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Rick Jennings

Nonprofit executive and government official Rick Jennings was born on April 17, 1953 in Houston, Texas to Clara J. Hopkins and Richard Jennings. Jennings was raised in Washington D.C. by his mother and stepfather, Estis Jack Hopkins. He graduated from Calvin Coolidge High School in 1972, and received an athletic scholarship to attend the University of Maryland, College Park. Jennings graduated with his B.A. degree in criminal justice in 1976.

Upon graduating in 1976, Jennings was drafted by the Oakland Raiders, and played with them in Super Bowl XI, but retired from professional football in 1977, after two seasons. In 1980, Jennings was hired as a sales representative at the Xerox Corporation, and was promoted to regional sales manager in 1990. In 1992, he became the chief executive officer of St. Hope Academy. Jennings was elected to serve on the Sacramento Unified City School Board in 1996; and the next year, Jennings served as the chief executive officer and executive director of the Center for Fathers and Families, a nonprofit organization offering parenting classes and mentoring programs in Sacramento. As executive director, Jennings launched the Making After School Time Rich and Rewarding (MASTERS) program and the Check In/Check Out program. Jennings was re-elected to the Sacramento Unified City School board of directors in 2000, and again in 2004. In 2014, he was elected to represent district seven on the Sacramento City Council. Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson appointed Jennings to serve on the Law and Legislation Committee and the Budget and Legislation Committee. He was also appointed to represent the City of Sacramento with The Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency, the Sacramento Public Library Authority, the Sacramento Regional Transit Authority, the Regional Water Authority, and the Sacramento Groundwater Authority. In 2016, Jennings was named Vice Mayor of Sacramento.

Jennings served on the board of directors of the Sacramento Sports Commission and the Wells Fargo Advisory Board. He also served on the board of the Los Rios Advisory Foundation. In 2017, Jennings was named a Dream All-Star by the Sacramento Kings.

Jennings and his wife, Cassandra Jennings, have two children, TJ and Asha.

Rick Jennings was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/5/2018

Last Name

Jennings

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Shepherd Elementary School

Paul Public Charter School

Calvin Coolidge Senior High School

University of Maryland

First Name

Rick

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

JEN12

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

He Or She Who Is Behind In The Great Race Of Life Must Run Faster Or Forever Remain Behind.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

4/17/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Sacramento

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Nonprofit executive and government official Rick Jennings (1953 - ) served on the Sacramento Unified School District board of directors for twelve years, and on the Sacramento City Council, in addition to serving as the chief executive officer of the Center for Fathers and Families.

Employment

Various D.C. Papers

Oakland Raiders Football

United California Bank

Xerox Corporation

St. HOPE Academy

Fathers & Families Center

City of Sacramento

Favorite Color

Blue

John Harris

Founder and president of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc., John Leonard Harris was born on July 4, 1961 in St. Louis, Missouri to Reverend Eugene Harris, Jr. and Maeola Wilson Blanchard. Harris attended the University of Missouri-Columbia, where he obtained his B.A. degree in radio, television and film production in 1984.

In 1989, Harris published Campus Programming for Life: The Challenge of the 1990s and Beyond for the National Association for Campus Activities Research Foundation. He worked for the University of Nebraska at Omaha as a student activities advisor from 1989 until 1991, serving as the primary advisor for a variety of groups including the Women’s Resource Center, American Multicultural Students and the Disabled Students Agency, handling a budget of more than $100,000. In 1992, Harris was published in the Journal of Intergroup Relations where his “Portrayal of the Black Family in Prime time Network” piece was awarded the first “Article of the Year” Award by the National Association for Human Rights Workers.

In 1991, Harris became the special assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and was involved in maintaining the presence of underrepresented minority populations on campus. In 1999, Harris joined the Lincoln based, City Impact, Inc. as the Men’s Youth Ministry Coordinator, leading a social club of primarily African American high school and middle school-aged boys. He remained there for three years.

Harris founded Encouragement Unlimited, Inc. in 2002, serving as chief executive and administrator for the faith-based charitable organization. In 2004, Harris returned to academia, working as a service-learning coordinator for Nebraska Wesleyan University.

In 2005, Harris obtained his M.Ed. degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education, and in 2006, he became an instructor at the University. Harris is a popular keynote and conference speaker, lecturing nationally in academia and to businesses on issues of diversity, cultural awareness, leadership, motivation and organizational effectiveness.

Harris is married to his wife Charlene (Maxey) of Lincoln, Nebraska, and they have four children, Preston, Shannon, JoAnna and John, Jr.

Harris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 6, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.282

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/6/2007

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Middle Name

Leonard

Schools

Spensmar Elementary School

Central Elementary School

Spector Junior High School

Saint Louis Priory School

University of Missouri

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

HAR27

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Louis, Missouri

Favorite Quote

He Is No Fool Who Will Lose What He Cannot Keep To Gain What He Cannot Lose.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

7/4/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Martin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken And Dumplings

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive and academic administrator John Harris (1961 - ) founded Encouragement Unlimited, Inc., a faith based charitable organization. He also served as an instructor for the University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

Employment

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Encouragement Unlimited, Inc.

Music Television

Westinghouse Broadcasting Corporation

St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley

Dartmouth College

University of Nebraska-Omaha

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John Harris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John Harris lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John Harris describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John Harris describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John Harris describes the Pentecostal church

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John Harris talks about the formation of the World Assemblies of God Fellowship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John Harris describes his father's ministry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John Harris describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John Harris describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John Harris recalls his parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John Harris describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John Harris describes his neighborhood in Wellston, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John Harris describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John Harris describes his early interest in sports

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John Harris recalls the television programs of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John Harris remembers listening to Motown music as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John Harris describes his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John Harris recalls the Irving Avenue community in Wellston, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John Harris recalls the increase in single parent households during the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John Harris describes how he came to attend the Saint Louis Priory School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John Harris recalls his transition to the Saint Louis Priory School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John Harris remembers his challenges at the Saint Louis Priory School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John Harris describes the tracking system at the Saint Louis Priory School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John Harris describes his experiences of racial discrimination at the Saint Louis Priory School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John Harris describes his experiences of racial discrimination at the Saint Louis Priory School, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John Harris remembers his mischief at the Saint Louis Priory School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John Harris remembers his brief time at Cleveland High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John Harris describes his basketball career at the Saint Louis Priory School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John Harris recalls his decision to attend the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John Harris remembers the sports programs at the University of Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John Harris talks about his studies at the University of Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John Harris describes the African American community at the University of Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John Harris describes Claude McKay's poem, 'If We Must Die'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John Harris recalls how he came to join the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John Harris recalls how he came to join the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John Harris describes his involvement with the Pan-Hellenic Council at the University of Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John Harris remembers the black athletes at the University of Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John Harris describes his role on MTV's 'Columbia Rock Report'

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John Harris describes his early work experiences

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - John Harris remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - John Harris remembers the first year of his marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - John Harris describes the political and racial climate at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - John Harris describes his community involvement at Dartmouth College

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - John Harris talks about his experiences at Dartmouth College, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - John Harris talks about his experiences at Dartmouth College, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - John Harris describes his educational program, If Dr. King Were Alive Today

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - John Harris recalls joining the administration of the University of Nebraska-Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - John Harris describes his introduction to motivational speaking

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - John Harris remembers his work in student activities at the University of Nebraska-Omaha

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - John Harris describes his transition to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - John Harris describes his experiences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - John Harris describes his experiences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - John Harris recalls his challenges at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - John Harris describes the racial tensions at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - John Harris describes his role at City Impact in Lincoln, Nebraska

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - John Harris describes the organizational structure of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - John Harris talks about the daily operations of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - John Harris talks about the future of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - John Harris talks about the role of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc. as a faith based organization

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - John Harris describes his plans for the future

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - John Harris describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - John Harris reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - John Harris reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - John Harris talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - John Harris reflects upon his role in African American studies education

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - John Harris remembers his childhood friends

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - John Harris describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - John Harris narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$8

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
John Harris describes his role on MTV's 'Columbia Rock Report'
John Harris describes the organizational structure of Encouragement Unlimited, Inc.
Transcript
Now how did you do in your major? Did you, did you really learn what you thought you were gonna learn and, and, and, and get close to becoming like a, a sportscaster?$$Well, I, I wish I could say yes (laughter). I wish I could say I, I was smart enough to maximize my time. But there, there were some good things happening. In my major, I did join, I did become a part of a show called the 'Columbia Rock Report.' They had an audition for three people who would be what they call video jocks and provide local concert information and other music news as a part of MTV's [Music Television; MTV] local broadcast. And so they had these multiple auditions, and I was fortunate to be able to be one of the individuals selected. So I was a, a part of the MTV show every, every day there that--called the 'Columbia Rock Report.' And so we would tape a, a, a vignette of what would happen, what happens in concert, the concert life of Columbia [Missouri], St. Louis [Missouri], Kansas City [Missouri], and surrounding areas. And so I was one of the individuals who actually got the opportunity to be what would you call a, a video jock during the MTV breaks. And so MTV would be showing their music videos, and then at the local breaks they would show our spots in the, the 'Columbia Rock Report,' our thirty minute spots. And these spots would play regularly. And so after a while, we became kind of local Columbia celebrities. But I still have my MTV jacket to this day. Of course, I could nowhere near wear it. But it's something that I was really proud of, being selected of this. And the one thing, you know, you talk about being able to acquire the skills, I think my, my fault in, in my major was that, as a person who wanted to do broadcasting, I spent more time doing the talent portion of the major and not enough time doing the technical. And, and many of the jobs early on were in the technical arena. They weren't in the talent arena. And so I had not invested myself into the place where--and again, I hadn't, I hadn't got that advising [at the University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri]. I mean, if someone had told me that you need to spend more time behind the camera than in front of the camera, I probably would have taken more time to do that. But you know, all, all the time I had spent in front of the camera learning the trade, learning the craft, learning how to speak well, learning how to, to, to, to pace myself, learning how to write scripts, learning all of those things to prepare myself for the on camera eventuality did not pan itself out into a job. But there were plenty of jobs for production assistants, editors, on and on and on. And when I graduated, I had not invested in, in that, in those skills as much as the talent skills.$And so the Encouragement Unlimited [Encouragement Unlimited, Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska] has three primary pillars: one--you'll have, you have that in the, in the handout I gave you--is a program, is, is partnerships. Our job is figuring really not to create a whole lot of different stuff. There's a lot of stuff going on. There are a lot of people who need encouragement. And so what we look for are people we can, we can partner with, and so we partner with the school system [Lincoln Public Schools]; we partner with community organizations; we partner with Lincoln food bank [Food Bank of Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska]; we partner with people who help other people. The second is programs. We do back to school supplies; we provide food assistance; we do the kinds of things that we think fill holes, fill a gap for people and families. And then lastly, we do what we call a postcard project. We have a postcard project, where we send people encouragement in the mail. We, we literally take postcards and we send them inspirational messages in, in the mail. And one particular mother of a young man I used to work with, with City Impact [Lincoln, Nebraska], she asked me after she got seven of my postcards, "How do you know what to write?" I said, "All I do is go down to the post office, take a stack of cards. I say a prayer. I say God, give me, give me a sense of what I need to put on this card. And I write it, and I stamp it, and I put it in the mail." I said, "That's as simple as it get." She goes--I said, "Why do you ask?" 'Cause we never follow up on these cards. She said--I said, "Why do you ask?" She said, "Because it seems that every time I get it, it's exactly what I need to hear." And sometimes I'll just put on the card, hang in there, you know, don't let go, you know, we're here for you, you know, as simple a message, you know, as you can provide for someone, and, and veritably we believe that it makes an impact. And so over five years of existence, you know, we've sent out about twelve to fifteen thousand of these postcards to people all across the United States who believe need encouragement. We send them to kids. I send them to my own kids. I send them to my family members. I send them to my nieces and nephews. I send them to people--somebody says hey, listen, I know this person So and So in Dayton, Ohio, and they need encouragement. And so I'll say okay, send them a postcard. And so our job is not to encourage everybody but to build an army of encouragers, an army of people who, who believe that every day they wake up they can in, they can inspire somebody to, to hang in there, to, to, to sustain life just one more day, no, more hour, one more minute. And so, our job is just to, is to promote hope, because our motto is if, you don't have anything if you don't have hope. You know, if you just can't--if you don't believe you can, then things just start to fall apart. And so, that's the one thing I found from the people in City Impact I was working with, is that, yeah, they, yeah, they would love to have more money, and, and they would love to have more, more stuff, you know, 'cause most of them were, you know, low income. But the one thing I found myself doing most often was, was trying to sustain hope for them, that things would get better, that the troubles you're having now you won't always have; the problems you're having now you won't always have. And now, we try to be a resource. You want to finish high school, and you don't know the mechanism. We can put together the pieces, but you've got to do it. We can't do it for you. So, we just try to be the resource and the, the conduit through which the hope and inspiration flows.$$Okay.$$And so when I left City Impact, that's the life now I live.

Louis O'Neil Dore

Trial lawyer Louis O’Neil Dore was the fifth of nine children born to Emily and Hezekiah Dore. He was born on March 14, 1945 in Beaufort, South Carolina. In the 1950s, Dore’s father changed the family name to Dore from Doe because he felt that Doe was a common name for anonymous persons.

Dore attended Robert Smalls Elementary School and heard Benjamin E. Mays speak at an assembly there. In 1963, Dore graduated from high school and was accepted into Morehouse College. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was the commencement speaker at his graduation in 1967. Dore obtained a teacher’s certificate from Georgia State College and his J.D. degree from the University of Georgia. He was one of only four African Americans in his law school class.

Dore worked tirelessly to help bring about changes in health and economic development in many areas of South Carolina, including Beauford, Hilton Head and Daufuskie Island. He worked with the Beauford-Jasper County Comprehensive Health Department as the legal officer, drafting contracts and deeds, writing grants, obtaining funds and petitioning for African American doctors to have the right to treat patients in local hospitals.

In 1980, Dore was the only African American plaintiff trial lawyer in Jasper County, South Carolina, and he became the first African American attorney to make senior partner in a white law firm. Dore became the managing partner of his own law firm in 1991. Both of his sons are attorneys in his firm.

Dore has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Penn School, Benedict College, and Beauford Memorial Hospital, and as a board member of the South Carolina State Board of Education.

Dore lives in Beauford, South Carolina with his wife, Vernita.

Dore was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 31, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.038

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/31/2007

Last Name

Dore

Maker Category
Middle Name

O'Neil

Occupation
Schools

Morehouse College

Clark Atlanta University

University of Georgia School of Law

Robert Smalls School

First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Buford County

HM ID

DOR04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

3/14/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hilton Head Island

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Trial lawyer Louis O'Neil Dore (1945 - ) was the first African American attorney to make senior partner in a white law firm, and was the only African American plaintiff trial lawyer in Jasper County, South Carolina.

Employment

Moss, Bailey, Dore and Kuhn

Dore Law Firm

Beaufort-Jasper Comprehensive Health Services, Inc.

St. Helena High School

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louis O'Neil Dore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louis O'Neil Dore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about his mother's education and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his maternal great-grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his maternal great-grandparents' land

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louis O'Neil Dore lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his earliest memories of school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers the Robert Smalls School in Beaufort, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his mentors at the Robert Smalls School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes the community of Burton, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about his family's work ethic

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his siblings' education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers the influence of his older brother

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Louis O'Neil Dore recalls his arrival at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his experiences at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers teaching in Beaufort County, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers the Vietnam War draft

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his decision to attend law school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about Charlayne Hunter-Gault

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Louis O'Neil Dore recalls his experiences of racial discrimination in law school

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his challenges at the University of Georgia School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his influences as an attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Louis O'Neil Dore remembers Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive Health Services, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his activism in Beaufort County, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his transition to private law practice

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Louis O'Neil Dore recall serving as a trial lawyer in Beaufort, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his legal casework

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his involvement in the Operation Jackpot trials

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Louis O'Neil Dore recalls opening a law practice with his sons

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his organizational involvement, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his organizational involvement, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Louis O'Neil Dore talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Louis O'Neil Dore reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Louis O'Neil Dore shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Louis O'Neil Dore describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Louis O'Neil Dore narrates his photographs

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DATitle
Louis O'Neil Dore talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Louis O'Neil Dore remembers Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive Health Services, Inc.
Transcript
What are your thoughts about King's [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] March on Washington?$$Oh, it was just overwhelming. Martin Luther King is one of the greatest persons in my life. I idolize him. For me he is, he is like a prophet. And of course Dr. Mays [Benjamin Mays] was president while I was at Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] and his last year as president was the year that I graduated and Martin Luther King was the commencement speaker for my graduation. And, and so this was the first time that I was exposed to the likes of Dr. Benjamin Mays, Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior and at Morehouse we had a tradition of chapel.$$Yes.$$Chapel was a requirement. We could only miss three days from chapel a semester and it was from breakfast to chapel and from chapel to class. There was always some interesting speaker that we had for our chapel services. Dr. Mordecai Johnson, Dr. Howard Thurman, just outstanding people. One of the persons that influenced me greatly my, my, my new religious thinking from the old church was Reverend Lucius Tobin [Lucius M. Tobin] who was my religion professor at Morehouse. There were a lot of people that impacted my life. I was in the economics department and Dr. E.B. Williams, a native South Carolinian was chairman of the Department of Economics and there were just a lot of impressive, impressive people around. It was, it was just a great experience coming from, coming from Burton [South Carolina] (simultaneous)$$(Simultaneous) Who were some of your classmates--$So what happens after law school [University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia]? You graduate in or you finished (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I finished in '73 [1973] and excuse me, and I intended to come back to practice with Charles Washington who is the only black lawyer in Beaufort [South Carolina] at that time and we had talked a great deal about me returning to Beaufort and practicing law with him and after my second year in law school, he passed. And so that kind of went out, went out the, out the window. But I came back to Beaufort and I was recruited by Beaufort-Jasper Comprehensive Health Services, Inc. [sic. Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive Health Services, Inc., Ridgeland, South Carolina], which was a local nonprofit community health organization headed at that time by [HistoryMaker] Thomas Barnwell from Hilton Head [Hilton Head Island, South Carolina] and they hired me as their legal officer and we were doing a lot of different things quite differently back then. And I'm sure if you've ever had an opportunity to talk to Tom Barnwell he's told you about all the things that were being done at that time in, in '73 [1973]. We, we were an activist group and an activist organization taking water, potable water to a lot of communities that didn't have potable water and that meant drafting contracts and agreements and easements and deeds and so forth in order to effectuate these arrangements for local water companies that we started. I also moved into the area of grants writing for the agency. For example I wrote a grant to the Campaign for Human Development [Catholic Campaign for Human Development] which was a Catholic foundation or nonprofit and the catalog foundation and they jointly funded a community store in Daufuskie Island [South Carolina]. Daufuskie is an isolated island separated by the Calibogue sound from Hilton Head and most--all of the people there went mostly shopped in Savannah [Georgia] once a month and didn't have a local grocery store and I wrote a grant and got it funded--got a local grocery store basically funded for Daufuskie Island and made a lot of trips to Daufuskie to organize the local residents over there and was basically the, the legal officer for that organization. We also had a few small legal battles with the local hospital, Beaut Memorial [Beaufort Memorial Hospital, Beaufort, South Carolina] didn't wanna give black doctors privileges to practice at the hospital, staff privileges, but more particularly, that was a problem I guess more so in Jasper County [South Carolina]. Jasper County wanted nothing to do with black doctors in the little twenty-two bed hospital over there.