The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

George H. Lambert

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert was born on May 12, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to George H. Lambert, Sr. and Arnitha Green Allen. Lambert graduated from William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania in 1971. He went on to earn his B.A. degree in urban studies from Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia in 1975.

Upon his college graduation, Lambert worked for two years at the Richmond Community Action Program. Then, he became a community organizer for the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia. Lambert was hired as the executive director of the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in 1980. He also co-founded the Alexandria Forum, as a space for civil rights groups to collaborate on key issues and strategic planning. In 1990, he led the branch’s transition into the fully affiliated Northern Virginia Urban League. During his tenure as the executive director, Lambert also served as a senior regional consultant to the National Urban League. Lambert left the Northern Virginia Urban League in the mid-2000s, at which time he served as a senior director for resource development for the United Way of the National Capital area and as the vice president of public affairs at Issue Dynamics, Inc. From 2011 to 2013, he served as the president and chief executive officer of the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio. Lambert was then appointed as the president and chief executive officer of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014. In this role, he created the Thursday Network, which facilitated interactions between African American youth and the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. Lambert also worked with the Washington Nationals to institute Black Heritage Day at Nationals Park; and he partnered with corporations like Potomac Electric Power Company to offer utility assistance in the African American community.

He was a member of the National Urban League’s Association of Executives; the Academy of Fellows. He was also a parishioner of Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia.

Lambert and his wife, Bernadette Curtis-Lambert, have five children together.

George H. Lambert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 2, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/03/2017

Last Name

Lambert

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

H.

Occupation
Schools

William Penn Senior High School

Virginia Union University

Randall Junior High School

James G. Birney Elementary School

H.D. Cooke Elementary School

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

LAM04

Favorite Season

Christmas holiday season

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Greece

Favorite Quote

Have Mercy. To God Be The Glory.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/12/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet potatoes, salmon

Short Description

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert (1951 - ) served as president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia and the Lorain County Urban League, in Elyria, before being appointed the president and CEO of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014.

Employment

Greater Washington Urban League

Lorain County Urban League

United Way

IDI

National Urban League

Northern Virginia Urban League

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:902,18:1476,26:3116,61:6818,112:7210,117:23982,376:24918,392:29520,465:29988,472:30378,478:39618,563:43146,616:43482,621:50292,712:51972,738:57936,844:58776,855:61212,951:61632,957:72011,1082:72741,1097:73471,1106:74347,1136:75807,1166:76683,1180:81314,1228:85958,1313:89656,1385:101030,1489:105868,1575:109089,1607:110090,1628:110629,1637:114094,1697:120870,1854:132882,2074:135342,2135:144035,2269:150335,2528:165718,2747:166310,2757:166606,2762:179494,3003:180352,3126:195515,3345:198438,3423:199465,3439:199860,3445:200413,3453:204570,3506:205250,3519:213898,3618:217865,3677:218230,3683:219179,3697:219617,3704:220128,3719:223194,3805:223559,3812:228304,3902:234022,3931:234858,3948:235314,3956:237062,3988:237670,3997:238962,4076:248462,4256:248766,4275:249070,4280:249450,4292:256414,4362:267200,4589$0,0:8005,181:14125,376:17950,441:28790,603:29310,613:32564,637:33166,647:34026,661:35230,680:37294,712:38326,726:48907,937:60128,1061:60472,1066:61418,1086:67264,1171:67696,1182:69784,1240:70432,1254:79230,1420:81680,1442:86384,1517:94708,1589:95412,1598:98756,1650:106332,1697:107424,1717:114480,1894:115152,1903:115908,1914:121868,1989:122120,1994:122624,2004:123254,2014:123884,2028:132810,2133:133130,2138:133690,2147:134730,2172:135450,2177:136810,2210:142401,2256:144052,2403:161680,2558:176500,2718:180388,2807:181441,2836:190060,2995
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of George H. Lambert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert talks about gender discrimination in the Baptist church

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert remembers staying in Washington, D.C. after his parent's divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert describes his parent's personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert talks about his brother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert talks about moving to York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about his mother's decision to move him out of Washington, D.C. as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert describes his neighborhood and upbringing in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert recalls attending William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert talks about developing his interest in African American studies

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert remembers his options after graduating from high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes his decision to attend Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls majoring in Urban Studies at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about the black political leadership of the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert recalls reading the works of influential black writers

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers joining the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert recalls backing coed dorms at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Richmond's annexation of Henrico County, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about his job offer from the Richmond Community Action Agency

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers his graduation from Virginia Union University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about his community organizing work

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls the history of the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about neighborhood preservation in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes his role at the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert talks about the Northern Virginia Urban League becoming an affiliate of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes African American politicians in Northern Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about Governor L. Douglas Wilder

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert recalls the articles he's published in African American newspapers

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his work with the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert remembers Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes past presidents of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert talks about his work in public affairs and with the United Way of America

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert describes his experiences with the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about the Black Lives Matter movement

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Chief Cathy Lanier of the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about educating young African American males on law enforcement procedures

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes the Greater Washington Urban League's partnership with the Washington Nationals

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about the Greater Washington Urban League's collaborations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes the scholarships and philanthropy of the Greater Washington Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert reflects upon the presidency of Barack Obama

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes race relations in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - George H. Lambert describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$12

DATitle
George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone
George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president
Transcript
So, are there any stories from this period of time? I mean, from these ten years that--?$$Well, you know, so I will share one with you. I had a great mentor when I served in Alexandria [Virginia] and for the Northern Virginia Urban League and so for the affiliate there and the person of a gentleman by the name of Ferdinand Day who is now deceased. Ferdinand Day was the, also he was the first African American to become the chair of the board for the, for the school board there [Alexandria City School Board] and so he, he was really my mentor. He, if you recall the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' and, and at some point in the movie, so Denzel Washington was the person who starred in the movie, but, but Herman Boone was the real coach. And so Herman was a good friend, good buddy. And so in the movie, you know, there was this whole discussion about the team, the football team not being able to go. I can't remember where it was, but not being able to go to someplace to play a game or whatever. And so Ferdinand Day, as the chair of the school board, said, well, you know, he would just cut some of the things out of the budget so that there would be resources and money for, for the team but it was that kind of boldness and, and leadership that Ferdinand Day really kind of brought. And so, you know, at some point the, the system really decided to acquiesce, if you will, and supported him in terms of the team but, but Herman Boone is someone that I really admired and when he did the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' when he and Denzel did the movie, I was still serving there. And so we decided that we were going to recognize Herman Boone at our annual gala, we were going to recognize him for his leadership. And so I remember having lunch with Herman one day and I said to him, "You know, it would be great if we could get Denzel Washington to come and present the award to you." And he said to me, he says, "Well George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], send him a letter." And so, so I did, you know, sent, sent Denzel Washington a letter and his people immediately got back with me, probably in a couple of weeks or so and said, "Unfortunately, Mr.," you know, "Mr. Washington is--has other commitments now and won't be able to come." So I called Herman and said, "Herman, I did what you told me to do, you know, we sent Denzel Washington a letter and asked him to come and I'm told that, you know, we're told that he's not going to be able to come." And Herman is kind of very direct when he talks with you. He said, "Okay, George, thank you, I'll take care of it." I didn't quite understand what that meant. So I'll never forget, maybe about a week or so later, my wife [Bernadette Curtis-Lambert] and I, we were coming in from church and it was Herman, he called, and so the phone was ringing as we were walking in the door and he said, and I said, hello, and so Herman said, "George, this is Herman Boone." And I knew who it was, he didn't have to tell me who, but I knew it was, "Herman Boone," and I said, "Hey, Herman, how you doing?" He said, "Well listen, I'm calling to let you know that Denzel Washington is coming." I said, "Herman, come on." I said, "Now, it's Sunday, you know, I'm coming in from church," and I said, "You shouldn't be really kind of, you know, pulling--." He says, "George, I'm telling you he's coming." I said, "Herman, you sure?" He says, "George, I'm standing in the man's kitchen right now and he wanted me to call you. He said, he wanted me to call Mr. Lambert and tell him he was coming." So, lesson learned from that. First of all, Denzel Washington, as he explained to Herman, as I understand, he never really saw my letter from him. His people got it and, you know, they knew how busy he was and so his people just kind of made a decision for him that he would just not be able to do it but Denzel Washington thought so much of Herman Boone and the work that he had done in terms of the integrating of the football team [at T.C. Williams High School, Alexandria, Virginia], he really wanted to come to present the award to Herman Boone. So, he did come at our gala to present the award to Herman Boone, so yeah.$$Okay.$$So when you ask me, you know, memorable experiences, that will be one I will never, ever forget, yeah.$$Okay, okay, that's something. So this would have been around the time the movie was out and--?$$Yeah, it was during the period that the movie was out, yeah, yeah.$$This is like in the mid-'90s [sic. 2000], I guess?$$Mid-'90s [1990s], yeah, yeah, mid-'90s [1990s] or so, yeah, yeah.$So you were there from 2011 to 2013; and you said you accomplished your objectives and kind of--$$Yeah, yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) got them back into working order.$$My coming, 'cause so, from Lorain [Lorain County Urban League, Elyria, Ohio], I did come to the Greater Washington Urban League [Washington, D.C.] but initially that was really not in the game plan because my predecessor here and a lady who I really considered a mentor, who I, you know, continue to revere as well, [HistoryMaker] Maudine Cooper, had served here as the president of the Greater Washington Urban League for a number of years and I had no idea that, you know, she was really considering retiring. And so even when she announced her retirement, yup, you know there were some folks who reached out to me and said, you know, "George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], Maudine is retiring, you ought to consider, you know, throwing your hat in the ring for the, for the Greater Washington Urban League." I was like, "No." You know, part of it with me was that I just, to some extent thought that everybody who thought they had arrived, so to speak, were going to be in the hunt to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League. It had nothing to do with my skillset but just kind of felt, everybody who arrived, that's where they were going to be and I just really didn't want to travel in that. And so to kind of show you how, because also kind of maintain, it was the Lord's hand in this as well. It was the last day of the cutoff time to submit your resume that I finally made a decision that I would submit my resume for the position, the last day, okay. And, and so, the last day and then, you know, six months or so later, because there was a number of rounds of interviews, or whatever that I went through, I actually went through six rounds of interviews, to then emerge and to actually become the president, you know, of the Greater Washington Urban League but initially, this wasn't my focus. I wasn't really looking, that I was even going to throw my hat in the ring. So, so I just, you know, I just kind of now step back and look at it and just know that there was, it was, you know, the intervention of the Lord's hand in it.$$Okay, well, now so, were there, were there a lot of candidates?$$Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean the, at the end of the day, some board members here shared with me, there were quite a few candidates, you know, and so, so yeah, yeah, but that, that, you know, for an affiliate of this size and for the work that this particular organization is involved in doing and for the, the notoriety that Maudine Cooper really kind of brought to the Greater Washington Urban League, that would be expected. I would have expected no less, really. That would have been a, that there would have been a number of candidates that would have had an interest in, in throwing their hat in the ring for, to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League.

Dr. Warren Goins

Physician Warren Goins was born on March 28, 1938 in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from Lincoln University with his A.B. degree in chemistry in 1959. Inspired by his own physician, Dr. Aurelious King, Goins went on to attend Howard University’s College of Medicine. While he was on partial academic scholarships, Goins later found out that Dr. King was paying the balance of his tuition. He went on to graduate from the Howard University College of Medicine with his M.D. degree in 1963.

In 1963 and 1964, Goins interned at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn. Then, from 1964 to 1967, he served as a captain in the United States Air Force, stationed in Wethersfield, England. Upon his return in 1967, Goins became a resident in internal medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center, where he then became a fellow in cardiovascular disease in 1969. Goins also served a fellowship at the Manhattan V.A. Hospital from 1970 until 1971. He went on to practice internal medicine with Preferred Health Partners at the Bedford Williamsburg Center in Brooklyn.

Goins and his wife, Charlynn Goins, have worked together in many philanthropic endeavors, helping organizations such as Boys and Girls Harbor, A Better Chance, the Gracie Mansion Conservancy, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others. In 2010, they made fractional gifts from their private collection of celebrated paintings by artists Robert S. Duncanson and Charles Ethan Porter to the Brooklyn Museum’s collecting initiative that focused on the acquisition of works by African American artists. Goins’ medical group has received many awards and honors for their work in the medical field, including the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s Physician Practice Connections Recognition Program in 2011, 2012 and 2013; and the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s Patient-Centered Medical Home Recognition Program in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Goins also received an award from the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s Diabetes Recognition Program in 2012.

Goins lives with his wife, Charlynn, in New York. They have two children: Hilary and Jeffrey, and four grandchildren.

Warren Goins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.276

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/21/2013

Last Name

Goins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Harvey

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Stuyvesant High School

Lincoln University

Howard University College of Medicine

First Name

Warren

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

GOI03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern France

Favorite Quote

I Can't.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/28/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Potatoes

Short Description

Physician Dr. Warren Goins (1938 - ) was a physician for over fifty years. He and his wife, Charlynn Goins, were well-known New York philanthropists who owned an important collection of nineteenth-century African American art.

Employment

Montefiore Hospital

Advantage Care Physicians

Manhattan V.A. Hospital

Maimonides Hospital

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:4221,129:5025,146:5494,154:5896,161:6164,166:6432,171:6968,180:7571,190:7839,195:8107,200:8710,210:9983,241:10921,259:14925,282:20028,400:40122,572:40394,577:41278,593:50870,678:58220,734:58736,742:59596,753:62195,792:62837,799:65191,825:73350,926:73938,933:77368,979:78054,990:81008,1011:81593,1017:82178,1024:96905,1208:98117,1233:100642,1294:101854,1307:102561,1316:103268,1324:106190,1335:106650,1341:107018,1346:107570,1354:109042,1426:118806,1521:122289,1608:123261,1627:123990,1639:124314,1644:124638,1649:125610,1671:141830,1840:148105,1866:148812,1874:152246,1922:153357,1934:153862,1941:161095,2000:177008,2193:184683,2284:185068,2290:191228,2416:191613,2422:197640,2497:201554,2557:206018,2630:206378,2636:209254,2650:213038,2731:215414,2769:215766,2774:216118,2781:216470,2789:223191,2850:225116,2883:226040,2899:226733,2909:227426,2921:227965,2929:228812,2945:233894,3044:234202,3049:234587,3056:235357,3068:237359,3107:242154,3141:243666,3167:245262,3195:246186,3209:247194,3239:247782,3247:259722,3438:260460,3453$0,0:5670,150:6230,160:6510,165:9870,279:10150,284:14320,298:17841,317:18745,327:19536,336:20101,342:20553,350:21005,355:23068,375:24186,390:24616,396:24960,401:25648,411:28404,429:28934,435:29358,440:33075,490:34563,520:36981,559:37632,569:41817,675:42468,683:43491,697:49225,790:49680,798:51760,804:52574,817:52944,823:53758,842:54424,847:55090,858:58173,885:59636,911:60560,924:61099,933:61715,985:62023,990:62485,998:65100,1007:66204,1021:67400,1036:68320,1047:68688,1052:69424,1062:70068,1071:72092,1103:82160,1183:82635,1192:84060,1223:85295,1243:85675,1248:89095,1305:91470,1344:96981,1366:98034,1384:98763,1409:102084,1469:102489,1475:102894,1481:103218,1486:103947,1496:104676,1502:107187,1549:108078,1563:108807,1573:109536,1585:110103,1593:111237,1606:112614,1620:113991,1636:121900,1678:123160,1698:123970,1709:126310,1754:127840,1773:128200,1778:131170,1831:131890,1840:134613,1864:138756,1929:141216,1973:142036,1985:143594,2031:153782,2207:154502,2223:159470,2335:163310,2365:164130,2426:168312,2487:169214,2501:171264,2540:172822,2561:179070,2625:180420,2634:180870,2641:181230,2646:188430,2798:191220,2847:196755,2881:197259,2891:198141,2906:198393,2911:198834,2920:200283,2947:200850,2964:201417,2977:201858,2989:202425,3000:202740,3006:207750,3069
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Warren Goins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his father's Melungeon heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls the holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Warren Goins describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers Stuyvesant High School in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls his early aspirations to become a physician

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his first impressions of Stuyvesant High School in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls his social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers joining Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls meeting his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his experiences with Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls his first impressions of Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his leadership roles at Lincoln University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his experiences at Lincoln University

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers his first impressions of his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls entering the Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his classmates at the Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his wife's college scholarship

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the perceptions of African American doctors

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers marrying Charlynn Goins

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers his internship at Maimonides Hospital in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls living in England while serving in the U.S. military

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his travels in Europe

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers practicing medicine in England

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls observing the Civil Rights Movement while living abroad

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers returning to the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Warren Goins describes the importance of board certification in the medical field

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his early career as a cardiologist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls obtaining his board certification

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins remembers buying a home in New Rochelle, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the declining role of primary medicine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls his wife's decision to attend Columbia Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the women's movement of the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls the start of his wife's legal career

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his relationship with his children

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls the success of AdvantageCare Physicians

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the changes in the health insurance industry

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his approach to patient care

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his administrative experiences at AdvantageCare Physicians in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins shares his views on the future of medicine

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the challenges he faced during his career

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Warren Goins recalls starting his art collection

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his art collection

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about acquiring the pieces in his art collection

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Warren Goins describes the artists in his art collection

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about the importance of the black art collectors

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Warren Goins reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Warren Goins describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his concerns for the future of African American physicians, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Warren Goins talks about his concerns for the future of African American physicians, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Warren Goins reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Dr. Warren Goins recalls living in England while serving in the U.S. military
Dr. Warren Goins talks about his administrative experiences at AdvantageCare Physicians in New York City
Transcript
Then you get drafted [into the U.S. military]. Is that when you get drafted?$$Yeah, they had the Berry Plan. So, you signed up when you were in medical school that they wouldn't interfere with your education until you finished either your residency or your internship. So, I had signed up to go in after my internship [at Maimonides Hospital; Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York] and in that, all my other friends didn't have to go because they were not physicians but they were drafting physicians. I had no choice, and so in, I guess it was '64 [1964], we were able to call up Washington, D.C., and speak to somebody and they, at that time I was drafted for two years and we offered to, if they sent me to Europe, I'd stay an additional year so that's what they did and I was really thinking of France at the time, and de Gaulle [Charles de Gaulle] kicked us out of France in '62 [1962], so I--$$You meant the United States.$$Yeah. So I went to, I was stationed outside of London [England] for three years, which was great.$$So, describe the experience.$$Well, it was very, very pleasant. We were in the little town of Wethersfield [England]. It was sort of equidistant between London and Cambridge [England]. We went, Charlynn [HistoryMaker Charlynn Goins] had a letter of introduction from her history professor, whose wife went to Cambridge [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England]--I guess in the late '20s [1920s] or '30s [1930s]--was a Cambridge grad. Sorry, I can't remember all of these names but, at any rate, when we went, we were a little reluctant to go because we were both young at this time and we knew this lady had to be in her sixties, but we did go visit her and when we got there she, a little town pretty close to where I was stationed. You know, the streets were named after her parents and everything, and they, she started inviting us to her parties that she had and one interesting thing, when I was getting ready to come back home, I talked about English, they were all sort of very soft, wore knickers. They called themselves farmers but they were all, they all were Cambridge grads and they all were talking about their poultry farm and this farm and they, I'm sure they were MI5 [Security Service] by this group. This was the ideal group for it. At any rate, I, we were getting ready to come back home--this was after three years--and they asked me, "Well, where else are you going?" And I said, "Well, we couldn't go to the continent," meaning France, and they said, I told them I had run out of money, and they said, "You know, we never met an American who ran out of money before." And that, I found very amusing (laughter). Never met an American who had run out of money.$$So she was nice to you then.$$Very nice. Used to include us in all her parties and--not all her parties but a good number of them--so we got a chance to see a different side of the English countryside and remember, 'Europe on 5 Dollars a Day' [Arthur Frommer] was very popular then, so as a captain with five years' experience, overseas pay and we didn't live on the base. They only had some fighter pilots and some important people who took care of the planes on the base and we lived in a little country village so, it was very good. We could jump in our car and drive to Paris [France] for the weekend, a long weekend, they didn't care if the doctors were on the base or not as long as one of them was there.$So you took on an administrative--I'm trying to understand the key, if you could help me--$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) understand the key things in your career.$$Well, I wasn't, while I was chief of medicine [for AdvantageCare Physicians, New York, New York], saw my full contingent of patients and I was involved, like for about four or five years, all of these eight centers, would send people to specialists and I would look over the referrals and sometimes I would call the doctor and ask, "Why are they sending this patient out," because one thing, we were an HMO [health maintenance organization], with a collective set amount of money and when you went to another doctor on the outside, the insurance company, they would bill the insurance company and then the insurance company would subtract the money from us and it was some service we could provide. Our group, before we had all of this condensation into one group [EmblemHealth, Inc., New York, New York], was very good in terms of following the directions and monitoring what should be done and what shouldn't be done. So, we were, things were good and probably, if anything, they were overpaid, you know, from the state and you know, 'cause one time, when we had a very good accountant who was on the parent company's board of directors, Rappaport [ph.], and he was basically a part time physician, a part time accountant with our group, but he was one of these men who must have been there sixty hours like everybody else, looking at the paper clips and turning off the lights in the different offices and running around, but, anyway it was interesting. I enjoyed what I did and we opened up a new center in Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn [New York] and I wrote a lot of the checks, too, and I just remembered during the summer, I wrote for twenty-one thousand dollars for an electric bill and I was saying, "Look, why have we got to have twenty-one thousand dollars?" This is a month for the electric in this building and it was a two story or three story, and they said, "Oh, you've got an elevator." And I said, "Look, twenty-one thousand--." And this was air conditioned. This was during the summer and you'd go to the place, you'd be freezing and I said, "Look, let's cut off the air conditioning." We didn't have the ability to cut off the air conditioning in that building because New York [New York] had all the controls over in New York, so they keep the air condition blasting, they keep the lights on all night, and then we get this twenty-one thousand dollar bill that we had to pay and, anyway, it was a lot of, some of it was humorous when I look back.$$But wait a minute. So, you're really talking administrative role too, with the practice--$$Yeah, we did, well, we were a partnership and we had administrators but, you know, the doctors looked over what they could. We weren't doing the administrative work with the employees or anything like that, but we was writing the, signing the checks and which money went out, and questioned what we thought was appropriate.

A. Scott Bolden

Lawyer and law partner, A. Scott Bolden was born Alan Scott Bolden on June 8, 1962 in Joliet, Illinois. Growing up watching his father try criminal and civil rights cases, he acquired exceptional oratorical skills, and knew that he would grow up to be a lawyer. In 1984, Bolden graduated cum laude from Morehouse College, where he received his B.A. degree in political science. Three years later, 1987, Bolden received his J.D. degree from the Howard University School of Law. While at Howard, Bolden was an active contributor to the Howard Law Journal, received a number of awards and scholarships and participated in the National Moot Court Team and Board of Phi Alpha Delta Legal Fraternity.

After graduating, Bolden would work as a law clerk for Judge Luke Moore of the District of Columbia Superior Court, a lead counsel in numerous trials for the New York County District Attorney’s Office, and eventually become office managing partner of Reed Smith’s Washington, D.C. office. Aside from successfully representing many developers and building owners in major real estate tax appeal litigations as a civil/commercial litigator, Bolden has had numerous accomplishments as a criminal defense litigator including representing numerous Clinton presidential appointees as witnesses in congressional and federal investigations. Bolden has been affiliated with the D.C. Chamber of Commerce, Economic Club of Washington, D.C., Individual Development Corporation and the Democratic National Committee. Aside from acting as a practicing attorney, Bolden has appeared on CNN’s Both Sides, ABC’s 20/20, hosted WAMU, WTOP and WOL radio programs and served as co-host on “Building Bridges for Business.”

Bolden lives in Washington, D.C, and has three daughters and one granddaughter.

Bolden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 25, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.093

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/25/2008 |and| 9/10/2012

Last Name

Bolden

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Morehouse College

Providence Catholic High School

Howard University School of Law

Sacred Heart Catholic Elementary School

First Name

A. Scott

Birth City, State, Country

Joliet

HM ID

BOL02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rio De Janeiro

Favorite Quote

Be Excellent At All Times, Somebody's Always Watching. Make Sure You Have A Plan B, C And D, Because Plan A Never Works.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/8/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Catfish

Short Description

Litigator A. Scott Bolden (1962 - ) was office managing partner of the law firm, Reed Smith, in Washington, D.C. He also represented numerous Clinton presidential appointees as witnesses in congressional and federal investigations.

Employment

New York District Attorney's Office

Reed Smith LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2720,68:2992,73:3332,79:3876,94:5644,149:12036,287:12444,294:13056,307:14348,332:18930,346:19840,362:20190,368:20540,375:22150,410:26560,492:27190,502:27470,507:27750,513:32930,626:33210,631:35310,672:43211,748:43722,780:44233,788:56205,1003:57519,1025:58030,1033:59709,1058:68328,1125:68811,1133:71502,1188:71985,1196:72606,1209:74745,1258:75366,1269:75711,1275:89133,1496:90204,1519:90897,1532:92220,1567:94299,1596:100230,1661:100490,1667:100750,1672:103740,1710:117338,1943:117794,1950:118934,1972:120606,2005:126524,2041:134084,2232:140348,2373:141572,2395:150105,2519:153820,2555:156201,2582:160154,2651:160556,2658:161025,2666:162633,2717:163705,2745:165045,2768:166117,2796:166653,2806:166921,2811:167457,2820:167993,2830:168395,2837:173336,2887:175388,2921:175996,2931:176300,2936:177136,2948:178200,2963:180708,3008:181088,3014:190787,3140:191735,3157:192525,3169:193236,3180:208702,3425:209270,3436:214169,3536:216157,3569:225970,3674:226432,3682:243263,3941:243571,3946:247729,4065:248037,4070:252118,4157:252734,4166:253735,4181:257236,4192:258149,4206:258564,4212:261054,4258:271050,4379$0,0:1564,43:3220,68:4600,91:23928,416:24786,424:25182,431:25710,443:26304,453:30854,479:38125,560:41205,612:45979,708:47827,746:50830,803:51215,809:55090,818:57090,853:57410,861:58210,872:59650,897:61410,918:64530,974:65970,991:73339,1077:78668,1187:81150,1231:81953,1277:82902,1301:83559,1313:84362,1323:90480,1354:90772,1359:91356,1369:99167,1505:100116,1519:100627,1528:110560,1629:112336,1672:118540,1761
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of A. Scott Bolden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his maternal family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his maternal family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden talks about colorism and passing in Newton, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his family's southern traditions

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden describes his mother's childhood in Newton, Mississippi and Joliet, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden describes his parents' careers

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden describes his paternal family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden remembers his father

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden considers which parent he takes after most and talks about their involvement in community activism and civil rights

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden remembers when his sister knocked out his front tooth

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden describes his relationship to his younger brother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden remembers watching his father collect lawyer fees on the weekends, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden remembers watching his father collect lawyer fees on the weekends, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden remembers the Joliet YMCA

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden talks about gang activity in Joliet, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden describes his grade school years in Joliet, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden remembers being bullied in grade school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden describes experiencing racial discrimination at Providence High School in New Lenox, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden describes experiencing racial discrimination at Providence High School in New Lenox, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden remembers learning about African American history at home

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden talks about race riots in Joliet, Illinois after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden considers how his background has influenced his career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden describes the influence of the nuns at Sacred Heart School in Joliet, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his experience at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his athletic activities and social life at Providence High School in New Lenox, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden explains why he chose to attend Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden describes pledging Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden describes pledging Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden describes working for the Congressional Black Caucus and meeting Dr. Benjamin Mays and HistoryMaker Parren Mitchell as a college student

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his political involvement as a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden remembers influential figures at Morehouse College and HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's announcement of his presidential candidacy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden remembers an experience with Dr. Benjamin Mays

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his decision to attend Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - A. Scott Bolden talks about HistoryMaker H. Patrick Swygert, president of Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his first year at Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C. and about his father's influence on his career

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Second slating of A. Scott Bolden's interview

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden explains what a case note is

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his case note in the Howard Law Journal on the 1985 'Tennessee v. Garner,' decision

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the Howard University Law school legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden describes his experience on Howard University School of Law national moot court team

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his mentor, Judge Luke C. Moore, and his decision to work at the New York County District Attorney's Office

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden describes his experience in the New York County District Attorney's Office under Robert Morgenthau

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the 1987 Tawana Brawley allegations

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the 1989 Central Park "wilding" case

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - A. Scott Bolden describes a high profile court case

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the summation of his work in the New York County District Attorney's Office

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his relationship with HistoryMaker Wilhelmina Rolark and joining the Reed Smith law firm in 1991

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden describes working at the Reed Smith LLP, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden describes working at Reed Smith LLP, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden talks about representing the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden talks about defending a Washington D.C. columnist in a media libel case

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden talks about representing members of the Clinton Administration before congressional investigation, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden talks about representing members of the Clinton Administration before congressional investigation, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his defense of NFL player Albert Haynesworth

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - A. Scott Bolden talks about representing Carlos Allen, who allegedly crashed a White House state dinner in 2009, pt.1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden talks about representing Carlos Allen, who allegedly crashed a White House state dinner in 2009, pt.2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his defense of Diane Gustus against charges of embezzlement in a 2008 Washington D.C. tax theft scandal

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his civic contributions to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the attempted shutdown of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt.1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden talks about the attempted shutdown of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt.2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden remembers meeting HistoryMaker Dorothy Height

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden talks about Adrian Fenty's lost re-election

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden describes his philosophy for good litigating

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden describes his responsibilities as managing partner at Reed Smith LLP

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - A. Scott Bolden talks being named Washington's Ubiquitous Power Lawyer and the Washington Business Journal's Lawyer of the Year

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - A. Scott Bolden describes his greatest disappointment

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - A. Scott Bolden talks about meeting his daughter, Shayla

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - A. Scott Bolden talks about his first marriage

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - A. Scott Bolden talks about The Family, a black professional organization

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - A. Scott Bolden reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - A. Scott Bolden considers what his parents think of his success

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - A. Scott Bolden describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - A. Scott Bolden shares his advice for aspiring lawyers

DASession

2$2

DATape

6$7

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
A. Scott Bolden describes working at the Reed Smith LLP, pt. 1
A. Scott Bolden talks about his civic contributions to Washington, D.C.
Transcript
But I was excited about it, you know, I hadn't written a lot in the last three years so I was concerned about that. You know there weren't a lot of people at Reed Smith--there weren't a lot of black lawyers at Reed Smith at the time. I was concerned about that, but more importantly I really thought Reed Smith was going to a way station. I'd work for two or three years, make a lot of money and then go do something else, with either the government or a smaller firm or run for office or something like that, because I didn't have a lot of confidence in, in having a long-term career with Reed Smith because I didn't have many examples. And you know Weldon Latham was here, [HM] Singleton McAllister was here and they recruited me, they helped train me but they trained me to develop business, quite frankly. The litigation skill-set was there, folks like Doug Spaulding and Bernie Casey honed my litigation skills when I first got here as an associate 'cause I had never done anything on the civil side, and it was like walking into a new world but the skills were transferrable and so I was grateful to all of them for working with me, but I started getting good reviews. I took a writing class when I first got here, no one ever knew that, but I did because it would take me twice as long to write a great brief or great motion, it would take me twice as longer than my colleagues and you could only bill for so much so I used to always ask the partners, "how long should this take?" and they would say, "Eight hours or ten hours." It would take me twice as long and so I always figured that they didn't--either, I was taking too long to write or, you know, they just didn't want me to bill more than eight to ten hours, but, be that as it may, it was, it was tough going the first year or two, but I got great reviews, I was well thought of, and then I realized I had a skill-set and that I could, I could sell that skill-set to the public companies to high-end individuals. I thought that was important because there were 77,000 lawyers in Washington, D.C. How I am gonna have a legal career, how are they gonna pick up the phone, I know I don't wanna work for anybody at Reed Smith vis-a-vis be tied to a partner that just feeds me work because that can be fleeting, quite frankly, and I wanted to stand on my own. I wanted--I decided I wanted to have a law practice at a big law firm and so I wanted to develop business. I wanted to make it rain if you will. We call it rainmaking. I knew that as an associate you know that was kind of difficult but you know you start baby steps and then you take larger steps and stuff, and so, I really focused after a year or two on trying to develop a book of business that would keep me either here or I could take wherever I went in the large law firm practice because I really liked working at a large law firm. I had a lot of freedom, you made good money, you worked on some interesting cases, you had some high profile cases, you would represent large corporations, you could do pro bono, I could you know do kind of the civil rights piece of what I loved to do, and, and so it gave me a lot of freedom and liberty to really operate on a broad legal space and that was important, you know, and it kept me busy so I had, you know, I could, I could chase business or try to develop a book of business. I was doing substantive legal work for some great clients and some great partners and then I was so I had my pro bono stuff was over here where I was working with the civil rights organizations on pro bono cases and so, you know, my name recognition began to grow because on the pro bono side I would represent elected officials or their such as [HM] Marion Barry or [HM] Sharon Pratt Kelly and their, their political actions committees that were under scrutiny at the time by the government. We had a lot of resources to bring to the table and so I started to represent folks like that, one, because they were high-profile, two, because I thought I we could help them, and three, it would broaden my name recognition. We would have meetings here at Reed Smith, we you know we, we, you know, anything that was gonna broaden my exposure as a young lawyer, I was willing to do because I figured that if I, if they knew who I was then they might call, but if no one knew who I was nobody's gonna call, quite frankly--$Okay, all right, all right. I know you're active in a lot of civic activities here in the District [of Columbia, Washington, D.C.] can you tell us about some of those?$$Well, you know, my, you know the, the, the most active organizations I'm involved in the District are the Recreation Wish List Committee and the [D.C.] Chamber of Commerce. The Recreation Wish List Committee I chaired when we built a $10 or $15 million dollar facility in Southeast Washington [D.C.] for the kids and families of Southeast Washington to, excuse me, play tennis, compete in tennis, learn tennis, and to be tutored and to have educational programs for young people who and their families, who historically have been denied access to just either of those, quite frankly. The founder is [HM] Cora Masters Barry, former first lady and wife of [HM] Marion Barry. She is just an incredible person and visionary and continues to run the center through the Recreation Wish List Committee. The name of the, the building is the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center. She built it through a private partnership. I was chair of the board when we built it and then we gave it to the District of Columbia and we continued to manage, operate it and to be a friend to the [Southeast Tennis and Learning] Center with all that is inside that space and just really--earlier this year they named the activity room this large activity room called the Round Room at the Center. They named it the Bolden Room, if you will, in honor of my contributions over the years and, and in honor of my leadership and my representation of the Recreation Wish List Committee that the prior mayoral administration, the prior mayor [Adrian Fenty] of this city, attempted to evict them for some unknown reason.

The Honorable Basil Paterson

Lawyer Basil Alexander Paterson was born on April 27, 1926, in Harlem, New York. Paterson’s mother Evangeline Rondon was a secretary for Marcus Garvey. Paterson received his high school diploma in 1942 from De Witt Clinton High School in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City. After working for six months, Paterson entered St. John’s College from which he received his B.S. degree in biology in 1948, having spent two years in the Army. Paterson entered St. John’s Law School and received his J.D. degree in 1951. Paterson then began his professional career as a lawyer in Harlem where he became law partners with Ivan A. Michael and former New York City Mayor David Dinkins. Paterson and Dinkins became heavily involved in Democratic politics in Harlem, along with former Manhattan Borough President Percy Sutton, and Congressman Charles Rangel.

Paterson was elected to the New York State Senate in 1965 where he remained until he won the primary to be the Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor on a slate headed by Arthur Goldberg in 1970. The ticket lost to incumbent Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. Paterson's son, David Paterson, was elected Lieutenant Governor in 2006; in 2008 he became Governor when Eliot Spitzer resigned. Paterson became the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Institute for Mediation and Conflict Resolution in 1972; he remained in that position until 1977. Paterson was the first elected African American Vice Chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 1972. In 1978, Mayor Ed Koch appointed Paterson to the position of Deputy Mayor of Labor Relations and Personnel. In 1979, Governor Hugh Carey appointed Paterson to the position of New York Secretary of State, making him the first African American to hold that rank. In 1989, Paterson became a commissioner of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a position he held until 1995.

Paterson chaired the New York City Mayor’s Judiciary Committee for four years, and the New York State Governor’s Screening Panel for the Second Department for eight years. Paterson also served for ten years as a member of the Board of Editors of the New York Law Journal. In 2003, Paterson was appointed to the Commission to Promote Public Confidence in Judicial Elections. That same year, Paterson was elected Chairman of the KeySpan Foundation Board of Directors. Paterson served as Co-Chairman of the New York State Governor’s Commission on Determinate Sentencing, and the New York State Commission on Powers of Local Government. Paterson received numerous awards including the Humanitarian Award from Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, and the St. John’s University Medal of Excellence. Paterson practiced law at the law firm of Meyer, Suozzi, English and Klein where he served as co-chair of the firm’s labor practice.

Accession Number

A2007.016

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2007

Last Name

Paterson

Maker Category
Schools

DeWitt Clinton High School

St. John's University

St. John's University School of Law

First Name

Basil

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

PAT05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

Get Outta Here.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/27/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hot Dogs

Death Date

4/16/2014

Short Description

Lawyer, city government appointee, state government appointee, and state senator The Honorable Basil Paterson (1926 - 2014 ) was appointed Secretary of State for New York, and was a New York State senator.

Employment

Levy and Harten

Paterson and Michael

New York State Senate

Meyer, Suozzi, English and Klein

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:189,3:441,8:5481,122:6174,137:6489,143:7497,184:8379,203:10836,251:19578,382:23800,477:27944,626:33124,852:73355,1274:79172,1360:85004,1507:87812,1574:92660,1603:94935,1686:101000,1753:101328,1758:102804,1782:103624,1847:112132,1991:115324,2059:115780,2066:132388,2477:155737,2867:177570,3206:189285,3572:189640,3578:193687,3676:200538,3776:201208,3789:207305,3938:208042,3959:214550,4033:216050,4067:218600,4119:218900,4124:221225,4211:221525,4216:224225,4302:229166,4350:229670,4358:232694,4425:238094,4543:244510,4729:248420,4780:250260,4818:250580,4823:251220,4845:257460,5036:258660,5117:268671,5277:269085,5284:289408,5592:289778,5598:294810,5776:302139,5819:302584,5849:308620,5943$0,0:3444,103:13400,257:13684,263:24061,457:26889,544:34575,655:37140,710:42338,816:62160,1282:63095,1292:67234,1363:71060,1516:104190,2181:134440,2487:143482,2630:167170,3005:177586,3174:185734,3357:186070,3362:196750,3532
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Basil Paterson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson explains why his parents came to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon police conduct in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers African American police officers

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his decision to pursue law

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his time at DeWitt Clinton High School

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers being encouraged to pursue college

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon his primary education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about educational inequality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls experiences at St. John's College

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon the impact of desegregation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the gentrification of Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers serving in the segregated U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the importance of protest

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls St. John's College School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the history of black lawyers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers founding his law firm

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes what he learned by practicing law

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers how he became a labor rights advocate

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls the New York City transit strike of 2005

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the Transport Workers Union

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls moving his law firm to his Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers other lawyers in the community

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls becoming involved in politics

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes the Harlem Clubhouse

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Robert Wagner and Robert Moses

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his early interactions with David N. Dinkins

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Adam Clayton Powell Jr.'s support

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon the progress of the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his first political campaigns

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes fraternity life in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his siblings

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon police conduct in New York City
The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Adam Clayton Powell Jr.'s support
Transcript
At that time do you remember--I mean, just thinking on the street, were, were there the same kind of tensions between the police and the black community in Harlem [New York, New York] that exists or has existed in the past?$$I've tried to think about that at different times, because growing up I had trouble with the cops. I always had trouble with the cops, and one once told my mother [Evangeline Rondon Paterson] I had a bad attitude. Well, you know, when you're eleven, twelve years old, how can you have a bad attitude? I mean, there was a tension, but there was no confrontation with the cops. Nobody would dare do that, but I can remember being chased by cops. For what? For putting a--building a fire in the street, you know. Three of us would--I always remember this, we were chased around a corner. It was dark--it didn't have to be that late, it was winter--and the cop threw his nightstick at us. I always remember that, the nightstick clanging along as we're running on, and I said--you know, I thought about it years later, the eldest person with us couldn't have been more than thirteen years old, twelve maybe, and a cop throws a nightstick at us. As I got older, it got more difficult. There's been tension with people in Harlem with the police since I can remember. It's always been there. The strangest thing is we used to say that the very cops who--by the way, corruption was rife, you saw it, you saw the numbers men, who were the only ones who knew the cops, knew their first names. Numbers, if anybody doesn't understand that, it was a policy racket, you bet three numbers, if you came out, you got 550 to one, what happened to the other 450? You figure it out. Some people got rich, and some cops got rich. All this came out with the Knapp Commission [Commission to Investigate Alleged Police Corruption] investigation many years ago, it all got--it was laid right out. But everybody that lived in Harlem knew about it long before that. You knew that when you saw a police car stop in front of the local deli on a Sunday morning, they're stopping to get their pay-off because the deli was probably selling beer before two o'clock or whatever time it was, we had blue laws in New York and churches required that they not sell beer before a certain time. You saw it. It was--obviously, and the cops break up crap games and somebody says, "Stop and give them the money," and the crap game resumed, yeah, you saw this. It's not like that anymore. I mean, there may be graft, there may be corruption, but it's not systemic. I mean, even when Judge Mollen, Milton Mollen Commission [Commission To Investigate Allegations of Police Corruption and the Anti-Corruption Procedures of the Police Department] investigated the Dirty Thirty precinct, his report was you had certain precincts where you might have a gang of four or five cops who in many ways intimidated the other members and did things that were bad, but it's not like it once was. I mean, it's systematized, but the precinct got a certain amount of money every month from the numbers men, the cop on the beat got, the traffic cop got, you name them, they all got paid a certain amount, it was known. What was funny, I look back now, I remember all these big scandals and they're shaking up the police department [New York City Police Department], they're transferring people from one borough to the other, but when I got to law school [St. John's College School of Law; St. John's University School of Law, New York, New York], I found out what that was about. The black book stayed in the precinct, so whoever came to the precinct knew who it was who paid X number of dollars into the precinct each week or each month. That began--it was an interesting point in law, because that black book was entered into evidence--I think it was Tom (unclear) [ph.] and his special prosecutors way back on the grounds that these were entries made in the ordinary course of business, which is a fundamental law of evidence. Entries made into any document in the ordinary course of business are admissible into evidence, so that black book was admissible into evidence, and that's how they got a lot of people. But that black book was always there, they could shift cops around, but it didn't matter. The system remained and existed until--probably the biggest impact on it was when they legalized the lottery. When they had a legal lottery--when they legalized it (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now, when did they legalize the lottery--$$Oh, that had to be--I was going to say I was in the State Senate [New York State Senate] when it happened, so it had to be around '68 [1968], 1968, '69 [1969], but there's still numbers men operating, the state and the government can't give credit, but private entrepreneurs can give credit. But it's not like it once was, and the graft is not there, but the tension still remained. You asked about the tension, the tension's still there, but they used to say the very same cops who were on the take would risk their lives to save you, there was a belief there, the very cops that might be abusing somebody (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Did you agree with it?$$Did I agree with it? Yeah, I think it was true. I think it was just a system that existed. They--some cops say, well, it was combat pay. Combat pay for what? For operating in a minority community, a black or Latino community? I literally have seen a cop cry, and asked--I was eating in a restaurant, what's (unclear)--I said, "What's that about," and another cop said to me, "He's being transferred." I said, "Where to?" He said, "Staten Island [New York]." I said, "Where does he live?" He said Staten Island, I said, he ought to be happy. He said, "He can't afford it." He was in a precinct where he could make money, he couldn't afford to be sent to a precinct where he couldn't make money, but that's--hopefully it's gone.$Rangel [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel] and Sutton [Percy Sutton], after I won, it was a one year term because they were doing reapportionment, they said, we're gonna reapportion you out, we've got, we got too--with our heavy hitters, and you're finished. Well, what happened--I was finished. I understood what they--they reapportioned me out of where I was strong, put me into mostly in Adam Powell's [Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.] district, so one of their people, unbeknownst to them, invited me to meet with Powell. He liked me, he said, "I like ya," he says, "Come meet with Powell." And Powell said to me--one day I went down to see Powell--here's a story, but it's true--went down to see Powell, took my wife [Portia Hairston Paterson] and one of my sons, my other--I have two sons, the other son--and Powell, only thing he wanted to know was, he said, "Are you Sutton's guy?" I said, "No, we used to be friends but he opposed me." He said, "Are you Sutton's guy?" And I said, "I don't think so, I think I'm my own guy." He said, "Well, okay." He said, "The four closest people to me all sing your praises." I said, "Who are they?" "Livingston Wingate [Livingston Leroy Wingate] says you're his protege." Wingate was his counsel, and I was Wingate's protege.$$What was that name again?$$Livingston Wingate.$$Livingston.$$He was his counsel, he later became a judge. Wingate had always kind of looked out for me. And then a guy named Chuck Sutton. Remember, he was the editor of a local newspaper one time, and then he was his press guy. Not Chuck Sutton--got the wrong name. Chuck Sutton's his nephew--Sutton's nephew--oh, his name'll come to me, but you know--you probably know the name, he was well-known in the black newspaper guild and all that--who I knew. And then a guy named Wellington Beal, who did a lot of economic stuff for him, and sometimes would ask me to sit down and work with him.$$Wellington--what was--$$Wellington Beal, B-E-A-L. And the last one was a fella named Lloyd Mitchell [ph.], who was his bodyguard, and Mitchell sang my praises to him, he said, he and his friends have always helped me. Well, we were street guys, so of course we were his help, he was a nice guy. So Powell said, "I'm interested, let me think about it." I was asking would he help me. He says, "Is that your wife and your son outside?" I said, "Yeah." He said, "Bring them in, I'd like to meet them," so I bring them in, introduced my wife and my son. About that time Daniel [Daniel Paterson] was--let me think. If this was '66 [1966]. He was born in '57 [1957], so he was nine years old. He hadn't yet turned nine, he was eight. So he said to him, "How old are you, Daniel?" He said, "I'm eight years old." "When's your birthday?" He said, "November 29th." And Powell stopped, he said, "Either you're the luckiest guy going or one of the slickest people I've ever met." He said, "Isn't this a school day?" He was smart. I said, "Uh-huh." "And you took your son out of school and brought him down here?" I said, "Uh-huh." It's his birthday. It's just one of those weird coincidences. Powell's birthday. So he said, I think I'm gonna support you (laughter). And you know what he did, he sent his secretary to bring all kinds of things that had his name on it, he used to send birthday cards to my--to my son, and by that night word was out I was Powell's candidate, and I was now Jones' [J. Raymond Jones] candidate. He called Jones. Powell said, "I want this guy," and Jones said, "Okay."

Reed Kimbrough

Reed D. Kimbrough is the Director of Diversity Programs and Community Relations for Cox Communications’ Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AJC). Kimbrough manages employee development and training at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He is the eldest of three children of retired United States army officer William Reed and Ernestine Willis Kimbrough. Born in Selma, Alabama, on February 27, 1951, Kimbrough spent his formative years between West Germany and the southern United States.

Upon his return to the United States, Kimbrough graduated from high school in Fort Knox, Kentucky and entered Eastern Kentucky University where he graduated with a degree in business administration. In his second year at Eastern, he was instrumental in starting the first chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. He served in the United States Army and rose to the rank of captain with his primary duties in the 101st Airborne Division as a helicopter pilot. He is a retired Major of the U.S. Army Reserves.

Kimbrough joined the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in the news circulation department. He was promoted to the production department where he managed building services, shipping, receiving, packaging, distribution and management-level employee development. He currently holds the position as Director of Diversity Programs and Community Relations.

Kimbrough is active in various organizations including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peopled (NAACP), the National Association of Minority Media Executives (NAMME), the Celebrate Life Foundation, Hands on Atlanta, Habitat for Humanity, and the Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. He serves on the board of Men Stopping Violence and is a long term member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Kimbrough is married to Charlcye R. Kimbrough and is the father of Anthony M. Kimbrough.

Accession Number

A2005.248

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/23/2005

Last Name

Kimbrough

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Schools

Custer Elementary School

The Academy @ Shawnee

Nurnberg American High School

Fort Knox High School

Eastern Kentucky University

Vilseck Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Reed

Birth City, State, Country

Selma

HM ID

KIM01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Porto Fino, Italy

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/27/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Newspaper publishing executive Reed Kimbrough (1951 - ) was Community Relations Director and Director of Diversity Programs at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Employment

United State Army

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

United States Department of Commerce

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1530,20:3485,51:5440,84:5780,89:6120,94:6545,100:10030,173:12325,220:14705,262:15215,269:24286,357:24754,364:30448,465:39028,640:52890,737:54066,854:94548,1287:97992,1367:98916,1380:100008,1397:110244,1590:112651,1625:123688,1747:127036,1791:149700,2099$0,0:3380,35:15741,129:20270,182:20910,191:22350,221:24830,330:25470,339:26670,363:27790,388:33165,410:33867,418:34335,424:34803,429:35271,436:39600,482:40770,493:55666,611:57094,631:61140,642:62028,652:63693,668:81486,946:89617,1017:90223,1024:90627,1029:92420,1034:93204,1041:101172,1118:102690,1147:102966,1152:110550,1263:112440,1274:115281,1288:116154,1304:116930,1320:117512,1327:124560,1373:128960,1391:132520,1396:135380,1411:137100,1421:145198,1510:145750,1518:150316,1549:152910,1558:153614,1566:156530,1589:158330,1619:158960,1627:172139,1698:173133,1716:173914,1737:176380,1761:177172,1770:178162,1784:179810,1790:180134,1795:180620,1802:202450,2197:206900,2247:208740,2257:211360,2274:212160,2289:214720,2338:216800,2388:217200,2394:221350,2433:224875,2494:229900,2532
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reed Kimbrough's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough describes his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough describes his father's parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough describes his mother's ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reed Kimbrough recalls drawing a plantation scene during grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reed Kimbrough describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reed Kimbrough describes his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Reed Kimbrough lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Reed Kimbrough describes the circumstances of his birth in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough talks about where his father was stationed

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough describes his experiences in Wiesbaden, West Germany

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough descries the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough recalls the diverse occupants of his U.S. military housing complex in West Germany

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough recalls moving to Fort Sill, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough recalls summer vacations in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough describes his paternal grandfather's land ownership and passing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough describes his experiences in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reed Kimbrough describes his experiences on the Fort Sill U.S. military base

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough recalls his elementary school years in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough describes his childhood road trips to Selma, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough recalls living with his paternal grandmother in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough describes Bad Nauheim Elementary School in Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough recalls his experience of racial discrimination in Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough recalls moving to California as a young teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough remembers the Cuban Missile Crisis

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough recalls attending Shawnee Junior High School in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reed Kimbrough recalls attending Nuremberg High School in Furth, Germany

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough remembers Nuremberg American High School

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough remembers his extracurricular activities in Vilseck, Germany

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough talks about the teachers at Nuremberg American High School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough recalls singing songs by The Temptations on street corners

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough remembers his military mentors and the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough remembers the Vietnam War and moving back to the United States

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough remembers attending Fort Knox High School in Kentucky

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reed Kimbrough describes his social activities in Fort Knox, Kentucky

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough describes his influential teachers at Fort Knox High School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough recalls the assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough describes the unrest after Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough recalls deciding whether to go to college or enlist

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough recalls his rejection from the United States Air Force Academy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough describes his decision to attend Eastern Kentucky University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough remembers his motivation to persevere in college

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough describes his college experiences

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough describes Eastern Kentucky University's Black Alumni Association

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough remembers his most influential teachers

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough talks about the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough recalls returning to Selma, Alabama

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough recalls his marriage to Charlcye Ritchie Kimbrough

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough recalls working for Atlanta's Federal Reserve Bank

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough describes his career at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough recalls attending a three-day leadership development program

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Reed Kimbrough describes his volunteer work

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Reed Kimbrough explains why he agreed to share his story

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Reed Kimbrough reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Reed Kimbrough describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Reed Kimbrough describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Reed Kimbrough shares his message to young people

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Reed Kimbrough talks about the importance of history

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Reed Kimbrough reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Reed Kimbrough narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Reed Kimbrough narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$8

DATitle
Reed Kimbrough remembers his military mentors and the Vietnam War
Reed Kimbrough recalls attending a three-day leadership development program
Transcript
And our role models were, were the men that we saw around us, [U.S.] military guys, that were doing positive things, at least moving in a positive direction. Did they have their own issues? Yeah, they probably did but those are the folks that we saw that were making decisions. They were primarily enlisted guys but they were sen- by this time they were senior enlisted guys.$$Now were these, these role models that you're speaking of, the older guys, were they black or were they white?$$They were primarily black--$$Okay.$$--about this time and now I'm talking about, you know, when I was, when I was a sophomore and then further on. Most of the officers were white, even then. I'm sure--I know there were black officers but they just weren't at, at our installation. Our installation was a training installation. So, and this is about the time that Vietnam [Vietnam War] was really getting hot. I remember it being, poking fun at a vet [veteran]. There was a group of us leaving the movie [in Vilseck, Germany], about four or five of us teenagers leaving the movie, and we saw this guy who was obviously intoxicated coming up the road and, and so we started picking fun of him. That's what, that is what military kids did. Military brats, they were teenagers and they, and they pulled pranks on folks and the only people they had to pull pranks on were soldiers who were about a few years older than them and we saw this guy coming up and he was staggering he and his buddy and we started poking fun of him and he looked at us, he said, "I'll kill you." He said, "I just got back from Vietnam," and he reached down to take his shoes off and we took off running. That was as close as Vietnam had gotten to me at that point. We had seen newsreels at the, at the movie theatre because at that time you go to the theatre, that you get, you get a newsreel and you get a cartoon and you get the feature.$$Okay.$$And I remember the bombing of the U.S. embassy, or the officers club, in Saigon [Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam] and because we kept getting fed that stuff. We were very patriotic.$And at that point somebody decided that maybe I should go away and get, get my perspective widened and I went to a, a leadership development program, a three-day course, through the National Association of Minority Media Executives [National Association of Multicultural Media Executives (NAMME)] where I met some folks with some national reputations. I learned more about the newspaper business and within a year of that, less than a year of that, I was tapped to become the, the operations manager of our packaging department, which is commonly named, known as our mailroom.$$Okay, now what, how do you feel that NAMME affected that, your change in position at the newspaper [Atlanta Journal-Constitution]?$$NAMME, NAMME helped me, and it was in Chicago [Illinois], it was in Chicago at, at Kellogg [Kellogg School of Management], Northwestern [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois]. NAMME gave me an insight into what newspapers, how newspapers can impact people and I think I always knew that but didn't really know what role I could have in that but in that three day period and doing, listening to some presentations and talking to some people, I realized that there were a lot of things in my background that I brought to the table that I had not adequately applied.$$And just what are a couple of those things that you realized?$$That business is built on relationships and that companies seek actively, leaders, people who could lead other people. I'd always decided that I would take a, as much as possible, take the backseat in terms of being a driver of anything. I felt I was better suited as a support person because I could get people to do things for me but as I thought about what, what, some of the things I share with you today, I realized that over the years I've always been kind of at the forefront, if not the leader, at least the guy that was saying, well you know, we can do this. If we just do this, we could do this. If we just did this piece, we can do this too and, you know, who knows what it'll look like in ten years and I had not done that with the newspaper. I was more plotting, I was more methodical, I want to do this, I want to do this and then we'll see what that happens. Somehow I came away from that three day period with a clearer understanding of how I could apply some of those skills, some of that leadership skill, and how it would just require a little bit of risk. Me just taking a little bit of risk and stepping outside of the comfort of my confines and I did that.

Malcolm Hemphill, Jr.

Educator and sports official Malcolm Montjoy Hemphill, Jr., was born June 24, 1931, in Chicago, Illinois; his father was Third Ward Republican Committeeman and his mother played piano and organ for A.A. Rayner’s Funeral Home. Hemphill attended Forestville Elementary School, which at the time was the largest and most crowded grade school in the country. A basketball player and president of his class, Hemphill graduated from Wendell Phillips High School in 1949. At Fisk University, Hemphill played basketball with Wilson Frost, and was counseled by Dr. Billie Wright Adams; he later transferred to Arkansas AM & N where he earned his B.S. in health and physical education in 1953.

In 1954, Hemphill taught elementary physical education in the Chicago Public Schools, but was drafted in 1955, after which time he served in the United States Navy aboard the U.S.S. Hector. Returning to Chicago in 1957, Hemphill married Gloria Owens and became the son-in-law of Olympic great, Jesse Owens. At Marshall High School (1960 to 1973), Hemphill rose from teacher to assistant principal to acting principal for over 5,000 students; during this time he also coached basketball and baseball. Hemphill joined the rising chorus of Chicago’s black teachers who complained about the Chicago Public School’s (CPS) discriminatory promotion procedures. Earning his M.Ed. from Northeastern Illinois University’s Center for Inner City Studies in 1971, Hemphill became assistant principal at Manley High School and later Hyde Park High School. Until his retirement in 1997, Hemphill was coordinator of Physical Education Programs for the entire CPS.

Concerned that there were no African Americans officiating high school games in Chicago, Hemphill, with John Everett and Wilfred Bonner, formed the Metropolitan Officials Association (MOA) in 1962. MOA successfully trained and agitated for the assignment of black officials to referee CPS games. MOA went on to become the largest minority sports organization in the country, with alumni officiating at the NBA level. In 1974, Hemphill was one of the first three black officials assigned to a Big Ten Conference game; he officiated in the Big Ten for 15 years. Hemphill organized and trained the first group of African American women officials, and was director of the Nate Humphrey Memorial Officials Basketball Camp. Hemphill and his wife, Gloria, remained residents of Chicago, where they raised two daughters.

Accession Number

A2005.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/31/2005

Last Name

Hemphill

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Montjoy

Organizations
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Carter G. Woodson South Elementary School

Forrestville Elementary School

Fisk University

University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Malcolm

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HEM02

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Gloria Hemphill

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cancun, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

6/24/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

String beans, Potatoes (Boiled), Tomatoes, Fresh Onions, Ice Tea, Cornbread, Cobbler (Peach)

Short Description

High school principal, sports official, and physical education coordinator Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. (1931 - ) was coordinator of Physical Education Programs for the entire Chicago Public Schools system, in addition to holding other high ranking positions within the organization. Hemphill was also one of the founders of the Metropolitan Officials Association, and one of the first African American officials assigned to a Big Ten conference game.

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Marshall High School

The Big Ten Conference

U.S. Navy

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
0,0:6218,104:9949,162:11860,192:12497,201:16284,219:17619,247:26416,398:27082,408:27674,417:34186,555:41410,619:42854,649:50162,743:50743,754:51324,763:57758,808:58626,829:58874,834:60238,929:60486,934:61044,947:61292,952:61788,961:68224,1039:68709,1045:70552,1069:73246,1097:75550,1162:75838,1167:79870,1227:82430,1277:83950,1311:86590,1445:87310,1456:87630,1462:92464,1523:93190,1543:105077,1816:108773,2075:115340,2173:139361,2458:149432,2530:151200,2583:157524,2744:158000,2752:158544,2761:160788,2832:170620,2968:172920,3001$0,0:3680,38:5060,48:5888,58:8188,116:12236,173:14812,223:19586,263:25202,441:25514,446:30780,499:31100,504:43247,657:50632,757:61709,915:62456,925:69925,1034:70573,1070:74380,1143:91892,1380:93048,1415:101745,1561:102045,1566:108068,1632:109490,1654:109858,1696:111146,1718:111790,1726:115960,1764:116690,1775:120169,1826:120997,1837:121273,1842:126380,1895:127596,1913:128280,1933:128888,1943:129192,1948:129572,1954:129876,1962:131920,1975
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Malcolm Hemphill, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother, Elizabeth Dickey Hemphill, and her death

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his father's political work and views

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his father's political colleagues

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his family's membership at Bethel A.M.E. Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he attended Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Forrestville Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his neighborhood and childhood friends, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his neighborhood and childhood friends, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls becoming a baseball coach for Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes local basketball players who played at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers watching Negro League baseball games

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls the athletics program at Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. talks about the creation of DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes himself as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers coaching baseball at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his plans after high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his transition to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his transition to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his friendship with HistoryMaker Dr. Billie Wright Adams

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls transferring to Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes adjusting to the segregated South

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandmother, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandmother, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers prominent figures at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his time at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes officiating for basketball games during his time in college

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains the difference between gym teachers and physical education instructors

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes changes to physical education in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the start of his teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes teaching and coaching at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers receiving an achievement award from Northeastern University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Manley High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Manley High School's basketball team

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his former student Wayne Stingley, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his former student Wayne Stingley, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recounts meeting his wife, HistoryMaker Gloria Owens Hemphill

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers attending the 1972 Munich Olympics with Jesse Owens

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his time in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the 1954 DuSable High School basketball team

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes transferring to Hyde Park Career Academy in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls working at Hyde Park Career Academy in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the past sports officiating system used in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the founding of Metropolitan Officials Association

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he became the first African American official in the Big Ten Conference

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the qualities of an effective sports official

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls discrimination while officiating for the Big Ten Conference, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls discrimination while officiating for the Big Ten Conference, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes working with basketball coach Bob Knight

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls the racism he experienced officiating for the Big Ten Conference

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his career as a referee

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. retells his colleagues' officiating stories

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the changes to basketball over the years

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes how basketball greats have influenced the sport

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his time as coordinator of the Office of Health and Physical Education and his retirement

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers coaching baseball at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois
Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he became the first African American official in the Big Ten Conference
Transcript
Can I backtrack a minute--$$Yeah.$$--something you asked me about why I, why I--how I ended up coaching baseball?$$Oh, okay.$$Yeah. And I--because the principal told you what you taught, and what you coached. And she told me that I was going to coach the basketball team 'cause she called me. I was to coach basketball. And then, there was going to be a second sport, and I was going to be the assistant football coach. Well, I was the assistant football coach, and I was working with a guy, Jim Peeples [ph.], whom, who I knew and, and we got along great, so it was fine. But then, when the baseball coach left, there was no one to coach the baseball team, so she gave me the baseball team. And I can't say to her, I'm not going to do that. You can't do that. You, you coach that sport. So, I was coaching at Marshall High School [John Marshall Metropolitan High School] on the West Side [Chicago, Illinois]. And, at that time, we had five thousand students in that building--uh, just, just kids everywhere. I mean, fantastic young people, fantastic young people. And I'd tease them then because I said, "You know, they talk about you so bad, they talk about you so bad because of where you live," and we laughed about that. So, I was coaching the baseball team with these kids. And there was a boys' club on the West Side. It was then called the Midwest Boys Club [Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Club, Chicago, Illinois]. And two friends of mine, John Everett and, and [Wilford] "Moose" Bonner, worked after school there. They both coached and taught physical education also, so they would tell me who the athletes were because they got them all year long. So, when I started coaching, I knew the guys and knew who could and who could not play. So, we played baseball and I had the team. The kids were doing well. And one of my guys who was Nathaniel Humphrey would say, "Well, coach, you know, we need to try to do this." So, I'd come home sometime. My dad [Malcolm Hemphill, Sr.] say, "Well, how'd your team do? I saw yesterday in the paper that you guys won." I said, "Yeah, we won." He said, "Well, how'd you do today?" I said, "We won." So, this went on for quite a little bit until we got ready to go to the semifinals, going to Comiskey Park [Chicago, Illinois] to play baseball. So, we--I came home and he said, "Well, how'd the team do? Did you, did you do okay?" I said, "Yeah, we won. Dad, we won, man, we won." He said, "Those kids win in spite of you, don't they (laughter)?" He knew that I really didn't know a whole lot about coaching baseball. I could watch a game, I enjoyed it, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I haven't played softball for so long, but I didn't really know what I was doing when I started coaching baseball, so he was right. They won a lot of games in spite of me, in spite of me, so I had great fun with those guys on the West Side.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$We're going to get to that, you know, catch up on your career, you know, as we go along.$Now, in 1974, you, yourself, you were chosen to become an official in the Big Ten [Conference], right, a basketball official?$$Yes, I was, I was.$$Yeah.$$And that came as a shock to me really because I, it wasn't something that I really aspired to do. But I was approached by a dear friend, John Everett, who was retiring principal at Simeon [Neal F. Simeon Vocational High School; Simeon Career Academy, Chicago, Illinois], who's, who was then working football, Big Ten football. And I was doing high school ball when I could because I was still coaching. But he said, "Why don't you, why don't you come on, and, and try for the Big Ten?" Man, I think they, they, they, they would give you an opportunity to do that. And I said, "John, I'm not really that interested in it." So, I finally filled out at an application, sent it in, and, and it was looked at. And I was called and asked to come and referee a scrimmage over at DePaul [University, Chicago, Illinois]. And I did, and I didn't think I was really that good--that, that Sunday because I'd, I'd had an exciting Saturday night. And the scrimmage was that Sunday morning, you know, and I, I was readying myself to go to church. And John called and said, "Man, they, they want you over at DePaul, you know, get on over there." And I did. And the supervising official then was Herm Royal [ph.], and he came down after I, after I, working--chatted with me. We talked and, you know, asked me if I might be interested in doing that. And I said, "Well, let me get back with you." He said, "Get back with me?" He said, "Get back with me tomorrow then." So, I came back and talked to my wife [HistoryMaker Gloria Owens Hemphill] about it, and she was excited about it. And my daughter, who was a basketball fanatic, jumped at the idea. So, and I thought it would be a good opportunity so I, I did it, and it was good. It was good for me and I think it opened the doors for some other guys to come in, too.

George Levi Knox, III

Retired vice president, corporate affairs for the Phillip Morris Company (now Altria Group, Inc.), George Levi Knox III was born September 6, 1943 in Indianapolis, Indiana. His great-grandfather, George L. Knox wrote Life as I Remember It: As a Slave and a Freeman in 1895 owned the Indianapolis Freeman, a tonsorial parlor and the Negro league baseball’s Indianapolis ABC’s. Knox’s father, George L. Knox, II was a Tuskegee Airman who presided over the 1944 Freeman Field Mutiny court martial and later made the Air Force his career. Growing up in the military, Knox attended nine elementary schools from two in Alaska to Alabama State University’s Lab School, Jackson School in Hempstead, New York and Hempstead High School. He graduated from Tokyo American High School in 1961 as president of his class and captain of the football team. After a brief stint at Purdue University, Knox joined his family at Tuskegee Institute where his father headed the AFROTC program. He graduated with honors, receiving his B.A. degree in political science in 1967. Knox, who had interned on the Vietnam desk at the Department of State in 1965 as part of the Foreign Affairs Scholars Program, pursued graduate studies at American University.

Knox entered the United States Foreign Service in 1968 serving as third secretary of the United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan. He also served in the Department of State’s Educational and Cultural Affairs Bureau. In 1975, Knox earned his M.B.A. from Harvard University and was hired by McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm. There, in addition to his other work, he did pro bono projects for the Japan Society, the Ford Foundation and the NAACP. In 1977, Knox joined Phillip Morris becoming vice president of Public Affairs in 1987. Knox served in several capacities at Phillip Morris, including secretary to the Board Committee on Public Affairs and Social Responsibility and chairman of Phil-Pac, the company’s political action committee.

Knox is a member of and formerly chairman of the board of the Studio Museum in Harlem. He was a board member of the American Ballet Theatre, Southern Center for International Studies and served as an advisor to the Japan Foundation. Knox is vice chairman of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute; a member emeritus of the Public Affairs Committee of the United States Military Academy; a trustee of the African American Experience Fund and served on the Business Advisory Council of the United States Information Agency. He has been a director of the Harvard Business School Club of New York, the Independent College Fund of New York; a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council of Alabama State University and a governor of the New School University.

Knox and his wife, Gail, divide their time between Stamford, Connecticut and LaJolla, California.

Accession Number

A2005.084

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/29/2005

Last Name

Knox

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Levi

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Alabama State Laboratory High School

Jackson Main Elementary School

Hempstead High School

Narimasu Tokyo American High School

Purdue University

Tuskegee University

American University

Harvard Business School

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

KNO01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

La Jolla, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

9/6/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Stamford

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ribs (Spare)

Short Description

Corporate executive George Levi Knox, III (1943 - ) is the former Vice President of Corporate Affairs for Phillip Morris Companies, Inc.

Employment

Philip Morris Incorporated

United States Foreign Service

McKinsey & Company, Inc.

United States State Department

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:5595,58:6165,65:8160,103:12245,182:12720,238:26580,332:27020,337:27460,342:28230,351:29110,361:31340,374:32240,395:32615,401:37550,467:38040,476:42128,535:42816,545:43332,552:43676,557:44020,562:45998,592:46686,612:53491,661:54221,715:56557,761:65354,876:66018,885:72911,960:74366,977:75045,985:76597,1015:78052,1047:81156,1131:81738,1138:82223,1144:91262,1222:91666,1227:95504,1290:104001,1409:111470,1505:118392,1573:118924,1581:130509,1659:136544,1717:149037,1906:152790,1913:159672,1982:163588,2001:171192,2088:173601,2155:177835,2235:178127,2240:178930,2279:189572,2446:190196,2455:195722,2516:219140,2794:221705,2825:224840,2861:229440,2883:233540,2931:233890,2937:242228,3029:242638,3035:244360,3067:248870,3141:257615,3230:258190,3236:261740,3248:263098,3264:263874,3274:264456,3281:265604,3290:271702,3335:272440,3346:278068,3404:278656,3413:279244,3421:279580,3426:280168,3435:282180,3442:293180,3530:295175,3561:297065,3590:309542,3802:324830,3916$195,0:5720,220:16366,375:19920,416:20515,424:21790,452:23150,477:26465,551:34014,610:38200,655:38690,661:45830,735:65317,1037:65762,1043:78862,1177:84452,1387:88950,1413:89780,1426:90776,1442:91357,1450:99720,1520:100210,1528:100630,1535:100980,1541:120624,1751:122375,1782:122890,1788:134684,1983:136946,2050:148525,2194:149800,2219:151450,2244:151825,2250:152200,2256:155574,2289:156138,2295:159992,2346:163376,2387:167308,2448:167838,2459:170290,2466:170822,2479:171354,2484:179036,2538:186211,2615:191536,2660:198300,2723:200301,2752:200997,2758:201867,2766:202215,2771:202737,2778:203433,2788:204999,2810:206217,2829:207870,2853:209088,2870:222379,2961:232520,3049:234360,3090:234680,3095:235080,3101:235560,3113:236120,3121:236600,3129:238870,3157
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of George Levi Knox, III's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III describes a letter from Booker T. Washington to his grandfather, John Clarence Wright

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III recounts how his father and maternal grandmother met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George Levi Knox, III details his paternal great great grandfather Charles Knox's journey from slave to freeman

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George Levi Knox, III explains how his great great grandfather's newspaper business declined under pressure from the Ku Klux Klan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George Levi Knox, III describes his father's early life

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George Levi Knox, III details how his father became a Tuskegee Airman

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III describes his father's role in the Freeman Field mutiny

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III remembers the segregated Lockbourne Air Force Base in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III recalls attending elementary school in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania and Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his paternal grandmother's political involvement in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George Levi Knox, III remembers his elementary school days in Anchorage, Alaska

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George Levi Knox, III recalls living in Montgomery, Alabama in 1953

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III describes his family's connection to Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III recalls moving from Montgomery, Alabama to Long Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his experience of transferring between schools

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III recalls how he developed leadership as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III remembers Hempstead High School in Long Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III recalls moving from Hempstead, New York to Tokyo, Japan

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III talks about being a teenager in Tokyo, Japan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George Levi Knox, III recalls Narimasu Tokyo American High School in Tokyo, Japan

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his difficulties at Purdue University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his decision to attend Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his mentors at Tuskegee University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III talks about deciding to major in political science at Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III remembers his time in the Foreign Affairs Scholars Program

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his position regarding the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III recalls Vietnam War teach-ins at Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III talks about his fraternity affiliation

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George Levi Knox, III recalls the impact of his father's sudden death on his civil rights activism

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - George Levi Knox, III recalls the dangers of civil rights activism in the South

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - George Levi Knox, III talks about enrolling in the United States Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III recalls entering the U.S. Foreign Service after rejection from the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III remembers his Japanese lessons for the U.S. Foreign Service

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his U.S. Foreign Service work in East Asia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his motivation to pursue his M.B.A. degree

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III describes his decision to attend Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III remembers Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III remembers working at McKinsey & Company

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III recalls his experience in Japan with McKinsey & Company

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III remembers the growth of Japanese industry in the 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III talks about being African American in Japan

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III recalls joining the staff of Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III describes Philip Morris International, Inc.'s contributions to the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III talks about the history of Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III details Philip Morris International, Inc.'s growth in the twentieth century

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - George Levi Knox, III describes his career track at Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - George Levi Knox, III remembers highlights from his time at Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - George Levi Knox, III talks about his achievements at Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - George Levi Knox, III reflects upon his experience as an African American at Philip Morris International, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - George Levi Knox, III describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - George Levi Knox, III reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - George Levi Knox, III talks about his wife and children

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - George Levi Knox, III reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - George Levi Knox, III describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
George Levi Knox, III describes his father's role in the Freeman Field mutiny
George Levi Knox, III talks about the history of Philip Morris International, Inc.
Transcript
We were getting to the mutiny I think.$$The--these bomber pilots were being shifted all over the place while they were in training to go to the Pacific, and they wound up in Freeman Field [Freeman Army Airfield, Jackson County, Indiana], which was in Indiana I think or Michigan, one of those two states. When they got there, they were told that the officers' club was off limits to them. Now these guys were all flying officers. If you flew a plane in the [U.S.] Army Air Corps you were an officer. There was an officer' club for officers, except that they were told they couldn't enter this officers' club because, well obviously they didn't want them in there, but the argument was you're, you know, student officers and so therefore your different from regular officers, so you're not to go into the officers' club. Well, these guys, you gotta, if you've interviewed Tuskegee Airmen, you know, this crowd is, was a pretty good crowd and they were all college grads or college guys, I mean, they might have left college to join the [U.S.] military and become a pilot during the war [World War II, WWII], but these were all pretty sharp guys, pretty aggressive guys, and they thought this was bull. And a bunch of them went to the officers' club one day and demanded to be let in. There was a, someone came out from the club and says you can't come in and then two or three of them walked passed and into the officers' club. It was a sit-in. You know they didn't go in and sit down, but it was basically a sit-in. Well, the Army Air Corps brought court-martial charges against these guys for mutiny and it was terrible. It was called the Freeman Field mutiny, and the court-martial board, which were all officers of the Airmen--this was not an outside group--was supposed to be led by Benjamin O. Davis [Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.] who at that time was a colonel I think it was. Yeah, he was the senior person involved in the Airmen as everybody knows, one of my absolute heroes. But, B.O. Davis was the president of the board and he figured this was not good because he's the commander of the, all of the black pilots in the service, he's the president of the board, this is not good, so he removed himself or was asked to step down as president of the board and the next senior officers became president of this mutiny, this court-martial and that was my father [George Levi Knox, II] who was the senior captain at the time. So, he presided over this court-martial, which itself was written about in a book by a guy named Jim Warren [James C. Warren] who wrote I think it's called the Freemen Field Mutiny ['The Tuskegee Airmen Mutiny at Freeman Field,' Lt. Col. James C. Warren] (unclear) and what a mess this was and the, the dancing act between, you know, trying to follow the rules of the Army Air Corps as presented by the military and being basically in sympathy with the mutineers quote, unquote, was probably quite difficult for him, and he never talked much about it, but apparently he required all of the white officers who were treating this quite dismissively to salute him and the court-martial board as they were supposed to do, but had not. And then there was a lot of tension in this court-martial, which resulted in three guys, the three who pushed past the officer being fined $50 each the others with letters of reprimand in their file, which were good, but still given what the charges were this was fairly modest result befitting the ridiculousness of the whole situation. A reversal of these actions was made by the [U.S.] Department of Defense in the late 1990s at the, an announced at a Tuskegee Airmen convention was just, sorry, it was wonderful to have their records expunged.$$Right and I think we interviewed I think [HistoryMaker] Roy Chappell was part of that group--$$There you are.$$--and some--$$Well you know about it then.$$Yeah, it's, it was quite a story.$$Yeah.$What is the origin of Philip Morris [Philip Morris Inc.; Altria Group, Inc.]? We think of tobacco companies as being southern, you know, that's where they grow tobacco (unclear)--$$No, Philip Morris was back actually a person. There was a man named Philip Morris Esquire and he was a tobacconist in London [England]. I've seen pictures of his shop, and he started selling cigarettes when they discovered that the British troops coming back from the Crimean War. Up to that time, you smoked tobacco in a pipe you know, had learned how to roll them from the Turks. So, he started selling cigarettes at this shop on Bond Street. There is some argument about what year it was, but it was 1840s, 1850s, something like that. Then the company got a royal warrant. I think it was from King Edward, King Edward [King Edward VII], the son of Victoria [Queen Victoria], so that'd be Edward the VII I think it was.$$So, now the one that married the American.$$No, no that was, that was the, that was his grandfather. So, Edward, the son of Queen Victoria would have been the VI or VII, I forget, and then the, then the one who married Wallis Simpson was Edward VIII, so this must have been Edward VII okay. I think that's right. At any rate, it's one of those, one of the guys, one of those Edward guys. So, he gives us a royal warrant and that's why the Philip Morris logo now has a, a crest that looks like the crest of the British monarch because that was the crest you could use if you had a royal warrant. So, the company became quite successful in England and started exporting cigarettes to the United States, and that's how an office was established, somewhere in New York I guess it was, received these exports and market them in the United States. Now, at the same time Teddy Roosevelt [President Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.] is president and the trust busting begins. So they're now going through the first part of the century busting all these trusts. The oil trust gets broken up. You know John Rockefeller [John D. Rockefeller] can no longer own all the oil there is, you know, so there have to be some other companies, so the oil and gasoline industry begins to diversify. The tobacco business in this country was run by a guy named James Buchanan Duke, Buck Duke, out of North Carolina, and he controlled the tobacco trust, the American tobacco trust. I don't know if that had a formal name, but he was in control of it, and the government breaks that up. At this point, Philip Morris the, the U.S. end of the English company incorporates itself in Virginia. I think it was in nineteen, in the early teens, as the trust gets broken up and becomes an independent company and that's the Philip Morris we know. It struggled for many years because even though there was competition, presumed competition in the industry now, still was dominated by the remnants of the Duke family, which became the American Tobacco Company. And as I said the company struggled for years through, well struggle, it was doing okay, but it wasn't it wasn't do, it wasn't behaving in any way that would lead you to believe that it would become what it became.

Sanford Cloud, Jr.

Attorney and foundation executive Sanford Cloud, Jr. was born on November 27, 1944 in Hartford, Connecticut to Inez Morgan Cloud and Sanford Cloud, Sr. Attending Burns Elementary School, Northwest Elementary School and Northwest Junior High School, Cloud graduated from Hartford’s Weaver High School in 1962. After staring his college career at the University of Arizona, Cloud transferred to Howard University in 1964 where he came under the tutelage of Frank Snowden, Nathan Hare and Naylor Fitzhugh. Cloud graduated as student body president, worked in the office of Senator Thomas Dodd and married his college sweetheart in 1966. His twin sons, Adam and Christopher Cloud, were born as he graduated cum laude from Howard University Law School in 1969. In 1992, Cloud earned his M.A. degree in religious studies from Hartford Seminary.

Cloud worked briefly for Aetna Insurance in 1969 and then became the first African American lawyer to work at the firm of Robinson and Cole. In 1976, Cloud was elected to the Connecticut State Senate and formed his own firm, Cloud and Iberguen. Returning to Aetna in 1978, Cloud became vice president of public involvement in 1986 and headed the Aetna Foundation until1992. He became the eighth president and the first African American president and chief executive office of the National Conference for Community Justice (NCCJ) in 1994. Cloud represented the NCCJ as a member of former President Jimmy Carter’s delegation overseeing the first Palestinian elections in Jerusalem in 1996. Before retiring from the NCCJ in 2004, Cloud convened faith leaders to combat racism and advised the United States Customs Commissioner on racial profiling in the area of international air traveling.

Cloud has lectured at the University of Connecticut Law School. A former board member of the Independent Sector, The Council on Foundations and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Cloud serves as director of Northeast Utilities, the Phoenix Company, Tenet Healthcare and Advest Incorporated.

Accession Number

A2005.053

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/18/2005

Last Name

Cloud

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Weaver High School

Burns Elementary School

Northwest Elementary School

Northwest Junior High School

Latino Studies Academy at Burns

Howard University School of Law

Hartford Seminary

University of Arizona School of Law

First Name

Sanford

Birth City, State, Country

Hartford

HM ID

CLO02

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Lincoln Financial Group Foundation

State

Connecticut

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Ciao.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

11/27/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hartford

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Jambalaya

Short Description

Foundation executive, lawyer, and nonprofit executive Sanford Cloud, Jr. (1944 - ) was the eighth president and the first African American president and CEO of the National Conference for Community Justice (NCCJ). He was also the first African American attorney at Robinson and Cole, was elected to the Connecticut state senate, and became Vice President of Public Involvement for Aetna.

Employment

NCCJ

Robinson & Cole LLP

Aetna, Inc.

Robinson & Cole LLP

The Connecticut State Senate

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:937,14:2431,36:17724,204:23974,253:25129,270:25822,298:30673,398:31135,405:37340,454:48140,561:50072,584:50744,594:51248,601:55260,630:55740,638:71784,778:72180,785:72444,790:73104,806:73566,814:79298,847:80760,870:82050,895:85962,912:87304,924:91986,954:92899,967:95910,982:98324,995:98772,1000:99556,1008:102258,1026:106376,1070:107160,1082:108168,1091:109848,1107:115700,1168:116400,1180:120000,1231:120500,1237:122500,1257:123600,1272:127111,1286:129690,1315$0,0:2120,40:2928,49:7271,166:9493,213:12624,255:16210,270:16840,278:24750,298:26360,306:30744,326:36691,357:37822,435:38431,443:46653,526:47141,540:48849,581:66701,858:67511,869:69212,898:74688,980:75157,997:90286,1118:98430,1212:98868,1222:99306,1229:99963,1240:106842,1337:107386,1346:110964,1413:111738,1426:112684,1444:127943,1629:128636,1640:129644,1667:142318,1866:143154,1878:144066,1968:153256,2024:153528,2029:157496,2047:160845,2118:170609,2215:173570,2253:180932,2334:195830,2437:196730,2476:197510,2491:208054,2631:208570,2638:209688,2678:210290,2686:213691,2712:214227,2721:215299,2749:226498,2905:227119,2915:228016,2933:228499,2941:229051,2951:232117,2976:232733,2986:239850,3103:243922,3147:245020,3157:249092,3185:249560,3192:249872,3197:250964,3219:263846,3410:274884,3562:276224,3586:315680,4025
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sanford Cloud, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his parent's meeting

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his experiences with church growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his siblings and extended family

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. remembers discovering golf

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. reflects upon his experience as a caddy at Tumble Brook Country Club in Bloomfield, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. explains how reading impacted him as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes living in public housing and the schools he attended in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. names influential school mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his experience at Weaver High School in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. recounts his decision to attend the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his experience at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. recalls his decision to transfer to Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. remembers his experience at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. remembers meeting his future wife at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes courting and marrying his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. relates why he wanted to become a lawyer

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes the activism on campus at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his experience at Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. remembers his early career after law school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his experience at Robinson & Cole LLP in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. explains how he became involved in politics

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. reflects on his tenure in the Connecticut State Senate

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about Aetna Life Insurance Company in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. explains why he attended Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his interest in theology

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. explains how he used his master's degree in religious studies

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his involvement with the National Conference of Christians and Jews

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about the naming of the National Conference for Community and Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes the work of the National Conference for Community and Justice, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes the work of the National Conference for Community and Justice, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. reflects upon highlights from his work with the National Conference for Community and Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes his future plans

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his parents witnessing his success

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sanford Cloud, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Sanford Cloud, Jr. relates why he wanted to become a lawyer
Sanford Cloud, Jr. talks about his involvement with the National Conference of Christians and Jews
Transcript
Now let me go back to undergraduate school at Howard [University, Washington, D.C.]. You graduated from Howard--$$Nineteen sixty-six [1966].$$Okay. Okay. And, and what--what influenced you to become a lawyer?$$Well I was, well as I told you the, the assassination of President [John Fitzgerald] Kennedy led me to the first thought and the fact that [President] Lyndon [Baines] Johnson was gonna become president. Of course, as it turned out he was a great president for African American people, and, and, and our interests. But just the, the sense of, I'd always been focused on issues of social justice and, and during that time at Howard, you know, not only were the Civil Rights Movement going on and gaining momentum but the war in Vietnam [Vietnam War] was raging. I became very involved in the student government and at the, my senior year ended up becoming president of the student body and so very involved in social related issues. And I also had the opportunity to work for the late Senator Thomas [J.] Dodd, Senator Chris Dodd's father, while I was at Howard as a research assistant. And that exposed me to the world of the United States Senate and that was an extraordinary experience. So all of those, all of those experiences and the environment in which I found myself led me to, to the law.$You eventually became involved with the National Council for Christians and Jews [sic. National Conference of Christians and Jews (NCCJ)] and did, when, when did you first become involved with that organization?$$Well I was, ended up heading up the Aetna Foundation for several years and in 1992 I decided that I wanted to go back to practicing law. I had been at Aetna [Life Insurance Company; Aetna Inc., Hartford, Connecticut] for fifteen years all told, and in that particular part of my journey with Aetna and, and, and just wanted a different environment, wanted out of the corporate environment at the time. And my partners at Robinson & Cole [LLP, Hartford, Connecticut] invited me to return home. And so I did and that's where I thought I was going to be, I had become chairman of the new foundation in the Hartford [Connecticut] area focused on children's issues called the Children's Fund [of Connecticut]. And so that's what I thought I was going to do, y'know go back to having a corporate and, and community practice. And, and then in ninety--late '93 [1993], I received a call from a headhunter in Chicago [Illinois] it was just before Thanksgiving weekend. And she said "I have talked to a number of people around the country and your name keeps coming up as the person that oughta become the next president of the National Conference [for Community and Justice]." Which it had, what it had become to be called simply the National Conference founded as the National Conference of Christians and Jews. And, "Would you be interested? It's an old human relations organization founded in 1927 and, and it's got some sixty regional offices in thirty some odd states around the country and, and oh, by the way it's headquartered in New York City [New York, New York]." And I said, I said, "You must be kidding to think that I would leave my beloved Connecticut Valley to go down and work in New York City." I said, "I like New York but I'm not going down to work and live there." And I said, "But send me some information and I will try to find you an appropriate candidate." And so she did and at some point over the Thanksgiving weekend I opened it up and what I opened up was the 1992 annual report. And while I had known of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, we had a very active regional office here in Connecticut and led by some very prominent old friends of mine that I knew, I didn't even know what they did but I figured, you know, Christians and Jews are getting together it must be a good organization and, and that's how I viewed it. Well I opened up this 1992 annual report, on the inside cover was the mission statement and the mission statement said, "And this National Conference, founders of the National Conference of Christians and Jews in 1927 as a human relations organization dedicated to fighting bias and bigotry and racism among all people and promoting understanding and respect among all people through advocacy, conflict, resolution, and education." I said, "No, this can't be what this organization is about. How could this be what its mission is?" Well that mission spoke to me primarily because all of my life I've always been about trying to build community across all of the divides, the race, ethnicity, culture, and, and faith. And, and in a quiet moment I said to myself, Sandy Cloud [HistoryMaker Sanford Cloud, Jr.] you oughta take your experience in the law and in public life and the corporate world and theological education and community building and go down to New York and, and focus on advancing this mission. And so Diane [Brown Cloud] and I had a conversation about all of that and she said, "You do what your, where your heart wants to take you." And so I ended up going down to New York eleven years ago in '94 [1994] and extraordinary run, I just retired from NCCJ at the end of December. And it was an extraordinary journey for me and hope I did some good that was '94 [1994] to, to '04 [2004], '94 [1994].$$Okay.$$--to '04 [2004].

Monte Ford

Senior vice president and chief information officer of information technology for American Airlines, Inc., Monte Ford, was born October 3, 1959, in Washington, D.C.; his mother Charity Hunt’s Georgia ancestors were written about in a book entitled Ambiguous Lives. Ford's father, Nathaniel Ford, was from Waycross, Georgia. Growing up in Southeast D.C.’s Stronghold neighborhood, Ford was inspired by his older brother who attended Wilberforce University; finishing Jackson Elementary School, he attended Augustus Paul Junior High School, Linton Hall Military School and graduated from co-educational Perkiomen School in Pennsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1977. Ford earned his B.S. degree in Business Administration from Northeastern University in Boston in 1982 where he met his future wife.

Ford worked for Digital Equipment Corporation as a marketing representative and in other positions from 1982 to 1990, while occasionally working as a disc jockey. From 1990 to 1994, Ford worked for the Bank of Boston, becoming senior vice president for technology. At the Associates First Capital Corporation, Ford served as the executive vice president and CIO from 1997 to 2000, when he was named senior vice president and CIO. In 2001, Ford became the chief information officer and senior vice president of information technology for American Airlines, Inc., which is a subsidiary of AMR Corporation; in this context, he was in charge of the information technology services group. From 2006 to 2008, Ford also served as the director of Moneygram International Inc.

Action oriented, Ford promoted the concept “Well done is better than well said;" his articles, True Colors and Be A King, Not A Joker, remain widely read in CIO circles. Active in youth programs, church leadership groups, and the Children’s Medical Center, Ford maintained a long history of community service for which he received numerous awards. Ford and his wife raised three children, settling in Southlake, Texas.

Accession Number

A2004.221

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/29/2004

Last Name

Ford

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Perkiomen School

Jackson Elementary School

Augustus Paul Junior High School

Linton Hall Military School

Fillmore Arts Center

Northeastern University

Katie B. Lewis Elementary School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Monte

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

FOR08

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

October

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is, So Now What? Well Done Is Always Better Than Well Said.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

10/3/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Corn (Fried)

Short Description

Corporate executive Monte Ford (1959 - ) is the senior vice president and chief information officer of information technology for American Airlines, Inc.

Employment

Digital Equipment Corporation

Bank of Boston

Associates First Capital Corporation

American Airlines

Moneygram International, Inc.

Favorite Color

Crimson

Timing Pairs
0,0:2581,30:7765,147:8170,153:9061,165:11734,227:12463,237:13030,245:18133,345:21859,450:30511,533:36815,602:45122,703:55163,808:64990,911:70550,961:71190,970:73520,1025:80148,1095:80852,1104:81996,1121:83932,1151:84548,1159:85252,1180:85780,1187:86396,1195:91500,1279:92028,1287:92820,1309:102690,1450:103410,1459:105660,1499:106200,1506:106560,1511:112244,1551:112736,1558:120758,1763:121681,1778:122888,1806:125728,1863:133893,2101:140455,2142:140715,2147:143835,2224:144355,2233:144875,2242:145135,2247:146045,2261:146370,2267:150465,2359:151570,2384:157640,2398:157982,2405:158438,2420:159179,2435:166136,2541:166744,2552:167124,2558:170468,2639:172444,2680:189840,2976:191520,3007:194010,3032$0,0:3024,91:3500,99:7852,333:25042,537:26482,572:33890,610:36835,650:37690,660:38545,670:45940,862:62687,1198:83646,1427:96344,1639:101848,1790:108454,1860:111973,1898:114966,1987:116937,2019:117448,2027:119492,2076:119930,2083:128732,2193:129084,2198:130052,2210:133982,2248:134486,2256:137006,2320:138014,2337:138950,2360:140030,2391:141398,2421:144134,2485:146150,2546:148814,2601:152126,2699:161062,2762:164424,2846:166392,2875:167130,2890:167786,2899:169590,2908:170000,2914:171230,2935:178528,3073:183038,3199:185826,3276:203480,3466:204620,3488:205608,3503:206368,3511:206672,3516:206976,3521:213520,3583:214150,3591:215320,3613:215680,3621:217300,3638:217930,3647:223450,3729
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Monte Ford's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Monte Ford lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Monte Ford states his mother's name, place of birth and birthday

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Monte Ford describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Monte Ford talks about the tradition of storytelling in his maternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Monte Ford explains his mother's migration to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Monte Ford states his father's name, place of birth and birthday

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Monte Ford talks about his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Monte Ford talks about his family's values and his religious upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Monte Ford describes his childhood neighborhood of Stronghold in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Monte Ford describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Monte Ford describes the influence of his two brothers on his worldview

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Monte Ford describes his elementary school experience in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Monte Ford talks about being sent to Linton Hall Military School in Bristow, Virginia for eighth grade

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Monte Ford talks about transferring to Perkiomen School in Pennsburg, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Monte Ford describes his experiences and friendships at Perkiomen School in Pennsburg, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Monte Ford describes his favorite teacher at the Perkiomen School in Pennsburg, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Monte Ford explains his decision to attend Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Monte Ford recalls courting his wife while they were students at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Monte Ford recalls courting his wife while they were students at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Monte Ford recalls accepting his first full-time job at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Monte Ford talks about graduating from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts in 1982

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Monte Ford describes his experiences and supervisors at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Monte Ford talks about his career transitions from Digital Equipment Corporation to the Bank of Boston to the Associates First Capital Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Monte Ford talks about his family

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Monte Ford recalls becoming the chief information officer of American Airlines in 2001

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Monte Ford recalls the reaction of American Airlines executives to the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Monte Ford reflects upon the process of rebuilding American Airlines' brand in the wake of September 11, 2001

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Monte Ford reflects upon his experience being an African American executive in corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Monte Ford recalls overreacting to a colleague's comment which he perceived as racialized

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Monte Ford talks about his mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Monte Ford explains his leadership philosophy and talks about workplace diversity

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Monte Ford shares an example to illustrate one of his favorite quotes

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Monte Ford describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Monte Ford reflects upon his life

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Monte Ford talks about his future career plans

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Monte Ford reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Monte Ford reflects upon his parents' pride in his career success

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Monte Ford describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

5$6

DATitle
Monte Ford recalls becoming the chief information officer of American Airlines in 2001
Monte Ford recalls the reaction of American Airlines executives to the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001
Transcript
I worked at this company, the Associates [First Capital Corporation; Citigroup, Inc.], and I ended up managing all of the technology there, became chief information officer [CIO] there, and I managed close to a couple thousand people in fifteen countries with eight or nine hundred million dollar budget, and it's a pretty big organization--two thousand branches and fifty-two call centers, and it was an enormous job and a lotta fun. I worked with some of the best people than I could imagine working with there, and I started off working for a guy, Walter B. Copeland--Larry Sweeten [ph.], and very quickly Walter Copeland, and I ended up--Walter moved on and I took the head job managing all of the technology there, and that, that was an interesting job, but it was a tough job. Well, Citigroup [Inc.] acquired the Associates, and I had a conversation with Keith W. Hughes, the CEO and the guy that kinda directed me at the time, and ended up working for American Airlines [Fort Worth, Texas]; they offered me a job to become chief information officer here, and that's where I am now, and American Airlines has the single largest--no offense to anybody else, but it has the single largest collection of really smart people of any place that I've worked.$$Now, when did you come to Dallas [Texas] in the first place--to the Associates? What year was that (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I came to Dallas in 1994.$$Okay, all right. And came to American Airlines--$$I came to American Airlines almost four years ago, beginning of 2001. So a few months before September 11 [2001, 9/11], right before the acquisition of TWA [Trans World Airlines; American Airlines] and its assets, but a few months before September 11 (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's really kinda a turbulent period, I mean in terms of activity around American Airlines. You got the acquisition of TWA--$$That's right.$$--one of the pioneer aviation--I mean airlines in the U.S. Pan Am [Pan American World Airways], TWA, that's (unclear) the old days (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's right, that's right--a lotta legacy, a lotta heritage in TWA and, and that name and what they meant to aviation and what they've built; the part of the aviation industry that they created, which American piggy-backed a lot off of. American has a storied heritage itself, obviously; the combination of those two companies was pretty daunting. The integration of those two companies was daunting at the time, for me, actually. We did that integration in eight months, which is a minor miracle; it might be the eighth or ninth wonder of the world, and we did it with incredible staff and a group of talented people here at American and TWA in a record period of time (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) What was your title when you came in? I'm sorry.$$I was the chief information officer--senior vice president; and I report to the chairman. And then September 11th came along and we were so far into the integration of TWA we couldn't stop it; we had to do it.$Many people don't realize, and I didn't really realize it 'til I came here today; I hadn't thought about it for some reason, so I guess it wasn't bad pub [publicity] for American Airlines [Fort Worth, Texas], but those were American Airlines planes--both of 'em, right?$$Two of the four planes were American Airlines planes, and two planes were United Airlines.$$Two, okay.$$That was a difficult time, you know? The person that's chairman now, who's Gerard [J.] Arpey, who--and I've talked about all these great people that I've worked with and worked for--he may be the most outstanding of them all. But we have a meeting every Tuesday that is an executive committee meeting, and I was on my in with the person that was in charge of marketing at the time, and his secretary came up to us in the hallway and said, "We have a situation," and he said, "yeah, we always have a situation." He said, "No"--she said, "no, somebody's hijacked one of our planes." And our operations center is on the phone as we passed him the phone with--cell phone--with a flight attendant on the plane. And so we rushed in and [Robert W.] Bob Baker was getting the information and listening to what happened and we were talking in Bob Baker's office. He said--he was listening in the phone call and then he said, "Our plane just ran into the World Trade Center [New York, New York]." I said, "You're kidding." Bob said, "Why would I kid you about that?" And so we all rushed, and we all have TVs in the conference rooms and I had one in my office, and we ran to the conference room and we're watching this plane in the side of building, and I remember just being awe struck, not knowing what to do. And then the CFO [chief financial officer] at the time, a guy name [Thomas W.] Tom Horton, came in and said, "United's missing a plane," and he came back and said, "they're missing six planes, and we can't find four planes." And so we were all tryin' to figure out what was going on, and as we were watching this on television and talking about it, and talking about what to do next, the second plane hit; on television, the second plane hit the World Trade Center--the United plane. And somebody in the room immediately said, "This is terrorism." And so we quickly gathered our belongings not knowing what was going on, what was happening in the world, and went to our operations center. And in the operations center, there is a place for everyone to sit in the case of emergency, so I have a seat; everybody has a seat--the CFO, the operations--head of operations, head of marketing, there's a place for the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA], the FAA, and the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation] and everybody has a seat there; we were all gathered there, and we went through the process of determining what was going on. We immediately grounded planes and it was--it seemed surreal, and I remember watching these buildings burning on television in the room with the FBI guy, and I remember Afric- tall African American gentleman; he said, "One of those buildings is gonna collapse." I said, "What do you mean?" He explained to me structurally what's gonna happen and how--the physics of it. And sure enough, it did. I said, "How did you know?" He said, "Well, we've got people and they knew it." And he explained it, and it happened, and--after he had gotten word and he'd been in touch with people, I guess in Washington [D.C.], or wherever. And that was a devastating time, and rebuilding the airline from that point in time, that was a daunting task. And there have been several times when I thought, this is overwhelming; we can't do this. But we have been able to do it and we're still in the process of doing it--

The Honorable Wilford Taylor

Wilford Taylor, Jr. was born on January 15, 1950 in Newport News, Virginia. His mother was a homemaker and later a teacher and his father was a mail carrier and chef. He grew up in Hampton, Virginia's Aberdeen community, which is now a historic landmark in the city. In 1968, Taylor was part of the first group of African Americans to integrate Hampton High School. While at Hampton High, he was a member of the football, baseball, track and tennis teams and the thespian club. He earned his high school diploma in 1968.

Taylor then attended Hampton Institute, where he earned his B.S. degree in business management in 1972. Following his graduation, he served in the United States army for the next three years, while earning his master's of commerce degree from the University of Richmond in 1975. In 1978, Taylor earned his law degree from the College of William and Mary. He started a law firm with good friend and attorney Bobby Scott, who is now a Congressman. In 1981, the firm merged with another firm and became Scott, Coles, Brown, Taylor and Melvin. From 1983 until 1985, Taylor worked as the Deputy City Attorney for Hampton. In 1985, Taylor made history, becoming Hampton's first full time African American judge. He served as a judge in the General District Court until 1995, when he was appointed to the Circuit Court, a position he holds today.

Taylor is an adjunct professor at his alma mater, teaching trial advocacy and therapeutic jurisprudence. He is a member of numerous organizations including the American Judges Association, Virginia State Bar Association and Lawyers Helping Lawyers Committee.

He and his wife, Linda, reside in Hampton and have two grown children.

Accession Number

A2004.101

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/20/2004 |and| 10/14/2004

Last Name

Taylor

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Hampton High School

Aberdeen Elementary School

George Wythe High

Hampton University

University of Richmond

The College of William & Mary

First Name

Wilford

Birth City, State, Country

Newport News

HM ID

TAY07

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Let's Fix It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/15/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef

Short Description

Circuit court judge The Honorable Wilford Taylor (1950 - ) was Hampton, Virginia's first full time African American judge. He served as a judge in the General District Court until 1995, after which he was appointed to the Circuit Court.

Employment

United States Army

Scott & Taylor

Scott, Coles, Brown, Taylor & Melvin

City of Hampton, Virginia

Hampton General District Court

Hampton Circuit Court

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2578,36:3634,63:3898,68:6868,143:8122,168:11092,238:12544,345:16240,431:16570,437:17032,447:18550,483:18814,488:19474,499:21850,552:23104,581:24028,653:24820,667:25282,676:31844,744:35394,835:36672,861:37027,867:37595,875:39228,896:39867,908:40151,913:40861,924:42281,952:42849,963:43204,969:46257,1022:46541,1027:47251,1039:50091,1102:50375,1107:57226,1155:60350,1229:62480,1272:64042,1315:65959,1350:74520,1451:84500,1563:85200,1572:90660,1673:91360,1686:91640,1691:94090,1734:94580,1743:95210,1753:101004,1806:101536,1814:112220,1992:113588,2020:114884,2041:115388,2050:116396,2071:132505,2307:134638,2345:142256,2399:142739,2417:146534,2513:148190,2545:154124,2685:162847,2756:167580,2814$0,0:6762,195:8556,263:8901,269:9315,285:9936,294:11592,332:16560,483:17043,494:18561,594:29804,773:32024,890:38166,984:38832,1029:43420,1126:44974,1162:48008,1236:48304,1248:55970,1293:73601,1614:73946,1620:74429,1630:74774,1636:75326,1644:78224,1743:93100,2027:98946,2080:99830,2090
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Wilford Taylor's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his mother's educational opportunities and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his father's employment

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his father's work ethic

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his maternal ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his summer activities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes Aberdeen Gardens, his childhood neighborhood in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor recalls holidays during his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about the focus of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 18 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 19 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his childhood experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 20 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor recalls memorable elementary school teachers

Tape: 1 Story: 21 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his childhood temperament

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about the importance of education for his family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about attending church in Hampton, Virginia as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his junior high school experiences in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his aspiration to be an airline pilot

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about attending Hampton High School in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor recalls racist incidents at Hampton High School in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his experiences with racism while growing up in the South during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his favorite high school subjects and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his long-lasting high school friendships

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor remembers visiting Broadway in New York, New York during high school to see 'Man of La Mancha'

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his high school's response to Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains his decision to attend Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his impression of Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his membership in Groove Phi Groove at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his experiences as an intern for Johnson & Johnson in New Brunswick, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his favorite classes and professor at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 17 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about directing the Hampton University Drug Education Program

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his experiences as a U.S. Army instructor at Fort Lee, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains his change of interest from flying airplanes to investment banking

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes how he met his wife, Linda Taylor

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about leaving his position in the U.S. Army at Fort Lee, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his decision to attend William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his experiences at William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about the grading system at William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his favorite constitutional law professor at William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes the academic rigor of William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about beginning a law practice with his friend Bobby Scott in the late 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his responsibilities in his federal litigation practice

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about the merger of Scott and Taylor with Stewart, Brown and Jones in 1981

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains how he became deputy city attorney in 1983 for Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about white city employees' responses to his role as deputy city attorney for Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his family's reaction to his employment as an attorney in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains the purview of a general district court in Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 17 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about becoming the first African American appointed to full-time judgeship in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 18 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes the lobbying process to be appointed general district court judge in the State of Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 19 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his judgeship appointment to the Hampton General District Court in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about the types of cases he tried as judge for the Hampton General District Court in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains how he handled cases when he knew the people involved

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes his first day on the bench in the general district court in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains the differences between a circuit court and general district court in Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about challenging circuit court cases and decisions

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon various perceptions of his conduct as a judge

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor shares his views on the media's role in enlightening the general population about court proceedings

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his perspective on juries

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes the types of cases typically brought before the Hampton Circuit Court in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about his perspective on sentencing guidelines in the State of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his life experiences, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains why his position as a role model honors those who influenced him

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor shares advice for people interested in pursuing a law career

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor reflects upon his life experiences, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilford Taylor narrates his photographs, pt. 3

DASession

2$2

DATape

3$3

DAStory

13$17

DATitle
The Honorable Wilford Taylor explains how he became deputy city attorney in 1983 for Hampton, Virginia
The Honorable Wilford Taylor talks about becoming the first African American appointed to full-time judgeship in Hampton, Virginia
Transcript
Let's talk little bit about in 1983 when you became the deputy city attorney [for Hampton, Virginia].$$Yes.$$How did that come about?$$Well, I guess at that time I was practicing I was, had, it was just a great experience. I enjoyed the practice of law. Of course, we [Scott, Coles, Brown, Taylor and Melvin P.C., Newport News, Virginia] were growing. The staff was growing, and you know, our caseload was growing. Things were going well, and opportunity presented itself in the city attorney's office in Hampton. And, and I was in, interested in that. I took a class in law school [William & Mary Law School, Williamsburg, Virginia] in municipal corporations, which is basically city government law, and became interested. And, and the city attorney offered me a job, and I, and that's when I started I guess, you know, again, pioneering. I became the first African American attorney to work in the city attorney's office. And I just thought that was a great opportunity to come back home and to become a deputy city attorney, a different kind of practice. You, you get in and you represent city government. You--your department heads and the city council. You, basically, you just try to help them with their legal problems and, and issues. And so it was a great, great experience. And so it was an opportunity to become, you know, a first, and, and I took it, and left private practice, and joined the city attorney staff.$$What were some of the--your accomplishments as deputy city attorney [for Hampton, Virginia]?$$I would say preventive law, working, making city department heads more aware of the legal implications of what they do. My focus and the focus of the city attorney was preventive law, to try not to create a situation where you have to end up in court litigating. I had several cases that went, ended up in court, but we, we were successful. I mean I was able to be, you know, to, to litigate successfully cases that did go to court. But I would say the most important thing was to prevent a lot of law cases in court and to get the managers to understand that they need to prevent and be, be cognizant of legal implications of what they do. And that was our big, big I guess claim to fame. And so I enjoyed spending a lot of time in meetings, and, and advising, and counseling department heads, and, and also helping city council avoid litigation. And I, I thought that was, that was the way to do it. And city manager at the time--I mean city, the city attorney at the time encouraged us to take that approach. And so, that was a big, big thing, big accomplishment I felt. I mean, I can't point to any one thing, how it helped, but I just know that, that many department heads were able to stay out of trouble based on counsel and advice that, that I helped them with.$So you have to get a majority of votes from [the Virginia General Assembly]--saying that this is the person we'd like to have [as Hampton General District Court judge].$$Well, that's the way it, when I, in '85 [1985], that's the way it worked. No, the, the--you don't have to. What, what you have to get is a majority vote of the General Assembly. You don't have to get a bar endorsement.$$Right. So you kind of have to lobby the General Assembly then?$$Yes, yes, you have to do that. But back when I became a judge [on the Hampton General District Court, Hampton, Virginia] in '85 [1985] that was the protocol.$$Okay.$$You had to go through a bar association. And so I went to the Hampton Bar [Association, Hampton, Virginia], 'cause they had never endorsed a black person for a vacancy. Now, I have to tell you, I was the first to be appointed a full-time judge, but I was not the first black judge on the peninsula. We had two other judges that came before me: Philip [S.] Walker and William [Thomas] Stone--$$But you were the first full-time.$$Yeah, first full-time. But those are two of my role models, are very outstanding gentlemen, and, and had they wanted to be full-time judges, they would have been (laughter). But they didn't want to. They were had very, very lucrative practices and, but they were part-time judges. They were just substitute, we call 'em substitute judges, but I was the first full time. But what happened, in '85 [1985], the vacancy came up, and I went to the Hampton Bar and asked for the endorsement, and they gave it to me. I was endorsed by the Hampton Bar for the first time, the first African American to be endorsed by the Hampton Bar for a, a judicial vacancy in Hampton. And of course, I went to the General Assembly, and I was elected a judge. And I became the first judge in Hampton and Newport News [Virginia], actually, on the peninsula. As you, you know, the Hampton and Newport News, we're part of Hampton Roads [Virginia] on this side of the water. I became the first African American judge, full-time judge on the peninsula.