalls her experiences at Banks Street Elementary School in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett talks about attending St. Stephen Missionary Baptist Church in Elizabeth City, North Carolina as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Katherine Bennett recalls her experiences attending P.W. Moore High School in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Katherine Bennett describes her experiences at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett describes her favorite extracurricular activities from high school and college

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett talks about playing sports at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett talks about her first jobs after graduating from Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina in 1944

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett talks about how she met her husband, HistoryMaker William Maurice Bennett

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes her tenure working in the physical education department at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett talks about joining the physical education department at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett describes her experiences as a referee and teacher at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett recalls the results of the implementation of Title IX on women's sports, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett recalls the results of the implementation of Title IX on women's sports, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett talks about the increase in popularity of women's sports after Title IX

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett describes the leadership roles she took later in her career at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett talks about whether Title IX has caused funding issues in college athletic departments

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett reflects on the success of Title IX

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes her proudest achievements as a professor at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett talks about achieving an Ed.D. at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about the National Sports Day Association

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett describes her involvement with cotillions for the Beaux-Twenty club in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett shares her thoughts about the growth of professional sports for women

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett describes her tenure as head coach of the women's basketball team at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett talks about being inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association Hall of Fame

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett reflects on the progress of women's sports

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about running the majorette squad at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Katherine Bennett talks about achieving an Ed.D. at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia
Katherine Bennett talks about playing sports at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina
Transcript
In 1977 you also got your doctorate degree, we didn't talk about that.$$Yes, right.$$Your Ph.D. [sic. Ed.D], why did you decide to do that?$$I got mad with the chairman of the department [of health, physical education and recreation, Virginia State College; Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia], we had an argument and I said, "You can have this department," I said, "you know what, I don't have to stay here." We had some guy who came in and we had disagreed on a lot of things, and I didn't think he was competent, and in fact I found out he was not really--I think he may have had the background, but he didn't know how to deal with us, and I said I don't have to deal with this. My husband [HistoryMaker William Maurice Bennett] said, "I think you need to take a year off or something," and I said, "Well, I'm going to go to grad school and get my doctorate." There was a guy that was at Virginia Tech [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia] who was a friend of my husband's, and he and my husband used to room together even though segregation was still in effect. I can't think of this guy's name now who was chairman of the department of health and physical education at Virginia Tech. He used to say--so my husband called him and he said, yeah I need somebody here, tell her to send me her resume and all that and come on up. So I immediately got tired, and the chairman who was here, we had an argument, and I said "You can have this job," and I went on and applied, and Virginia Tech gave me a stipend, and I got a scholarship from the southern association for education, and I went on up to Virginia Tech. And came out and got my doctorate and came on out here in two years, and I came on back, and next thing I know I was chairman of the department (laughter).$When you were in college [Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina], you had mentioned earlier that you saw all of these sports and activities for women and that's how you decided you wanted to be a physical education teacher.$$Well, we had what they called in our school was called a WAA--Women's Athletic Association, which had gotten started and I used to be in that. They had groups coming in from all colleges. All the colleges had--not all of them but several of them like Virginia State [College; Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia] was part of it and Hampton Institute [Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia]--it was called Hampton Institute then and they had what they called the WAA--Women's Athletic Association because they didn't have sports for women, that was the only thing that we had. So that started then and so when I got there I was active in that.$$So what did the WAA offer to women?$$Sports, so that you could play, and then we had all the other colleges that were part of it we had women's sports association meeting and it rotated from college to college.$$And what sports did you play in college?$$Volleyball, and tennis, and gymnastics.$$Did you enjoy those sports?$$Oh yeah, and I think you'll see in one of those pictures over there where I'm sitting on a boy's shoulders, that was in the gymnastics squad.$$What did your mother [Annie Howard] and your grandmother [Annie Howard] think back home?$$Oh they thought--well first place when they saw my picture--we had a paper called the [Norfolk] Journal and Guide [New Journal and Guide]. You ever heard of it? The Journal and Guide was a black paper that was put out, and Norfolk, Virginia was the base and the Journal and Guide handled all black stuff about black colleges and universities [HBCUs]. So when my picture came out, oh everybody wanted to know, how did she learn how to do that, 'cause we didn't have any of that in our high school [P.W. Moore High School, Elizabeth City, North Carolina].$$Your picture from being a majorette came out?$$Yes and I still have that picture right now. It's one of those that came out in the paper and they had listed in there that where I went to high school. And see, everybody was shocked. "How did she learn how to do that," so a lot of envy (laughter).

Charles Brown

Charles “Sweet Charlie” Brown was born in Canton, Mississippi, on February 24, 1936. Brown's parents, Ruby McClure Brown and Reginald Brown, Sr., moved to Chicago when Brown was still young, and playing basketball in Washington Park became the center of his activity. After attending grade school at Betsey Ross, Brown went on to attend DuSable High School.

In 1954, along with teammates Karl Dennis, Bobby Jackson, Paxton Lumpkin, and Shellie McMillon, Brown was part of the DuSable Panthers basketball team, which became the first all-black team to reach the finals of the Illinois state high school basketball championship. The Panthers finished second that season, with their only loss coming in the final game. Following high school, Brown briefly attended Indiana University before transferring to Seattle University; there, he joined basketball legend Elgin Baylor on the court, and Brown’s game winning shot against UCLA in the Elite Eight propelled Seattle to the Final Four in the 1958 NCAA tournament. The following year, Brown was named as an All-American.

Following his graduation from college, Brown played in the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) on teams in Seattle and Chicago. Following his retirement from basketball, Brown worked as a community relations executive for the Jewel Grocery Corporation. He has since retired, but his passion for basketball remains. In 1994, Brown officiated over the Class AA Illinois state championship game, and the assignment director of referees for the Chicago Public League. In 1995, Lettuce Entertain You and Rich Melman began funding a senior basketball tournament, now known as the Windy City Shootout; Brown served as the president from the beginning of the tournament, which was aimed at players fifty and older from around North America.

Accession Number

A2004.154

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/31/2004

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Du Sable Leadership Academy

Betsy Ross Elementary School

Indiana University

Seattle University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Canton

HM ID

BRO24

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Live It, Love It, And Make The Best Of It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/24/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish

Short Description

Basketball player and basketball official Charles Brown (1936 - ) was part of the DuSable Panthers basketball team, which became the first all-black team to reach the finals of the Illinois state high school basketball championship. Brown went on to play in the Amateur Athletic Union on teams in Seattle and Chicago, and after his retirement, became the assignment director of referees for the Chicago Public League, and began funding a senior basketball tournament, now known as the Windy City Shootout.

Employment

Jewel Food

Windy City Shootout

YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago

Chicago Jamaco Saints

Buchan Bakers

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:750,20:6675,185:7125,194:7875,202:8400,210:13950,329:15525,364:30604,511:31274,533:33042,569:48184,721:48500,726:48974,733:49290,738:52529,790:70610,1001:74925,1041:80683,1114:82018,1130:82552,1147:92512,1223:113522,1471:113952,1477:121225,1534:124750,1623:125350,1633:128550,1641:129270,1651:130310,1665:151490,1915:158887,2022:159439,2032:172734,2232:173090,2237:177243,2312:181183,2399:181515,2405:186973,2468:197846,2640:201743,2685:216710,2928:217550,2939:218726,3020:226958,3120:227378,3126:228470,3146:233172,3163:234349,3177:242267,3291:251492,3413:255843,3472:270450,3644$0,0:725,7:1235,15:28466,440:31050,513:31526,528:31934,536:33294,558:33974,573:35470,619:42795,701:44007,717:45421,742:46330,753:50269,812:60624,908:63462,951:64580,968:75580,1131:82550,1184:87296,1227:87904,1236:97200,1414:123460,1729:125450,1759:126080,1770:128180,1821:128600,1833:135232,1891:139206,1942:143661,2022:144066,2028:150720,2055:160230,2330:177089,2641:192875,2836:196000,2863
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles Brown lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles Brown talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles Brown explains why his maternal family left Mississippi and moved to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles Brown talks about his father and lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles Brown describes his father's family background and his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles Brown describes his earliest childhood memories of playing in Washington Park in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles Brown describes his earliest childhood memories of playing in Washington Park in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles Brown describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles Brown talks about his early education at home and at Betsy Ross Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles Brown explains why he attended Dusable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles Brown talks about his favorite subject at Betsy Ross Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles Brown describes his activities at Betsy Ross Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles Brown compares class elections at Betsy Ross Elementary School to Democratic machine politics in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles Brown recalls his teachers at Betsy Ross Elementary School and DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles Brown recalls how he first began playing basketball during his time at DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles Brown recalls playing basketball at DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles Brown recalls the limited opportunities to play organized basketball as a child in Chicago, Illinois in the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles Brown recalls his local sports heroes who went on to have professional careers

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles Brown recalls trying other sports such as football and wrestling

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles Brown talks about his jump shot

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles Brown describes the basketball position he played at DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles Brown lists the players on the 1953 and 1954 DuSable High School basketball teams, and other good basketball teams in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles Brown recalls the DuSable High School basketball team's opponents in the Chicago Public School Athletic League

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles Brown talks about the restrictions against African Americans playing division one college basketball in the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles Brown talks about the Seattle University vs. the University of Kentucky 1958 NCAA Championship Game

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles Brown recalls the career of professional basketball player Bob Boozer

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles Brown talks about facing discrimination in travel accommodations while playing Amateur Athletic Union basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles Brown recalls playing against white teams with hostile fans in high school and college

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles Brown talks about lessons he learned for navigating tense interactions in various situations

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles Brown recalls the 1954 Illinois boys state basketball championship game, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles Brown recalls the 1954 Illinois boys state basketball championship game, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles Brown reflects upon the officiating in the 1954 Illinois boys state basketball Championship game

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles Brown talks about his knee injury and recovering from his knee surgery

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles Brown talks about his career after he stopped playing basketball

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles Brown talks about officiating youth basketball

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles Brown explains the origins of the Windy City Shootout, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles Brown explains the origins of the Windy City Shootout, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles Brown remembers the first Windy City Shootout tournament in 1990

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles Brown talks about the Windy City Shootout and continuing to play basketball as a senior citizen

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles Brown explains how players are assigned to teams in the Windy City Senior Basketball League

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles Brown reflects upon the U.S. Men's Basketball Team's loss in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles Brown describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles Brown reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles Brown reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Charles Brown lists his children and grandchild

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Charles Brown describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Charles Brown talks about his jump shot
Charles Brown talks about the restrictions against African Americans playing division one college basketball in the 1950s
Transcript
Let's just take you back to DuSable [High School, Chicago, Illinois] in 19--now when you--I was asking you about some, some of the heroes, sports heroes around town and stuff but when, when you started playing basketball, now you just, just started as an eighth grader, I mean what were the, what were the skills that you had to work on the hardest? I mean what, what could you do you know at that time? I mean what was your best skill in that?$$My best skill was shooting always. And I was known for just a long shot. I had one shot when I started. It was a hook shot. I took the ball and turned my back to the basket because I was too small to do anything else. When I learned how to shoot the jump shot, it was just coming into being. There was no jump shot, that was a one hand push and a jump shot it was something that was unheard of. I think someone said that a guy by the name of Hank Luisetti was supposed to have originated the jump shot, that's arguably you know true but we don't know. But I had a one handed push shot after learning how to hold the ball on the bottom with one hand and then pushing it away with the other. That was my shot. But then after realizing you can get your shot off a lot faster if you were on the run and you stopped and jumped and shot it. And so I developed this shot along with many guys who were experimenting with it at the time. A guy by the name of Ed Spears [ph.], he was a teammate of ours. He's one of the three people that graduated in my junior year at half season. That January graduation that was the year we were--we did win the city championship with three new members coming up from the, the bench. But Ed Spears had what we considered the, the most perfect jump shot ever and he could hit it eight, nine, ten, eight out of ten easily. Eddy was a--also a neighborhood of mine. He lived in the next block and we're still friends. But Eddy would shoot what we call the rocking chair jump shot. He'd get up in the air and he'd sit down. And he'd shoot the ball as if he was sitting in a chair. And it was one of the most--it was the prettiest shot that you wanna see. And he was a nervous kind of guy. But when he jumped up in the air he looked like he just relaxed and it looked like he was looking at television, just shooting the ball. Well he opened up the [Illinois] Tech [Holiday Basketball] Tournament with like four, five, six of these in my junior year. He's still known and he still shoots that shot. I think he's almost seventy years old but he can still shoot that shot. It still looks good to me today as it did way back when. And I have some footage a couple of years ago we played a, a rematch, a fundraising game against [Theodore] Roosevelt High School [Chicago, Illinois] over at Roosevelt. And I got him on film shooting that shot. I can use that same film and reflect it all the way back to 1953 and you couldn't tell the difference between the guy. So that was my favorite shot was the jump shot--$$Okay.$$--and that was the shot that Coach [Jim] Brown said "Son if you don't have to drive to the basket, if you don't have to dribble the ball and you can make seven to eight out of ten from right here, why bother." And his favorite saying was "Shoot the ball son, shoot the ball," that was it and maybe slap the hell out of you. (Laughter) And then you'd go and do what Jim Brown said. You know, but that was his saying and even now many of the guys they get together and they look at each other and use that term, "Shoot the ball son," you know so you can see jump shot without a doubt, without a doubt. That was a favorite shot.$We all went to college 'cause Jim Brown was good at seeing to it that we all got into college. Paxton [Lumpkin] and I went to Indiana University in Bloomington [Indiana]. Curly [Johnson] and Shellie [McMillon] went to Bradley [University] down in Peoria [Illinois]. Bobby Jackson went to Northern [Illinois University] up in DeKalb [Illinois]. Karl Dennis also went to Northern. I am not sure where all the rest of the guys go but I'm sure if I thought about it I could tell you each one. But those are the ones that have come to mind that went to the major colleges because at that time blacks weren't attending major colleges at division one. Division one didn't have blacks playing and even when we went to play, the unwritten rule across the country among all the division one coaches, you played one black, two max.$$Right.$$And you don't play more than two unless you're losing. And so was the case when Paxton and I was in Indiana, the other two blacks were Hallie Bryant who went on to play twenty-five years with the [Harlem] Globetrotters because he couldn't play in the NBA [National Basketball Association] and Wally Choice, Montclair, New Jersey.$$Oh.$$And I can remember being a part of a, a game against Michigan State [University, East Lansing, Michigan] at that time Julius McCoy who was All American in football and basketball at Michigan State. We were losing like seventeen points and Coach [Branch] McCracken put in all four black guys. We caught up and I think we took a three point maybe two, three or four point lead. And he jumped up on the floor in the middle of a fast break and called time out. And there was mass substitution. All the blacks came out. And we won the game, but it was a very obvious move that we had worked our butts off to get to get to this--to take this lead back from a seventeen point deficit and then we all came out. So the rule was adhered to. And you know you can talk to some you know white coaches now today they, they talk about this unwritten rule among division one coaches. And until the guy [Don Haskins] down at UTEP [Texas Western College of the University of Texas; The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas] who won the NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association] championship and he received a lot of pressure because they, they said that he had an all black team. And Carl Nicks in the--from Englewood High School [Chicago, Illinois] was on that team. No Carl Nicks I think he was with Larry Bird down in Indiana State [University, Terre Haute, Indiana], but there was someone else I think from Chicago [Illinois] on the UTEP team but anyway that was considered to be an all-black team which it wasn't not all-black, but it was primarily black. And they were like the first ones to win the NCAA championship. And he was criticized for using mostly black players.

Larry Hawkins

Educator, youth organizer, championship coach, and sports authority Larry Hawkins was born on December 12, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois. The Wabash YMCA, the Southside Boys Club and Phillips High School formed a “golden triangle” of athletic activity for youth in his neighborhood. Hawkins attended Douglas Elementary School and graduated from Phillips High School, where he was a star basketball player in 1948. He received an A.A. degree from Wilson Junior College in 1950. Hawkins served in the United States Army from 1953 to 1955. He acquired his B.S. degree from George Williams College in 1956, his M.S. degree in 1972 from George Williams, another M.S. degree from Roosevelt University in 1980 and his Ed.D. from the University of Illinois in 1986.

As coach for Chicago’s Carver High School, Hawkins’ 1962 team featured future NBA champion, Cazzie Russell. This team lost the Illinois state championship by one point. In 1963, Hawkins cultivated the clutch potential in unknown sophomore Anthony Smedley, who hit a shot with five seconds left on the clock to clinch the championship. He coached volleyball at Hyde Park High School and advocated for girls athletics. Hawkins founded the Institute for Athletics and Education in 1972. Through this effort, he prepared hundreds of students to move on to college. Hawkins also founded the Parent Athletic Support Team and the National Parents Committee on Youth Sports. He served with Big Buddies Youth Services, Concerned Coaches of Chicago, the Educational Advisory Committee of the Urban League, the U.S. Olympic Committee on Youth Identification and the First Congressional District Legislative Council, among others. As director of the Office of Special Programs at the University of Chicago, Hawkins steered at risk youth towards college, while acting as mentor, counselor, and teacher.

Hawkins, who lived in Chicago, was sought nationally as an authority on African Americans in sports and has published widely. In 1984, he received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from George Williams College.

Hawkins passed away on January 30, 2009 at the age of 78.

Hawkins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 2, 2003.

Accession Number

A2003.283

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/2/2003

Last Name

Hawkins

Organizations
Schools

Douglas Elementary School

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Kennedy–King College

George Williams College of Aurora University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HAW02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

South of Spain

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/12/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greek, Green Beans

Death Date

1/30/2009

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive, academic administrator, high school basketball coach, and high school volleyball coach Larry Hawkins (1930 - 2009 ) founded the Institute for Athletics and Education in 1972, then the Parent Athletic Support Team and the National Parents Committee on Youth Sports. Hawkins also served as mentor and counselor while steering youth towards college as director of the Office of Special Programs at the University of Chicago.

Employment

Carver High School

Institute for Athletics and Education

University of Chicago

Favorite Color

Maroon

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larry Hawkins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larry Hawkins lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Hawkins describes his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Hawkins briefly describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Hawkins talks briefly about his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Hawkins remembers his maternal grandfather and talks about inheriting the square-dance calling tradition

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Hawkins describes his maternal grandmother and spending time with his grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Hawkins briefly describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Hawkins talks about his family's migration to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Hawkins describes the sights and sounds of his childhood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Hawkins describes the sights and sounds of his childhood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Larry Hawkins talks briefly about gang activity in his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Hawkins describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Hawkins describes his experience at Stephen A. Douglas Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Hawkins remembers his teachers at Stephen A. Douglas Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Hawkins describes attending Olivet Baptist Church and Allen Temple AME Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Hawkins talks about the tradition of square dancing in Chicago's African American communities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Hawkins describes his experience at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Hawkins remembers playing basketball at Wendell Phillips Academy High School and with the Hartzell United Methodist Church

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Hawkins talks about the emergence of the Chicago Area Project delinquency prevention program

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Hawkins talks about attending Woodrow Wilson Junior College in Chicago, Illinois and becoming one of Carson Pirie Scott's first black hires

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Larry Hawkins explains why he chose to attend George Williams College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Larry Hawkins describes his experience as an undergraduate student at George Williams College Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Hawkins talks about volleyball at George Williams College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Hawkins talks about lasting friendships he developed studying at George Williams College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Hawkins remembers Dr. Karl Zerfoss of George Williams College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Hawkins talks about being drafted into the United States Army in 1953

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Hawkins describes joining the faculty at Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois as a physical education instructor and basketball coach

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Hawkins talks about coaching basketball at Carver High School and the legacy of basketball at Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Hawkins describes his coaching strategy, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larry Hawkins describes his coaching strategy, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larry Hawkins remembers coaching former NBA player Cazzie Russell at Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Larry Hawkins talks about the players on the 1962 Carver High School basketball team that were recruited by colleges

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Larry Hawkins remembers the IHSA state championship game between Carver High School and Stephen Decatur High School out of Decatur, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Larry Hawkins remembers losing to Theodore Roosevelt High School out of Gary, Indiana, coached by Louis "Bo" Mallard

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Larry Hawkins talks about memorable games the Carver High School Boys Basketball team played during the 1963 season

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Larry Hawkins describes winning the IHSA boys basketball championship in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Larry Hawkins talks about where members of the 1963 Carver High School basketball team went post-graduation

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Larry Hawkins talks about Altgeld Gardens and Mayor Richard J. Daley's support of the Carver High School basketball team

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Larry Hawkins remembers his former player, Bishop Robert Lewis

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Larry Hawkins talks about how 1960s American politics affected high school students in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Larry Hawkins reflects upon his coaching career in high school sports and the sports community in Altgeld Gardens Homes

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Larry Hawkins talks about joining the faculty of the University of Chicago as director in the Office of Special Programs in 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Larry Hawkins talks about tension between the University of Chicago and the Woodlawn and Hyde Park neighborhoods on Chicago, Illinois' South Side

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Larry Hawkins describes youth programming and initiatives in support of at-risk youth at the University of Chicago, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Larry Hawkins Larry Hawkins describes youth programming and initiatives in support of at-risk youth at the University of Chicago, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Larry Hawkins talks about field trips hosted by the Office of Special Programs at the University of Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Larry Hawkins describes his most rewarding moments in the Office of Special Programs at the University of Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Larry Hawkins describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Larry Hawkins talks about earning a doctorate degree in early childhood education from the University of Illinois in 1980

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Larry Hawkins reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Larry Hawkins describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

11$5

DATitle
Larry Hawkins describes his experience as an undergraduate student at George Williams College Chicago, Illinois
Larry Hawkins describes joining the faculty at Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois as a physical education instructor and basketball coach
Transcript
Well, tell, tell me about George Williams [George Williams College, Chicago, Illinois]. I mean--$$Well, there was another of those interesting experiences. It was a small school about five hundred people, maybe six hundred. And their philosophy was that you had to work in the field that you were studying in so you'd understand it. So they had us all in different places all around the city while we were going to school. But it was there that I learned a whole set of things about working with groups and how you handled them. And where I came across a man named Karl Zerfoss, and I think that's F-O-S-S--$$Can you spell, yeah.$$Z-E-R-F-O-S-S. He would, he'd been a former basketball player, came out of Georgia, and wrote some papers that we talked about, 'cause it was the first time I was in a place where you could go by your instructor's house and sit and have dinner with him and talk about things. You know, because that--it was that kind of atmosphere, so that this guy wrote the guidance point of view for coaches. And, of course, that started my thinking in that direction that coaches might be able to do something other than just win games while they're working with young kids. But he was a favorite teacher of mine, but I had a lot of good teachers there. There was a guy named Fenszemacher [ph.] who was, who argued, you have to be a professional like other professionals or they'll, they won't treat you like one. And he argued that to people who wanted to go into physical education. And the, the real heavy there was Arthur Steinhaus, who in physiology, was, you know, respected around the world. So, in that college, you had to take enough science to go to medical school. A lot of kids did. We had about six courses we had to take. There were, there were people in other aspects that were good--swimming, (unclear). It was just a staff that was good only because you could get to know them. There were several ways that you got to know them. And it wasn't the teacher over there and you're over here.$So what did you do next?$$Well, then I--a friend of mine named Ben Blewett [ph.], who was one of the guys in the neighborhood, was working at Carver High School [later, Carver Military Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois]. And he knew I was graduating and told me that the coach at this school had just passed, and they were looking for a physical education teacher. So I went to apply and was accepted and got cleared with the local Board of Education. And I went to Carver, and that began another adventure that was different.$$Okay. Now, what was--now Carver is on the far South Side of Chicago [Illinois].$$It was in Altgeld Gardens.$$That's a housing project.$$Yeah. It was a housing project. It was originally built for war workers, I think, for those steel mills out there. But it was a housing project and at the time, the Chicago Housing Authority had an interesting approach to this whole thing. It was a nice garden area. It was like a small town. People knew each other and there was an established kind of order because people had lived there for a while. It was a terrific place to be. The high school was located at the edge of the, the project. It was never a very big high school, about five or 600, 700 kids. And I was dropped there. And basketball, of course, still my interest and I, of course, that was what I did--was a basketball coach, as well as the physical education teacher. And the kind of experience there that was interesting is I worked with a woman named June McLaren [ph.] who had been a classmate of mine at Phillips [Wendell Phillips Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois]. She--we, we both worked in the same gym, worked out of the same office. So, I think she helped me to understand that, you know, everybody had to have some time in the gym because she did the cheerleaders, and I did the basketball team. And we would argue and fuss about who would have time, but we eventually worked it out. And it was helpful later when it got to be more imperative that we share. And I already had the idea, you know, that you had--we had to take the kids to the library or for a pep talk or something, so she could have the gym so she could work that out. But my first experiences at Carver were, were pretty good, and then it just kept getting better and better and better. And one year, a fellow named Carl Dennums [ph.] bought me a group of students who were in his eighth grade class. Now, Carver was kinda half high school and half upper grade center. On one side of the school is seventh and eighth grades, so on the other side was the high school. That sounds smaller--was really, and he said, I've got some guys--they're going to really make the team go. And I said, okay, I'd like to see that. And then, I went over to see Mr. [William] McQuitter who worked in the park district. And he pointed out, these guys are gonna be something and so on, so on, so on, and so. And they were alright. It was a group of young fellows, they were all friends and they were the damnedest group of kids I've worked with. There's one of them I never did understand until I saw Michael Jordan. I really didn't understand it until I saw Michael Jordan. If--$$You were--expect him and what, what?$$Because of what he could do.$$Who was he?$$Darius Cunningham, Peter Cunningham [Darius "Pete" Cunningham].$$Okay.$$At about 5'9", maybe 5'10", he was able to do just a whole lot of things--shoot it. He could--oh, he could just do a lot of stuff. He was a terrific guy. But it's not just him, it was the height. And Cody [William "Cody" Anderson] and Harold Jenkins [ph.], all of those guys who made up a kind of whole cloth and they were our freshman group. And I, I really think that one of the reasons people think of me as a good coach is because of those young people. Because no matter how screwy I came out with ideas, they took them and made them sense of what I wanted them. So I spent four years with them and it was, it was a lark.

Kenneth Walker

Educator and basketball referee Kenneth R. Walker, Sr. has devoted his career to serving his home state of Rhode Island. Born in East Providence on December 19, 1930, to Lillian and Frank Walker, Walker has dedicated his professional life to improving urban education.

Walker attended Providence College, where he received a B.A. in 1957. Upon graduating, he began teaching English and social studies for the East Providence School District while also serving as a guidance counselor. He earned an M.Ed. from Rhode Island College in 1962, where he worked part time from 1967 to 1969 as the assistant director of Project Upward Bound, a federally supported program for economically and educationally disadvantaged youth. Walker was promoted to assistant principal at Central Jr. High School before accepting a position as assistant professor of education at Rhode Island College in 1970. He remained on the education faculty at Rhode Island College until 1993, rising to the rank of full professor in 1989. Walker also earned a Ph.D. in education from Boston University.

During his tenure at Rhode Island College, Walker directed the Teacher Corps, a project of the college and the Pawtucket School Department aimed at raising the quality of education for low-income students. Walker also served as director of urban education at the university. In 1963, Walker became a basketball referee and officiated Division I games in the East Coast, Big East and Atlantic 10 athletic conferences. He traveled with a team of Big East all-stars to Angola in 1982. Walker also serves on the Rhode Island Board of Parole.

Since 1998, Johnson has been an associate professor at Johnson & Wales University. He has been a member of several educators and basketball referee organizations and served as president of the Big Brothers of Rhode Island. Walker has been honored several times for his service to youth and education, and was the 1980 recipient of the NAACP Freedom Fund Award in Education. He married Gail B. Smith in 1955, and has three children. Walker still lives in his hometown of East Providence.

Accession Number

A2003.186

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/13/2003

Last Name

Walker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Virginia Union University

East Providence High School

Bliss Elementary School

Central Junior High School

Providence College

Rhode Island College

Boston University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

East Providence

HM ID

WAL03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Rhode Island

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Jeepers, Girl.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/19/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Meatloaf

Short Description

Education professor and basketball referee Kenneth Walker (1930 - ) is a collegiate basketball referee and educator who has worked to improve urban education in Rhode Island.

Employment

East Providence School District

Rhode Island College

Central Junior High School

Johnson & Wales University

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:671,4:1408,16:1743,22:12410,206:14610,251:28450,413:43190,665:68310,882:69183,894:101245,1102:101760,1108:107425,1169:108352,1179:109073,1190:109691,1197:112631,1257:118238,1300:118633,1306:121642,1321:122278,1328:123126,1338:128050,1392:128550,1398:153896,1637:164950,1772:167700,1800:168701,1818:170976,1902:177890,1973$0,0:1376,9:5418,82:6020,111:6364,116:31184,415:31952,425:40208,619:51452,756:63180,832:65726,841:66790,861:67854,937:71046,1452:89990,1638:128506,2085:135742,2270:154677,2420:155496,2432:170640,2584:186100,2786:191004,2846:191988,2868:192480,2982:193136,2992:202410,3090
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth Walker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth Walker lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth Walker talks about his mother, Lillian Frye Walker's, family and how his parents Frank and Lillian Frye Walker, met

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth Walker describes his father, Frank Walker

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth Walker talks about his father, Frank Walker's, family history and lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth Walker describes his earliest childhood memory of East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth Walker describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth Walker talks about Rhode Island's colonial history and its Portuguese and Cape Verdean communities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth Walker describes his experience working on his father's rubbish removal truck

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth Walker describes his experience as an African American in a majority white neighborhood in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth Walker talks about Bliss Elementary School in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth Walker describes his childhood personality and extracurricular activities

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Kenneth Walker remembers student teaching and serving on the faculty at Central Junior High School in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth Walker talks about his basketball coach, Frank Saraceno, at Central Junior High School in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth Walker talks about aspiring to be a teacher and his love of history

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth Walker describes his mentor Reverend Dr. Samuel D. Proctor, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth Walker talks about playing sports at East Providence Senior High School, in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth Walker describes the African American community in Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth Walker describes his mentor Reverend Dr. Samuel D. Proctor, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth Walker describes his experience at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth Walker talks about serving in the Korean War and finishing his undergraduate degree at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kenneth Walker talks about returning to teach at Central Junior High School in East Providence, Rhode Island in 1957

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Kenneth Walker describes an incident of racial discrimination at East Providence Senior High School, East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth Walker talks about working at a settlement in Providence, Rhode Island and teaching at Central Junior High School in East Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth Walker talks about completing his M.A. degree at Rhode Island College in Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth Walker describes his teaching philosophy and the evolution of the use of slang by the students he taught

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth Walker explains how he was recruited to teach at Rhode Island College in Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth Walker explains the Upward Bound program at Rhode Island College in Providence, Rhode Island

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth Walker describes the process of becoming a basketball referee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth Walker talks about balancing being both a referee and a teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth Walker talks about confronting disrespectful players and coaches during his career as a basketball referee

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kenneth Walker lists some of the places he's travelled as a referee and his favorite coaches

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth Walker talks about being paid off the books as a referee

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth Walker talks about the demanding schedule of basketball officials

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth Walker lists his favorite college basketball players and talks about traveling in inclement weather

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth Walker explains how he was appointed to the Rhode Island State Parole Board

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth Walker describes the professional background of the members of the Rhode Island Parole Board

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth Walker talks about the racial demographics of the inmates in the Rhode Island correctional facilities and the cost of incarceration

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth Walker talks about the role of race in the United States' penal system

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kenneth Walker details the importance of helping inmates transition back into society

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth Walker talks about contractors who profit from the United States prison system

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth Walker remembers his daughter being afraid to be at home alone

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth Walker talks about the Attica Prison Riot in 1971

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth Walker explains how drug and alcohol addiction lead to incarceration

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth Walker talks about Federal Correctional Institutions in New England

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth Walker describes how he would change the penal system

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth Walker describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth Walker reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

13$8

DATitle
Kenneth Walker remembers student teaching and serving on the faculty at Central Junior High School in East Providence, Rhode Island
Kenneth Walker talks about confronting disrespectful players and coaches during his career as a basketball referee
Transcript
The interesting thing about Central Junior High School [East Providence, Rhode Island], I, you know, started there in the seventh grade, twelve years of age-- never thought I'd be talking about the future, never gave any thought to the future at that school. But after--I, I did my student, and to jump forward, I did my student teaching at Central Junior High School. I wanted to go back there to see teachers that I had had as a student. I did my student teaching there. And the principal, who had been the principal when I was there as a student--the last day I was there, I went in to thank him for allowing me to do my student teaching. And I was sitting there in front of him and he's sitting behind the desk. And he, he looked at me, and he asked me if, if I, if I would like to come back there to teach. I said, "Oh, absolutely." So, I went back to that same junior high school that I went to. I went back there as a social studies teacher. I left that school--I graduated from the ninth grade in 1946. And in 1957, I went back to that school as a social studies teacher, and stayed there until 1970 when I left to go to college. But I came in as a classroom teacher of social studies and, and left there as the assistant principal. Is that significant? It's significant in the sense that I was the second person of color to be hired--what, what, I'm sorry, I mean, the third person of color to be hired in the system, the first to be hired on the secondary level as a, not only as a male, but also as a black. And so, that was a, you know, I, and, and then I have youngsters who I taught, youngsters who I had to discipline, and now, you know, 19-, I mentioned I started in '57 [1957]. I left in 1970, so there's a period of unrest. And the, the black is beautiful and, and some of the young people did not appreciate some of the discipline that I had to dole out, especially some of the black kids they thought, he, he's supposed to be different.$And, and tell us some stories. You know, I had asked you earlier about just some stories from your, you know, from your time as a referee?$$I think of--well, I, I remember once I teched, I called a technical foul on this young man.$$What game is this, do you remember?$$No, no, I don't remember the game. But a coach, you know, I teched him. And the coach said, "Well, what, what happened?" So I said, "Well, I happen to know, coach, that my mother and father were married for at least a couple of years before I was born. And, and he called me something that--related to me being born out of wedlock." Well, the coach laughed. He thought, you know, he thought that was funny. He, "Wow, that's pretty good, Ken." I can think of being at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and it, the game was almost over and I, I guess, I guess Dartmouth had called a time out. We're ready to play and the team that calls a time out, when they're ready to play, you, you begin playing. You don't wait. And the other team has to be ready to play, too. Well, the other coach and I, I don't know, I may be illusioned. So, I say, "Okay, men, let's go, we'll ready to go." So he said to me, this other coach said, "Yeah, Walker, we know, you got to get back to punch a clock in the morning." I said, "What did you say?" Officially, you're not supposed to talk to coaches, see. I, I was, I'm always guilty of that. I mean, I could be indicted on that every day. So, "What did you say?" He said, "Aw," said, "yeah, you got to get, get back, got to punch a clock in the morning." "Well," I said, "let me tell you something. I got more degrees behind my name than the president of your institution, so don't give me this business about, I got to punch a clock. As a matter of fact, I think I'll stay over and do some skiing," which wasn't really true. So the next time I saw him, he, he, he said, you know, he said, "Gee, you know, we had those words." He said, "I, I wasn't really, you know, I just had something to say." I said, "Well, I work too long and hard for what I have for, for you to make, and you, you probably did think that I was a blue collar worker." I said, not to (unclear) being a blue collar worker, but I'm not a blue collar worker. He said, "Yeah, and I heard that, yeah, yeah, you, you're a doctor, right? I, yeah, yeah, you're right." So, and so that, I mean, I think of those two stories. I think of, of going somewhere. And I, I had been chairman of the Rhode Island Parole Board for a number of years. And someone had seen me, had seen at least an article or something I had done--he said, "Gee, you, you, you, you, you lead a different type of life. I guess, see, calling a ball game is easy, huh? I mean, when you're making decisions on people." I said, "Yeah, it's," I said, "but it all affects people one way or the other, whether it's there or there." So, yeah, but it is different, so, you know, you, so and it, and as I said, there are some coaches that are just good people and there are some others that, that--$$Who--(simultaneous)

Norm Van Lier

Chicago Bulls basketball great Norm Van Lier was born in East Liverpool, Ohio on April 1, 1947. Van Lier played both basketball and football while attending Midland Lincoln High School. While there, he led the 1965 basketball team to an undefeated state championship. Van Lier went on to St. Francis College in Loretto, Pennsylvania, where he continued to excel on the basketball court. He graduated with degrees in history and special education, and was the school’s all-time assist leader.

In 1969, the Chicago Bulls selected Van Lier in the third round of the NBA draft, but he was traded to the Cincinnati Royals before the season began. With the Royals, Van Lier led the NBA in assists his rookie year, making the NBA All-Defensive Team his second year. Returning to the Chicago Bulls in 1971, Van Lier became part of the Bulls’ powerhouse team of the 1970s, which included players like Bob Love and Jerry Sloan. He appeared in three NBA All-Star games, was named to the NBA All-Defensive First Team three times and the NBA All-Defensive Second Team five times. Van Lier’s full court shot on January 19, 1977, against the San Antonio Spurs is ranked as one of the greatest moments in Chicago Bulls history.

Van Lier retired from basketball in 1979. He worked as a television basketball analyst for different stations (Fox Sports Net and Comcast Sports Net) since his retirement, as well as co-hosting a popular radio talk show, The Bull and the Bear, on WSCR-AM in Chicago. Committed to education and young people, Van Lier worked as a motivational speaker. He was also a member of Project Teamwork, a group formed by Reebok Foundation designed to improve racial and human rights sensitivity in school-age children.

Van Lier passed away on February 26, 2009 at the age of 61. He is survived by his wife, Susan, his two daughters, Hilary and Heidi, and one granddaughter.

Accession Number

A2003.260

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/4/2003

Last Name

Van Lier

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Midland Elementary School

Midland Junior High/High School

Saint Francis University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Norm

Birth City, State, Country

East Liverpool

HM ID

VAN02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

I'm above dirt.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

4/1/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster Tails

Death Date

2/26/2009

Short Description

Basketball player Norm Van Lier (1947 - 2009 ) played for the Chicago Bulls and the the Cincinnati Royals. Van Lier led the NBA in assists his rookie year, making the NBA All-Defensive Team his second year. He appeared in three NBA All-Star games, was named to the NBA All-Defensive First Team three times and the NBA All-Defensive Second Team five times. Upon retirement, Van Lier became an analyst for Comcast Sports Net and Fox Sports Net.

Employment

National Basketball Association

WVON Radio

ESPN, Inc.

Compton Community College

Chicago State University

Continental Basketball League

World Basketball League

Worcester Vocational High School

Northeastern University

Fox (20th Century Fox), Channel 32

SportsChannel

WMVP Radio

WSCR Radio

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Norm Van Lier interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Norm Van Lier lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Norm Van Lier recalls his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Norm Van Lier remembers his mother and grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Norm Van Lier discusses his response to discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Norm Van Lier describes his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Norm Van Lier recounts growing up in Midland, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Norm Van Lier recalls his elementary and high schools

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Norm Van Lier recalls the popularity of high school sports in Midland, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Norm Van Lier remembers the people who influenced him

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Norm Van Lier describes his early involvement in football

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Norm Van Lier recounts his early interest in baseball

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Norm Van Lier recalls his early interests and aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Norm Van Lier remembers his high school sports successes

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Norm Van Lier describes his high school social life

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Norm Van Lier discusses his racial awareness in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Norm Van Lier explains his decision to attend St. Francis College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Norm Van Lier describes Saint Francis College in 1965

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Norm Van Lier recalls the reaction to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Norm Van Lier remembers the death of his friend

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Norm Van Lier recounts his experiences playing college basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Norm Van Lier describes life at Saint Francis College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Norm Van Lier recalls his college basketball success

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Norm Van Lier recounts getting drafted by the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Norm Van Lier remembers his rookie year with Cincinnati

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Norm Van Lier explains why he was traded to the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Norm Van Lier assesses his talent as a pro basketball player

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Norm Van Lier recalls playing for the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Norm Van Lier comments on the importance of good coaching

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Norm Van Lier describes his teammates on the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Norm Van Lier shares his successes with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Norm Van Lier describes a disappointing game versus the Golden State Warriors

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Norm Van Lier discusses drug use in pro sports

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Norm Van Lier comments on the problems with recruiting teenagers to play professional sports

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Norm Van Lier expresses his opinion of giving back to the community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Norm Van Lier discusses the need for family support

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Norm Van Lier discusses what role sports should play in a community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Norm Van Lier recalls his difficulties after leaving the NBA

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Norm Van Lier discusses his job with Fox Sports Net

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Norm Van Lier shares his thoughts on the championship-winning Chicago Bulls

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Norm Van Lier expresses his concerns for minorities and youth

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Norm Van Lier reflects on his life and career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Norm Van Lier discusses his future plans

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

7$10

DATitle
Norm Van Lier recounts getting drafted by the Chicago Bulls
Norm Van Lier assesses his talent as a pro basketball player
Transcript
NBA [National Basketball Association] draft in '69 [1969]--you actually graduated from school [Saint Francis College, later Saint Francis University, Loretto, Pennsylvania] with a degree.$$Yes sir.$$In '69 [1969] in the NBA draft, you were drafted by the [Chicago, Illinois] Bulls, is that right?$$Well draft day was May 12th actually, the day I graduated (pauses) 1969. Dick Klein--Bob Logan, a local who worked for the [Chicago] Tribune [newspaper], and Bob's still a dear friend, he called and said, "Hey, Norm Van Lier, you've been drafted by the Chicago Bulls." I said, "Who?" "The Chicago Bulls."$$The Bulls weren't that old.$$The Bulls were two years old. I said, 'Wow! Okay." I had also received a phone call from Tex [Texas Earnest] Schramm [Jr.], the late Tex Schramm of the Dallas [Texas] Cowboys [professional football team], to have a tryout to play football if I would come to camp there. Baseball was done at this point. I think the skills of playing--honestly of playing baseball, you miss four or five years like I did I think it's hard to come back and deal with, 'cause this--when I went to school I stopped playing baseball, which was one true love. And then I got a call from the New York Nets [basketball team], saying I was drafted by them--they had two leagues in those days--the ABA [American Basketball Association]. I said, "Wow, that's good." A week later I got a call from [Richard] Dick Klein who owned the Chicago Bulls at the time. Said, "I want you to report to camp, we got this new coach, [Richard] Dick Motta--August 18th." And I said "Well, Mr. Klein, I can't make it." He said, "Well, what do you mean you can't make it?" I said, "Me and my buddies, we just bought a Volkswagen bus, and there's this concert we want to go to up at Woodstock [New York]." (laughs) He said, "Wood what?" I said, "I'm going to this big concert, now I can come a couple days later." He said, "If you don't come, don't show up." I said, "But, we were planning to go to this." And I missed Woodstock.$$So you went to camp, you missed Woodstock to come to camp.$$Yes, I did. And I was there--wasn't there an hour and Dick Motta said, "Go back, come in September, you made the team already, I didn't need to see you." I said, "You gotta be kidding me." I wanted to see this group Canned Heat--old rock and roller. And the unbelievable story--a year later, I'm in my Jaguar [automobile] driving cross-country--Route 66, ended up in L.A. [Los Angeles, California]. Went up into the canyons and this group was playing volleyball, and I stopped and some guy from Chicago happened to be there, "Hey, Norm, Norm Van Lier," 'cause I just got traded back to Chicago. I said "Yeah." And it was the group Canned Heat, playing volleyball. And I got to play with them and stay with them for three, four days. Unbelievable, how life can be. I believe in affirmation, anyway. I just--I truly believe in that. So it happened.$$(Simultaneously) Okay. Alright, so you, you were in Chicago, you report back--did you get a chance to report back in September?$$Oh, yeah, I came back. That's when camp started and the season started, it's a lot earlier now. I mean, we were there--we started earlier in those days. They've pushed it back a little bit and bunched the games up now. We started around the first of September in those days, playing ball. You get August, October--I mean in August--months like that you better be ready to play. So I came to camp and Dick Motta came to camp, we started--the exhibition season started. I made the team and was playing a little bit, and the next thing I know I was traded to Cincinnati [Ohio, Cincinnati Royals basketball team] for two years before I came back to Chicago.$Now how would you assess your own talent in terms of, when you arrived at the pro [professional] level. Did you think you were as athletic as some of the other guys?$$No, I couldn't run and jump like a lot of guys today. Or then. I was very quick, I had desire, and a toughness. That's what it's about. Hit me, hit me again, sock me if you want. I can put a tolerance on my pain, that I'm going to worry about that pain after the game. Right now, you're not going to hurt me. I'm not even going to show I'm hurt. Take the broken finger, put it back in place, let's go. I had that. That was my talent. But as far as the skills of, "I can jump out of the gym, no." The other talent I had, I could use both hands in handling the ball. That was taught to me way back in grade school. And that was good for what I had to do as a play maker. As a matter of fact I was quicker off the left-hand dribble that I was the right-hand dribble. Now for sixty yards, I'll outrun most people. Hundred-yard dash, my brother used to fly by me around the sixty-yard mark 'cause I was done. So quickness was my game. I would look at you like a counter-boxer. Like [Wilfredo] Benitez used to fight [Tommy] Hearns and all these guys, and Sugar Ray [Leonard]. I'd let you throw the punch 'cause I know offensively, I can't go after you. But you throw the punch I'd counter. Bam! I was reaction to what you did. So that made me a great defensive ballplayer. You make a move, I'm that quick, I'll catch up with you. Anticipate. So, if that's talent, okay. But other than that, no. I always like to use, the fact that I was pretty smart on the court. When I went out to do things, how to get after referees. People would say, "Well Norm's crazy." They use to compare Jerry Sloan and I. Where he hustled and had desire, I was supposed to be the crazy guy. It was always a situation with white and black. Don't think I don't remember that. I'm not intelligent enough to coach, come on--I ran the show. But sometimes you had to do things. [Chester] Chet Walker's tired. We don't want to use a time out. So, I'd disrupt something over here to say, "Hey, get a rest." I got a guy kicked out of a game once, 'cause I said "He called me a name." Referee said, "Time out, get security over there." I said, "Yeah, Chet, sit down, rest, rest." So we wouldn't waste our time out. Dick Motta said, "You're pretty smart that way, huh?" I said, "Yeah, gotta think of something." This is what it's about.

Sanford T. Roach

Educator and basketball coach, Sanford T. Roach, was born in Frankfort, Kentucky. Roach graduated from Danville Bate High School in 1933 in Danville, Kentucky, where he was a basketball and football star and salutatorian of his class. In 1937, Roach earned his B.S. degree in natural sciences from Kentucky State University, where he was the captain of the basketball team, a track and field star, editor of the student newspaper, and a student council member. In 1955, Roach earned his M.A. degree in education from the University of Kentucky.

After graduating from college, Roach returned to his old high school to teach and coach basketball. Over the course of three years, Roach's coaching record was 98-24; in 1941 he gained notoriety for benching his five starting players the day of the district tournament for disobeying his curfew rule. Roach's strict sense of discipline on the court caught the attention of the principal of Lexington's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, and he was soon hired as teacher and coach. Roach taught biology, physiology, and anatomy classes; by 1943 he had become head basketball coach. In his twenty-two years as head coach, Roach led Dunbar High to a 512-142 record.

In 1965, Roach's first wife, Mary, herself a basketball enthusiast, died unexpectedly. Shortly after, Roach retired from coaching. Between 1965 and 1966, Roach served as principal of George W. Carver Elementary School, becoming the first black principal of an integrated elementary school in Lexington. Between 1966 and 1975, Roach worked as an administrator at Lexington Junior High, and became the first black principal of a Fayette County secondary school. From 1975 to 1988, Roach worked as a minority recruiter and principal assistant for the state secretary of transportation, and from 1989 to 1995 he worked for Mayors Scotty Baseler and Pam Miller.

Roach received numerous awards and honors for his educational and coaching career. In 1974, Roach became the first African American board member of the University of Kentucky Athletic Association; in 1991, the new Paul Laurence Dunbar High School dedicated its S.T. Roach Sports Center in his honor. Roach was featured in the National High School Sports Hall of Fame; the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame; and the Kentucky State University Athletic Hall of Fame.

Roach passed away on September 2, 2010 at the age of 94.

Roach married Lettie in 1967, and had two children: Sandra Cole and Tom Roach.

Accession Number

A2002.225

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/10/2002

Last Name

Roach

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

T.

Organizations
Schools

Bate High School

Kentucky State University

University of Kentucky

Danville Bate High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sanford

Birth City, State, Country

Frankfort

HM ID

ROA01

Favorite Season

Football, Basketball Season

State

Kentucky

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Kentucky

Birth Date

2/26/1916

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Lexington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

9/2/2010

Short Description

Elementary school principal, high school basketball coach, and high school principal Sanford T. Roach (1916 - 2010 ) coached Lexington's Dunbar High basketball team for twenty-two years, in addition to teaching and becoming the first African American principal of an integrated elementary school in Lexington, Kentucky.

Employment

Bate High School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

George W. Carver Elementary School

Lexington Junior High School

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sanford Roach interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sanford Roach's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sanford Roach discusses his family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sanford Roach remembers his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sanford Roach recalls his childhood home, Danville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sanford Roach recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sanford Roach recalls his high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sanford Roach remembers his days playing high school basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sanford Roach recounts an injury suffered while playing basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sanford Roach discusses the successes of his high school basketball team

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sanford Roach remembers his father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sanford Roach shares stories about his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sanford Roach recalls a humorous story from his college years at Kentucky State College

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sanford Roach discusses his sports career at Kentucky State College

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sanford Roach remembers his first teaching position after college

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sanford Roach describes a rewarding professional experience

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sanford Roach remembers his mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sanford Roach talks about his high school basketball coaching career during the 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sanford Roach describes working for the Merchant Marines in the Great Lakes

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sanford Roach recalls episodes in courtship

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sanford Roach reviews his career at Bate High School, Danville, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sanford Roach discusses basketball strategy

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sanford Roach describes the concerns of a high school basketball coach

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sanford Roach discusses the discipline of his basketball players at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sanford Roach recalls the travels of his Paul Laurence Dunbar High School basketball team

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sanford Roach remembers basketball stars he coached at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sanford Roach discusses issues in mentoring youth

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sanford Roach discusses the successes of his teams at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sanford Roach explains why he retired from coaching basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sanford Roach discusses segregation in the University of Kentucky's basketball program

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sanford Roach describes an instance of racism at a University of Kentucky basketball game

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sanford Roach explains how he helped Tubby Smith become head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sanford Roach discusses race relations in the University of Kentucky's athletic department

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sanford Roach considers his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sanford Roach describes his mother's response to his career in basketball

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sanford Roach describes how he'd like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Sanford Roach and wife with P. G. Peeples at a Magic Johnson reception

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Sanford Roach with Earvin 'Magic' Johnson and Jacques Wigginton

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - 'Transition Game' by Billy Reed

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Sanford Roach receiving a hall of fame award in Tampa, Florida

Bob Love

Born in Delhi, Louisiana in 1943, Love was one of thirteen children. Throughout his childhood and most of his adult life, he suffered from a debilitating stutter. This handicap forced him to turn inward and dream of becoming a professional basketball player. As a child, Love nailed wire hangers shaped as hoops onto his grandmother's house and pretended some his competitors were some of the nations best. Love graduated from Moorehouse High School in Bastrop, Louisiana in 1961. After high school, Love attended Southern University in Baton Rouge where he received his degree in Food and Nutrition.

Following college, Love began his professional basketball career with the Cincinnati Royals. He was later traded to the Bucks, and then traded once again to the Chicago Bulls in 1968. During his eight seasons with the Bulls, he led in team scoring for seven years and was a three-time NBA All Star. He also holds the second highest scoring record in Bulls history with 12,623 points.

Love's basketball career ended as a result of a back injury in 1977. After that, his opportunities seemed limited. He tried for seven years to find steady employment but his stutter made it impossible. In 1984, he was hired as a dishwasher for $4.45 an hour. At the age of 45, in 1988, Love's life changed after meeting a speech therapist that helped him cure his stutter. In 1992, he returned to work with the Bulls as the Director of Community Affairs.

Bob Love, the man who once shied away from speaking in public, now gives motivational speeches to thousands of teens each year. His jersey was retired on January 14, 1994, but he is the proud recipient of the Individual Achievement Award from the National Council for Communicative Disorders and the Oscar Robertson Leadership Award, the NBA's highest award.

Accession Number

A2002.155

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/15/2002

Last Name

Love

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Moorehouse High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Bob

Birth City, State, Country

Delhi

HM ID

LOV03

Favorite Season

None

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/8/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Basketball player Bob Love (1942 - ) was an all-star forward with the Chicago Bulls and is now a motivational speaker.

Employment

Chicago Bulls

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:3058,53:3886,64:6462,105:7106,114:8210,127:13670,161:32760,535:33068,540:34993,587:51910,815:85130,1192:88955,1286:89255,1296:94430,1377:94730,1382:106570,1480:129476,1778:136009,1857:143595,1941:144134,1963:145200,1968$0,0:3934,33:4854,50:5406,57:9454,142:10098,151:10834,171:15066,271:25830,371:26280,377:34471,651:38660,716:54356,902:54853,919:55421,935:60976,1012:83351,1439:83746,1445:90980,1581:91280,1586:118538,1968:134300,2072:150491,2326:153083,2502:173445,2761:174235,2821:174867,2916:177711,2974:205197,3368:228357,3604:229621,3624:250520,3894
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bob Love's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bob Love describes his parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bob Love describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bob Love describes his maternal grandmother, Ella Hunter, who raised him

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bob Love talks about losing his grandmother and her influence on him

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bob Love talks about his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bob Love talks about his growth spurts during childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bob Love describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bob Love describes the sights, smells, and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bob Love describes a time when his friends scared off Klux Klux Klansmen

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bob Love describes growing up with a stutter while attending Morehouse Parish Elementary School in Bastrop, Louisiana and becoming the starting quarterback

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bob Love describes playing basketball at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bob Love talks about constructing a make-shift basketball as a child to practice basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bob Love describes his social life at Morehouse Parish High School in Bastrop, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bob Love talks about his influential coaches during college at Southern University in Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bob Love describes his offer from the Cincinnati Royals in 1965 to play for the NBA

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bob Love talks about playing for the NBA in the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bob Love talks about the initial challenges of playing for the NBA as a stutterer

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bob Love describes his first professional contract with the NBA in 1966

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bob Love talks about the challenges of finding employment after his retirement from the NBA in 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bob Love talks about being traded from the Cincinnati Royals in 1968 to the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bob Love talks about the Chicago Bulls' initial reluctance to hire him in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bob Love describes leading the Chicago Bulls' scoring from 1968 to 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bob Love talks about the difficulties of establishing a career after professional basketball as a stutterer

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bob Love talks about his first and second marriage and his stuttering

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bob Love talks about experiencing difficulties when he simultaneously retired, got divorced, and had back surgery in 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bob Love describes finding work at Nordstrom Restaurants in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bob Love talks about getting help for his stuttering and then becoming a spokesperson for Nordstrom Restaurants in 1988

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bob Love describes his therapy at the Speech and Hearing Center in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Bob Love talks about the relationships he formed while working at Nordstrom Restaurants in Seattle Washington from 1984 to 1992

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Bob Love describes what he teaches his children

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bob Love describes the background of his nickname, "Butterbean"

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bob Love talks about being traded from the Chicago Bulls in 1977 to the New Jersey Nets then the Seattle SuperSonics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bob Love talks about mentoring young students and athletes

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bob Love describes how he mentors young athletes to value their education

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bob Love describes how he uses his personal experiences to mentor young people

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bob Love describes how he motivates young people by sharing his struggles with his speech impediment

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bob Love talks about his involvement with a Civil Rights protest in Baton Rouge, Louisiana as a student at Southern University in 1962 with H. Rap Brown and Stokely Carmichael

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bob Love talks about the experiences he had while traveling with the NBA

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bob Love describes the challenges young NBA players face today

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bob Love talks about the NBA player, Yao Ming

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bob Love describes his role models growing up

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bob Love talks about what values he considers important

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bob Love talks about returning to Chicago, Illinois in 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bob Love shares talks about an experience during his spokesperson years

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bob Love describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bob Love talks about his political interests

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bob Love describes his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bob Love describes what he wants his legacy to be

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bob Love talks about The HistoryMakers project

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Bob Love's photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$6

DATitle
Bob Love talks about the initial challenges of playing for the NBA as a stutterer
Bob Love describes how he motivates young people by sharing his struggles with his speech impediment
Transcript
Very good. What kind of challenges did you run into initially, when you, as a new, as a newcomer to the world of professional basketball?$$Well, I, I found out that, that you had to, you had to be able to communicate and stuff, you know if you wanted to, if you were a good player, and you wanted to make the All-star team, you wanted to get endorsements, you had to, you had to be able to talk and stuff, you know and I ran into all kind, all kind of obstacles, because I couldn't talk, and all the sports writers knew it and stuff, they would very seldom interview me after the games because, they didn't have time to wait, wait on an answer from me and stuff, and, and I basically understood that because, because it took a lot of pressure off me a lot of times too. But, we had to, we had to take care of our bodies, we had to, we had to stay in shape all year round, and they didn't have programs, like they have now for the players and stuff, once the basketball season was over, you had to go out, you had to go out and do a job, you have, you had to go out and find a job, and you had to work, and because I had a speech problem, the team never really cared and stuff you know, all they really wanted you to do was be ready for the next season and stuff, you know and I never knew that that a bunch of guys were coming in the next year and, I had to be ready for the next season. So, I never really got into therapy, I may had gone into therapy one time, and, and the person embarrassed me so, I didn't want to go out on the street and meet a total stranger, and the next day go out and talk to him. Can you imagine a big ole guy like me, six feet eight, I meet you, and I meet you stuttering, pushing and stuff, it would scare you to death [laughs]. And, I would always quit, I would, I would always quit because they never, they gave me any techniques on how to control my blocks, and whatever and stuff, you know they never told me anything like that.$Would, would you tell, a younger person who has a speech impediment to ask for therapy?$$Oh, of course.$$Because most students don't ask.$$Of course.$$They don't think of that.$$Right.$$They don't think they can be helped.$$Right, I always tell them, I always tell them, that if I, I wasn't privileged as these young, as these young kids, kids have now. Growing up in a small town in Louisiana, we didn't know anything about speech therapy, my grandmother, my grandmother used to, my grandmother used to put three marbles under my tongue, and I would get in my Sunday school class, there and stuff. You know my grandmother said, "Robert Earl, I put these marbles under your tongue, and once you get in your Sunday school class, you won't stutter, and stuff." And, so, I would, I would always stick the marbles under my tongue, and I would get in my Sunday school class there and my teacher would be calling on me to read the Sunday school book. I would get up there and I would start stuttering, and I would start stuttering, and I would swallow two of them suckers every time [laughter]. Every time, every Sunday school morning, I swallow two marbles, so one Sunday morning I tell my grandmamma, I said, "Grandmother I'm up to my neck in marbles, and I still stutter, let's try something else" [laughs]. And, then, a lot of the time, a lot of the times I would go outside there and I would have my little fantasy game against these great players, and I, and I would get tired and thirsty and stuff, and I would run back inside my grandmother's house and try and ask her for some water. Most of the times, my grandmother would be washing dishes, with some big rag, and washing the table and stuff, and I would start off stuttering, and stuttering, "Grandma can...I...have some...water?" And, before I could get that water, my grandmother would hit me in my mouth with that rag, and she would say to me, "Spit it out Robert Earl, spit it out" [laughs]. But, I never spit it out but you know what, I learned to stop asking her for that water, you know [laughter]. Then I went and got my own water, but, but I always encourage them to, to get help at any early age, and stuff, don't be, don't be bashful about it, and you got to be motivated, you got to be motivated. You, you got to have a goal, a lot of people just want to be able to, to go, to go to the office, answer the phone, and maybe say hello to somebody and stuff, but I was motivated. I wanted to become the greatest motivational speaker in the world, and stuff, you know, and I still do. And, and I would dream that dream, I would tell them hey you got to be motivated you got to have a dream, and, and, and you got to, once you, once you go to therapy, I said you go to, once you leave that therapy room, the therapist can only do so much. They could tell you what to do, how to do it, but it is up to you to put in that extra effort, that extra time, and stuff. You see that's what I have to do, even now, every morning I get up, I look into the mirror and I practice. I get on my, my, my vowels and say my vowels, and I let a little air out, I start my vocal cords, vibrating, and I find a lot of time, a lot of time, a lot of days, a lot of days, I can go through the whole day with no blocks, no stuttering. Then, a lot of times I would have blocks, but I know how to get out of those blocks, and, and, and I'm not afraid I'm not afraid to look people in the eye when I talk to them. I, every, every time I have a presentation to make, I'm excited, I'm excited, it's almost like a, it's almost like I'm getting ready to play in the seventh game of the NBA championship. Man I, I can't wait to get up there, I can't wait to get up there because I got a story to tell, a story to tell and the Lord told me, said "Robert Earl, now, you can, you can go out and tell it. " And boy, I go out and I tell it [laughs].

Ricardo Patton

College basketball coach Ricardo Maurice Patton was born on October 23, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee to Juanita Patton and Leroy Reed. After his 1976 graduation from Nashville's Hume Fogg High School, where he lettered in basketball, Patton attended Belmont College in his hometown and studied physical education. He earned two athletic letters and was named a small college All-American during his senior year, paving the way for his induction into Belmont's Sports Hall of Fame. Patton earned his bachelor's degree in 1980 and went to work as a studio cameraman at Nashville's CBS affiliate, WTVF-TV. In 1985, his passion for sports began to blossom into a career when he accepted a coaching position at Two Rivers Middle School and Hillwood High School, both in Nashville.

Moving into the arena of college basketball, Patton served as assistant coach for Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee for two seasons between 1988 and 1990. He obtained an M.A. in Administration and Supervision from Trevecca Nazarene College in 1989. In 1990, Patton accepted a post as assistant coach at Arkansas-Little Rock University, but returned to Tennessee in 1991 to assist head coach Frankie Allen at Tennessee State University. Patton achieved the title of head coach at the University of Colorado in 1996. In his first season, he led the Golden Buffaloes to win 22 games - their most wins ever - resulting in their first NCAA Tournament since 1969. The team has continued to play extremely well under his direction, and the recognition Patton earned gained him the title of head coach for the 2000 Big 12 All-Star Team during a tour of Austria. However, Patton prizes good character and determination above basketball skills. To encourage these qualities, he requires his team to take an etiquette class prior to each season.

Patton golfs avidly and holds a fifth-degree black belt in Tae Kwan Do. He is a member of the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Patton and wife Jennifer have two sons, Ricardo, Jr. and Michael.

Accession Number

A2002.118

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/18/2002

Last Name

Patton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Hume-Fogg Academic Magnet High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ricardo

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

PAT01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Golfing

Favorite Quote

We're All About The Same.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

10/23/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

College basketball coach Ricardo Patton (1958 - ) was the head coach of the University of Colorado basketball team.

Employment

Middle Tennessee State University

University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Tennessee State University

University of Colorado

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:24630,311:44210,554:46450,604:47990,631:52120,704:60730,868:61220,881:67330,905:69650,954:87330,1172:88240,1194:89150,1199:91516,1228:107775,1434:108675,1452:109650,1470:114075,1555:118719,1585:121645,1696:122107,1704:122723,1713:138258,1938:139170,1979:153308,2234:155046,2272:170836,2425:179104,2568:179615,2577:180199,2588:191352,2751:197974,2843:200210,2885:215517,3100:216101,3119:223870,3196$0,0:5682,119:10356,208:11996,252:18310,414:37950,654:45750,845:46800,863:50925,986:51450,995:58570,1038:58905,1044:60714,1088:86760,1491:91750,1584:96352,1671:106024,1845:106492,1852:114430,1921:121878,2077:127832,2137:131686,2213:137590,2331:147575,2454:150520,2504:159958,2702:160262,2707:160794,2715:161934,2747:169530,2861:170565,2877:174291,2957:180544,3029:180832,3034:181980,3049
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ricardo Patton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton describes his parents' backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton shares his Baptist church experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton talks about attending Glen Elementary School

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about his struggles during childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton describes his personality as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton describes growing up in poverty

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ricardo Patton describes his childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton recalls his first jobs in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton talks about playing basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton recalls his self-growth at Hume Fogg High School in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton describes his basketball career at Hume Fogg High School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton recalls changing his attitude while attending John C. Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton talks about attending Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about quitting the basketball team at Belmont College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton recalls his basketball career at Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton recounts meeting his wife and leaving Belmont College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton describes his jobs after graduating from Belmont College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton describes coaching at the collegiate level

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton describes his recruiting technique

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton shares his advice to basketball players

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton talks about his transition to head coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon the community response to his coaching position

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton describes how his childhood affected his coaching style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton describes his coaching strategy

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton talks about the challenges he has faced as a coach

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton describes his players' recent injuries

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton talks about factors that influence the strength of his team

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton talks about his future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon the joys and pressures of coaching basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton talks about what college basketball players need to know

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton talks about his two sons

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton describes what being a HistoryMaker means to him

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando
Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques
Transcript
Okay, now you also took up taekwondo too, right?$$I started practicing martial arts, Taekwondo, in the ninth grade. And I'd come home every afternoon and watch the "Green Hornet" and fell in love with Bruce Lee at that point and had to start practicing martial arts. And fortunately we had a Taekwondo school which was in walking distance, probably three or four miles, but that was, that was walking distance for me and was able to go to, to practice with Master Shin Young Kong.$$Now did--were you able to pay for this yourself or?$$You know, at the time, we had to sign a contract. I had to sign a contract and I'm sure as a young kid. I'm not familiar with all the legalities of contracts, and I just remember not paying and, and receiving a notice from a collection agency that I owed this money. And my instructor never said anything to me. I guess he had just kind of turned delinquent bills over to the collection agency, and they sent the letters. But I finally ended up paying him later on, and he's still a very dear friend to me now, and he's still my instructor.$$What's his name again?$$Shin Young Kong, S-H-I-N, Y-O-U-N-G, K-O-N-G.$$And he's, he's a Korean, right?$$He is from Korea. He is a ninth degree master, a grand master actually, and he's one of the few in the United States. And he has really helped shape my attitude about a lot of different things and, and, and certainly I think my players now see some martial arts background in, in just kind of the way I, I do things and some of the philosophies I have about how we work.$$What, what, what's the most important part of that philosophy that you use in your basketball coaching?$$Well, I think--you know, the thing I remember most that my instructor said to me when I received my black belt was, to become a black belt means you should become a better person. And that's one of the philosophies I've, I've tried to hold onto and pass along to, to my guys. A few years ago here--a couple of years ago, the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union] attacked me because we were having prayer on the court after practice, after games, and they thought that I was trying to force religion on the guys. And, and I explained to them that by no means am I trying to force religion on any of my guys. All I'm asking them to do is have a good heart and be a good person. And I think that, that goes hand in hand with what my instructor said to me years ago: To become a black belt means you should become a better person.$$Okay, that's--I like that, but do, do you think that there's a way that you could, you know, pass those values on outside of the context of prayer, you think or?$$I think certainly; I think just in the way that you conduct yourself. I think that my players have to see the, the type of values that I'm preaching, they have to see them in me first, because I think they can, they can quickly identify someone that's being not true to, to what he's, what he's talking about or what he's preaching. And so I think first they have to see those values being displayed by, by my actions, and if they do that, then, then I think they will believe that what I'm saying is something I truly believe in.$Now I know you're, you're--have a reputation as an intense coach. And when you--what, what are some of the techniques that you use to get your team ready for a game? I know I was reading about--I think the first time you all played the University of Kansas you kind of locked them in or something, right?$$Well, well, you know, one of the things we did was I was looking--I was tossing and turning. This was my first game as an interim coach and it's against Kansas, the number four team in the country. They're coming here, and it's gonna be a packed house. So I'm tossing and turning the night before, thinking of how can I motivate these guys to come out and lay it on the line, give all they have and because at that point they hadn't done that yet. And so I finally came up with, you know, I think we ought to just sleep in the gym. Until we learn to protect our home court, we ought to just sleep in it. So then I'm tossing a little bit longer, and I'm thinking, well, we can't do that. So I wake up the next morning and I still have this deal about, you know, we ought to just sleep in the gym until we learn to protect it. So I, I, I, I talk to the athletic director about it. And, and I said, you know, the one thing I don't want it to be--become is a gimmick. I don't want the media to get a hold of it, because I don't want it to appear like it's a gimmick. This is something I truly believe in, and a lot of that stems from a martial arts background, the discipline that it teaches. So he said, "Ricardo, if you wanna do it, you can do it." So I called the local hotel. It was--it's a Ramada now. It was a Holiday Inn. I called them and got some rollaway beds, and so we, we camped out. We came to, to, to the girls' game that night. We went to the girls' game, watched them play for a half. Then we went in our locker room and watched the movie "Glory," and, and then we camped out that night. And we lost by one or two points to the number four team in the country. And I think the fans realized that things were gonna change, and they did change.$$But did the players live up to your expectations?$$They did, and that was the same group--that year was a struggle. Again, we only had six games, and I think we won probably--probably went five hundred in those games. But that was better than they had, had been, 'cause we finished the year nine and eighteen. And again, I, I coached the last six games, and we won three of those. But the following year that same group took us to the NCAA tournament.$$And that's the year you, you had Chauncey Billups.$$Chauncey Billups; had another McDonald's All-American by the name of Martice Moore, who had transferred in from Georgia Tech, who had been a freshman a year in ACC [Atlantic Coast Conference] a few years before. And so, and then we had four other seniors that were quality reserve players for us. And so they did; they lived up to the expectations. We worked extremely hard. There was some discipline in the program, and it was a good group to coach.

Jerry Harkness

Born in May 1940 in Harlem, New York, Jerry Harkness is an athlete of natural talents. As a student, he played every sport imaginable; however, when Jerry Harkness joined the basketball team at DeWitt Clinton High, his ability on the court became apparent. While attending Loyola University, his performance on the basketball court made sports history as Jerry Harkness led the team in scoring for three consecutive years. Nearly forty years after ending his collegiate basketball career, the 1,749 points he scored still remains the third highest in Loyola's history. As team captain in 1963, he led Loyola to the National Championship and was named the NCAA's Most Valuable Player.

Upon his graduation, Jerry Harkness decided to join the New York Knicks. In 1967, he was traded to the Indiana Pacers. Two years later, Jerry Harkness became a sportscaster in Indianapolis.

He also devoted much of his time to civil rights issues, by serving with the Indiana Human Rights Commission and working actively with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Currently, Jerry serves as Executive Director of the Indianapolis Chapter of 100 Black Men.

Accession Number

A2000.024

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/12/2000

Last Name

Harkness

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

DeWitt Clinton High School

Loyola University Chicago

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Jerry

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

HAR01

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

San Francisco, California

Favorite Quote

Faith Is The Substance Of Things Hoped For And The Evidence Of Things Unseen.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Birth Date

5/7/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Indianapolis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Rice

Short Description

Basketball player Jerry Harkness (1940 - ) has played for both the New York Knicks and Indiana Pacers.

Employment

New York Knicks

Indiana Pacers

WTHR News Channel 13

United Way of Greater Indiana

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:13280,237:30227,429:30761,436:36290,468:36899,477:37334,483:40466,535:41510,554:45686,608:48731,659:49601,671:56432,715:56912,721:62864,806:63824,820:77080,955:78315,980:78575,985:83450,1116:86765,1209:88650,1247:89300,1270:98078,1364:98606,1371:102920,1412:103460,1424:104180,1437:110180,1495:115948,1561:116524,1571:116812,1576:119548,1634:120052,1644:133615,1815:135995,1865:138630,1953:140925,1980:145175,2065:145940,2073:146960,2087:147555,2096:152910,2192:154695,2220:156310,2245:165990,2327:189338,2697:190382,2710:192035,2733:192383,2738:202320,2868$768,0:7820,147:10658,194:11088,200:11776,212:12120,217:18299,246:19300,258:23878,357:24233,363:27002,455:27783,467:31230,479:31526,484:32414,510:32784,516:35040,537:37624,588:37896,593:38576,604:39392,647:44288,765:45852,793:47212,816:56597,869:60818,962:61421,976:62158,988:63900,1035:66848,1095:67384,1105:72144,1125:72627,1133:73800,1157:74697,1175:78630,1260:78906,1265:79389,1274:84514,1334:85180,1346:85476,1351:85920,1364:92037,1429:92534,1437:93031,1446:93386,1452:109535,1720:112685,1793:113660,1817:114035,1823:115010,1847:124443,1964:130137,2093:135904,2201:137291,2224:138824,2270:143470,2279:144037,2287:145252,2303:150355,2376:150760,2382:161650,2484:166460,2603:169198,2659:169494,2664:170604,2686:182618,2866:182926,2871:197758,3090:198086,3095:226610,3532
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jerry Harkness' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jerry Harkness lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jerry Harkness talks about his parents' roles during his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jerry Harkness describes his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jerry Harkness talks about his mother's nervous breakdown

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jerry Harkness describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jerry Harkness describes his childhood personality and meeting Jackie Robinson

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jerry Harkness talks about his dreams and aspirations as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jerry Harkness talks about playing basketball as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jerry Harkness talks about the popularity of basketball

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jerry Harkness talks about his experiences in school

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jerry Harkness talks about his grandfather's job as an elevator operator

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jerry Harkness describes the richness of his community in Harlem, New York City, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Jerry Harkness describes growing up poor

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jerry Harkness talks about his experiences in school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jerry Harkness describes his interest in basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jerry Harkness describes Walter November's role in getting him on Loyola University's basketball team

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jerry Harkness talks about athletes that influenced him

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jerry Harkness talks about the history of the Harlem Globetrotters

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jerry Harkness describes college athletics recruiting in the late 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jerry Harkness describes the challenges of adapting to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jerry Harkness describes what shaped his development as a basketball player

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jerry Harkness describes the discrimination he faced playing college basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jerry Harkness describes the most memorable basketball games he played at Loyola University Chicago pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jerry Harkness describes the most memorable basketball games he played at Loyola University pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jerry Harkness talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jerry Harkness describes the impact winning the 1963 NCAA Championship had on his loved ones

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jerry Harkness talks about signing with the New York Knicks

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jerry Harkness remembers getting cut from the New York Knicks

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jerry Harkness talks about getting hired as the Quaker Oats Company's first black salesman

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jerry Harkness describes the strain of being cut from the New York Knicks had on his marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jerry Harkness describes the significance of the American Basketball Association

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jerry Harkness describes trying out for the Indiana Pacers

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jerry Harkness reflects upon getting cut from the New York Knicks

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jerry Harkness talks about playing for the Indiana Pacers

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Jerry Harkness describes making the longest shot in professional basketball history

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Jerry Harkness considers what he would have done differently during his professional basketball career

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Jerry Harkness talks about leaving the Indiana Pacers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jerry Harkness describes the toll playing basketball took on his knees

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jerry Harkness talks about being a sportscaster for WTHR News Channel 13 in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jerry Harkness compares being a sportscaster for television and having a sports show for radio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jerry Harkness talks about being hired as fundraiser for the United Way of Greater Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jerry Harkness describes his fundraising accomplishments

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jerry Harkness describes the programs he developed working for the United Way of Greater Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jerry Harkness talks about the Indiana Black Expo in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jerry Harkness talks ending his involvement with the Indiana Black Expo in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jerry Harkness describes his involvement with 100 Black Men

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jerry Harkness comments on athletes' failure to contribute to society pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jerry Harkness comments on athletes' failure to contribute to society pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Jerry Harkness talks about black ownership of sports teams

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jerry Harkness talks about minority ownership of basketball teams

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jerry Harkness describes the ideal athlete

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jerry Harkness describes how being an athlete has shaped his life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jerry Harkness describes how having cancer has impacted him

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jerry Harkness talks about his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jerry Harkness considers advice he would give to disenfranchised youth

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jerry Harkness describes the women he admired

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jerry Harkness talks about the significance of black history

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jerry Harkness reflects upon his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jerry Harkness narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

7$10

DATitle
Jerry Harkness describes his childhood personality and meeting Jackie Robinson
Jerry Harkness describes the most memorable basketball games he played at Loyola University Chicago pt. 1
Transcript
We--you were talking about--I'd like you to share some more memories growing up, you know. And, and I'd like you to describe--well, let me have you first describe how you were as a, you know, a young, young person. You know, were--you know some people are precocious; some people are dreamers; some people are shy.$$Um-hm, I was shy except for I--early on I realized that I was gifted athletically. I was real fast; I was the second fastest in the area. I was shy with the young ladies, and that led for a long time in my life and probably helped me because I, I penetrated into athletics later on. But early on I found out that I was fast, and I, I got involved in athletics; went to the Harlem YMCA. And in going there, later on in life, it--I, I met a person that turned my life around. I didn't have a lot of confidence in myself. Even though I, I, I excelled in sports, I still wasn't sure of myself. And this guy came up to me--and this is early on--well, I was in high school. And I didn't wanna jump into this, but it's such a big part of my life. He came up to me and said, "You know, you're not that bad of an athlete." I looked up to him, and my mouth flew open. Then he walked on and walked away. He said, "You know, you might be able to get a scholarship to, to, to college," and he walked. We were at the Harlem YMCA, and his name was Jackie Robinson. Here he used to come down and talk to the guys and the kids, and I was one of 'em, and Jackie--that was it. And strange enough, when he told me that, I felt confident. And as a senior in high school I went out for my basket--for the basketball team, only as a senior. And I made it, and we won the championship, and I got a scholarship. But he gave me that extra push, that edge, and I loved him. And he--I--he was like a, a, a spiritual dad, somebody that you just admired and just, oh. And when he told me that, it changed my life around.$$Well, I can understand that.$$Yeah.$$Did you have other contact with him besides--$$No, I was--$$Okay.$$--so bashful. If I wish I had because people ask me that. I really wish--I'd follow him sometime when he--even when he, he stopped playing ball, and he was with Chock Full O' Nuts and downtown he had become a vice president. I re--I saw him down there and followed him, just wanting to say something to him and couldn't--didn't have the nerve. Even when he was with all the ga--the kids at the Y[MCA], I was so bashful I didn't wanna go up to him or get involved with him or. But he--that's all he needed to say 'cause I, I admired him so. And my life kind of, kind of leaned that way, doing the things that he was doing, not as good (laughter), but leaned that way. I often wondered--he had that much of an effect on me.$$Well, sometimes it just takes one, one instance--$$One instance--$$--you know--$$Yeah.$$--and that, that$That's nice. Now which--what games were the most memorable. I mean, I know the one, you know, where you shot it--you know, you sat--$$Yeah.$$Was that the most memorable or--$$There are two or three games. The most memorable one for me is when Mississippi State [University, Starkville, Mississippi] had to sneak out to play us. See, we were in that era where Mississippi [State Univerisity, Starkville, Mississippi] was in that Deep South conference, Mississippi State. And they would not--they would win their conference, but they could not come--they could not come to play in the NCAA Tournament because it was against their rules to play against black players. Now they got tired of that, Babe McCarthy [James Harrison "Babe" McCarthy] and all these guys from Mississippi State, the president. And it was just the government was against them doing it. So I think the government was getting ready to, to serve an injunction to make sure they wouldn't come up. But Mississippi State said I'm tired; we're gonna play in this tournament; we're the best, and then our season ends. They split the team up and--six in each or seven in each--and they took two separate planes at different times. And they snuck out of Mississippi, and they played us in East Lansing, Michigan; and I'll tell you, all of the hate letters we got from the Ku Klux Klan and all that, that we bet not play, and we bet not win. And then we got letters from the black community, that we'd better win (laughter). So we got it from both ways - we'd bet not win; we'd better win and all. And it got so bad that [George] Ireland, the coach at the, the--watch our mail. And anything that came into the dorm, he had to look--he had to, to look through it before it got in. And they had snuck up there, and then we're getting to play. First time the Deep South had come up, and it was history. And I'll never--you don't realize history is being made until I went to shake the, the captain's hand at Mississippi State, and I saw all these lights go off, clack, clack, clack. And here we're playing in the NCAA tournament. And we play 'em tough, rather they played us tough I should say, and we won by seven or eleven points I, I think; but really tough, a lot of--I started to feel the pressure because people were--we were starting to be noted as the all-black team and kind of representing black folks, so. But it was excellent. But the white kid, Jack Egan was just a fighter, a strong Irishman from the Southside [Chicago, Illinois] who didn't care wherever--he never showed any prejudice, but he didn't show any support for us either. He was just a hard-nose; I'm on your team; we're gonna win together and that's it. And we've gotten to be real--he's a lawyer now. But he, he went through it too in the South, because he was Catholic and Irish and so he had some, he had some problems too, so it brought us all together. And he had a leadership skill that was good along with Ron Miller's leadership skill. It kind of blended us in, bringing it from his nationality, and all of us bringing it from parts of the South where they wasn't afraid. I was gettin' nervous. And Les [Hunter] and and, and Vic [W. Victor Rouse] were--had been through this before, the South with the segregation. And I would--had just had dibs of it from Virginia, so it hurted. I, I, I was influenced; I was shaken a little quicker than them, but they kept me together. It was--we had all the parts of a, a national championship team; we really did, early.