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Frances Frazier

Education consultant and life coach Frances Curtis Frazier was born on May 19, 1948 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Patsy Thompson Curtis, a homemaker and William Henry Curtis, a building manager. In 1966, she graduated from Little Flower Catholic High School. After high school, Fran applied to become a Vista Volunteer, the national forerunner of the current Vista Program. She was in one of the first groups of this national initiative for young people to become part of “The Great America”. She studied at John Hopkins University and worked with maternal deprivation babies. Later she was sent to Portsmouth, Virginia in a small community to help residents who were being harassed by the Klu Klux Klan. Fran taught peanut farmers how to read and write. It was after her Vista experience that with the help of a local school principal she entered Norfolk State University and in 1972 received her B.S. degree in special education. Fran received a Master/Doctoral fellowship to attend The Ohio State University and graduated with her M.A. degree in learning disabilities and behavioral disorders in 1973.

In 1986, Frazier was a special education teacher for Columbus City Schools, working primarily with seventh and eighth graders. After working as a special needs coordinator for the National Assault Prevention Center of Columbus, Ohio from 1985 to 1987, Frazier was hired to the executive staff for the Director of the Ohio Department of Human Services. While at the Department of Human Services, Frazier worked for the Office of Minority Family Preservation and Prevention Services and served as an administrator for cultural initiatives. She has also served as an education and school climate consultant for universities, colleges, professional associations, school districts, and social service agencies across the country. Since 1979, Frazier has established programs, conducted retreats and given presentations on issues of sisterhood, spiritual development and self-empowerment.

In her current role, Frazier is the principal investigator of “Rise Sister Rise,” a research study on trauma and resiliency in African American girls that was developed in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and women’s organizations across the state. Additionally, Frazier serves as a senior associate for Everyday Democracy, an organization that promotes public dialogue and civic engagement in communities and workplaces.

Frazier has received numerous awards and commendations for her work including the Black Family Award from the Columbus Urban League for co-creating “Black Family Week” in the state of Ohio; the “Woman of the Year” Award from the Eldon W. Ward YMCA; the “Women Making A Difference Award for Community Leadership” from the Ohio Department of Health; from Triedstone Missionary Baptist Church she received the “Remarkable Women’s Award” for her work in the Columbus community. She has also garnered the YWCA “Woman of Achievement Award” in Racial Justice and recognition from the State of Ohio for engaging state employees to participate in workplace dialogues on racism. Frazier has received the “Golden Rulers Award” from the Columbus, Ohio School Board. She is also a recipient of the “Living Faith” Award from the Columbus Metropolitan Area Church Council.

Frances Curtis Frazier was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 6, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.078

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/4/2012 |and| 5/10/2013

Last Name

Frazier

Maker Category
Middle Name

Curtis

Schools

The Ohio State University

Norfolk State University

Little Flower Catholic High School

St. Elizabeth's Parochial School

The DePaul Catholic School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Days

First Name

Frances

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

FRA08

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

5th - 12th grade African american girls; adults

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $100

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water, Nature

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

5/19/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbus

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pastries

Short Description

Social activist and education consultant Frances Frazier (1948 - ) is an education and civic leader in the State of Ohio, having established programs, conducted retreats and given presentations on issues of sisterhood, spiritual development and self-empowerment across the country. She is the principal investigator for the ground-breaking research on trauma and resiliency in African American girls in Ohio, “Rise Sister Rise.”

Employment

Freelance Work

Everyday Democracy

Ohio Department of Human Services

Buckeye Boys Ranch

Columbus City Schools

National Assault Prevention Center

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Frances Frazier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about how her mother and how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier recalls advice her mother shared with her as a teenager

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about her father, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about her father, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about her parents' employment as a maid and butler in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about her childhood neighborhood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about her siblings and attending a Catholic elementary school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Frances Frazier recalls her experience at St. Elizabeth's Parochial School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Frances Frazier talks about moving to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's Nicetown neighborhood and attending Catholic schools

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about attending St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's Nicetown neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about her desire as a teenager to become a nun

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about her taste in music as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about a turbulent period of her youth and moving into a federal housing project in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier explains how observing domestic violence as an adolescent affected her personality

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about her home life during her high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about writing short stories and plays as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Frances Frazier talks about how the 1963 March on Washington influenced her plans for the future

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Frances Frazier talks about her decision to join VISTA after graduating from high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about joining the VISTA program in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about a year of service with the VISTA program in the Mount Hermon community of Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier recalls being threatened by Ku Klux Klan members while serving in the VISTA program in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about VISTA training and teaching in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about her decision to enroll at Norfolk State College in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about mentors and her mother's reaction to her rebellious behavior

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about social mores at Norfolk State College during the late 1960s and early 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about black college basketball players during the late 1960s and early 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about the special education program at Norfolk State College in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about volunteering in Norfolk, Virginia's Ghent neighborhood while a student at Norfolk State College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about enrolling in a master's program at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about Dr. Frank Hale and his efforts to increase diversity at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about the transition from Norfolk State College to The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about applying theories in special education to her work with children with learning and behavioral disorders

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about her decision not to complete her doctoral studies at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about teaching boys with behavioral disorders at Buckeye Boys Ranch

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier recounts a spiritual experience she had after her husband's death

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier describes physical and psychological changes she felt after having a spiritual experience

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about the origins of her women's group, A Quality of Sharing

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about the inspiration for and the philosophy of her women's group, A Quality of Change

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about reading women's literature and the early meetings of her women's group, A Quality of Sharing

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Frances Frazier's interview, session two

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about the philosophy of her women's group, A Quality of Sharing

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about community responses to her women's group, A Quality of Sharing

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about working for the Ohio Association for Retarded Citizens

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about the origins and development of Black Youth Week and Black Family Week in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about Reverend Dr. Charles Booth and her Sunday morning radio show, Focus on the Family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about her Sunday morning radio show, Focus on the Family

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about her working for the Child Assault Prevention Project

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about the impact of Grace Williams and HistoryMaker Dorothy Height on the YWCA

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier explains her definition of womanism and how it informed the activities of her women's group, A Quality of Sharing

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about African American women leaders of the 19th century

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about attending the Third World Conference on Women in Nairobi, Kenya in 1985

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier describes her experience at the Third World Conference on Women in Nairobi, Kenya

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about organizing around women's health issues in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about attending a women's summit in Moscow, Soviet Union and working for the Ohio Department of Human Services

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about a spiritual calling that influenced her plans for the future

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier explains the role of spiritual directors within the Catholic church

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about the end of her career at the Ohio Department of Human Services

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about the origins of the Women's Day of Prayer in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about Reverend Dr. Leon Troy and Second Baptist Church in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about her relationship with Reverend Dr. Leon Troy

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier describes husbands' reactions to her women's empowerment activities

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier recalls the incident that inspired her to organize a national women's conference

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier explains her motivations for organizing the Conference for the Awakened Woman

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier explains how the Women's Movement stifled the political empowerment of black women, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier explains how the Women's Movement stifled the political empowerment of black women, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about the sabotage of the Conference for Awakened Women in the early 2000s

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about the relationship between the African American community and immigrant groups in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about the purpose of federal refugee funds

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about early experiences working with girls on issues of aggression and victimization

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about her various professional roles, including consultant and community organizer

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about the origins of the research study, Rise Sister Rise, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about the origins of the research study, Rise Sister Rise, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about the planning period for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about the Ohio cities selected for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier details the findings of her research study, Rise Sister Rise, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier details the findings of her research study, Rise Sister Rise, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about the Search Institute's 40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier talks about the participant selection process and survey criteria for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier talks about partnerships and events organized in the wake of the Rise Sister Rise research study findings

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier talks about her hopes for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier talks about partner organizations and funding for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Frances Frazier talks about her future plans for the research study, Rise Sister Rise

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Frances Frazier talks about a future event she would like to organize

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Frances Frazier talks about what she would have done differently in life

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Frances Frazier reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Frances Frazier talks about women she has mentored

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Frances Frazier reflects upon her life

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Frances Frazier describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Frances Frazier narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Frances Frazier narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Frances Frazier recalls being threatened by Ku Klux Klan members while serving in the VISTA program in Portsmouth, Virginia
Frances Frazier talks about the inspiration for and the philosophy of her women's group, A Quality of Change
Transcript
Now, tell us that story now about the [Ku Klux] Klan [KKK] shooting at you. There's gotta be a whole story to that.$$It was. Well, they didn't necessarily want us in this community [Mount Hermon, Portsmouth, Virginia]. And we were at a--we were doing our shopping like at a Kroger, but it wasn't as sophisticated as a Kroger but, and a group of Klan members started walking around the--inside the parking lot.$$Now, how did you know they were Klan members?$$Because they were dressed in white.$$With the hoods?$$With the hoods.$$That's a good--$$It's a good way to know.$$Yes.$$So I just happened to look out there, and I said, "Marcia [ph.], look." So we both look out, and we see these guys walking around in the parking center. (Laughter) And we didn't take our groceries out of the shopping cart. We just paid and drove the shopping cart home. And we peed in our pants all the way home. We were scared to death. We pulled the blinds and the shades and stuff down, just really scared. So we called--I even remember this woman's name, but I won't call it. But she was with VISTA [Volunteers in Service to America, later, AmeriCorps VISTA]. She was like our VISTA contact. So we called her and said, "You know, the Klan's in our neighborhood and just need to know what to do." And we didn't get--I can't remember what she said, "Don't leave your community. Stay with your community." And so we're thinking, it might not be good to stay with our community because we had really gotten to know these people. And we felt that they could burn their houses down. You know, I knew they were coming to burn our house down. They could burn them or they could really harm the people. If they were looking for us, then it might be better if we left our neighborhood. So we--you know, when I think about it now, it's like, was this real? But anyway, we put scarves on our heads. We tried to disguise ourselves and you had, then, you had to take a ferry from Portsmouth [Virginia] to Norfolk [Virginia]. So that's what we did. And there were VISTAS in Norfolk, so we stayed with them. And the Feds caught a carload of these Klan members and they had Molotov cocktails. They had guns. They were really gonna try to kill us. So then this woman, who is our rep [representative], comes to Norfolk to see us. And like, she's like, "You should not have left your community. Stay in your community." And we're like, "We're nineteen years old now," you know? "We're doing the best we can. We're scared to death," and we didn't want our commun- we didn't want people in our community to--I mean they could've bombed, you could have blown our house down with a good wind. So we just didn't wanna jeopardize, jeopardize our community. So eventually we went back and opened up a little daycare center for our community. And I continued working with peanut farmers, and we had our graduation. But then I was ready to go to college then.$Now explain to us what the crisis was where this would be necessary.$$Well, it was after Vietnam [War]. A lot of our men who were in college or who might have been considerable desirable mates, most of them had been killed in the Vietnam War, or when they had come back, they were suffering terribly from posttraumatic stress syndrome, or were now on heavy drugs. And it was just--our community had been decimated by the Vietnam War. And life for African American women during this time was awful. And Haki's [HM Haki Madhubuti] theory was that women are the light of the world and if women were not healthy mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually that neither would communities and neither would children, and eventually it would be our destruction. And he felt that our men, who were healthy, who were able-bodied, who were whole needed to step up and be those second husbands. Well, and June Jordan had subsequently had written about this as well. I read the article. I read the book. And I was kind of fixated on the article and I said to myself, "This won't happen." But I knew it was happening, and it was happening more than we knew in many places. And I think certainly man-sharing was happening even if it wasn't approved. But if I looked at it as a, as a potential possibility that might help our community, I wasn't sure it would be sanctioned by our community. Maybe a great idea, but not wholeheartedly approved of because I knew women would have a rough time with that, especially if you had a really great man who now felt that he should help two or three of the other women in the neighborhood with their children or with anything that a man might be needed for to help stabilize a family. So what I thought about was if women could learn how to really be friends with each other, actually learn how to love each other and care for each other, and create real sisterhood, that maybe that might help in stabilizing our communities and so A Quality of Sharing was our attempt at helping black women to learn how to love themselves, so that they would be comfortable enough to learn how to really create friendship and bonds of sisterhood with other women to get work done, to literally become change agents right in our own communities, so that became my work.

Ann Walker

Civil rights activist Ann Walker was born in Freehold, New Jersey, on February 27th, 1928. Her mother, Mabel B. Edwards, was a seamstress, and her father, Robert Willard Edwards, worked in the trust department at Howard Savings. She attended Jefferson Junior High and Court Street School before Freehold High School in Freehold, New Jersey. For two years after her high school graduation in 1946, Walker attended Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia. In 1950, she married Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, who would later serve as Chief of Staff for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and as executive director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) from 1960 to 1964. In 1951, Walker graduated from Howard University with her B.S. degree in accounting and economics, and one year later, her first child, Ann Patrice, was born. In the next five years, Walker would have three more children.

During the 1960s, Walker and her husband were very active in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1961, they participated in the Freedom Rides, for which Walker would spend a week in jail in Jackson County, Mississippi. Two years later, in 1963, during Martin Luther King Jr.’s campaign to desegregate Birmingham, Walker was beaten on Mother’s day at the Gaston Motel by the National Guard.

In the 1970s, the Walkers lived in New York, where for thirty-seven years her husband, Dr. Walker, was Senior Pastor at Canaan Baptist Church of Christ in Harlem. During this time, Walker volunteered with the Westchester Foster Grandparents, serving one-on-one as a tutor and mentor to young people. She also served as board president for two terms at the Yonkers YWCA and as Mayor’s Liaison to the Black Community in Yonkers. In 1975, after raising her children, Walker entered the workforce at North American Philips as the Branch Director of their credit union. She retired in 1989, and in 2004, when her husband also retired, the Walkers moved to Chester, Virginia.

Ann Walker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 22, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/24/2010

Last Name

Walker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Ann

Schools

Jefferson Junior High School

Court Street School

Freehold High School

Virginia Union University

First Name

Theresa

Birth City, State, Country

Freehold

HM ID

WAL13

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/27/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Civil rights activist Ann Walker (1928 - ) participated in the Freedom Rides and the campaign to desegregate Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. Her husband, Reverend Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker, served as Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s chief of staff.

Employment

North American Philips Company

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ann Walker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ann Walker lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ann Walker describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ann Walker describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ann Walker talks about her mother's organizational involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ann Walker describes her parents' personalities and her likeness to her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ann Walker describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ann Walker describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ann Walker describes her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ann Walker remembers the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ann Walker describes her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ann Walker remembers her childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ann Walker talks about her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ann Walker recalls the racial discrimination at Freehold High School in Freehold, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ann Walker describes her social life at Freehold High School in Freehold, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ann Walker recalls her early experiences of travel

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ann Walker recalls her attempt to organize a walkout protest

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ann Walker recalls her graduation from Freehold High School in Freehold, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ann Walker describes her experiences at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ann Walker recalls meeting her husband, Reverend Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ann Walker remembers the notable figures at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ann Walker talks about the births of her children

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ann Walker describes her experiences of discrimination in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ann Walker describes her early exposure to The Links

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ann Walker recalls the reprisals against her husband, Reverend Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ann Walker describes the members of the SCLC

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ann Walker remembers her role in the Mississippi Freedom Summer

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ann Walker recalls being jailed for her activism in Jackson, Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ann Walker recalls being jailed for her activism in Jackson, Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ann Walker recalls being beaten by police in the aftermath of Project C

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ann Walker remembers being jailed in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ann Walker remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ann Walker recalls leaving the South

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ann Walker describes her experiences of discrimination in Yonkers, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ann Walker talks about her experiences as a pastor's wife

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ann Walker talks about her son's incarceration

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ann Walker recalls working for the North American Philips Company

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ann Walker describes the notable members of the SCLC

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ann Walker recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ann Walker remembers her husband's association with Nelson Rockefeller

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Ann Walker remembers the Harlem community in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Ann Walker describes her involvement with The Links

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Ann Walker describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ann Walker reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ann Walker describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ann Walker narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ann Walker narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Ann Walker recalls her attempt to organize a walkout protest
Ann Walker recalls being jailed for her activism in Jackson, Mississippi, pt. 1
Transcript
Do you recall any, any civil rights activity at all in, in--when you were growing up (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The only thing I re--$$--any organized, you know, activity or the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] being involved?$$There was a Mr. Fenderson [ph.], he was always trying to get people to join the NAACP, course I was a kid. But I do remember in my high school [Freehold High School, Freehold, New Jersey], one of the girls was going to be in a play and they said her brother before her had been in this play and he had gotten into a--jumped into a barrel of cotton and came out, you know, with his eyes big and whatnot. And the black kids complained. And they said that his sister was going to have to do the same thing. And we decided if she did it, we were gonna walk out. Well, I sat with the orchestra down at the front, I was playing violin then. And when she, she didn't jump in the barrel of flour, she jumped behind the barrel of flour and was making the big eyes and whatnot. And I got up and I walked out, nobody else walked out with me. But we had said we were gonna walk out. I went to my locker and got my things and went home, because assembly was the last period of the day. And the next day the principal asked me why did I leave, and I told her, I did not want to see somebody of my race making a fool of themself. She didn't reprimand me, I didn't get any punishment or anything.$$Wha- what did the other students say as their reason for not (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) They didn't say anything, no. I had just walked and that was it (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) They never--they didn't give any, any excuse for not walking out?$$No excuse or nothing, unh-uh.$$Okay. You, you didn't ask them why they--why they--$$No I didn't ask them, I was mad with them.$$Okay. So this--this is your senior year, correct?$$It was either my junior or senior year.$Were there any whites at the--angry white people at the bus stop (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) When got--when we got to Jackson, Mississippi there were policemen on both sides and if you wanted to go someplace else you couldn't. But they escorted you right into the white waiting room and arrested you. As soon as you stepped in that door, you were under arrest. And so we spent the first night in the Jackson, Mississippi city jail. The two white girls [Margaret Leonard and Miriam Feingold Real] were in the cell next to me. They gave us cold peas and cold corn for dinner. And the mice were running up and down the bars of the jail--of the cells. And I could talk to the two white girls in the next cell, see we--they were segregated.$$'Cause they were white they had their own cell.$$Yeah, right they were in--yeah. And then the next morning, I kept notes and I still have them of every day we were in jail. I think like five or six o'clock the next morning they got us up and took us to the county jail, the Hinds County jail [Hinds County Detention Center, Jackson, Mississippi]. And that's where I did a week and it was terrible. I couldn't talk about until maybe about twenty--twenty, twenty-two years ago, it was so bad.$$Well what was it like?$$There were bugs. There, I think, thirteen of us in one cell. You're sleeping on the floor and whatnot, and at night when the girls were sleeping you could see the bugs crawling over them.$$Now these are--these are all black women?$$All black women in that one cell, the white women were in another cell. And the food, they would--as I remember I think they put it through a slit and something in the bottom of the door and they gave you your food that way. The food was terrible and you had no, we had no, no toothbrushes, no washcloths or anything. And they kept telling us we would get them until finally one of the white--one of the black ministers came and brought things. He said he'd left a package, I think he said something like thirty pounds, I have it in my notes, but we never did get them. And we couldn't, the water--it seemed like when you wanted to take a--to take a glass of water, it was hot. And if you wanted to bathe, it was cold. I mean it was just--it was just terrible. And the guard was so mean. At night he would turn the air conditioner on. If it was cool, he would turn the air conditioner on. In the day, he would turn the heat on. And we would sing to the men--I could hear my--we could hear the men singing and I don't know where their jail was, it was somewhere near, but we could hear them singing and we would sing back to them. And he would tell us to stop singing and we wouldn't stop singing. And that's when he would turn the air conditioning on so that we would stop singing. But it didn't stop us. And those girls were the--they were as clean as any college roommate. And they si- had a line strung up, I don't know if it was a string or what across the cell and they would rinse out the little things, you know, at night and hang them on the line. But it was terrible. And the Salvation Army came by one day and they told us we were all going to hell. We were sinners and all going to hell (laughter). We're sitting in that, you know, riding the bus anyplace we wanted to sit.$$This is a white, white members of Salvation Army?$$White Salvation Army, yeah.$$Okay, so what kind of songs did you sing, do you remember what?$$We sang the freedom songs, "Over my head, I hear music in the air" [sic. 'Freedom in the Air'], 'We Shall Overcome,' there was something to the tune of 'Day O' ['Banana Boat Song'], 'Day O' that [HistoryMaker] Harry Belafonte sang. We, we--I had--I forget the words to that, but we sang it. Whatever, you know, anybody knew that was a freedom song. We--they were called freedom songs and we would sing them, uh-huh. And then somebody had a book, may have been more than one but I read, I forget the name of it, 'The Long Day' [ph.] or something like that. Somebody had a little radio and we could hear when they would take some of the cellmates out to go to Parchman penitentiary [Parchman Farm; Mississippi State Penitentiary, Parchman, Mississippi]. Then the next, you would hear on the radio, you know, "Some Freedom Riders left So and So and they'll be in Jackson [Mississippi] at such and such a time." So we knew somebody else was coming. And they were--they were a nice group, there was never any confusion, no friction.

Jewell Jackson McCabe

Founder of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Jewell Jackson McCabe was born on August 2, 1945, in Washington, D.C., to broadcasting pioneer Harold “Hal” Jackson and businesswoman, Julia O. Hawkins. McCabe started dancing at three and graduated from the New York High School of Performing Arts as a dance major in 1963. McCabe attended Bard College until 1964, when she left after her marriage to Frederick Ward, an advertising copywriter; they divorced in 1967. McCabe later married Eugene McCabe, then-president of North General Hospital in New York City; though the couple divorced in 1992, McCabe retained her former last name for professional purposes.

Active in the community, McCabe spent summers in the late 1960s teaching dance to at-risk teens in Harlem. McCabe began her institutional career when she took a receptionist’s job with the city in 1969. After swift and repeated promotions, McCabe was named Director of Public Affairs at the New York Urban Coalition in 1970. That same year, McCabe joined a small group of women, the first chapter of the NY Coalition of 100 Black Women. McCabe served as Press Officer for Women and Minorities under Gov. Hugh Cary from 1975 to 1977. In 1977, McCabe became Director of Government and Community Affairs for WNET-TV. Elected president of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, in 1976, McCabe expanded the organization nationally; it became the National Coalition of 100 Black Women in 1981. In 1991, McCabe stepped down to become the Chairman of the Board, an office she held until 1993 when McCabe became the first woman finalist for the executive directorship of the NAACP.

A Presidential, Gubernatorial, and Mayoral appointee, McCabe was appointed by President Clinton to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council’s Committee on Conscience. Governor Mario M. Cuomo appointed McCabe to the New York State Council on Fiscal and Economic Priorities and to Chair of the New York State’s Job Training Partnership Council.

McCabe has earned two honorary doctorates, from Iona and Tougaloo Colleges, and has served on the following boards: Reliance Group Holdings; the New York City Investment Fund, L.I.C; The Wharton School of Business; and Bard College. McCabe is President of Jewell Jackson McCabe Associates – a multi-lingual strategic communications firm specializing in competitiveness training and executive coaching. The firm has advised American Express; Time Warner; The Coca-Cola Company; Matsushita Electric Corporation of America (Panasonic); International Business Machines Corporation (IBM); Council for Opportunity in Education (COE); NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.; Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and The College Board. McCabe, a frequent guest political analyst, has opined on the Today Show, in The New York Times, and is featured in Brian Lanker’s “I Dream A World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America”. McCabe has also been honored for her community activism by receiving the following awards: citation from Malcolm/King College; citation from the YWCA; Eastern Region Urban League Guild Award; a Seagram's Civic Award; a Links, Inc. Civic Award; and an Outstanding Community Leadership Award from Malcolm/King College.

Accession Number

A2007.181

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/7/2007 |and| 6/20/2007 |and| 6/25/2007

Last Name

McCabe

Maker Category
Middle Name

Jackson

Schools

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

Bard College

P.S. 136 Roy Wilkins School

Park View Elementary School

First Name

Jewell

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MCC10

Favorite Season

Fall, Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. James Island, Italian Riviera, French Riviera

Favorite Quote

In order to be in the right place at the right time, one has to be in the wrong place 90% of the time with the perseverance to keep going in order for that 10% to pay off.$Behind every significant finding in American history are black women that are unrecognized.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/2/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shellfish

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Jewell Jackson McCabe (1945 - ) was the founder of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, president of Jewell Jackson McCabe Associates. She was also the first female finalist for the executive directorship of the NAACP.

Employment

New York Urban Coalition

New York City Human Resources Administration/Department of Social Services

Summer in the City

Coalition of 100 Black Women

National Coalition of 100 Black Women

Favorite Color

Gold, Orange, Red, Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jewell Jackson McCabe's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe lists her favorites, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's upbringing, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's radio program, 'The House That Jack Built'

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother and grandmother's relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her parents' education and religious background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's first marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reads Ahmet Ertegun's introduction to her father's autobiography

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her parents' early years of marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her earliest childhood memories, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her parents' famous acquiantances

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her birth at her parents' home

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her relationships with her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her childhood in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her family's traditional meals

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her early sense of responsibility

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her dance training

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her schooling, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her hobbies

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her home life

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her start at the High School of Performing Arts in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her audition for the High School of Performing Arts in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the dancers she admired

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her challenges at the High School of Performing Arts, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her challenges at the High School of Performing Arts, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her decision to attend Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her first marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers living in New York City's Greenwich Village

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences as a switchboard operator, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls joining the New York City Human Resources Administration

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls working for the Summer in the City program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes how she met Eugene L. McCabe

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her divorce

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls how she came to work for the New York Urban Coalition

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her early career at the New York Urban Coalition, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her early challenges as a manager

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about successful businesspeople who were not college graduates

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early philanthropy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's career

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her mother's stroke

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother's influence

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the circumstances of her parents' divorce, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the circumstances of her parents' divorce, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her father's business activities in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's career, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Jewell Jackson McCabe's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe lists her favorites, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her maternal grandmother's experiences of discrimination

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls lessons from her maternal grandmother

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother's upbringing and parenthood

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's education

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's education

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's career, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about how her parents met

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's leadership

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her upbringing in a wealthy black family

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother and father's parenting style

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's social circle

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers moving with her family to New York City

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers going backstage at New York City's Apollo Theater

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her family's food traditions

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's legacy in the entertainment industry

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her transition to the High School of Performing Arts in New York City

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers the dance department of the High School of Performing Arts

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences as a dancer at the High School of Performing Arts in New York City

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her exclusion from the senior recital at the High School of Performing Arts

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Arthur Mitchell's advice

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her dance background

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's social circle

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her mentors

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her decision to study dance at Bard College

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences in the dance department at Bard College

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her charitable activities

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early ambitions

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls teaching dance to pregnant youth

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her position at the New York City Human Resources Administration

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the political climate of the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career advancement, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career advancement, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her start at the New York Urban Coalition

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her promotion at the New York Urban Coalition

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Commission on the Status of Women

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the black community's tradition of service

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the erasure of black women's achievements

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the founding of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her introduction to the coalition movement

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the aims of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the early years of the Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers the mentorship of J. Bruce Llewellyn

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her work with the Partnership for New York City

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the importance of networking

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her early career, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her early career, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers lobbying the U.S. Senate

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her career

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about Governor Hugh Carey's administration

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about globalization

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her recruitment strategy

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her involvement in the Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her connection to social activists

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the founding of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about black women's history of service

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about white male leadership

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her political values, pt. 1

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her skill set

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the New York Urban Coalition's Give a Damn newsletter

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her political values, pt. 2

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her nomination for the NAACP presidency

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her campaign for the NAACP presidency, pt. 1

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her campaign for the NAACP presidency, pt. 2

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her challenges while running for the NAACP presidency

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the male supporters of her NAACP presidential candidacy

Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her criticism of Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe shares her criticism of the Million Man March

Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Spelman College's centennial drive, pt. 1

Tape: 15 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Spelman College's centennial drive, pt. 2

Tape: 15 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Coalition of 100 Black Women's role modeling programs, pt. 1

Tape: 15 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Coalition of 100 Black Women's role modeling programs, pt. 2

Tape: 15 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Candace Award, pt. 1

Tape: 15 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Candace Award, pt. 2

Tape: 16 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Aspen Institute Executive Seminar

Tape: 16 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers organizing a black women's leadership seminar, pt. 1

Tape: 16 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers organizing a black women's leadership seminar, pt. 2

Tape: 16 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her poll about black female leadership

Tape: 16 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the corporate board selection process

Tape: 16 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her involvement with the Wharton School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 16 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her international travels

Tape: 17 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her work as an executive coach

Tape: 17 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about food traditions in the African American community

Tape: 17 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Panasonic Kid Witness News program, pt. 1

Tape: 17 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Panasonic Kid Witness News program, pt. 2

Tape: 17 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her goals for the National Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 17 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her professional opportunities

Tape: 17 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls suffering a nearly fatal car accident

Tape: 17 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 18 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe narrates her photographs

DASession

2$2

DATape

11$12

DAStory

2$9

DATitle
Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the erasure of black women's achievements
Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2
Transcript
When I'm asked about the 100 Black Women [Coalition of 100 Black Women; National Coalition of 100 Black Women] it's amusing to me because we know that if you look back over history, there's always been an Ida B. Wells in the picture. You know, there were the great Candaces in the Bible, great warrior princesses, you know. You've got these images that are just--repeat themselves. The responsibility is from generation to generation to improve, to empower, to be as sophisticated because the challenges tend to be the same. But the mechanisms of society that have the issues of classism, racism, sexism, those change. So you've got to know the modern tools, whatever the rhetoric is of the industry. I mean we're in the telecommunications industry today, right. We're in instant information transfer today. So we've got to be as sophisticated in terms of dealing with the issues of suppression as we were after we were so called freed, so that if you look at a Frederick Douglass--and that's why my quote, to me, is very important, that behind every important initiative is a black woman or a group of black women going unrecognized. It was Ida B. Wells whose scholarship--and see, we have to take ownership over our gray matter. My problem with Louis Farrakhan [HistoryMaker Minister Louis Farrakhan]--I enjoy sitting next to him to discuss things, but you cannot have a Million Man March with 50 percent of your gray matter being because of--his religion, suggests that, that 50 percent of the gray matter be disempowered, disenfranchised, marginalized, ignored. You can't have that. So our history starts back--and I like to think about the chronicling, the journalism of Ida B. Wells, who did the research, that had the information, that helped to empower abolitionists but helped to empower the Frederick Douglasses of the world. And when she had to flee, before she went to Europe, when she had to flee Memphis [Tennessee], it was fifty thousand women that came together in New York State under the umbrella of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. So these were 19th century women. Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, 1896, elected the head of. And then the continuum is, here you have--and these become metaphors because for every one name that I mention that has big aura and big marquee, there are smaller examples. When you look at my library and you, and you, and you look at the young women in the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s [1960s] and what they represented--and it has to be recorded, and it has to be respected--it was the elder middle-class black women that said we needed black men. They found Martin Lu- [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] he was talented, but they found him and empowered him. So we went from 1896 with Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin to twe- early 20th century. And then you had Ida still fighting in the Niagara Movement with W.E.B. Du Bois. But who's remembered? W.E.B. Du Bois, you know. So you have in 1913, you have this sort of plethora, this, this burst of--whether it be the AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.] started, then the Deltas [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.] started and the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] start, so you have these starts. But there are major, not better than the black men or the white men or the white women, but need to be recognized and need to be role models to inspire you, to inspire me, for us to understand that we have to raise the bar.$The grid for me when I was going into a town, number one, Ruth Mueller Hill would call, you know, the elder stateswoman, who was usually either a Delta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.] or an AKA [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.], who--but it didn't matter because she was the woman that everybody genuflected to. And I would look at the, the city and I'd say, "What is the revenue stream from the private sector?" Is it a real estate driven town? Is it a finance driven town? Is it, you know--does Procter and Gamble [Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio] own the town? Does--is it a consumer product kind of town? And then I'd say, "Give me the highest ranking black woman there." Now at that point, honey, we didn't have titles. We were all secretaries at best. The rarity of the Claudine Malones [Claudine B. Malone], you know, MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts] trained, MIT professor, you know, heads of--Claudine, I'd marvel at her successes. I mean back in the '80s [1980s] Claudine was the chair of audit committees when people didn't know what audit committees (unclear) corporations were. But I say that to say the critical mass of us were in the public sector as either teachers, educators, lawyers. We were not in the private sector. Listen, Ken Chenault [Kenneth Chenault] didn't get recruited. He was an arbitrage specialist but--until 1983. So when I'm talking organizing the 100 Black Women [National Coalition of 100 Black Women] around about 1979, 1980, we launched in 1981. From 1981, in ten months I organized twenty states, and I had launched with fifteen, including District of Columbia. So we were in thirty-four states and the District of Columbia, right? And in certain areas it just proliferated. We lost no one until second generation of presidents after me. And I made a commitment because part of my responsibility was to be a new face for a new generation. And succession planning had not been institutionalized in any of the civil rights organizations. And we were a gender driven civil rights organization [National Coalition of 100 Black Women]. We were good race women, and we're feminists, and it's a combined thing. It's not either/or, you know, when and where I enter, the whole race, so that the grid was I want somebody from the governor's office--in the founding group. And we basically said twenty-four because twenty-four had started the New York [Coalition of 100 Black Women]--. And I want somebody--I want not just somebody. So it was private sector, public sector. It was municipal, state and federal. And you say federal, how could you? Very easy, because you've got a congressional delegation. Therefore, there are people that are legislative aides that work for congressional delegation based in that city.

Joan Sandler

Joan Delores Sandler was born on October 2, 1934 in Harlem, New York. Her mother worked as a nurse’s aide and domestic and her father was an elevator operator. Sandler was educated in New York City public schools earning her high school diploma in 1952 from the New York High School of Music and Arts.

After graduation, Sandler worked as a clerk for an insurance company. She also surrounded herself with artists and musicians, while becoming a political activist involved in the peace movement. In the early 1960s, Sandler began studying theatre with the Negro Ensemble Company and landed a role on the television drama series, Black Girl.

She began her art career in 1975, working as a program specialist for the Department of Cultural Affairs. Sandler then went on to work for the Black Theatre Alliance and Fundraising in the Public Interest. From 1983 until 1987, she worked for the Metropolitan Museum of Art where she was in charge of community education. She also worked for the National Endowment for the Arts and the Museum of American Folk Art. In 2001, Sandler served as executive director for the foundation of her longtime friend, artist Romare Bearden. The Romare Bearden Foundation continues Bearden’s visual arts legacy through community outreach and education.

Sandler continues to consult in arts education. She has worked as a lecturer and faculty member at Hunter College, New York University, Marymount College and Princeton. She has served as an advisor to many foundations and grant making organizations. Sandler has received a number of awards and honors for her contributions to arts education.

Accession Number

A2005.035

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/2/2005

Last Name

Sandler

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

P.S. 10 Magnet School for Science and Technology

P.S. 113 Anthony J. Pranzo

Julia Ward Howe Junior High School 81

Ps 333 Manhattan School For Children

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Joan

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SAN03

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, Seniors, Cultural Organizations and Artists

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Adults, Seniors, Cultural Organizations and Artists

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern Europe, Caribbean, South America

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/2/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soul Food, French, Italian, West Indian Food

Short Description

Arts educator Joan Sandler (1934 - ) worked for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Endowment for the Arts. She was also a lecturer and faculty member at several colleges and universities.

Employment

Romare Bearden Foundation

Museum of American Folk Art

National Endowment for the Arts

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fundraising in the Public Interest

The Black Theater Alliance

New York City Department of Cultural Affairs

Favorite Color

Turquoise

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joan Sandlers' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joan Sandler lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joan Sandler describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joan Sandler describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joan Sandler talks about her parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joan Sandler describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joan Sandler talks about her ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joan Sandler describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joan Sandler lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Joan Sandler remembers holiday celebrations in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Joan Sandler shares stories about her mother's and her maternal aunt's experiences in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Joan Sandler shares memories of growing up in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joan Sandler talks about her mother's family history

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joan Sandler describes rent parties at her home in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joan Sandler describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joan Sandler remembers a special Christmas with her mother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joan Sandler describes her elementary and junior high school experiences in New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joan Sandler describes living with family in Rocky Mount, North Carolina after her parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joan Sandler talks about her stepfather, Willis Hunter

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joan Sandler recalls her interests at Julia Ward Howe Junior High School 81 and The High School of Music and Art in New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joan Sandler talks about listening to radical street orators in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Joan Sandler talks about her early adult life in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joan Sandler talks about the early years of her marriage to Alvin Sandler

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joan Sandler talks about Louis E. Burnham's influence on her life

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joan Sandler talks about her friendship with Lorraine Hansberry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joan Sandler describes living in Mexico with her family

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joan Sandler remembers the political atmosphere of New York, New York in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joan Sandler describes her work with the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joan Sandler recalls her work with the Black Theatre Alliance and acting career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joan Sandler remembers developments in African American art from the 1960s to 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joan Sandler describes the effects of political activism on her family life

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joan Sandler describes her work as an artists' model and promoting black films

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joan Sandler talks about working at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joan Sandler describes changes in the black art world in the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joan Sandler talks about her work as a regional representative for the National Endowment for the Arts

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joan Sandler talks about consulting for arts foundations and museums

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joan Sandler talks about growth in the black filmmaking and the need for developing black theatre

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joan Sandler describes the purpose of an artist-based foundation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joan Sandler talks about her goals and plans for the Romare Bearden Foundation in New York, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joan Sandler talks about challenges for contemporary African American artists

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joan Sandler talks about her daughters, Eve and Kathe Sandler, and their careers

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joan Sandler reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joan Sandler reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joan Sandler describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joan Sandler shares her memories of Paul Robeson

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Joan Sandler recalls James Baldwin's final days

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Joan Sandler reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Joan Sandler describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Joan Sandler describes her hopes for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Joan Sandler narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joan Sandler narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Joan Sandler remembers a special Christmas with her mother
Joan Sandler talks about working at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, New York
Transcript
Tell me a little bit about the Christmas with no ornaments.$$Yeah. That was the building, yeah, before we moved to 113th Street [New York, New York]. And, I guess I was ten years old around that time, maybe a little older. And, we knew it was Christmas and we knew there was not a gift in the house. And, no special foods 'cause normally there would be that. There was just a very poor Christmas. And, my mother [Mary Wade Alexander] had a boyfriend at that time and either he was still with his family and coming back and forth, or he just wasn't present. And, we had nothing. And, my mother said--and, I guess we were just sort of walking around, you know, just looking sad but not complaining loud, but my mother saw that. And, she just took all these magazines and pieces of paper and she made all these wonderful things by hand. And, she got us involved in making it. And, my brothers tell the same story. They were smaller than me at the time. And, she just had this incredible spirit and magic about her that she could pull us from the dust bin really, and make, make Christmas. And, all--so these decoration were handmade. My mother was very good with her hands. She was a great seamstress, and she was a great cook, and she, she just had this creative spirit. And, it's a Christmas--and we had just about enough food in the house at that time. And, it's a Christmas I and my brothers, when we get together, we talked about it. But, now my older brothers have passed away, but they remembered it very well. And, they remember her spirit.$Let's talk about your work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art [(The Met), New York, New York].$$Yeah. I was trying to remember where I was just before I went to The Met. Let me get this story straight, now (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) You were at Fundraising in the Public Interest.$$Yeah, Fundraising--I guess I did go straight to The Met from there. In fact, the position that was created before I went there, my dear friend Herb Scott-Gibson [Herbert Scott-Gibson] was working for them. And, it were called [Department of] Community Education. There was a whole education department that was devoted to non--all the stuff The Met had not done for years. It was making the museum accessible for people in wheelchairs. It was bringing in community groups if you live--coming to the gallery; was working with senior citizens. I had about, it was in that department about four or five places for people. Also, doing bilingual lecturers and that kind of thing. I think I mentioned that. But, my friend Herb Scott-Gibson who had that job for about two years passed away. And, he was a good friend of mine. He passed away and, and it was rather shocking. And, then I--someone from The Met called me and said, you know, "They're looking for someone, would you come in and interview for it?" I must have known at least a dozen people from around the country--no, didn't know who they were, in some cases I knew them; who interviewed for it. And, I, you know, I was interested in the job certainly but it was always fascinating to me that when Philippe de Montebello said, "She's the one" (laughter). So, I said, "Okay, not bad, not bad." I was told that much later by people who sat in on the interview. So, I was there for I guess close to four years with a very exciting department. A couple of snakes in the grass who tried to, you know, bite my ankles off and that kind of thing.$$(Laughter).$$And, but we did a lot of wonderful things and as a result I was able to also bring musicians into the museum, like Randy Weston and people like that; have an afternoon talk between Romare Bearden and [HistoryMaker] Richard Long, have those ki- that caliber of people there. The head of the Museo [de Arte de Puerto Rico] in [Santurce] Puerto Rico, the head of the culture institutions there would come. And, we'd do whole wonderful talks in Spanish. And, I asked to Philippe to introduce them, 'cause Philippe spoke Spanish even though he's, he's French, he spoke wonderful Spanish. And, he would, you know, some of the scholars he knew. So, I was able to just move into a lot of different directions with enormous resources. And, then, then things got a little tight there and a little funny 'cause I was also very much a favorite, not just by Philippe but also by the president of the museum, Bill Macomber [William B. Macomber Jr.]. And, and then the last thing I did there working with my neighbor who has a Ph.D. from Harvard [University, Cambridge, Massachusetts], I did a study on the needs and the patterns of professionals of color and art museums in America. And, I had mostly--focusing actually on the northeast and maybe the mid, mid-Atlantic states, yeah, down passed Washington [D.C.].$$What did you discover in your study (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, I discovered that art museums are the hardest places to work in, in that you're--the, being accepted and considered on the par as your white counterpart, even if you might come in with all the degrees and everything, that never happened. Art museums adjusted poorly and slowly to what was the changing population on many levels. Not just in the program area but in the hiring practices and that kind of thing. We found that museums that weren't, even though they weren't a part of the study that were like science museum, natural history museum, historical societies were a little more open to, to diversity. And, to diversity among professionals and encouraging that. It was, it was an interesting study. It was used for a long time in a lot of situations, and it was, it was known all over the country. And, I was active in the museum professional associations, and that kind of thing. And, then that was the last thing I did and that was my last year at The Met.