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Sheryll D. Cashin

Professor Sheryll Cashin was born on December 15, 1961 in Huntsville, Alabama to Joan and John L. Cashin, Jr. She received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1984, her M.S.c degree in English Law from Oxford University in England in 1986, and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1989.

In 1989, Cashin served as a law clerk for Judge Abner Mikva for the U.S. Court of Appeal, D.C. Circuit. The following year, she served as a law clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1993, Cashin served as director of community development for The White House during the Clinton administration. As director of community development for the National Economic Council, she oversaw urban policy and community development initiatives and advised on community development in inner-city neighborhoods. She also worked as an advisor on urban and economic policy with a focus on community empowerment programs. As staff director for the Community Empowerment Board in the Office of Vice President Al Gore, Cashin worked on community-based revitalization strategies for urban and rural communities. In 1996, Cashin left public service and joined the faculty at Georgetown University Law Center, where she has taught Constitutional Law, Race and American Law, and other subjects. In 2018 she was installed as the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Civil Rights and Social Justice.

In 2004, Cashin published The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class Are Undermining The American Dream. Then, in 2006, she published The Agitator’s Daughter: A Memoir of Four Generations of One Extraordinary African American Family, which chronicles her family history from slavery to the post-civil rights era. In 2014, she published Place Not Race: A New Version of Opportunity in America; and, in 2017, Cashin published Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy. The following year, her book The Descendants, which focused on the role of segregation in subordinating African Americans, was released. She has also written commentaries for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media.

In 2004, her book, The Failures of Integration was an Editors’ Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a three-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction in 2005, 2009, and 2018. In 2014, her book Place Not Race was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction.

Sheryll Cashin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.006

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/21/2019

Last Name

Cashin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Schools

Vanderbilt University

University of Oxford

Harvard Law School

First Name

Sheryll

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

CAS04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Morocco

Favorite Quote

Power Concedes Nothing Without A Demand, Never Did Never Will

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/15/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Cuban

Short Description

Lawyer and professor Sheryll Cashin (1962 - ) served as the White House’s director of community development during the first Clinton administration before publishing several books and becoming a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Employment

U.S. Court of Appeals

U.S. Supreme Court

The White House

National Economic Council

Office of the Vice President of the United States

Georgetown University Law Center

Favorite Color

Aqua

Paula Giddings

Professor Paula Giddings was born on November 16, 1947 in Yonkers, New York. She received her B.A. degree in English from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1969, where she served as editor of the university’s literary magazine, The Promethean.

In 1969, Giddings worked as an editorial assistant for Random House and later as a copy editor until 1972. She then became an associate book editor for Howard University Press. In 1975, Giddings moved to Paris, France where she served as the Paris bureau chief for Encore America/Worldwide News. In 1977, she was transferred to the New York office and served as an associate editor until 1979. In 1984, Giddings published her first book When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America. The following year, she served as a contributing editor and book review editor for Essence magazine. She then became a distinguished United Negro College Fund (UNCF) scholar at Spelman College. In 1988, she published In Search of Sisterhood and then joined the faculty of Douglass College at Rutgers University where she held the The Blanche, Edith, and Irving Laurie Chair in Women's Studies from 1989 to 1991. Giddings also served as a visiting professor at Princeton University and Duke University. In 2001, Giddings joined Smith College as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor of Africana Studies. She also served as the editor of Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism a peer-reviewed feminist, interdisciplinary journal. She then became Smith College department chair and honors thesis advisor for the department of Africana studies. In 2002, she edited Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race 1866-2002 and in 2008, she published Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Giddings retired from Smith College in 2017.

Giddings has also written extensively on international and national issues and has been published by the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), The Nation, and Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, among other publications.

In 1982, she received a Ford Foundation Grant; and, in 1985, Giddings was the recipient of the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. That same year, she received the Alumni Award from Howard University and the following year Giddings won the Westchester Black Women’s Political Caucus Award and the Building Brick Award from the New York Urban League. In 1990, she received the Anna Julia Cooper Award from Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, and an honorary doctorate degree in humane letters from Bennett College. In 2008, her book Ida, A Sword Among Lions won The Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award.

Paula Giddings was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 8, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.226

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/8/2018

Last Name

Giddings

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Yonkers

HM ID

PAU01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Short Description

Professor Paula Giddings (1947- ) served as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita of Africana Studies at Smith College and authored When and Where I Enter, In Search of Sisterhood, and Ida, A Sword Among Lions.

Favorite Color

Blue

Willie L. Hill, Jr.

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. was born on July 29, 1946 in Mobile, Alabama to Rennetta and Willie Hill, Sr. After graduating from Williamson High School in Mobile, Alabama, Hill received his B.S. degree in music education from Grambling State College in Grambling, Louisiana in 1968. He went on to receive both his M.M. degree and Ph.D. degree in music education from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1972 and 1987, respectively.

In 1968, Hill began teaching instrumental music in the Denver Public Schools, where he remained for sixteen years and was an instrumental music supervisor for four years. He then joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder College of Music, where he served as assistant dean and professor of music for eleven years from 1988 to 1999. During that period, he also served as the director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los Angeles, California. In 1999, Hill was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

As a woodwind specialist, he was a faculty member of the Clark Terry Great Plains Jazz Camp. He also founded and served as co-director of the Rich Matteson-Telluride Jazz Academy, and later founded the Mile High Jazz Camp in Boulder, Colorado. In 1984, Hill was a member of The Colorado Clarinet Choir touring organization, which represented the United States in London, England at the International Clarinet Symposium. His experiences as a conductor include numerous citywide honor performances, All-State Jazz Ensembles, All-County Bands, and as musical director at The Schwayder and Bonfils Theaters.

Hill was a former member of the Denver Broncos Jazz Ensemble and a regular performer at the Denver Auditorium Theater, Paramount Theater, and Boettcher Concert Hall. Hill also performed with George Burns, Liza Minnelli, Lena Horne, Lou Rawls, Ben Vereen, Lola Falana, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis Jr., Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Jon Faddis, and many others.

He served as president of The National Association for Music Education (MENC) and the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE). He was also a member of the writing team for MENC's Vision 2020 program and a member of the national board of directors for Young Audiences, Inc. Hill later served as president of the Colorado Music Educators Association and Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society.

In 1998, he was inducted into the Colorado Music Educators Hall of Fame. In 2001, Hill was the recipient of the Lawrence Berk Leadership Award presented by the IAJE. Hill co-authored Learning to Sight-Read Jazz, Rock, Latin, and Classical Styles, and was the author of The Instrumental History of Jazz, Approaching the Standards, and Jazz Pedagogy: The Jazz Educator's Handbook and Resource Guide. Hill is listed in the first edition of Who's Who among Black Americans, Who's Who among International Musicians and was a 2003 Lowell Mason Fellow.

Willie L. Hill, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.221

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/5/2018

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Willie

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

HIL19

Favorite Season

October

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribean

Favorite Quote

Never Put Off for Tomorrow What You Can Do Today

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/29/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Fried Fish

Short Description

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. (1946- ) served as assistant dean and professor of music at the University of Colorado, Boulder and was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Favorite Color

Purple

William Banfield

Professor and composer William Banfield was born on March 24, 1961 in Detroit, Michigan to William Banfield and Anne Banfield. He attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan and graduated in 1979. Banfield enrolled at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated with his B.M. degree in jazz studies in 1983. He later received his Th.M. degree from Boston University in 1988, and his D.M.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1992.

Banfield accepted his first teaching position at Madison Park High School in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1983, he resigned from his position and founded BMagic Records. Two years later, Banfield founded Young Artists Development, Inc. After he received his D.M.A. degree in 1992, Banfield served as assistant professor of African American Studies/Music at Indiana University. In 1997, Banfield served as the endowed chair of humanities, professor of music, director of American cultural studies/jazz, popular, world music studies at the University of St. Thomas, Minnesota. He then became the W.E.B. DuBois fellow at Harvard University in 2002. The following year, Banfield was the visiting Atelier artist at Princeton University; and, in 2005, he was hired as a visiting professor of composition at the University of Minnesota. Banfield subsequently accepted an appointment at the Berklee College of Music as a professor and director of the Africana Studies program. In 2010, he was hired by Quincy Jones’ foundation called the QFoundation, to write a national music curriculum for American popular music.

Banfield has also released a number of albums which include Extensions of the Tradition in 1996, Striking Balance in 2004, Spring Forward in 2009, and Playing with Other People’s Heads in 2014. He was also the host of National Public Radio’s “Landscapes in Color: Conversations with Black American Composers” and an original program on WCAL at St. Olaf College entitled, “Essays of Note.” Banfield has authored seven books, completed six symphonies and two operas. In 2014, Banfield launched JazzUrbane, a contemporary jazz recording label. He has also served on the Pulitzer Prize composition panel.

William Banfield was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.218

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/17/2018

Last Name

Banfield

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

BAN06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

It Don't Mean A Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/24/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Professor and composer William Banfield (1961- ) was made director of Africana Studies at the Berklee College of Music in 2006, and has released several albums as a recording artist, wrote six symphonies and two operas, and published seven books.

Favorite Color

Blue

Steven Rogers

Professor Steven Rogers was born on June 14, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois to J.P. Rogers and Ollie Mae Rogers. He was accepted into A Better Change program and attended Radnor High School in Radnor, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1975. He went on to receive his B.A. degree from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts in 1979, and his M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1985.

After graduation from Williams College, Rogers worked at Cummins Engine Company and later moved to Rocky Mount, North Carolina to work for Consolidated Diesel in 1981. He went to work for Bain and Company; and, in 1989, Rogers and his wife Michele Rogers purchased their first company, Fenchel Lampshade Company in Chicago, Illinois. In the following years, the couple purchased another lampshade company and a retail store. In 1995, Rogers sold his ventures and joined the faculty at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. During his tenure, Rogers became the director of the Larry and Carol Levy Institute for Entrepreneurial Practice. After seventeen years at the Kellogg School of Management, Rogers joined the faculty at Harvard Business School in 2012. The following year, Rogers became the faculty director for the Inner City Initiative for Competition. In 2016, he was a volunteer visiting professor at the United States Military Academy for the Army at West Point. Rogers also served as strategic advisor at OCA Ventures.

Rogers joined the board of directors of SuperValu, Inc. as director in 1998. He also joined the board at S.C. Johnson & Wax and Oakmark Mutual Funds. Rogers was named one of the top twelve entrepreneurship professors at graduate business schools in the U.S. by BusinessWeek in 1996. The following year, he was named one of the fourteen “New Stars of Finance” by BusinessWeek. In 1998, he was selected as Entrepreneur of The Year by Ernst & Young and received the Bicentennial Medal for Distinguished Achievement from Williams College in 2000. In 2005, Rogers received the Bert King Award for Service from the African American Student Union at Harvard Business School. Rogers was also named one of the top 150 influential people in America by Ebony Magazine. Rogers was also the most decorated professor in the Kellogg School of Management’s history and received the Outstanding Professor Award for the Executive Program 26 times and the M.B.A. Lawrence Levengood Outstanding Professor of the Year award twice.

Rogers has two daughters: Akilah and Ariel.

Steven Rogers was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 16, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.212

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/14/2018

Last Name

Rogers

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Steven

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

ROG10

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Pigs get fat and hogs get slaughtered.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Grits

Short Description

Professor Steven Rogers (1959 - ) taught at the Kellogg School of Management for seventeen years and at Harvard Business School for seven years.

Favorite Color

Brown

Dorothy Burnham

Professor Dorothy Burnham was born on March 22, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York to Frederick Burnham and Aletha Dowridge. She attended P.S. #11 and graduated from Girls High School in Brooklyn in 1932. Burnham received her B.S. degree in microbiology in 1936 from Brooklyn College in New York.

In the early 1930s, Burnham was active with the American Student Union; and, in 1941, she and her husband, Louis, moved to Birmingham, Alabama to the headquarters of the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC). During that period, the Burnhams, along with civil rights activists Esther Jackson and James Jackson, coordinated sit-ins, freedom rides and voter registration drives. They also worked to initiate equal pay for workers, integrate the public transportation systems and public institutions. Burnham worked in the Birmingham office until it closed in 1949. In 1949, she returned to Brooklyn and worked as a laboratory technician in New York City area hospitals. Later, Burnham joined the faculty at Hostas Community College and also taught biology, bioethics and health sciences in the adult education program at Empire State University, in the City University of New York (CUNY) system, during which time she was also active in the New York State Teachers Union.

Burnham was active in the national organization of Women for Racial and Economic Equality, as well as with the Sisters Against South African Apartheid, Genes and Gender, and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. She also served as president of the Louis E. Burnham Awards Fund. In 2011, Burnham was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Better World Awards by the New York Friends of People's World, for her role in the fight for quality public education. Burnham was named a Brooklyn Renaissance Woman, and her lifetime achievements were recognized by New York State Senator Velmanette Montgomery during the reading of a Senate resolution. Burnham was the recipient of the Heritage Award from State University of New York Empire State College in 2012.

Burnham, the widow of Louis Burnham, has four adult children: Claudia, Margaret, Linda and Charles.

Dorothy Burnham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15 and 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.209

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Burnham

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR28

Favorite Season

N/A

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

N/A

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/22/1915

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Professor Dorothy Burnham (1915- ) worked for the Southern Negro Youth Congress in Birmingham, Alabama and was a laboratory technician in New York City area hospitals before teaching at Hostas Community College and Empire State University.

Favorite Color

N/A

Reginald L. Jackson

Visual artist and professor Reginald L. Jackson was born in 1945 in Springfield, Massachusetts. He graduated from Springfield Technical High School in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1961 and received his A.A. degree in graphic arts, printing and photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York in 1965. He studied art for two years at Paier College of Art in Hamden Connecticut before enrolling at Yale University, where he received his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees in graphic design, film and photography in 1970. He obtained his M.S.W. degree in policy and planning from SUNY Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York in 1976, and his Ph.D. degree in communications and visual anthropology from the Union Institute in 1979. He completed post-graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the department of urban studies and planning in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jackson was a founding member of the Black Workshop in 1968, a group of African American graduate students studying architecture, city planning and graphic design at Yale University. He later joined the faculty at Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts in 1974. Jackson’s photographic work was presented in the “African Extensions: A Photographic Search for African Survivals in the Americas” exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Brunswick, Maine in 1981. In 1986, Jackson established Olaleye Communications, Inc. to document, create, and distribute educational, visual, and cultural information pertaining to African retentions in the Americas.

His work was featured in Black Boston: documentary photography and the African-American experience. Jackson was chosen as a Simmons College Man of the Year in 2007. Jackson also served as the chair of visual communications, dean of international relations, and academic vice president at the African University College of Communications in Accra, Ghana from 2008 to 2012.

Jackson’s work and papers are held at The Yale University Art Gallery, The Boston Athenaeum, the Library of Congress, MIT Museum, Studio Museum in Harlem, the Bowdoin Museum of Art, the RISD Museum of Art and Simmons University and Amherst Colleges.

Jackson’s board affiliations, memberships and tenured honors include: the Boston Pan-African Forum, the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health, artist emeritus at Northeastern University's African American Master Artists in Residence Program, emeritus professor of communications at Simmons University, Society of Senior Ford Fellows and fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution.

He has received numerous academic awards including a Fulbright Fellowship, Ford Foundation grants and fellowships from the Smithsonian Institute, University of Massachusetts, Boston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Reginald L. Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.208

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Reginald

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

JAC47

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Place Warm

Favorite Quote

Lets keep it rolling

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/10/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Avocado

Short Description

Visual artist and professor Reginald L. Jackson (1945- ) served as professor at Simmons College and served as dean of international relations and vice president at the African University College of Communications in Accra, Ghana from 2008 to 2012.

Favorite Color

Red and Green

Walter Fluker

Professor and minister Walter Fluker was born on August 26, 1951 in Vaiden, Mississippi. He served in U.S. Army as a chaplain's assistant from 1971 to 1973, received his B.A. degree in philosophy and biblical studies from Trinity College in 1977, and M.Div. degree in 1980 from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. Fluker completed his Ph.D. degree in social ethics at Boston University, in 1988.

From 1981 to 1986, Fluker served as pastor of St. John’s Congregation Church, U.C.C. in Springfield, Massachusetts and became university chaplain and assistant professor of religion at Dillard University in 1986. He became assistant professor of Christian ethics at Vanderbilt Divinity School, and assistant pastor at First Baptist Church. In 1991, Fluker was named dean of black church studies and Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial professor of theology and black church studies at the Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. In 1992, Fluker became editor of the Howard Thurman Papers Project. He served as director, National Resource Center for the Development of Ethical Leadership from the Black Church Tradition at CRCD in 1993. In 1998, Fluker joined Morehouse College as executive director of The Leadership Center (renamed the Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership), the Coca Cola professor of leadership studies and professor of philosophy and religion. In 2004, Fluker served as visiting professor for the University of Capetown Graduate School of Business, and as a distinguished lecturer in the International Human Rights Exchange Program. Fluker was a distinguished speaker for the U.S. Embassy in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria; Cape Town, Pretoria and Durban, South Africa, China; and India. Having served visiting professorships at the Harvard College and Divinity School, Princeton Divinity School and Columbia Divinity School, Fluker joined the Boston University School of Theology faculty as the Martin Luther King, Jr. professor of ethical leadership and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Initiative for the Development of Ethical Leadership in 2010. He consulted for the Democratic Leadership Council National Conversation, Goldman Sachs Global Leaders Program, the Department of Education, the Department of State, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation.

In 2004, Fluker joined the editorial board of American Association of Colleges and Universities’ publication, Liberal Education. In 2006, he served on the Boston University School of Theology board of overseers. Fluker also served on the advisory board of the ‘Core Commitments: Education Students for Personal and Social Responsibility’ with the Association of American Colleges and Universities. He has served as a board member for the Atlanta Speech School, Trinity Press International, and the Howard Thurman Educational Trust. He is a member of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Society for Christian Ethics and Society for the Study of Black Religion.

Fluker’s recent publications include The Papers of Howard Washington Thurman, and a 2016 publication ‘The Ground Has Shifted: The Future of the Black Church in Post-Racial America’ that received the Theology and Religious Studies PROSE Award honorable mention.

Fluker and his wife Sharon Watson Fluker, have four children and six grandchildren.

Walter Fluker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.205

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/12/2018

Last Name

Fluker

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Walter

Birth City, State, Country

Vaiden

HM ID

FLU01

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

Stay in the light

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/26/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Peach Pie

Short Description

Professor and minister Walter E. Fluker (1951- ) joined the faculty of Boston University School of Theology as the Martin Luther King, Jr. professor of ethical leadership and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Initiative for the Development of Ethical Leadership in 2010.

Favorite Color

Blue

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr.

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was born on November 7, 1954 in St. Louis, Missouri to Arlena Scott Franklin and Dr. John E. Franklin, Sr. His family moved to Detroit, Michigan in the late 1950s and he graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy in 1972. He studied theater at New York University School of the Arts before obtaining his B.S. degree in zoology from Michigan State University in 1976. In 1980, Franklin received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. He later earned an M.Sc. degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health in 1999 and an M.A. degree from Northwestern University in 2014.

Franklin began his career as an instructor in psychiatry at New York Hospital Cornell University Medical College in 1984. At the affiliated Westchester Division facility in White Plains, New York, he served as the attending physician in the substance abuse and eating disorder units. In 1986, Franklin moved to Newark, New Jersey to join the faculty of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School. He worked with substance abuse patients at two Newark area institutions, the Institute for Counseling and Training and St. Barnabas Hospital, and held consultancies with the State of New Jersey and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In 1993, Franklin began a long-term career at Northwestern University and achieved the rank of full professor. He held faculty appointments in the departments of psychiatry, surgery and medical education/medical humanities and bioethics. Franklin provided psychiatric services for medical/ surgical inpatients, directed the Addiction Division and fellowship, had a general psychiatric practice and was the transplant psychiatrist for the Kovler Organ Transplantation Center. In 2002, Franklin was named associate dean for minority and cultural affairs at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and in 2016, he became associate dean for diversity, inclusion and student support.

In 1985, Franklin helped found the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, and he has co-authored numerous papers, chapters, books in the areas of addiction, organ transplantation and health disparities. Franklin served on national committees for the National Institute for Drug Abuse, Institute of Medicine and Federal Drug Administration. He has served on community boards, including Lakefront Supportive Housing, Community Counseling Centers of Chicago, Westinghouse Scholars and did psychiatric disability examinations for the State of Illinois for 20 plus years. Franklin is a 2002 Leadership Greater Chicago fellow. He has served as a member of numerous professional organizations including the American Psychiatric Association, the National Medical Association and Black Psychiatrists of America. In 2017, he was elected into the Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honors medical society. Franklin has been recognized for his teaching contributions with awards and commitment to issues of diversity; in 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Franklin and his wife, Terri West Franklin, have three children.

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.111

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/21/2018

Last Name

Franklin

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

FRA17

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If it ain't broke don't fix it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/7/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. (1954- ) became an expert on addiction and organ transplants and has an over twenty five year career at Northwestern University Hospital and Medical School. In 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Favorite Color

Brown

Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence

Professor and psychiatrist Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence was born on June 27, 1937 in Indianapolis, Indiana. He graduated from Cathedral High School in Indianapolis and went on to receive his B.A. degree in pre-medicine in 1959 from Indiana University-Bloomington, and his M.D. degree in 1962 from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

Lawrence interned at E. J. Meyer Memorial Hospital in Buffalo, from 1962 to 1963 and then served two years as a general medical officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1963 to 1965. He returned to Indiana University School of Medicine and completed his residency and fellowship in child psychiatry and his chief residency in general psychiatry in 1969 at Indiana University School of Medicine. He was board certified in psychiatry in 1970 and child psychiatry in 1971. Lawrence was then assigned to the Child Guidance Clinic at Wilford Hall U.S. Air Force Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas from 1969 to 1972. He then joined the faculty of the Medical School of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) as assistant professor in 1972 and served as associate dean for student affairs (Dean of Students) in the Medical School in 1981, serving in that role until his retirement in 2005. Lawrence retired as tenured professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Family and Community Medicine in 2005. The University of Texas Board of Regents bestowed upon him the title professor emeritus in 2005, and Lawrence returned to the department of psychiatry on a half-time basis to construct the faculty development process for the department.

Lawrence served as a member of numerous organizations including as the 92nd President of the National Medical Association (NMA) from 1993 to 1994. He also served as past chairperson of the Group on Student Affairs (GSA) Minority Affairs Section of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). He was awarded the AAMC Minority Affairs distinguished Service Award for his leadership and work on behalf of underrepresented minority students throughout the U.S. in 2004. He also served on the Council of Children, Adolescents and their Families of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) of which he is a Distinguished Life Fellow. He is also a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), he served as past membership chairperson. He received the 2005 AACAP Jeanne Spurlock Lectureship Award for his contributions nationally and internationally to the understanding of the role of race and culture in children’s mental health.

Lawrence served on the Executive Committee of United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County and chaired the Board of Trustees. He also chaired the Management Board of San Antonio Fighting Back, a major substance abuse intervention project funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Lawrence and his wife, Dr. Barbara Lawrence, have three children; Courtney Nicole Lawrence, MD, Leonard Michael Lawrence, MD, and David Wellington Lawrence, MPA. They also have five grandchildren.

Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 6, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.119

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/6/2018

Last Name

Lawrence

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

LAW06

Favorite Season

My Birthday

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Lisbon, Portugal

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/27/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Professor and psychiatrist Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence (1937- ) was named professor emeritus University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Medical School in 2005 and previously served as associate dean for Student Affairs in the Medical School in 1981, and a tenured professor.

Favorite Color

Blue