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Dori Wilson

Publicist and model Dori Wilson was born in Winona, Mississippi. At the age of seven, Wilson moved to Chicago, Illinois. She attended Farren School, Shakespeare Elementary School, and Hyde Park High School. She continued her education at Roosevelt University, where she graduated with her B.A. degree.

Upon her graduation from Hyde Park High School, Wilson began working for Goldblatt’s in the Accounts Payable Adjusting Department in 1961. Wilson then moved to Compton Advertising, Inc., where she worked as a secretary and assistant producer. She also started her part-time modeling career and became the first African American runway model in Chicago, Illinois in 1964. Wilson began her modeling career by working for Marshall Field & CO. and Carson Pirie Scott. In 1968, Wilson joined Foote, Cone & Belding and on their advertising project with Sears, Roebuck & Co. During the project, she also worked as a model and instructor at Sears, Roebuck, and Co. Charm School. She was promoted in 1970 to director of fashion and casting at Foote, Cone & Belding, where she cast models and helped producers during shoots. During this time, she continued to model and starred in numerous fashion shows, advertisements, and events, including Gucci’s Fall 1970 campaign and the Dress Horsemen and Trophy Board Annual Benefit Fashion Spectacular in 1975. In 1980, Wilson began her successful entrepreneurial career with the opening of Dori Wilson Public Relations, a firm whose clients have included the City of Chicago, Tiffany & Co., and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The following year, Wilson helped form The Chicago Academy for the Arts.

Wilson has been a member of the Girl Scouts of Chicago’s Association Board for over thirty years. She has also been listed in Who’s Who Among Black Americans and in Donna Ballard’s book, Doing It For Ourselves: Success Stories of African American Women in Business, which was published in 1997. In 2008, she was honored in an evening of recognition at the Stanley Paul/Raelene Mittelman Scholarship Benefit.

Wilson lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Dori Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 25, 2010 and July 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2010.029

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/25/2010 |and| 07/16/2017

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Lincoln Elementary School

John Farren Elementary School

Ariel Community Academy

Hyde Park Academy High School

Roosevelt University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Dori

Birth City, State, Country

Winona

HM ID

WIL53

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

I'm Just Saying... And It Is What It Is And Whatever

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/15/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers, French Fries

Short Description

Public relations executive and model Dori Wilson (1943 - ) was the founder of Dori Wilson Public Relations and the first African American runway model in Chicago, Illinois.

Employment

Woolworth's Department Store

Goldblatt's

Compton Advertising

Foote, Cone and Belding

Dori Wilson Public Relations

WMAQ-TV

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue, Bright Colors, Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dori Wilson's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson lists her favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson talks about her parents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson talks about her elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers her childhood homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson describes her early interest in fashion and beauty

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her early career in advertising

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson describes how she became a professional fashion model

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson recalls her appearance on 'The Dating Game'

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the black is beautiful movement

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her community involvement in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about her positions at the Foote, Cone and Belding advertising agency

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson remembers her talk show, 'Memorandum,' pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers her talk show, 'Memorandum,' pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson recalls founding Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes the clientele of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her relationship with Oprah Winfrey

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her decision not to pursue a television career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about the public relations industry

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her involvement in political campaigns

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson recalls her public relations work with The HistoryMakers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson reflects upon the future of her career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her parents' opinion of her career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson narrates her photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Dori Wilson's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson lists her favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson remembers her early experiences in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson recalls her early experiences in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her siblings

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers the holidays

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson describes her early aspirations

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Dori Wilson remembers moving to Highland Park, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers living with her mother's white employers

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson recalls her experiences of discrimination in the Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson remembers the Shakespeare School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her early work in the retail industry

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how she came to work for Compton Advertising, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson recalls her first professional modeling job

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her modeling career in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about 'The Dating Game'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson talks about the advertising industry in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson describes her experiences as an African American model

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the elite society of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson remembers her transition to the public relations industry

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson remembers the nightlife of the 1970s in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson remembers meeting Potter Palmer IV

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson talks about her social circle

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers notable figures from the entertainment industries of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson remembers Barbara Gardner Proctor

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the advertising agencies in Chicago's River North

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes how she came to work at Foote, Cone and Belding

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson recalls the initial investments in the Dori Wilson Public Relations firm

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson recalls the early years of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson remembers the events organized by Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her friendship with Oprah Winfrey

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers her role in Oprah Winfrey's early career

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about Oprah Winfrey's career

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the importance of networking in public relations

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the challenges of small business ownership

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her career in public relations

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about segregation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her involvement on the boards of civic organizations

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her role at the Chicago Academy for the Arts in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about her public relations projects

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes how she became her nephew's guardian

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the challenges of parenthood

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about the future of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her service on women's boards

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson describes the fashion industry in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers Nena Ivon and Marilyn Miglin

Tape: 10 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson talks about the Lawson House YMCA in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson talks about her relationship with Ann Dibble Jordan

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about her work with Columbia College President Mirron Alexandroff

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her experiences in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her life

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 3

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$8

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Dori Wilson describes how she became a professional fashion model
Dori Wilson describes how she came to work at Foote, Cone and Belding
Transcript
But on this job I was working for Shepp Chartok [ph.], who was the executive TV producer. And Shepp was, again, a very wonderful liberal Jewish fellow and liked me and saw something in me and I said to him, "I want to learn what you do," because I knew that he was always going on photo shoots and on filming shoots and so it was--it was Shepp Chartok who took me on, on some of his filming for commercials. And I remember that we were at Reyeye Studio, R-E-Y-E-Y-E studio in Evanston, Illinois, and we were--because one of the accounts that I worked on, that my boss worked on at Compton Advertising [Compton Advertising, Inc.; Saatchi and Saatchi] was Alberto Culver [Alberto Culver Company; Unilever]. And during those years Alberto Culver did lots and lots of TV commercials and they were for what was called (unclear) testing, so we did hundreds of commercials and the ones that would hit the air would be the ones that tested properly. But we were always in casting sessions for models with great hair. So it was on one of these pre-shooting, pre-filming casting sessions, Shirley Hamilton was there, who was a large agent in town, and Shirley Hamilton saw that I was tall and thin and said to my boss, "I'd like to send her on an audition," and I remember my boss saying at the time, "Well, let's just hope she gets it." So, I did and that's how I started in that.$$Okay. Were you excited about that?$$I think it was a job and it was a chance of getting more money and I'm--I'm sure that I was somewhat excited about that, and I'm not sure whether at this time Shepp Chartok was my boss because Shepp subsequently left or whether it was Jack Davis who was at this boss--my boss at that point. But I remember that I would get off from work at four o'clock, run outside and catch the bus in order to be on the--the first audition that I had was for the auto show [Chicago Auto Show]--the first job that I had was for the auto show. And so I would work to be on the floor and I'd work the five to eleven [o'clock] shift at the auto show. And because I could speak, you know, our backgrounds came in handy, I was talking about Chevrolet cars, I remember that. And during the intermissions, when we were having our breaks, I met lots of other models who said you should be doing runway work, and I did not really know what runway work meant, but I subsequently learned. And I went and auditioned, I was at 111 East Jackson [Boulevard], as I said, which was very close to State Street and Marshall Field's [Marshall Field and Company Building, Chicago, Illinois] was holding auditions every month for the models to do there, at that time weekly, they were called tea room shows that were in the Narcissus Room on the seventh floor of Marshall Field's. And I went on those auditions for a year before I finally got a chance to do the work, but I became involved in other things in the city that gave me the visibility to do other work.$$Now, let me ask you, in these early days, were you the only black model out there doing these things at the auto show, for instance, were you the only black model there?$$No, I wouldn't say I was the only black model, there were a few, because remember some of them--some of the models traveled. And certainly I wasn't--so there were other models, there weren't very many, and there weren't very many who were aggressive to want to take it to the next step, because I didn't want to do just the auto show, I wanted to do the other things that I heard about. And I remembered that there was a model, and I don't know whether or not you know her, whose name is Ann Jones, who is just extraordinary; very short, but with wonderful hair and very chiseled features. I think maybe half Indian [Native American]. And so Ann Jones was the photo model at that time because that was the look that was in for models that you couldn't really tell quite what they were. In the runway business, however, I was accepted for being different and for being tall and for being skinny and for being dark because fashion guys create--love that, you know it makes--a dark skin is better for showcasing their clothes. So what had been considered a liability for me when I was growing up became an asset. Though I will say that when I started modeling, I sent my picture to one of the major traveling shows, and they sent my picture back to me because I did not look like the look that they were--were looking for. On the other hand when the designers came in from Paris [France], I was what they were looking for.$So you're at Foote, Cone and Belding and are you--I have you as director of fashion and casting and so what are you doing in that regard then?$$Well, Foote, Cone and Belding recruited me after reading a story about Dori [HistoryMaker Dori Wilson], and I think Dori's work with the film festival [Chicago International Film Festival], and, and as I mentioned, I had gained some notoriety while with Compton Advertising [Compton Advertising, Inc.; Saatchi and Saatchi], and CBS 2 [WBBM-TV, Chicago, Illinois] called up and, and asked me to, to take over--there was a very popular show called 'The Lee Phillip Show.' And I hosted 'The Lee Phillip Show' for two weeks while Lee [Lee Phillip Bell] took a holiday, which was just unheard of. And so there was an article written about that, of the various clothes that I wore, and here's what Dori's doing on this show and whatever. And so Al Weisman [Albert P. Weisman] from Foote, Cone and Belding called up and said, "You know, you're in the advertising business. You've got, at this point, four years under your belt, and we need you to--we'd like to talk to you about coming to work for us." Well, I had also been doing my modeling, and I'm wearing my top eyelashes and bottom eyelashes, and, and my wigs, and I'm running to do my fashion shows after work. And I said, "Nah, I'm not interested. I wanna become a big model, a big, black model." And those were the days of Naomi Sims in New York [New York] and Naomi was indeed my color, and had made wonderful strides, and that's what I wanted to do. And so John--I mean, excuse me, so Al Weisman said, "Well, I just want you to come and talk to somebody." So it ends up that I met with John O'Toole, who was president of, of Foote, Cone and Belding. And I didn't really realize the significance of that. And so I remember arriving for our breakfast with my wig case in my hand and lots of stuff on because I had a fashion show that day. And John, in essence, said to me, "Okay, you've got four years of experience under your belt. We need African Americans. We need women, so don't you wanna become more than just a pretty face?" And I said, "How dare you say that to me?" He said, "Well, I mean your pretty face, you know you're not making--it's not really doing anything important, but you can come and work for us and really make a difference, and I will still allow you to pursue your fashion shows." And so I did. I went (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So what did you learn, what--$$And then I got in trouble for doing my modeling because when I went there, because I'd had experience with, with TV production, Foote, Cone had picked up millions and millions of dollars in billing in Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.], the Sears business. And Sears would make, what we called regional commercials, like they would make dresses and shoes and this--whatever they had on sale, they would make little short commercials, and those commercials ran in different markets. You know, Texas could be dresses. Ohio could be shoes. So they were really doing retail only in TV commercials. And there was a unit of us that traveled around doing commercials. You know, in the winter, we worked in Florida or in California. In, in the good months, we worked in Chicago [Illinois]. So our little retail unit did some six or seven hundred commercials. My job in that was fashion director, fashion and casting. So if, indeed, Sears says, we're gonna be selling these dresses, then I would arrange for casting sessions to bring the models in, and then make sure that they were fitted properly. That they looked good, that they were accessorized properly, of course, working with seamstresses and things. But, therefore, the title, casting and fashion because they felt--Foote, Cone felt that that would give me--that would be a way for me to use whatever knowledge I had learned in the fashion business. And so it was a title that they created for me.$$I see. So you were there--is it, you said--$$Fourteen years.$$Fourteen years, okay.$$And I left there only to open my own business [Dori Wilson Public Relations, Chicago, Illinois]. And during that time, it was a wonderful experience, again, because traveling with a unit, and the unit being a TV producer, associate producer, a writer, an art director, a copy--I mean a copywriter and an account executive. And so it was a wonderful learning experience too. And, again, you learn about the work that goes into making these little commercials that we may or may not remember. It's a huge, huge business.$$So what--well, it's a huge business, and that's when really things were staffed, you know--$$Oh, yeah.$$--because you had--$$Yes.$$--you know, I mean that's when jingle writers, you know, or singers (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Exactly.$$--even could make a lot of money--$$Oh, yeah, and we worked so much with those jingle writers and, and the singers and the voiceover people and I still hear voices on TV that I recognize. Joel Corey was a very big one, and I still hear Joel doing McDonald's [McDonald's Corporation] and things around town.

Joyce E. Tucker

Experienced advocate of equal-opportunity employment Joyce Elaine Tucker was born on September 21, 1948 to Howard (George) and Vivian Tucker in Chicago, Illinois. A middle child with two sisters, Tucker attended Irving Elementary School and Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois where she received her diploma in 1966. Tucker earned her B.S. degree from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1970 and began working as a substitute teacher for Chicago Public Schools.

In 1970, Tucker was also hired as a mental health specialist at Tinley Park Mental Health Center. Four years later, she served as coordinator of the Illinois Department of Mental Health’s equal employment opportunity and affirmative action (EEO/AA) programs. Tucker was then promoted to chief of the EEO/AA Title VI program at the Illinois Department of Mental Health. She received her J.D. degree from the John Marshall Law School in 1978 before becoming acting director for the Illinois Department of Equal Employment Opportunity. In 1980, Tucker was hired as director for the Illinois Department of Human Rights and was the first black woman to serve in the Governor’s cabinet.

In 1990, Tucker was appointed to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by President George H.W. Bush and in 2001 President George W. Bush appointed Joyce to the White House Initiative Advisory Board for Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Tucker began her own EEO management company Tucker Spearman & Associates in 1997. Since 2002, she has been vice president of Global Diversity and Employee Rights for the Boeing Company.

Tucker has been named a “Diversity Leader” by Women of Color magazine and was the keynote speaker at the Executive Symposium for Women Business Leaders in 2006. She has also received the Legacy of Opportunity Award, awarded by the Black Law Students Association at the John Marshall Law School.

Joyce Tucker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 24, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.033

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/24/2010

Last Name

Tucker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Schools

John Marshall Law School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Proviso East High School

Irving Elementry School

First Name

Joyce

Birth City, State, Country

Chciago

HM ID

TUC06

Favorite Season

September

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

San Francisco, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/21/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Corporate executive Joyce E. Tucker (1948 - ) has more than thirty years of experience with civil rights and equal employment. She has served in the Illinois Department of Human Rights, the U.S. Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, appointed by the president.

Employment

Boeing Company

Tucker Spearman & Associates

Illinois Department of Human Rights

United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Illinois Department of Equal Employment Opportunity

EEO/AA Title VI Program, Illinois Department of Mental Health

Title VII Program, Illinois Department of Mental Health

Tinley Park Mental Health Center

Chicago Public Schools

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:15486,217:18183,253:18879,264:36652,477:37718,491:39522,517:55751,731:56906,754:77552,1077:80048,1117:85214,1140:85506,1145:87112,1175:88645,1206:93974,1314:94558,1323:97551,1403:105300,1474:105675,1480:109300,1527:109840,1534:134426,1888:134786,1894:135866,1916:146561,2075:147145,2085:149116,2146:161161,2348:167650,2411:176074,2582:200925,2918:202455,2942:204155,2962:208915,3059:209340,3065:212145,3137:216480,3211:217160,3220:242738,3551:251062,3685:262008,3854:279556,4054:299488,4357:299999,4365:301386,4387:301678,4392:303280,4406$0,0:2571,25:29298,400:29570,405:30998,426:32630,452:35282,502:41470,603:41742,608:43170,634:60381,833:68835,1007:69135,1012:70935,1045:72360,1079:74835,1134:76860,1174:82785,1288:83085,1293:87625,1307:88665,1324:91070,1390:92175,1417:92760,1429:93605,1457:97115,1531:101405,1634:101665,1639:113213,1805:113598,1811:114984,1925:122992,2077:123377,2083:138550,2245:139270,2253:142570,2307:143020,2314:143545,2336:147370,2431:152470,2532:152995,2540:159070,2661:161545,2699:168690,2767:169002,2772:171732,2827:187313,3040:194832,3140:197460,3183:198993,3221:199650,3231:200161,3243:200964,3252:207090,3281:207465,3287:207765,3292:224207,3490:230550,3573
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joyce E. Tucker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her maternal great-grandfather's store

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her father's childhood and service in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her childhood personality and likeness to her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her father's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Joyce E. Tucker describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker recalls playing outside in her childhood neighborhood on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker recalls a spooky experience in her childhood basement

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes the television shows and music of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience at the Hayes School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience at the Hayes School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her awareness of politics as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her elementary schools in Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood and in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience at Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois and being a minorette

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her friend Kathy Walker Owens (ph.)

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker describes the racism she and her friends experienced at Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes herself as a student at Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her interest in football and basketball at Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about discussions about Fred Hampton's assassination and shootings at Jackson State University during college

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about Fred Hampton and racial divisions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about the political atmosphere at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois in 1968 and 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her social life at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her dating life at Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as a substitute teacher in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as a substitute teacher in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience working at Tinley Park Mental Health Center in Tinley Park, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience working at Tinley Park Mental Health Center in Tinley Park, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker describes filing a discrimination grievance against Tinley Park Mental Health Center in Tinley Park, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker recalls becoming Coordinator of Affirmative Action for the Illinois Department of Mental Health

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her promotions within the Illinois state government

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes becoming Director of the Illinois Department of Human Rights, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker describes becoming Director of the Illinois Department of Human Rights, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as Director of the Illinois Department of Human Rights

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience with partisan politics in the Illinois General Assembly, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience with partisan politics in the Illinois General Assembly, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker remembers the tragedies that hit her family, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker remembers the tragedies that hit her family, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes the campaign and election of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington in 1983

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about Bernard Epton and Republican politics in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about the death of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington in 1987

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as Director of the Illinois Department of Human Rights

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker describes being appointed to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about the reasons she was not reappointed to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 1996

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about starting her consulting firm, Tucker Spearman and Associates

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker describes the success of Tucker Spearman and Associates

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker describes being hired by Boeing in 2002

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as Vice President of Global Diversity and Employee Rights at Boeing, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience as Vice President of Global Diversity and Employee Rights at Boeing, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her department at Boeing

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her experience on the President's Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her experience with the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boys and Girls Club in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Joyce E. Tucker describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Joyce E. Tucker recalls developing her principles as a child

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Joyce E. Tucker reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Joyce E. Tucker reflects on her career

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Joyce E. Tucker talks about her family

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Joyce E. Tucker describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Joyce E. Tucker describes becoming Director of the Illinois Department of Human Rights, pt. 1
Joyce E. Tucker describes being appointed to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Transcript
What was [Chicago Mayor] Harold Washington like?$$He was fabulous. I mean he was fabulous. He was definitely committed to equal employment opportunities, civil rights. He was brilliant. I mean his, his concept of language and he was a fighter. And when I was working on helping deal with the, the implementation of the legislation and the, getting the budget for this agency [Illinois Department of Human Rights], I'm working with him all the time. You know, and I'm not understanding that a senator is someone that you are supposed to ask permission to meet or whatever. When I would go by his office, if I, if I saw him, I went in. And he was available. I mean he never told me, you're not supposed to do that. Now his staff would look at me like I was out of my mind but it was like Harold, bam, I was, I was in there before they could come get me. But I never knew that there was any protocol or whatever. You know, if I need a person, I see the person, I go talk to the person. And with senators and legislators you're supposed to make an appointment, you do that but I think Harold kind of enjoyed that naivete. And the fact that, you know, I believed in what I was doing. And I never really let anything be a barrier 'cause I really didn't know I was supposed to. So while they were doing a national search for the director, the Governor [James Thompson, Jr.] mentioned to me, he said Harold Washington is recommending that you become the director of Human Rights. And I said "Really, I didn't know the search committee recommended me" and the Governor said, "It is my job (laughter) so I'll decide who get it, who gets it." But as I was setting up the staffing plan and I was, you know, coming up with the criteria for the director, and I was giving the search committee what I thought the criteria of the director should be, I looked at it and said "Well, that looks like me." And then I resigned from some of the committees that I was on because I thought it would be a conflict of interest but the people on the search committee told me that my chance of getting the directorship was slim to none. There was no way that I could be considered because one lady said I didn't pay my dues. And so I asked her, "How much are they?" (Laughter) that didn't go over too well. But, you know, I mean I felt like if you want something, you go for it or you asked yourself for the rest of your life "What would happened if I--" You know, the, the worst that could have happened was I would have been turned down. Well, I didn't have it anyway. And the best that could have happened was I got it, which I ended up getting it. But they were, you know, there's no way. So Harold recommended that I get, the governor consider me for the position and I think it was on a Friday the 13th, governor was supposed to announce the position on a Monday and the Thursday the 12th, his, one of his staff people caught me in the train station going back to Chicago [Illinois] and said, "Governor wants to interview you tomorrow morning." And my first response was, "That's Friday the 13th," and they said yeah. And then I said, "Well, I don't have any clothes." "Look, governor wants to see you tomorrow morning 9 o'clock." So I did whatever I needed to do, got a room, you know, went to the Governor's office, interviewed, and he said, "Why should I give you this job?" And I said, "Well, Governor, because it's the only thing that makes sense, you know. I know the budget, I know the staffing plan, I know the legislature, I know your staff." I said, "Anybody that comes in to this position, I'm gonna have to train." And he said, "Thank you," and that was it. That was the interview. And I'm thinking, like okay. I mean, I've never had an interview that short. There is no way I got the job. So I remember going on the train writing him thank you for the interview because I knew someone else was gonna get this job. So I get a call that Monday on my direct line and I pick it up, and I hear "This is the Governor speaking, congratulations Director." And I went like, "who is this?" This is the Governor speaking. And I'm going like, "yeah, yeah, who is it?" I mean I didn't know it was the governor. He says, "Joyce, you got the job." And I said oh--and he goes, "Why did you say that?" I said, "My grandmother says be careful what you ask for, you just might get it."$So what happened in 1990 that you left the--, what happened (unclear) (simultaneous)?$$Well, I was the Director of [the Illinois Department of] Human Rights, and as a 706 Human Rights Agency we interface a lot with EEOC [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission], which meant we interface a lot with Clarence Thomas who was the chair of the EEOC. And we were an aggressive agency then, I mean we set some things in place that other agencies modeled in terms of how we enforce the Human Rights Act. We were, Illinois was one of the bigger human rights agencies, so we kind of stood out. I was the, had been president of the Illinois Association of Official Human Rights Agencies which were all the 706 agencies. And we kind of like made a mark for ourselves. And, Har--, Clarence was a friend and so he was going to the Appellate Court [United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit] and he asked me, he said, "Do you wanna take my spot at EEOC?" And I said, "Well I don't know if they would give it to me or not." He says, "Well I told 'em you're not like me. You know, (laughter) you're not conservative like I am." And he says, "You want the spot?" I said, "sure." He said, "Send me a resume." So I sent him a resume, he sent it to the White House, and they called me and they asked me to come in for an interview. Well the same thing happened when they called me at home and said this is the White House, I went through that "Really, who is this, give me your number I'll call back." And so I called back, it was the White House. And they said we wanna interview you, you know, Clarence sent us your resume and we wanna interview for, you know, Clarence's position. And I went in for an interview with Chase Untermeyer [Charles Graves Untermeyer], who was Chief of White House staff [assistant to the President and director of the Office of Presidential Personnel]. And, you know, he interviewed me and all this stuff, and then finally when the interview was over, I said, "Look, I am a supporter and advocate of affirmative action. I can't work for anybody who doesn't like affirmative action because that's what I do." He showed me the White House Affirmative Action Plan under Bush. And he said we have no problem with that, you know.$$Now this is [President] George Herbert Walker Bush?$$George, right.$$The, the older Bush.$$I served Bush I.$$Bush I.$$And then he took me through a tour of the White House. Now everybody told me when you meet Chase Untermeyer, don't have a problem because he's gruff, he doesn't any personality, he's cold, he's distant, he's all of these things. With my interview he was the nicest, warmest, kindest, friendliest person ever. And they couldn't, really couldn't believe it was the same person. But we connected, you know. It was, it was a great interview. And that's how I ended up getting that job. I filled his spot. I wasn't designated chair, you know, 'cause they gave that to someone who was more conservative than me. But I became one of the commissioners.$$Okay. For the EEOC?$$For EEOC.$$Yeah.$$And it was a challenge. You know, it was a challenge when the Republicans were in the majority, it was a challenge when the Democrats were in the majority because I had been raised to think that these kind of jobs weren't political. That you don't look at the politics of the situation, you do the job. And I came there with a civil rights background, you know. That's what I did. And not everybody who gets appointed to those positions brings the same kind of background.

Ada Anderson

Civic leader and philanthropist Ada Anderson has been highly acclaimed for her civil rights work. She was born October 2, 1921 in Austin, Texas to Cecilia and Walter Collins – the fourth of nine children. In 1937, Anderson graduated from L.C. Anderson High School which remained segregated until 1971. She went on to Tillotson College, graduating with her B.S. degree in home economics in 1941.

After college, Anderson worked for the Texas Employment Commission as an employment counselor creating workshops and seminars on dealing with finances, aimed particularly at women. She went on to teach for the Austin Independent School District and worked as a psychometrist. In 1951, she finished the coursework for a M.S. degree in library science. However, she could not complete the degree as the school would not allow her to attend the program’s required fieldwork at the state library. This experience enforced Anderson’s commitment to civil rights. In 1951, she gained co-ownership of the real estate and insurance firm Anderson-Wormley with her husband, Andy Anderson. Two years later she helped found the Austin chapter of Jack and Jill of America and worked as both a National corresponding secretary and its South Central regional director. In 1965, Anderson earned her M.S. degree in educational psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and completed graduate courses in business and finance at Northwestern University. A landmark election occurred in 1982 when Anderson was the first African American to win a countywide election in Travis County to serve on the Austin Community College Board.

Anderson is the recipient of many accolades including her entrance in the Texas Black Women’s Hall of Fame and the African American Women’s Hall of Fame both in 1986. In 1992 she was named Woman of the Year by the Women’s Symphony League of Austin and in 1999 she co-chaired the Mayor’s Blue Ribbon Task Force for the Austin Independent School District. Her ties to the school board remained strong and in 2006 she was celebrated by the Austin School District Board of Trustees as an Outstanding Alumna in their Alumni Hall of Fame.

Ada Anderson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 13 and 14, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.011

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/13/2010 |and| 5/14/2010

Last Name

Anderson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Occupation
Schools

Huston-Tillotson University

University of Texas at Austin

L.C. Anderson High School

University of Chicago Booth School of Business

First Name

Ada

Birth City, State, Country

Austin

HM ID

AND10

Favorite Season

October

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Wiesbaden, Germany

Favorite Quote

You Can Find Mediocrity Anyplace And Anytime, But Not On My Time.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

10/2/1921

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Community leader Ada Anderson (1921 - ) was the first African American elected to the board of the Austin Community College District. For her work with civil rights, she received several awards, including 'Woman of the Year.'

Employment

Anderson-Wormley Real Estate

Austin Independent School District

Texas Employment Commission

Favorite Color

Pastel

Timing Pairs
0,0:3516,73:4452,87:4842,93:6090,116:11865,178:12397,183:19470,238:20471,253:21108,261:35438,362:48508,498:49288,512:49912,532:50224,537:50692,545:59050,653:68532,717:79951,808:89678,871:90686,888:97019,953:97929,964:98839,978:111220,1040:113200,1059:124138,1134:125018,1149:130480,1226:134880,1253:135370,1259:135860,1265:139550,1289:140238,1299:140582,1304:141012,1310:141528,1316:142560,1334:142990,1340:143420,1346:147238,1375:160716,1510:161598,1523:162382,1533:170212,1581:170556,1610:171158,1618:180600,1730:181132,1738:204086,2045:217190,2170:221389,2232:221737,2237:225739,2360:226348,2368:232890,2422:235530,2512:236330,2525:236730,2531:248500,2640:250600,2657:262680,2766:263380,2772:264500,2781:268330,2823:269107,2832:278390,2905$0,0:6260,78:7520,96:10040,139:10580,146:14979,166:15424,172:21031,324:21654,333:24057,365:24413,370:24858,376:39708,440:40318,446:42530,455:43570,468:44610,483:45754,496:57400,652:57724,657:63750,726:64194,731:71720,751:95669,1033:96399,1044:98370,1111:101071,1154:101728,1173:117212,1252:118044,1266:118772,1274:119188,1279:119708,1285:120540,1299:121372,1308:132180,1356:138140,1394:139531,1450:148014,1503:178688,1787:184360,1825:184900,1832:189238,1872:190006,1880:191030,1888:195930,1918:196434,1923:198650,1928:202709,1991:208021,2063:210160,2077:216076,2147:220319,2194:220841,2202:221537,2210:222233,2219:222929,2230:224060,2247:225278,2267:232540,2335:232920,2340:234750,2349:248841,2491:249462,2504:270830,2653:272343,2673:273411,2692:276610,2737:297394,2980:298082,2994:298512,3000:320885,3276:322685,3315:322985,3325:333740,3509
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ada Anderson's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson talks about her paternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal great-grandfather's land in Austin, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal great-grandfather's property in Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson talks about the founding of Pilot Knob Elementary School in Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson talks about her paternal family's land in Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal grandparents' home

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson remembers her relationship with her paternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson describes her paternal aunts' and uncles' duties on the farm

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson remembers her childhood home

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson describes the history of L.C. Anderson High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson lists her father's siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson lists her father's siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ada Anderson describes the geography of Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes her maternal grandfather's family background

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson talks about her maternal grandfather

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson describes her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson lists her mother's siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson talks about the memorials to her family in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson describes the history of education in Pilot Knob, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson describes the history of education in Pilot Knob, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ada Anderson describes her family's community involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ada Anderson describes her mother's personality and talents

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes her parents' education

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson remembers her father's role in the community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson talks about her neighbors in Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson remembers the Great Depression

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson describes her parents' finances

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson describes the sounds of her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson describes the expectations of her as a young girl

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ada Anderson remembers a flood in Pilot Knob, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ada Anderson describes her earliest memory of school

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Ada Anderson remembers bird watching with her older brother

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Ada Anderson describes her family's holiday traditions

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Ada Anderson describes her grandfather's first car

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Ada Anderson remembers her father's farmhands

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson describes her maternal aunts' occupations

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes the geology of her family's land

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson remembers L.C. Anderson High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson remembers the faculty of L.C. Anderson High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson remembers Tillotson College in Austin, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson describes her teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson remembers her wedding

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson talks about women's rights in Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes her access to her own finances

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson recalls the birth of her children

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson recalls her return to Austin, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson recalls integrating the library program at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson recalls her experiences of discrimination at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson talks about her master's degree in educational psychology

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson remembers working at the Texas Employment Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ada Anderson describes the discrimination at the Texas Employment Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson recalls investigating employment discrimination in Austin, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson remembers founding the Austin Human Relations Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson describes her civil rights activism in Austin, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson remembers the disenfranchisement of African Americans in Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson describes her master's thesis

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson recalls becoming a psychologist for Austin Independent School District

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson recalls conducting aptitude tests for the Austin Independent School District

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson remembers a student she diagnosed with a learning disability

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson recalls founding a real estate firm with her husband

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson remembers the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson recalls founding a life insurance company with her husband

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson remembers meeting Robert F. Kennedy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson describes her support of John Connally's gubernatorial campaign

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson remembers Texas Governor John Connally's inaugural ball

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson describes her friendship with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson recalls the integration of the Austin Independent School District

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes her children's experiences in integrated schools

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson recalls the closure of L.C. Anderson High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson remembers her election to the board of the Austin Community College District

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson describes her board service at the Austin Community College District

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson remembers founding the Leadership Enrichment Arts Program

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson describes the Leadership Enrichment Arts Program

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson recalls traveling with the Leadership Enrichment Arts Program

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson recalls organizing an exhibit at the LBJ Library

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Ada Anderson describes the discrimination against African American artists

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Ada Anderson recalls organizing the 'Our New Day Begun' exhibit, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Ada Anderson recalls organizing the 'Our New Day Begun' exhibit, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Ada Anderson talks about her inclusion in 'Black Texas Women: 150 Years of Trial and Triumph'

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Ada Anderson recalls being honored by the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Ada Anderson recalls her role in the construction of the Long Center for the Performing Arts in Austin, Texas

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Ada Anderson talks about the Long Center for the Performing Arts in Austin, Texas

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Ada Anderson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Ada Anderson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 11 - Ada Anderson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Ada Anderson narrates her photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Ada Anderson describes her paternal great-grandfather's land in Austin, Texas
Ada Anderson describes the discrimination at the Texas Employment Commission
Transcript
In 1872 he [Anderson's paternal great-grandfather, Newton Isaac Collins] purchased his first land, that's the first that we have, we're aware of. And he bought ninety-two and a half acres. And the improvements he put on it was, I mean, again I'm, I'm quoting from the written document, large two story house for his family, and a well, two barns, and a tenant house for a tenant to farm the land and while he was, his--he was working in his construction company. And the tenant was supposed to, from when his sons got old enough from time to time teach them farming. Newton Isaac also when they got old enough would take one and then another of his sons to teach them the building trade. The land I told you has such fascinating bits to it. The, the land he bought, the ninety-two and a half acres was part of the Henry Warnell tract. Henry Warnell was one of the defenders of the Alamo [San Antonio, Texas]. And the, the land was land that the government gave him as a reward for his service at the Alamo. My grandf- Newton Isaac purchased the land from Henry Warnell's heirs directly from, (laughter) to the heirs. I was, when I started working on, on, on the family history I was really--oh, and the, the deed to that land said that it was three miles from Austin [Texas]. I found out that three miles from Austin meant three miles from the capital which meant something interesting was on that land currently. And it was really interesting at how I learned that. I had, I had gone down to the general land office to find out a little bit more about the history of that land and one, there was someone else, when I asked, when I asked my question of the, the worker there, the, the attendant, there was a customer sitting there who overheard my conversation and he said, "Lady," (laughter), "do, do you know who Henry Warnell was?" "I don't have a clue." And then he went on to tell me. And he said, "You know, if I, my family owned any land," (laughter), "and it belonged to someone who had fought at the Alamo, I would tell everybody." I said, "Oh, okay" (laughter). But at any rate, they located the land and what was on it currently, (laughter) first of all, my own real estate office 'cause we later had a real estate business [Anderson Wormley Real Estate and Insurance Company, Austin, Texas], my, my own business, you know, over a hundred years after my great-grandfather had sold it. And it extended into what was the old airport [Robert Mueller Municipal Airport, Austin, Texas]] which is now being redeveloped. And so we recently--and, and by the way, he bought the ninety-two and a half acres but as land became available adjacent to his land, he purchased additional land to a total of a hundred fifty-six acres. And so that 156 acres extended from our office at 3724 Airport Boulevard into the airport (laughter) which was, I was really delighted to learn (laughter).$And I wasn't there very long, very long but I was the only who had had enough background, I was qualified to be a counselor and it, it was nobody else in the, in the local office [of the Texas Employment Commission; Texas Workforce Commission] that could be a counselor so I was promoted to a counselor and I did all of the testing, aptitude testing, all of it for this whole area. And the, and, and I did all the testing for the, for the labor unions. They did not permit African Americans to take any tests, nothing, nada, nothing. Hispanics could only take one thing, I only remember one thing, it might have been two but it was whatever was the most undesirable thing that you could possibly imagine. And at that time they were using for, for insulation, what is that stuff, it's, it, it just cuts your, it's, I can look, I can see it now, little pink stuff and it was, they used it in, in all of (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Fiberglass, is it fiberglass?$$Fiberglass. That was the only thing Hispanics could take. And everything else the white folks could take but they couldn't take electrical, they couldn't take plumbing, they couldn't take any of those, those tests. The--I also did the test for clerical workers. And from time to time they had courses that would help the, the clerical workers hone their skills. And the, excuse me, when a clerical worker would come in, they would, two sisters, one my color and one fair, two sisters, they would give them, the, the one my color would not get a referral and they were pretty consistent about that. And they had to teach--then I, when I started interviewing they had to teach me the system and by this time we'd had some legislation that affected all of that so you didn't just blatantly say it's, you know, it's race, it's race based. So when a new person would come in to apply for a job, if it were an African American, we had little cards like this with the form printed on it and at the bottom it had, well you first you described them, and you--kind of their demeanor, and then you have a little section that you talk about, you, you describe any comments you want, remarks, it's marked, it was remark. So if it were an African American they would always start the first sentence with courteous or anything that started with a C for colored. And if it were Hispanic they would--we used a pencil--and if it were Hispanic, you just kind of accidentally (laughter) hid a, you know, a little mark in the, in the remarks, you just kind of, as though your, your, your pencil kind of slipped. Fascinating stuff (laughter). We had, we had one man who owned a, a, a John Deere company in, in, not company what's the word? You know, in Austin [Texas], anyway a dealership in Austin. And periodically he would call for a cook (laughter) and he would say, "I want one of those big, fat black mammy types that can cook" (laughter). So I would just go and take all of his information and never comment. I said, "One of these days he's gone walk in this office and ask for me" 'cause I apparently was his favorite (laughter). One day he came in and asked for Mrs. Anderson [HistoryMaker Ada Anderson] and they brought him to my desk (laughter) and he acted as though, you know, absolutely nothing had happened and he did not use (laughter) that same language. And I was still there longer, you know, and he would call in, (laughter) he didn't use the same--he still would call for me but (laughter) he wouldn't use the same language.

Theresa Fambro Hooks

Theresa Fambro Hooks was an award winning columnist and photographer for The Chicago Defender. Born May 5, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois, Hooks graduated from Parker (now Robeson) High School in 1953 and went on to attend the University of Illinois, Roosevelt University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in their Fashion Design Department.

Joining The Chicago Daily Defender in 1961, Hooks served as woman’s editor and society columnist and published articles in the daily pages about social and community events, food and fashions. She also wrote an advice column as “Arletta Claire” and a column called “Social Whirl,” later renamed “TeeSee’s Town.” In “TeeSee’s Town,” Hooks covered the “good news” in the community including art, theatre, culture and the movement of Chicago’s business, corporate, community and social leaders. Her other professional positions included manager of community/public affairs for Philco-Ford’s Chicago Residential Manpower Center and special assistant to the president of Olive Harvey College for public information. As president of Theresa Fambro Hooks and Associates, she provided public relations, communications and marketing services for ETA Creative Arts Foundation, National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Abraham Lincoln Center, The Woodlawn Organization, among others.

Hooks was active with the Girl Scouts, various YWCAs, the Westside Association of Community Action (WACA), Midwest Sickle Cell Association, West Chesterfield Garden Club, and Adoption Information Services. She was national president of the National Association of Media Women and received the Phenomenal Woman Award at V-103’s Expo for Today’s Black Woman, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Black Public Relations Society, the Russ Ewing Legacy Award of Excellence, Outstanding Journalist from the Chicago Association of Black Journalists, and The Fashion Connection Award. Hooks was a member of Christ United Methodist Church.

Hooks was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 16, 2009.

Hooks passed away on January 31, 2016.

Accession Number

A2009.145

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/16/2009

Last Name

Hooks

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Fambro

Occupation
Schools

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Paul Robeson High School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

St. Anselm's School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Theresa

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HOO06

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Have A Blessed Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/5/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tuna

Death Date

1/31/2016

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Theresa Fambro Hooks (1935 - 2016 ) was a longtime society journalist at the Chicago Defender where she maintained a popular column, 'Teesee's Town.'

Employment

Chicago Defender

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Theresa Fambro Hooks' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her mother's early experiences in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about the origin of her father's name

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks recalls her paternal grandparents' home in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her parents' organizational activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers segregation on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her mother's civic involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about the Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her interest in photography

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks lists the social clubs she covered for the Chicago Defender

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about black-owned publications in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers covering President Barack Obama's inauguration

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her coverage of social events in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her coverage of social events in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about reporting on cultural events in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her public relations firm

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the challenges she faced as a society columnist, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the challenges she faced as a society columnist, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about gossip columns

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her authority at the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her hiatuses from the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her writing style

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the process of writing her column

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the election of Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks reflects upon her career at the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her family and friends

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

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DATitle
Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers covering President Barack Obama's inauguration
Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Transcript
Is there any particular event that you enjoyed covering the most? I mean--$$Um-hm.$$--most of 'em are annual events, right? Most of 'em are annual (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes. Well, I always enjoyed going to the Snakes [Royal Coterie of Snakes] and the 40 Club [Original 40 Club]; those were the two top ones. And Mr. Sengstacke was--John Sengstacke [John H. Sengstacke] was a member of both, and he always would invite me, or make sure that I got an invitation to cover it for the Defender [Chicago Defender], and I always looked forward to that.$$Okay. What made that event more exciting?$$Well there was the, it was the caliber of the members; they were all the professional men, the doctors and the lawyers and judges, and you know, it was just the caliber of men that--they were all very professional men. And the--of course their ladies were all gorgeously dressed and wore the latest of fashions, and so that would--that always made it fun to watch them and to see what they were wearing.$$Okay.$$And I didn't--I wasn't taking pictures then, so we always had--like Tony Rhoden or somebody would be taking pictures for them, and we would run them in the paper the next week--usually the next week.$$Okay. When you look back on your career, is there any (cough)--or what would--excuse me--what would be the biggest events that you covered?$$Well, the biggest event is the most recent event, and that was the inauguration of [HistoryMaker] President Barack Obama. I didn't cover it for the Defender, I went on my own, but I went to several of the parties and took pictures. They--but we had a photographer that took pictures for the Defender that ran in the paper, but that was the biggest thing; that was very exciting for me. I had decided early on when it looked like--that he was gonna win, that I was gonna be there. I say I've got--there's no way in the world that I cannot be there. So I looked forward to that from the summer, I had made up my mind that I was going. I had gone--I was in Washington [D.C.] for an anniversary party with some friends, and that's when they were talking about, "He's gonna win." I said, "Well if he's gonna win, I'm gonna be there." So that was the biggest thing I covered, but it really--I didn't cover it for the Defender. I covered it for my, for myself. But that was the biggest thing that I've done--I've been involved in in my life. I do believe I will treasure that moment forever (laughter).$The most memorable moment in my life at the Chicago Defender was the night that Dr.--was the afternoon that Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was assassinated. I was down in the, in the new- in the composing room. At that time, we were in the basement of the 2400 South Michigan [Avenue]. And I was down there. It was a Thursday, and the paper came out that Friday. And I was down there overseeing the women's pages. And I heard someone from upstairs hollering, saying, "Dr. King has been shot, Dr. King has been shot." And I ran up the steps and the teletype machines were just going. They were just ding, ding, dinging. And I said, "What is, what is going on?" And they said, "Dr. King has been shot." So immediately, I mean the people were just--phone calls were coming into the Defender, you know, "Is it true? Dr. King's been shot?" And we were saying yes. So we knew that our night ahead of us was gonna be long and tirome--tiring. So we decided, the newsroom, Sam Washington, Dave Potter and I think Betty Washington and I, we decided we better go get something to eat because we were gonna be there for quite a while. So we went down to the--there was a restaurant on 22nd Street/Cermak Road, called Batt's [Chicago, Illinois], and we went down there to eat. And I guess it was about, at that time it was about four o'clock, and we were sitting there, not saying much of anything. And the waitress came over and said, "He's dead." And, of course, we all just dropped, you know, our hearts just dropped. So the owners of Batt's [Nathan Batt] came over to the table. He knew us, and knew who we were. And he came over, and he said, "It's on me." And we were, you know, getting ready to pay. We're trying to get out of there and get ready to pay. And he said, "It's on me. You don't have to pay." So we came back to the Defender. And we started giving out assignments, who was gonna do what and cover--I was gonna try to get, call people and get some reaction on the phone, and somebody else was gonna go in the library and pull out photographs. Somebody else was gonna pull out some of his, his quotations and we were gonna have to just almost redo the front part of the paper all over again. And we started, and we went on and, and people who had gone home for the day, like Audrey Weaver and Lloyd General, they came back, I mean without--it amazed me because this was the first time I had ever seen a newsroom really at work and had come together. And people just start coming in, you know, without anybody calling them; they just knew that they needed to be there. And they all came in, and we sat there, and we worked. We cried, we worked, we cried. Eventually, John Sengstacke [John H. Sengstacke] who had been in Detroit [Michigan] called and said, you know, "What's going on?" And, "How's the city?" And we're saying it's, you know; it's upheaval. You know, there're fires all over the place. So he said, "I'll be right there." So, he jumped on a plane and came home, and he said when he was in the air, and they were circling Midway [Chicago Midway International Airport, Chicago, Illinois], he could see the fires down on the ground. And it just bothered him so much 'cause he loved Chicago [Illinois] so much. And he came back to the Defender, and we worked again. And Tom Picou [Thomas Maurice Sengstacke Picou], who was our managing editor at that time, he was there. He came in. And we all sat around, and we finally put the paper together. And then we sat there, and then we cried. We just all cried. We tried to--we had done what we could. We knew we had put a paper together that we could be proud of, that Dr. King could be proud of if he could see it. We had done the best we could. And the king was dead and all we could say was, "Long live the king." And we had done a job that nobody thought--nobody ever reckoned that we would have to do. But we did a good job, and we were very proud of ourselves. And it was the moment that I will never--I never will forget at the Chicago Defender; how we all came together and produced, without anybody hollering at anybody, anybody getting angry with anybody, anybody upset with anybody else. We were all, we just were there, we were there for Dr. King. And we had done a job, and the king was dead. And long live the king.$$Thank you very much.

Amy S. Hilliard

Comfort Cake founder and CEO Amy Sharmane Hilliard was born Audrey Sharmane Amy Hilliard on August 16, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan. Hilliard received her B.S. degree (with honors) from Howard University in 1974 and her M.B.A. from Harvard Business School in 1978.

After school, Hilliard went to work for Bloomingdale’s as a member of their buying team in New York. In 1981, Hilliard joined the Gillette Company in the Personal Care Division working in Product Management. She led the team that successfully created and launched White Rain Shampoo in six months. In addition, Hilliard managed the development and execution of the multiple brand Miss America promotion during this period. By 1985, Hilliard was promoted to Senior Product Manager for Gillette at Division Headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts. She was responsible for the general management of Gillette’s largest personal care business, the $100 million White Rain hair care products franchise. In 1987, Hilliard became the Director of Marketing for the Lustrasilk Corporation (a Gillette subsidiary) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In Minneapolis, Hilliard left Gillette in 1990 to work for The Pillsbury Company where, as the Director of Market Development, Baked Goods Division, she helped create some of the first Pillsbury Doughboy advertisements that were targeted to people of color. In 1992, Hilliard began working for the Burrell Communications Group in Chicago, Illinois as Senior Vice President and Director of Integrated Marketing Services. Burrell Communications Group specializes in developing advertising and marketing campaigns targeting African American consumers and the urban market. Hilliard then founded The Hilliard Group, Inc. in 1995 and served as its President and CEO. The Hilliard Group specialized in developing multi-cultural marketing and sales strategies for Fortune 500 corporations. In 1999, Hilliard became Senior Vice President of Marketing for Soft Sheen Products, a Division of L’Oreal U.S.A. While still working at L’Oreal, Hilliard made the decision to go into business for herself. Hilliard founded The Comfort Cake Company on February 15, 2001 and serves as its president and CEO. By 2002, The Comfort Cake Company had expanded into the Chicago Public School system cafeterias, and by 2003, Comfort Cakes were being sold on Amazon.com and in 7-Eleven stores.

Formerly an adjunct professor at DePaul University’s business school, Hilliard has lectured at leading universities including Harvard, The University of Chicago, Northwestern, Duke and UCLA. She has consulted internationally in London and in South Africa, where she presented business development opportunities to President Nelson Mandela’s cabinet. Her work has been profiled in The Wall Street Journal, Ad Age, Business Week, Working Woman, Entrepreneur Magazine, Essence, Black Enterprise, and Ebony among others. In 2005, Hilliard published a book entitled, Tap Into Your Juice: Find Your Gifts, Lose Your Fears, Build Your Dreams.

Hilliard is the proud mother of two active teenagers, Angelica and Nicholas.

Hilliard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.082

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2008 |and| 11/20/2008

Last Name

Hilliard

Maker Category
Schools

Roosevelt Elementary School

Ludington Magnet Middle and Honors School

Cass Technical High School

Harvard Business School

Howard University

First Name

Amy

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

HIL11

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

SuperValu

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Seek Progress, Not Perfection.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/16/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Short Description

Corporate chief executive and marketing executive Amy S. Hilliard (1952 - ) was the founder and CEO of the Comfort Cake Company. She worked in multicultural marketing for the Pillsbury Company, The Gillette Company and L'Oreal, and founded a marketing firm called The Hilliard Group, Inc.

Employment

Joseph's

Polaroid Corporation

Bloomingdale's

The May Department Stores Company

Young & Rubicam

Gillette

Lustrasilk

Pillsbury Company

Burrell Communications Group

The Hilliard Group

L'Oreal

Comfort Cakes Co LLC

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Lime Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:31630,398:42067,466:42938,486:44345,523:47159,583:47695,594:50174,664:51514,758:54663,847:63086,950:63680,963:65594,1021:72194,1227:72656,1236:72986,1244:73448,1253:74438,1272:74702,1277:96300,1522:97350,1547:102600,1644:106310,1754:111250,1806:115150,1894:120175,1984:120925,1995:121225,2000:134204,2186:134796,2195:136350,2240:137978,2287:139088,2308:139902,2345:140642,2356:140938,2361:144690,2372$0,0:444,12:1850,64:2886,81:5476,122:11470,251:11840,257:12136,262:12432,273:20964,374:24017,448:25153,459:27354,530:27922,540:28206,545:29200,574:33389,671:36868,783:39424,849:46480,930:46760,935:50190,1035:50470,1040:50960,1049:61060,1218:61380,1226:61860,1233:62260,1239:63620,1263:65220,1310:66660,1334:67140,1341:67460,1346:77003,1461:77673,1473:82631,1562:82899,1567:83368,1575:85110,1594:85713,1606:89331,1679:89599,1684:89934,1690:90336,1698:92681,1758:94155,1785:94557,1792:95026,1801:95361,1807:95897,1818:96433,1828:104276,1918:104636,1924:107732,1987:109964,2031:110324,2037:111764,2064:112772,2085:119340,2142:119748,2147:121788,2175:124134,2203:124542,2208:124950,2213:129886,2280:132190,2309:134302,2347:135646,2374:135966,2380:136478,2391:137310,2405:138526,2429:139038,2440:141726,2530:144734,2616:154056,2728:155832,2772:160124,2854:160420,2859:161678,2883:167722,2910:168082,2916:168658,2926:171322,2985:172258,3005:173338,3041:174058,3053:174346,3058:176866,3127:177154,3132:177442,3137:182870,3166:183398,3177:183794,3194:185378,3234:185972,3244:190592,3351:190988,3362:191252,3367:191912,3380:192176,3385:193628,3420:195146,3467:195608,3477:195938,3486:198116,3555:198512,3572:198776,3577:199040,3582:201482,3662:208626,3706:209458,3722:211378,3773:212082,3787:212338,3792:212978,3805:213554,3818:214066,3829:214898,3848:215538,3860:215794,3865:216306,3874:216690,3884:223085,3971:223635,3983:224515,4010:224790,4016:226875,4036:227241,4047:227668,4055:228644,4081:229864,4122:236025,4303:237001,4332:237611,4344:238892,4380:243997,4417:244600,4429:245337,4441:247012,4464:248352,4479:248888,4487:254414,4570:255052,4594:255458,4604:256154,4630:256676,4642:256908,4647:257604,4664:260736,4773:267385,4837:267775,4845:271610,4906
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Amy S. Hilliard's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her mother's upbringing during the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her likeness to her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her maternal great-grandmother and great-aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her maternal aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her great-aunts' catering business

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the death of her mother's oldest sister

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her likeness to her father

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her paternal great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her family's racial ancestry

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her parents' siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her earliest memory of school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the origin of her name

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the black business district in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the holidays

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her father's occupation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the Grace Episcopal Church in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers integrating Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her social life at Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her experiences of integration busing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her early interest in literature

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her graduation from Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the riots of 1967 in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her college applications

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining the cheerleading squad at Cass Technical High School

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her transition to Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the civil rights activities at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her mentors at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers a friend who was murdered by her fiance

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her start as a fashion buyer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her career as a fashion buyer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the African American fashion buyers at Bloomingdale's

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her work at the May Merchandising Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her transition to the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the start of her interest in advertising

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the start of her interest in advertising

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Amy S. Hilliard's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her decision to study at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about H. Naylor Fitzhugh

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her mentors at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers becoming Bloomingdale's fashion buyer

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining The Gillette Company

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the Miss America pageant of 1984

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers The Gillette Company's interest in the black hair care market

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the black hair industry's resistance to majority corporations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls The Gillette Company's acquisition of the Lustrasilk Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her multicultural education initiative at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the Pillsbury Company's first advertisement featuring people of color

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her first day at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls hiring African Americans to work at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her role at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the advertising industry in South Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers founding the Hilliard Jones Marketing Group

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls managing Soft Sheen for L'Oreal S.A.

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the changes in the black hair care industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the founding of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the founding of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the support of her children

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the operations of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the first customer of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her search for a production bakery

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the bankruptcy of her production bakery

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her children's roles at the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the staff of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her book, 'Tap Into Your Juice'

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard reflects upon her life

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her plans for the future of Comfort Cake Co LLC

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the impact of the financial crisis of 2008

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her family

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the importance of community service

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$6

DAStory

6$10

DATitle
Amy S. Hilliard describes her early personality
Amy S. Hilliard recalls The Gillette Company's acquisition of the Lustrasilk Corporation
Transcript
So you were a good student. But what type of child were you?$$I think as a child, I was very inquisitive. I wanted to know how things worked. I wanted to know why. "Why is this this way?" And, "Why can't we do it that way?" I liked doing things my way, you know, finding ways to do it the way that I liked to do it. I liked to have things done right. I was, I liked my reports to be really, really well done. I liked to--when I would set the table at home I wanted it to be set just so. I liked cooking when I was very, at a very young age. In fact one of the things I did when I was growing up was, because my mother [Gwendolyn Russell Hilliard] was in school while I was in elementary school [Roosevelt Elementary School, Detroit, Michigan], she taught me how to cook. I guess she--since I learned how to cook, I used to have to cook dinner for my whole family, I think starting about the sixth grade. So, I learned how to cook for six people. And when I was out on my own, I only knew how to cook for six people. So (laughter) I had a lot of leftovers by the time I went out on my own. But I used to cook a lot. And I used to love to cook for my dad [Stratford Hilliard]. I used to love to make sandwiches, make his lunch. That was something that was very special for me. So, the napkin had to be folded very nicely. I would stick pickles on his sandwich on a toothpick, and I'd fold the napkin and I'd, you know, arrange his food. And he used to really love that. I remember making a pie for him when I was in elementary school. Because our neighbors next door to our home had fruit trees, and so I would go pick the cherries. And I made him--because cherry pie was his favorite. And I made him a cherry pie, and I forgot to take the pits out of the cherries. And the pie was delicious, and he broke into it and broke a tooth. But he was like, "Baby, this is the best pie anyone's ever made" (laughter). I broke his tooth. I was creative. I liked to experiment with food, and my mother always let me do it. One St. Patrick's Day I said, "I want to make green pancakes." And she said, she had food coloring, and she said, "Okay." And so I made green pancakes that looked horrible. Nobody would eat them because they looked bad. Green pancakes was a great idea, but they didn't look too good. So, I used to experiment with everything.$There was a company called Lustrasilk [Lustrasilk Corporation], which was owned, which was out in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which had the, a product called Luster Curl, and Right On Curl maintenance products. All these products were doing very well in black hair care. The company was never owned by black people, it was owned by a German guy. The company was started by a Mexican guy who was a chemist for 3M, and found out that he had a product that would straighten sheep's hair. So he figured there're a lot of wooly headed people in this world, and a lot of them are black. So, let's use this product to straighten some black hair. And that's how Lustrasilk got started.$$I can't see the image of a sheep with straightened hair.$$Yeah. So that's, you know, that's how that company got started. But they're out in Minnesota, this is a $50 million company. And Gillette [The Gillette Company] sent me out to have dinner with this guy. Sitting across the table just like I'm sitting across from you, and said, "You know, how much would it take for us to buy your company? We can buy it for at least--you're doing 50 million, we can buy it for 50 million." And he took me on a tour of his plant at midnight that so nobody would know he was thinking of selling. And that's the company that Gillette ultimately bought. And that's what brought me out to Minnesota in 1989, well, actually 1987. They bought the company and asked me to go out there as director of marketing for Lustrasilk. And so that's what moved me to Minneapolis, Minnesota. I had been married since 1982. I had just had my first child, Angelica [Angelica Jones]. She was born in 1986, and I was just going back to work when they asked me to go and move to Minnesota. So, I basically commuted for six months back and forth with a six month old daughter, who stayed in Boston [Massachusetts]. But I went ahead to Minneapolis to get a house ready for us, and commuted every two weeks. Sometimes my baby would come with me and stay with me for two weeks while I was learning a new company, getting the acquisition transitioned into Gillette. And then stayed with them, launched new products with Lustrasilk, and stayed with them through 1989, '90 [1990]. And that's when I left Gillette. And I left Gillette because at the time there were a lot of acquisitions starting, and Gillette was under fire to be acquired by a larger company. And so they had a plant in St. Paul [Minnesota], a big plant for Gillette in St. Paul, Lustrasilk had a big plant. They started consolidating, and they said "We're going to move the Lustrasilk operations back to Boston," and I didn't want to move back to Boston. I'd done, I'd moved my family across the country, I wasn't interested in moving them back. And that's when I said, "No, I'm going to resign and stay in Minnesota and stay here and find something else to do." And it was a tough decision, because, you know, Gillette wanted me to come back. But I stood my ground and said, "No, I'll take, you know, the package and stay here." But the saddest thing I ever had to do was when they--was to help them close the Lustrasilk plant. These were people who were, when we got there, they knew nothing of Corporate America, but yet they had built a $50 million business. The books were still kept by hand, and these were people who gave their all to this company. And when we got there, I just, I loved them all, you know. I had to go down many times to that plant floor when we were launching new products and say, "Look, guys, we need to make this happen. You know, who's got a new--I need a name for this new product, I don't have one." We'd have a contest. So, I had people who were workers in the plants submitting names for our new products, and they would get so excited. To have to go there and stand in line, shake each person's hand, and give them a mug that said, "Thank you for your work at Lustrasilk. We're sorry, we're closing the plant," was something I'll never forget. I'll never forget it, because that was their livelihood that they gave. And Gillette--you know, this is what big companies sometimes do, and they just closed the plant. And it taught me a very valuable lesson. I had tried actually to buy Lustrasilk from Gillette when I knew that they wanted to move the operations, because I didn't want to close that plant. I wanted to keep the company going as an independent company. I raised $75 million with a team of people who worked at Gillette. You know, the general manager for Lustrasilk was a black man. The head of sales was black. I was black. The three of us were together. And I went to a venture capitalist and we raised $75 million to buy it, and Gillette wouldn't sell it. And that's when I said, "I'm not going back to Boston." So they rolled it back to Boston and they did their thing, and I stayed in Minneapolis.

Myrtle Davis

Pharmacist and veteran city council member Myrtle Reid Davis was born on October 9, 1931 to Emmalee Reid, a teacher, and Carl Reid, a postal worker. Davis was raised in Rock Hill, South Carolina where she attended Emmett School Elementary and High School. After graduating from high school in 1949, Reid went on to attend Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana where she pursued her B.S. degree in pharmacy.

In 1953, Davis was hired at the Queens City Pharmacy in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 1956, she moved to Atlanta, Georgia where she was hired by the Triangle Prescription Shop. That following year, she was married to activist and local physician, Dr. Albert M. Davis.

Throughout the 1960s, Davis served on the boards of numerous Atlanta based organizations including the League of Women Voters of Fulton County, where she served as president. She also served on the board of directors for the Gate City Day Nursery Association, and in 1970, she was elected to serve on the board of directors for the Atlanta Urban League. In 1979, Davis was hired by Leadership Atlanta where she worked as co-executive director for ten years.

In 1981, Davis ran for public office and was elected as a member of the Atlanta City Council. During her tenure on the Atlanta City Council, Davis served as chair of the Human Resources Committee, the Water and Pollution Committee and the Community Development Committee. Davis also served for five years as chair of the Finance Committee. Then, in 1994, after Maynard Jackson decided to leave his post as mayor, she became a candidate for mayor of the City of Atlanta. She later became the coordinator for the 1996 Atlanta Expo, and in 1998, Davis retired from city government as water utility manager for the City of Atlanta.

Davis’ other affiliations include the Kiwanis Club of Atlanta, the National Board of Girl Scouts, the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, the Task Force for the Homeless and the City of Atlanta’s Board of Ethics.

Davis lives in Atlanta, Georgia with her two daughters, Judge Stephanie C. Davis and Stacey Davis Stewart. Stephanie is a judge in the Magistrate Court of Fulton County, and Stacey is the senior vice president of Fannie Mae.

Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 28, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.037

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/28/2008

Last Name

Davis

Schools

Emmett Scott School

Xavier University of Louisiana

First Name

Myrtle

Birth City, State, Country

Rock Hill

HM ID

DAV22

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Walgreens

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Treat Others As You Would Want Them To Treat You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/9/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Pharmacist and city council member Myrtle Davis (1931 - ) was a city councilwoman for the City of Atlanta, Georiga. She also ran for mayor of the city in 1993. Davis served as the coordinator for the 1996 Atlanta Expo, and in 1998, she retired from city government as the City of Atlanta's Water Utility Manager.

Employment

LaBranche’s Drug Store

Queen City Pharmacy

Triangle Prescription Shop

Atlanta Department of Watershed Management

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:1008,18:8424,159:21280,291:25960,423:30370,470:33990,476:35110,506:35950,525:36510,534:43040,594:43586,603:44210,615:44834,624:47884,646:49204,672:49644,678:50436,747:50964,755:51492,762:81842,1173:82364,1182:87512,1247:91022,1315:96556,1391:96921,1397:97359,1405:98890,1412:101808,1444:105546,1470:109370,1481:111779,1523:117314,1590:121810,1645:124160,1671:128860,1724:129180,1729:131660,1766:134700,1824:135020,1844:135340,1849:139740,1950:144224,2047:145268,2068:146080,2086:146312,2091:151770,2154:152430,2173:153090,2216:163760,2332:164392,2342:164945,2350:166841,2382:168737,2414:175610,2536:176114,2548:176786,2561:179232,2584:180216,2597:189720,2746:201395,2895:201720,2901:205750,2982:206075,2989:206335,2994:206725,3002:207245,3011:209442,3021:211374,3053:211962,3062:215584,3092:221588,3233:224324,3288:227580,3298$0,0:1950,49:2730,61:4212,83:7254,133:11622,237:21372,431:31430,482:32150,492:39590,633:44124,662:45429,683:47430,704:52302,765:67440,1005:80266,1136:92320,1287:92896,1294:97792,1362:98368,1370:98752,1375:99136,1380:119973,1600:122976,1659:135183,1820:141790,1879:155808,2014:156568,2070:158620,2102:164396,2198:166524,2250:178588,2354:187430,2526:190811,2622:217205,2918:218055,2929:218650,2937:223848,2998:225192,3015:231408,3123:239694,3183:255816,3421:259388,3524:260604,3549:270201,3631:276596,3745:279957,3783:280443,3790:281415,3813:282954,3840:283764,3855:285384,3883:286194,3903:286761,3911:287895,3934:293430,3999
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Myrtle Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes her parents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis talks about her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis describes her community in Rock Hill, South Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis describes her community in Rock Hill, South Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis remembers segregation in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls segregation in Rock Hill, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis recalls her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis talks about her college education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis describes her mentors during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis talks about her Catholic faith

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls her social life during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis recalls her preparation for college

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis talks about her childhood pastimes

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Myrtle Davis remembers the start of World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls the entertainment of her youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis remembers her arrival at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis recalls her experiences at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis remembers the leadership of Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes her activities at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis recalls her classes at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers her professors at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her internship at LaBranche's Drug Store in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis talks about Mardi Gras

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls her graduation from Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis describes her first impressions of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis recalls how she met her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Myrtle Davis remembers Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis remembers the community on Auburn Avenue during the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis describes her husband's civil rights activism in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis talks about her children

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis recalls her mother's civil rights activism in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes segregation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers the Peyton Wall in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis describes the Collier Heights neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis remembers the events of the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls joining the League of Women Voters of Atlanta-Fulton County

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls her experiences of discrimination in the medical field

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis describes the integration of the medical industry in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis describes her role at the Gate City Day Nursery Association

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis talks about her work for the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis remembers her involvement with her daughters

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes her role in the Leadership Atlanta program

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers her older daughter's car accident and rehabilitation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her younger daughter's college application process

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis remembers her campaign for Atlanta City Council

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her time on the Atlanta City Council

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls her campaign for the mayoralty of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon the mayoral leadership of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis remembers the support for her mayoral campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis recalls her role at the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes her civic involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis shares a message to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
Myrtle Davis talks about her Catholic faith
Myrtle Davis describes her husband's civil rights activism in Atlanta, Georgia
Transcript
Now, you talked a little bit about church and your parents [Emmalee Williams Reid and Carl Reid] being Presbyterian, what church did your family attend?$$They were Presbyterians; both were very active in the church. And let me tell you how the whole intrusion of the whole--how Catholicism started in my life. My father got sick and went to St. Philip's Hospital [Rock Hill, South Carolina] and was--which was a Catholic hospital. And, of course, he had daily visits from, from the Chaplin there at the hospital who was a Catholic priest. And this Catholic priest was telling him about his plans to build a new Catholic church in the colored section of town which was Saint Mary's [Saint Mary Catholic Church, Rock Hill, South Carolina]. And that he needed someone to, to be an organist and asked him if he knew anybody. So my father said, "Well, my, my, my daughter Myrtle [HistoryMaker Myrtle Davis] plays. Maybe she would play for you." So he asked me if I wanted to do it and I said, "Well, sure, I'll do it." But, what my father used to do, we used to go to the 9:30 Mass and I would play and he would be outside waiting for me to take me to the Presbyterian church. Well, as time went on, and we did that for a long period of time where every Sunday morning he would take me to play at the Catholic church and then we would go to the Presbyterian church. Then it got to the point where I really liked the Mass and the Catholic church. And, they were a little bit disappointed I guess that I did not wanna continue in the Catholic church, but certainly they said it was my decision to make. My, my father said, "You're already female and you're already colored, why do you wanna add another thing to your, your life, another misery to your life to become Catholic as well?" But I hadn't looked at it like that. But there at that time, of course, in Rock Hill, South Carolina there were very few Catholics. There was one Catholic church, Saint Anne's [Saint Anne Catholic Church, Rock Hill, South Carolina] and, of course, St. Mary's was developed when I was in, in high school [Emmett Scott School, Rock Hill, South Carolina]. But, that was the whole motivation for my changing in, in religion from one to the other.$$How old were you?$$Well, I was actually, when I became interested in it, I was probably was fourteen, fifteen years old. When I actually was baptized or taken into Catholic church, it was my freshman year in college [Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, Louisiana].$$Okay. What was the name of the Presbyterian church?$$It was Hermon Presbyterian Church [Rock Hill, South Carolina].$$Okay, and the Catholic church again?$$St. Mary's.$$St. Mary's.$$Uh-huh.$$And so, you went through the religious instructions to be confirmed and first communion and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's right, that's right. Actually, what happened was I had taken instructions at St. Mary's before I went to college, and I didn't finish. Well, when I came back my freshman year, was when I had my--when I was taken into the church. My confirmation took place in New Orleans [Louisiana] because I was a sophomore in college and it was occurring at the St. Louis Cathedral in, in New Orleans and they had a confirmation class. And that's where I was confirmed.$Now let's talk more about your husband. You get married and he's a very prominent physician, tell me about your husband and--'cause he's involved in a lot of different organizations and things here in Atlanta [Georgia] so tell me about some of his doings here in Atlanta (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, well he was, and particularly leading into the Civil Rights Movement. My husband was truly an activist. And I think if anybody had--if he'd had his, his--he made his own decisions about what he wanted to be I think he would have--first of all, he would have been a foot, football, football or basketball coach. He loved sports. But, in addition to that, he was truly a social activist. He became involved in, in causes and he was very active during, during the student movement [Atlanta Student Movement]. Supported the students entirely. He helped them get out of jail, he got out and picketed with them and so he was, he was that kind of person. I can remember one night in particular when he and [HistoryMaker] Dr. Clinton Warner and someone else went down to the old Heart of Atlanta Motel [Atlanta, Georgia], and they took bags and in the bags they had just packed towels, you know. They were gonna check into the Heart of Atlanta Motel because it was one of the places that, you know, just refused to open up. So they went down and, of course, they were arrested. So he did have--he had that streak of rebellion in him. I mean, he, he--there was, there was this need to, to make things better and he was gonna be a part of it. I mean, he--there was hardly a time that he ever sacrificed being out of his office but when something came up that he had to attend to that had a civil rights' nature to it, I mean, he was involved in that. There was a group of men who met on a regular basis to strategize and to support the students. And some of those people included Jesse Hill and--I'm trying to think of some of the early leaders in there but they were a lot of people on the Atlanta University [Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia] campus, professors on the--many doctors, folks who, whose certainly livelihood did not depend on, on jobs. I mean, they--there jobs were not threatened as a result of the actions that they took. But Albert [Davis' husband, Albert Miles Davis] continued to be active, he also became president of the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] and served in that capacity. In fact, I think he was serving as president of the NAACP when, when Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was assassinated. I mean, with it came a lot of--well, lot of things to respond to at the time, I mean, other than the student unrest and meeting with the downtown business people about opening up businesses. And he and Sam Williams [Samuel Woodrow Williams], who was--Sam Williams was a pastor of Friendship Baptist Church [Atlanta, Georgia], were very instrumental in meeting with the Atlanta school board to help integrate the schools. So he was very much involved in all of the integration efforts going on at that time.$$Now, after you marry, you no longer work at the--as a pharmacist?$$I worked for a while, I worked until possibly I was carrying Stephanie [HistoryMaker Stephanie Davis] and I stopped after a while during my pregnancy.$$I'm sorry, I meant to ask you about your husband. You mentioned the Guardsmen [National Association of Guardsmen].$$Um-hm.$$What group was that?$$It, it's a social organization that still exists. But they started a, a chapter here in Atlanta and there were about thirty guys who got together and established an Atlanta chapter. And what it was, it was truly a social club but they had entertainment at the various cities where each chapter was located. It still goes on this way about four times a year. And, of course, the Atlanta parties were the parties that, that people liked to go to 'cause it was a, really a good time.$$

Stacey Stewart

Chief executive and philanthropist Stacey Davis Stewart was born on March 1, 1964 in Atlanta, Georgia. Inspired by her parents Myrtle Reid Davis and Albert Miles Davis, who were both committed to public service, Stewart developed an interest in community outreach from a young age. Stewart received her B.A. degree in economics from Georgetown University in 1985, and later received her M.B.A degree from the University of Michigan.

In 1987, Stewart became a senior associate with Merrill Lynch in New York, and worked there until 1990. Stewart worked in the public finance division, assisting state and local governments in structuring more than $2 billion in funding for housing and infrastructure projects. In 1990, Stewart became vice president for the investment banking firm Pryor, McClendon, Counts & Company.

In 1992, Stewart became the public affairs director for the Housing and Community development department for Fannie Mae Foundation in Atlanta. In this role, Stewart was responsible for implementing low and moderate income homebuyer programs. In 1995, Stewart became vice president of the department before becoming the President and Chief Executive Officer for the Fannie Mae Foundation in 1999.

In 2003, under Stewart’s leadership, Fannie Mae became the largest private foundation in the country dedicated to affordable housing and community development. Stewart managed all aspects of the Foundation’s operations including financial investments, strategic management, financial operations, technology, human resources, research and legal matters.

In 2007, the Fannie Mae Foundation announced that the company would consolidate its philanthropic initiatives into the Office of Community and Charitable Giving, which Stewart heads as the senior vice president.

Stewart is the recipient of numerous awards including a 2004 Women of Distinction award from the American Association of University Women and honorary doctorate degrees from Morgan State University and Trinity College.

Stewart was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 31, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.221

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/31/2007

Last Name

Stewart

Maker Category
Middle Name

Davis

Schools

St. Paul of the Cross Catholic School

Margaret Mitchell Elementary School

The Westminster Schools

Georgetown University

Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan

First Name

Stacey

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

STE11

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

That's Cool.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

3/1/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Popcorn

Short Description

Foundation executive Stacey Stewart (1964 - ) was senior vice president of the Fannie Mae Foundation's Office of Community and Charitable Giving, and later became the foundation's president and CEO.

Employment

Merrill Lynch

Pryor, McClendon, Counts and Company

Fannie Mae Foundation

Fannie Mae

Favorite Color

Gray

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Stacey Stewart's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart recalls her father's activism

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart describes her father's medical practice

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart describes her paternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart describes her paternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart recalls her father's childhood and upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart describes how her parents met and their courtship

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Stacey Stewart talks about her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Stacey Stewart describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart remembers Annie Lou Hendricks

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart remembers her paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart describes her relationship with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart recalls the Collier Heights neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart remembers her mother's civic engagement, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart remembers her mother's civic engagement, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart recalls an early experience of racial discrimination, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart recalls an early experience of racial discrimination, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart talks about racial discrimination among children

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart remembers her early education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart remembers The Westminster Schools in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart describes her early personality

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart recalls her mother's involvement with women's organizations

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart remembers her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart talks about her scoliosis

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart recalls her social activities during high school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Stacey Stewart talks about her religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Stacey Stewart remembers her sister's car accident, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart remembers her sister's car accident, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart recalls her decision to attend Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart talks about the aftermath of her sister's accident

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart talks about her sister

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart describes her experiences at Georgetown University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart recalls studying economics at Georgetown University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart describes her decision to attend business school

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart remembers developing an interest in public finance

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart recalls joining Merrill Lynch and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart recalls her position at Pryor, McClendon, Counts and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart remembers her colleagues in the public finance industry

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart recalls her bond deals at Merrill Lynch and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart recalls her challenges in the finance industry

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart describes her experiences at Pryor, McClendon, Counts and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart talks about the discrimination and corruption in the public finance industry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart describes the firm of Pryor, McClendon, Counts and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart describes minority owned investment banking firms

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Stacey Stewart talks about bond deals

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart describes the history of the Federal National Mortgage Association

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart recalls implementing a home ownership outreach campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart recalls the criticism of the Federal National Mortgage Association

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart talks about the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart talks about the racial gap in home ownership

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart remembers heading the Fannie Mae Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart describes the programs of the Fannie Mae Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart talks about Franklin D. Raines

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart recalls the charges against executives of the Federal National Mortgage Association

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart talks about restrictions on the public finance industry

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart recalls the decision to close the Fannie Mae Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart recalls the decision to close the Fannie Mae Foundation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart recalls serving as chief diversity officer at the Federal National Mortgage Association

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart talks about Daniel H. Mudd

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Stacey Stewart describes her hopes for the Federal National Mortgage Association

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Stacey Stewart reflects upon her career

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Stacey Stewart talks about her husband

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Stacey Stewart reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Stacey Stewart talks about the obstacles to home ownership

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Stacey Stewart talks about the displacement of public housing residents

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Stacey Stewart describes the HOPE VI development program

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Stacey Stewart reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Stacey Stewart lists her favorites

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Stacey Stewart narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Stacey Stewart recalls the Collier Heights neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia
Stacey Stewart recalls serving as chief diversity officer at the Federal National Mortgage Association
Transcript
The neighborhood I grew up in is called Collier Heights [Atlanta, Georgia] and it was considered almost it was considered a subdivision back then, back then. And it actually has a different, the technically has a different name the subdivision does, and I just can't remember the name of it right now. But the, the neighbors call Collier Heights and it's in northwest Atlanta [Georgia], just north of southwest Atlanta which, which is where a lot of black middle class at Atlantans grew up. And, but it was unique in that Collier Heights, when a lot of the black professionals that had lived a lot around the Atlanta University Centers [Atlanta University Center; Atlanta University Center Consortium, Atlanta, Georgia], Simpson Road, Ashby Street [Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard], that whole area, Fair Street all of that. When a lot of them moved out from that part of Atlanta they moved west and this particular neighborhood was one that where the land was acquired by all blacks. Black contractors, builders, built all the homes. And all the homes were owned by black, black people. So it had a very strong history in having been developed and built, constructed and owned by black people. Unlike southwest Atlanta which had been primarily white and when white flight occurred in Atlanta, a lot of those white families moved out of the city and blacks moved into those homes. Our neighborhood had, had always been built and owned by black people. So you had a very strong history of pride in that neighborhood. And you know we lived around the corner a few houses away from [HistoryMaker] Herman Russell, who, a very prominent and good friend of my family's and, and across the street from [HistoryMaker] Dr. Harvey Smith who was a dentist, across the street from Dr. William Shropshire [William Bruce Shropshire] who was a dentist, down the street from the Miltons, Mr. Milton [ph.] had been a banker in Atlanta. And we just had a, have had a, had a very prominent set of families who lived in that community. In fact, one of the stories that has come out or at least I've heard is that Coretta King [Coretta Scott King] wanted to move in that neighborhood. And they lived on Sunset Avenue in Atlanta. And I think it was Martin [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] who said, who didn't wanna move in that, into that neighborhood and wanted to stay sort of in the neighborhood they were in. But it was, I think a real up and coming neighborhood for a lot of black prominent families, you know, in the late '50s [1950s] early '60s [1960s]. By the time I, I think my family moved into their home in about 1962 or so. And so that was just a year or two before I was born. And so, so I, my upbringing was always around black people that I, I never knew a time when I didn't see or wasn't surrounded with black people that were prominent or successful, or doing well. I didn't, not that I wasn't exposed to others, you know, I, you had a wide range of, of people I was exposed to, but in terms of who, who, I was mostly surrounded with, it was primarily black people that were always doing well. And so I never had a thought in my mind that black people didn't have the ability to do well and be successful. That was never something that entered my mind. In fact, when I go to cities where I don't see that strong black middle class, it's, it's hard, it's harder for me, you know, (laughter). I don't even, I can't fathom that. And I struggle it, with my own children [Madeleine Stewart and Savannah Stewart] in that I want them to always have that constant exposure as well. But, but so I always feel like I was, I grew, I was able to grow up in this very, very fortunate set of surroundings. I mean we, we were not rich, by any stretch of the imagination but we lived a very comfortable, I had a very comfortable way of living. And, and my sister [HistoryMaker Stephanie Davis] and I talk about this all the time. And we, I felt, we, we always knew we were blessed, you know. We always felt we were blessed. And, and felt very fortunate to have been able to be in the family that we were in and have the kind of exposure we had so.$(Simultaneous) So how's it gonna change what you do and the diversity, what--did, did, did you displace someone who was (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) No, I didn't, no. When I came, well how on the giving how it's gonna change is really a lot is staying the same, particularly through this transition year. And our main focus areas of housing homelessness in D.C. [Washington, D.C.] remain. I think what's gonna change is sort of how we do it. I mean now we're much more integrated with the business units around how are they working with certain partners, lender partners, and other partners to create effective solutions to financing housing. And how does grant making support that? Some of the partners that we work with are nonprofit partners so we, they may need some grant support along with loan and equity financing tools to be able to do the business. So it's a much more comprehensive approach to working with our partners than we've ever had before. Which, which is really a great thing. And I think that's making us a more impactful partner. Just create more, more housing. On the diversity thing it was completely on a different tract. I mean I came back to the company, the company had sort of identified that it had really lost its focus with respect to diversity. Here Fannie Mae [Federal National Mortgage Association] was one of the models of corporate diversity for years and through this restatement period, you know, it was very hard to focus on just about anything else other than getting accounting right, getting the systems right, getting the operations back on track, you know, it was just so many things needed to be fixed in the company that I think people just lost sight of other big priorities like diversity. And so when I came back to the company it was all Dan Mudd [Daniel H. Mudd] was becoming aware of the fact that, wait a minute we're, we're not where we really need to be on our diversity stuff. We need to reenergize this and get this back on track. And the head of diversity was on leave at the time. And so there wasn't really anybody to lead the effort and I sort of raised my hand and said, "I'll do it." And it was because, not because I had this long steep background in diversity, it was because I care about it and thought I could help. And, and so and so Dan said, "Give it a shot." So I'm now the chief diversity officer and kind of running with developing a new strategy for us in terms of diversity and bringing diversity and giving and the business altogether. So creating a lot more alignments. The diversity isn't just off on its own as some feel good thing, it's really sort of a part of everything else that we do. From recruitment hiring, retention of employees, to the culture, how we behave, and work within the company.$$(Cough) Excuse me.$$It's okay.$$Can you--oh, sorry.$$Through to the: how we do business? And how we take advantage of the market opportunities so as I mentioned before. So, so this is all, it's a--so I feel like I've got sort of two jobs but I think we're also in a way redefining what--now that giving is really now a part of the company again and we have this focus on diversity we're really defining a whole new way that Fannie Mae expresses its values around the corporate social responsibility in a variety of ways. And I sort of see myself as being over that. I also think that the company is wanting to redefine what its mission is. You know, it had a way of thinking about it when Jim was, Jim Johnson [James A. Johnson] was the chair and it had its way of thinking about it when Frank [Franklin D. Raines] was chair. I think now the company is saying in, in turn to fulfill our mission, our public mission what, what are the ways in which we wanna go about doing that? And I sort of feel like my experience and my background the company is now putting me in a position where I can help define that for the company. So it's really, it's really kind of fun (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So, so it's an exciting time for you then?$$Oh yeah, oh, no it's great. It's great.$$And you'll be able to pull, pull on your business background too in it--$$Absolutely, absolutely.$$--in a more integrated way.$$Yeah. Yeah. I'm not an HR [human resources] type so I don't, the people piece I'm like, "Can you help me on that," 'cause (laughter) I'm not a HR executive and so diversity has a big piece of that. But I am a businessperson in, in a way. And have been a CEO of an organization [Fannie Mae Foundation] so understand people and culture and, and from that perspective. And so it really is a lot of fun.

Gloria Scott

Gloria Dean Randle Scott was the eleventh president of Bennett College located in Greensboro, North Carolina. She was the second female chief administrator at Bennett College. Scott was born on April 14, 1938 in Houston, Texas to Juanita and Freeman Randle. She attended Blackshear Elementary School and Jack Yates Secondary School where she graduated from in 1955. A scholarship fund afforded Scott the opportunity to attend Indiana University. She received her B.A. degree and M.A. degree in zoology in 1959 and 1960, respectively, and her Ph.D. in higher education in 1965.

In 1961, Scott’s career began as a research associate in genetics and embryology at Indiana University Institution for Psychiatric Research. During this time, she worked as a biology instructor at Marion College until 1965, making her the first African American instructor at a predominately white college in Indianapolis, Indiana at the time. Scott held the positions as Dean of Students and Deputy Director of Upward Bound at Knoxville College in 1965 and as the Special Assistant to the President and Educational Research Planning Director at North Carolina A&T University in 1967. During her ten year tenure, Scott continued to make history by becoming the first African American National President of the Girl Scouts in 1975. She then served as the Institutional Research Planning Director at Texas Southern University for a year before becoming Vice President at Clark College in Atlanta in 1977.

After ten years at Clark College, Scott became the President of Bennett College in 1987, thus fulfilling her life’s mission to educate African American women.

Scott is the recipient of three honorary doctorate degrees. She has been featured in several publications such as Who’s Who Among American Women, Famous Texas Women and Essence magazine.

Scott is married to Dr. Will B. Scott, a professor of sociology.

Scott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 8, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/8/2007

Last Name

Scott

Maker Category
Middle Name

Dean Randle

Occupation
Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

Jack Yates High School

Indiana University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

SCO05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any. Especially teens.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Any. Especially teens.
Special Interest: Women's groups, education, girl scouts, defense groups, religious groups, and social action groups,.

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

We Must Do And Not Just Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

4/14/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Corpus Christi

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Peach Cobbler

Short Description

College president Gloria Scott (1938 - ) was the president of Benedict College and was the first African American national president of the Girl Scouts of America.

Employment

Indiana University Institute for Psychiatric Research

Marian College

Knoxville College

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Texas Southern University

Clark College

Bennett College

Girl Scouts USA

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Scott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about her older siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott talks about her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her younger sister

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls attending kindergarten at the Fourth Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers enrolling at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her father's interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers her baptism

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her experiences of color discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers her paper route

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott remembers her experiences as a Girl Scout

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott describes her aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott remembers attending the prom at Jack Yates Senior High School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers Bernie Harper

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her decision to attend Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers William S. Holland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls her arrival at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her studies at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the delay of her marriage license

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her early career in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls being hired as a dean at Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott recalls her civil rights activism with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes Stokely Carmichael's visit to Knoxville College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about school desegregation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls the accreditation of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott recalls working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her vice presidency of Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott talks about Johnnetta B. Cole and Niara Sudarkasa

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about the accreditation of historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers promoting diversity in Girl Scouting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her presidency of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls leading the National Urban League's education committee

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her conflict with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott talks about the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott talks about her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls the St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas
Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts
Transcript
So now we're in elementary school [Blackshear Elementary School, Houston, Texas].$$Okay. Um-hm.$$What type of student were you?$$Um-hm.$$Well I should say what type of child were you? We know you were a good student.$$Um-hm. Well, I really was a child, I guess that you would probably call square, because, and then again, the early adults to whom I was exposed, starting I guess with kindergarten and my parents [Juanita Bell Randle and Freeman Randle] and the people around us, all were about having you do right and I attributed a lot of my development as the person to my church. I said, I was for a while, I was the only person in my house who went to church. This is before my sister [Greta Randle] and brother [Billy Randle] came back and before the other children were born, I was staying alone with my parents. And Rose Hill [Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church, Houston, Texas] was right across the street and as later life, I would describe that I was a high energy child, I used up a lot of peoples energies, I mean I was like a sponge and I was attracted to the church and I, I said it many days, the church probably helped keep me out of a lot of trouble, because I would, I would go over--this is the truth and this sounds weird to people when they say, when I say this. I think on Monday night may- maybe they had prayer meeting, I would go over and sit in the back of the church for prayer meeting. On Tuesday night, they had something else, I would go over. On Wednesday night they had Christian benevolence meeting. Now, I learned probably as a very young girl what a benevolence fund was, how people in the church would put their money together so that when people needed loans and things, benevolence and I, 'cause I asked, what the word was, I, I was inquisitive like that. If there was something I didn't really know, I'd ask. And Mr. Milligan [ph.], the husband of the ma- of the woman I was telling who'd take--I would go home with them on Sundays he worked for the post office, he was the person in charge of that, then I'd go to choir rehearsal and then Sunday school teacher, teachers' meeting on Friday night, I would go over and sit and listen. So, the church, a lot of that and then the people there would take us on field trips and we always had six weeks of summer bible school, you know, it isn't like now days, it's two days or whatever? We would have six weeks and it was great for the children, because we had nothing else really to do. And so that kind of helped to shape me to be the kind of person that I was and to really learn. And when I was seven, we were practicing for the Easter play. We had Easter, churches, you know, used to have Easter programs on Easter Sunday, and we were doing the, going to reenact the crucifixion and so we were practicing on Friday evening, Good Friday before Sunday and this, the girls were playing Mary Magdalene and all the others and the boy had the cross on his shoulder and, you know, the--the various things and so we were going down the aisle and so the girls were crying and we were, and so our, our director said, "Okay, you all can stop, that was good, we're all ready for Sunday." And so I remember sitting down and I was crying, I sat in the chair and I was crying, and so she came over she said, "Gloria [HistoryMaker Gloria Scott], you can stop crying now. It's all over, it's good. You all are doing good," and I said to her, "Did they really kill him just because he was doing good?" And she said, in later years, again as an adult, she said, that you can't imagine, "I said, 'What, what--if, I said, yes?'" And I said, "Well, if that's the truth, I want to be like him and I want to be a Christian, so I want to be baptized Sunday." They always baptize on Easter Sunday, and she told us later, she said, "I said, 'Oh girl, unh-uh, your mama, no you can't just decide you wanna be baptized. No you--I have to go and ask.'" I said, "Well, will you go and ask my mother?" She said, "I have to go and ask your mother." Well, we lived right across the street. So we went over to my house and again at this time my mother was not in church, nobody in my family was in church so she told my mother that I had said that I wanted to be baptized. So my mother said, "Girl, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, I wanna be like Jesus." And she said, "Oh, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, yes I do, I do want to be like Jesus, I want to do good; I want to do the right things." So eventually she relinquished and so she had to get a dress, get a white dress for me for Sunday to be baptized. So I was baptized on Sund- Easter Sunday morning, and nobody in my family was there.$Now, s- stepping out of the academic arena--$$Um-hm.$$--we need to talk a little bit about your involvement with the Girl Scouts [Girl Scouts of the United States of America].$$All right, sure. I was a girl, Girl Scout here in Houston [Texas] in San Jacinto Girl Scout Council and I think a little bit earlier I told you about that, about going to Oklahoma and all that. So, when I went away to college [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana] I was not involved and at my job at Knoxville [Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee] as dean of students, at that time that was in 1965, a Dr. Jeanne L. Noble who was on the board of Girl Scouts, national board, who was one of my mentors, she had been president of Delta Sigma Theta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] when I was the second vice president and they had gotten Girl Scouting to try out a new program, called Campus Gold, to try to look at young women who had gone, who'd graduated and had gone to college who were Girl Scouts and to see could we not get them as volunteers to learn to be troop leaders and so forth. And so, she called up and ha- had the Girl Scouts ask me if I would have a Campus Gold group on Knoxville's campus and we did. So we created that Girl Scout group and we sponsored three troops for girls, Brownies, Juniors and ca- two, two Brownies and a Junior troop in the low income neighborhood right around Knoxville College. And it was a fantastic thing for the college girls as well as the students so. And in Girl Scouting once you start doing something as a volunteer, they keep, you know they keep rolling over and so, the next thing I knew I was asked to serve on a regional committee and that to help select kids for international opportunities, and I said I would do that because also, I wanted to always try to make sure that things are equal and the girls, black girls had a acqu- equal access to those. So I served on that group and then we moved to North Carolina to Greensboro at A&T [Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University], and while I, when I went there, Girl Scouting was just undergoing kind of a realignment like it's doing right now nationally, and council coverage and a new council had been created and I was asked to serve on a committee to help set up the personnel policies and all for that council and to help them recruit the first executive director. So I did and I did another volunteer job.

Leatrice Branch Madison

Civic leader, retired educator, and community activist Leatrice Branch Madison, was born September 5, 1922 in Washington, D.C. to Julia Bailey Branch and Hayes Branch. She was the oldest of three daughters. She attended the racially segregated public schools of Washington, D.C., graduating from Dunbar Senior High in 1939. Madison went on to earn a bachelor’s of science degree (cum laude) from Miner Teachers College in Washington, D.C. in 1943 and a master’s of arts degree in guidance and personnel from the University of Chicago in 1947.

Madison taught in the public schools of Washington, D.C. from 1943 to 1949 and Cleveland, Ohio between 1949-1951 and again later from 1954-1960, before becoming a fulltime wife, mother, homemaker and community volunteer in 1960. During this time, she also worked as an assistant librarian at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (1951-1952). Madison has served on the boards of numerous educational and human services organizations, including the Bingham Day Nursery, United Way Services, the Federation for Community Planning, Case Western Reserve University Board of Overseers, and Blue Cross of Northeast Ohio. Madison was a founding member of Heights Citizens for Human Rights—forerunner of Heights Community Congress--an organization established to ensure equal rights and fair housing for minorities moving into Cleveland Heights. She was also a founder of and one of the original board members for HARAMBEE: Services to Black Families, an agency designed to provide parenting skills to teenage parents and to recruit permanent adoptive homes for Black youngsters.

Madison’s devotion to community service also inspired committee work with the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, Friends of Karamu, the NAACP Fund Dinner, Case Western Reserve University’s Visiting Committee on the Humanities, the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra Advisory Council, the Planned Parenthood Long Range Planning Committee, and the Juvenile Court Youth Services Advisory Board, among others. In 1963, she helped launch the Cleveland Heights / University Heights Summer School Project, recruiting participants from the Cleveland Public Schools and raising funds to offer financial assistance to those in need. The project, which ended in 1969, helped pave the way for the integration of the Cleveland Heights / University Heights Schools.

Madison is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the NAACP’s Distinguished Service Plaque, the Federation for Community Planning’s President’s Award, Who’s Who Among Black Americans, and the University of Chicago Alumni Association’s Public Service Award. In 1999, Mrs. Madison and her husband Robert P. Madison received the Cleveland Opera Award for their visionary support of the arts in Cleveland. In 2004, she was honored by the Golden Age Centers for her many years of community service. Madison is an alumna member and former president of the Links, Incorporated, Cleveland Chapter.

Madison and her husband, Robert, reside in Shaker Heights, Ohio. They are the parents of two adult daughters.

Madison was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 14, 2004.\

Leatrice Madison passed away on March 30, 2012.

Accession Number

A2004.074

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/14/2004

Last Name

Madison

Maker Category
Middle Name

Branch

Occupation
Schools

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Miner Teachers College

University of Chicago

Shaw Junior High School

Lucretia Mott Elementary School

First Name

Leatrice

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MAD03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

9/5/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pudding (Corn)

Death Date

3/30/2012

Short Description

Community activist Leatrice Branch Madison (1922 - 2012 ) is a co-founder of and one of the original board members for HARAMBEE: Services to Black Families, an agency designed to provide parenting skills to teenage parents and to recruit permanent adoptive homes for African American children.

Employment

District of Columbia Public Schools

Cleveland Public Schools

Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leatrice Branch Madison's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leatrice Branch Madison lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her childhood home in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about the schools she and her siblings attended

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leatrice Branch Madison describes her school years in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls being in teachers college as the United States entered World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls how she met and married her husband, HistoryMaker Robert P. Madison

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her husband's experience in the 92nd Infantry during World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leatrice Branch Madison remembers the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her grandparents and the death of her grandmothers

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about the political affiliations of Washington, D.C.'s African American community during the 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about voting rights for Washington, D.C. residents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her membership in the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her mother's influence on her own civic engagement and her parent's attempt to buy a house

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about living in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls her time living in Paris, France, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls her time living in Paris, France, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls returning to the U.S. and teaching in Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her daughters and Karamu

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Leatrice Branch Madison describes enduring racist terror in Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leatrice Branch Madison describes the racial demographics of Cleveland Heights, Ohio when her family moved there in 1960

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about people who lived in Cleveland Heights, Ohio and her involvement in community organizations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her neighbors in Cleveland Heights, Ohio and integrating a summer school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her experience with the education system in Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leatrice Branch Madison recalls when she began to see changes in the racial demographics of students in Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about a recommendation she made for inner city schools in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about the HARAMBEE adoption program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her involvement with the Women's Committee of the Cleveland Orchestra

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her volunteer efforts through Jack and Jill and The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about Project Discovery and United Way Services

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about predominantly black organizations The Links, Incorporated and Jack and Jill of America

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about the importance of education reform and her concerns for the 21st century

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about fundraising

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leatrice Branch Madison talks about her grandchildren

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Leatrice Branch Madison reflects upon her success and awards she has received

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Leatrice Branch Madison remembers moving to Paris, France and serving on the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library Board

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Leatrice Branch Madison narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
Leatrice Branch Madison describes enduring racist terror in Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Leatrice Branch Madison recalls returning to the U.S. and teaching in Ohio
Transcript
Now Cleveland Heights [Ohio] is a rather exclusive suburb at that point in history isn't it?$$I guess it was. Guess it was.$$Was that a positive experience then integrating the neighborhood?$$Well we had some good neighbors.$$Okay.$$We got threatened before we ever moved. See one thing that happened, the Sun Press had an article, a very inflammatory article because some people had moved--(unclear) those areas. And the Sun Press, you know, in essence, the Negroes are comin'. And we got threatened. Somebody called my husband [HistoryMaker Robert P. Madison] and, you know, asked him why was he movin' and our house was just about complete. As a matter of fact, we were gonna move in the next weekend, the next week, we'd move on the weekend. And he told Monk [Robert P. Madison] he would buy his house, buy our house if we would meet. And Monk said okay I'll meet you at my office and he never showed up. But during that period, and I don't know why, [J.] Newton Hill came as director of Karamu [House, Cleveland, Ohio] and they bombed his house. And then he was gonna buy a house from a family named Garrd, no I got it backwards. The Garrd family, G-A-R-R-D, they said they would sell to Newton Hill, they bombed it. So when they sold to Newton Hill they bombed it again. So I heard both of those. And one of, this is the irony you deal with, and one of those occasions, Robert Madison had left home to get the model of the American Embassy to take to the [U.S.] State Department the next day. And I'm sittin' here with two little kids [Jeanne Madison and Juliette Madison] and the house is shakin'. And, you know, he is getting this kind of recognition and this is what's happening. And then one Mother's Day we heard, it was night, we had been out to dinner and come in, we heard a bomb and they bombed Rodger Saffold's house at one point. So I don't know. We never did find out. And I got a copy of the letter we used to get religiously in that box, the hangman's noose and the letter. And we called the Cleveland Heights police and I called the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation]. I never heard that they found anybody or that they knew who it was. But it ceased after a while. And we had some good neighbors who looked out for us.$$Okay. So you built the home in Cleveland Heights, is that one that Mr. Madison designed?$$As a matter of fact, there are two Madison design houses side-by-side. We moved, we were supposed to move the same time, we were a week apart. How it all got started, a guy who was a psychiatrist, who has since died, Charles DeLeon, came and said to Monk, "I have two adolescent daughters and I'm livin' in an apartment, I wanna build a house." So his wife, Sydney [ph.], and I, we'd go out and look at land, and we had looked in Bratenahl [Ohio], we'd lookin' out in Mayfield Village [Ohio], we're lookin'. And Robert came home one day and said, "Ya know, I was drivin' down North Park Boulevard and I saw two lots." So we got a white lawyer who bought those two lots for us and gave us a quick claim deed. And then Robert designed the houses, and the City of Cleveland Heights said okay if you go in straight up, you know, with no deception, it's okay. So (unclear) the contractor said the same thing. And so we moved in our house first, October the 27th, 1960. And I will never forget the first night we were there, all of a sudden I see all these people running out in the street, across the street to the ravine. I thought oh my God what has happened now. I didn't hear anything. But nothin' happened. And then one night somebody came up into our circular driveway and the light came down our drape, and Monk ran outside to see what it was and I was pleading with him, "Don't go out, don't go out, stay in here." We had some harrowing times, but we survived.$And so, when you came home in '53 [1953] where did you settle?$$Well, we went back to Washington [D.C.] and he [Madison's husband, HistoryMaker Robert P. Madision] taught a year and announced he was coming back here [Cleveland, Ohio] to open his office. So I said well since we like to eat, I got up and got a job teachin'. So I taught a semester before we came back here, and we came back here in '54 [1954] and he opened his office, you see. When I came here in '49 [1949] I had my master's [degree] and I went down--people told me, "Oh Cleveland board won't hire you, they don't hire colored teachers." What it is, they would only hire colored teachers and put up in an area where there were colored teachers and colored kids. It happens, thank goodness, I wrote to the state first and got my certificate for elementary schools and for guidance counseling, and went down and talked to Dr. Levinson [ph.]. And Miles Standish [Elementary School, Cleveland, Ohio] at that point was in transition. And so he said I'm--we didn't even have a car, so he said I'm gonna appoint you to Miles Standish--no I'm gonna appoint you to a school on a streetcar line. So every day I rode the bus and then I had to walk that long two blocks from 105th street to Miles Standish until we got a car. And so I taught there a year and a half. But while I was down at the board of education, I went to find out about guidance counseling. So I went to information, they said to go to the second floor. I went to the second floor and they said, oh no go to the sixth floor, this was 1949. And I went to the sixth floor, they said go to the second floor. I said, I just left the second floor and we just stood and looked at each other. Slowly it dawned on me I was getting the run around, and I don't have good sense. We came back in '54 [1954] and I went through the same thing again (laughter).$$But you got hired?$$Well I got hired to teach, but I got a degree to do some counseling, I think I could do some counseling as well as some of these other people.$$Did you ever get a position counseling?$$No, 'cause I came home, eventually.

Antoinette Malveaux

Born March 19, 1958, in San Francisco, California, Antoinette Malveaux has spent most of her career helping others. The youngest of five children, Malveaux attended public schools in San Francisco. In 1981, she graduated with a B.A. in economics from the University of San Francisco. As part of the management track, she worked in the financial analysis and management division, specializing in international markets.
In 1985, Malveaux earned an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and was hired by American Express Bank as director of global marketing and strategic planning.

Malveaux left American Express in 1991 to assume the position of director of operations for the National Black M.B.A. Association. From there, she was named executive director in 1993 and was then promoted to president and CEO. Under her leadership, the National Black M.B.A. Association developed into a multinational organization and its membership tripled. She left the group in 2003 to pursue other interests, including traveling through Europe.

Malveaux is actively involved in the community, serving on the Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco; the Better Business Bureau; and the Girl Scouts USA, Chicago chapter. She has been listed in Who's Who in American Business; received the Rainbow/PUSH Reginald Lewis Trailblazer Award and served on the Council on Graduate Minority Education.

Accession Number

A2003.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/21/2003

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Paul Revere Elementary School

Aptos Middle School

Lowell High School

University of California, San Francisco

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Paul Revere College Preparatory K-8

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antoinette

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

3/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream (Rocky Road)

Short Description

Association chief executive Antoinette Malveaux (1958 - ) served as the director of global marketing for American Express, and in the capacities of director, president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association.

Employment

Bank of America

American Express Bank, LTD.

National Black MBA Association

Favorite Color

Green, Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antoinette Malveaux's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux shares stories from her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her mother's personality and her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about how her parents met and their divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antoinette Malveaux names her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls food from her childhood and attending the local Catholic church as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux lists schools she attended in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux explains how developing a racial consciousness affected her academic studies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her educational mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her family's civil rights activism and recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her experience at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls her mother's decision to teach at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the University of Mississippi's campus atmosphere in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux explains her decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her mentors and the curriculum at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about working for American Express Bank after graduating from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the culture and management of American Express Bank in the late 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her relationship with George Carmany, chief administrative officer for American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the corporate citizenship projects she worked on at American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her work as executive director of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her successes as president and chief executive officer of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America
Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director
Transcript
Okay, so, so you were at Bank of America?$$I was at Bank of America. I had started--when I was at univer- when I was at City College [of San Francisco, San Francisco, California], Bank of America was one of the three jobs that I had, and I quit the other two jobs and kept Bank of America. Then, when I went back to school to the University of San Francisco [San Francisco, California] I continued to work at Bank of America. By then I had gotten a promotion. I had moved forward and now I was working in the collections department collecting on credit cards as opposed to processing the payments. So, I worked there in the evenings. Again, one of the strongest, strongest and best individuals in the, in the department and while I was at University of San Francisco my supervisor had, he and I'd had a conversation and he, he was pretty good. He was always looking out for--as opportunities came up he always made sure that he would talk to employees about putting them forward. And an opportunity had come up to be a student loan officer, and he sat down and talked with me and put me forward for that position. I said yes that's something I wanna pursue, and so I became a student loan officer which was a different kind of position then. Bank of America had created a position in this, in two branches in the city where there would be students who were trained to be loan officers and their portfolio would be student loans. They would also carry the title of student relations representatives, very much a community relations representative, and we would represent the bank at college campuses and high schools, and so I would go to high schools and talk to high school students about savings accounts and credit and banking, about student loans and how to pay for your education, how to pay for cars and what you might want for yourself in life, but primarily about savings and investments and loans and then I would also manage the student loan portfolio and, and extend loans to students. And so I was a student loan officer. And so I worked and went to school.$Your involvement with the National Black MBA Association begins to grow in the early '90s [1990s] and--$$Yeah, after the late '80s [1980s] I joined, I joined in '86 [1986], late '86 [1986]. I became the chapter president in '87 [1987] of New York. I went on the board, I think it was in '89 [1989] and, and then came to a crossroads, and I had when I came to the board I was asked because of my background in strategic planning I was asked to take the organization through a strategic planning process. And up to that point, they hadn't had--they hadn't had anybody or too many people that I was aware of who, who was involved in strategic planning, who had discipline in strategic planning or experience in strategic planning, and you typically that's one of those parts of corporate America you typically didn't find African Americans in. You might have your little ghettos, but you, you typically didn't find them there. So, I took the, created a committee and, a strategic planning committee and my committee and I took the organization through a strategic planning process, and we took them through a process from start to finish, so we extended the process into--after we finished with the strategic plan got them into business planning and action planning so that we could really make sure that the, the plan was not just a piece of paper, it was not just something that we could hold up and say okay we got a plan, but we wanted to keep driving the discipline into the organization so that we could really focus and--on what it was we wanted to do and we could understand what it was going to take to do what we wanted to do, so we weren't as much of an organization that was full of talk, but one that could move to action. And when we got to the end of that process, we did some visioning with the executive committee, worked with a gentleman by the name of Horace Smith [ph.] who was an advisor to the group and he, he worked with me to do some visioning and with the executive committee and get them to a place of decision-making around what we were going to do with this plan and how we were going to take this plan forward. And so the decision was made that the organization would change, that it would build its own management capability. At that point, we had a lot of outsourcing managed by an association management firms and had just begun to bring some things in house and so they made a decision to hire an executive director, and they asked me and another person if we would do that and the other person decided--we were supposed to go in together--the person decided that he couldn't do it. He had a family, I didn't. The organization could not meet his expectation and his needs in terms of what he needed for his family. You know, I was either young and dumb or I had the angel sitting on my shoulder and I made the decision to go forth and, and it took us, but it took us about a year and a half to get through that dialogue and that discussion and get to that decision that I would leave corporate America and come head the National Black MBA Association.$$Okay.$$But by the time that I had made that decision, George Carmany had left the bank [American Express Bank, New York, New York]. He was still with American Express; he had gone to another division of American Express in Boston [Massachusetts]. He had asked if I wanted to go, I said no. I was not interested in moving to Boston, and I wanted something different and this opportunity came, so I was at a crossroads and this was the opportunity that was put before for me at the time that, you know, things were moving. You know, they were moving at parallel paths and then they went like that and so.