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Dori Wilson

Publicist and model Dori Wilson was born in Winona, Mississippi. At the age of seven, Wilson moved to Chicago, Illinois. She attended Farren School, Shakespeare Elementary School, and Hyde Park High School. She continued her education at Roosevelt University, where she graduated with her B.A. degree.

Upon her graduation from Hyde Park High School, Wilson began working for Goldblatt’s in the Accounts Payable Adjusting Department in 1961. Wilson then moved to Compton Advertising, Inc., where she worked as a secretary and assistant producer. She also started her part-time modeling career and became the first African American runway model in Chicago, Illinois in 1964. Wilson began her modeling career by working for Marshall Field & CO. and Carson Pirie Scott. In 1968, Wilson joined Foote, Cone & Belding and on their advertising project with Sears, Roebuck & Co. During the project, she also worked as a model and instructor at Sears, Roebuck, and Co. Charm School. She was promoted in 1970 to director of fashion and casting at Foote, Cone & Belding, where she cast models and helped producers during shoots. During this time, she continued to model and starred in numerous fashion shows, advertisements, and events, including Gucci’s Fall 1970 campaign and the Dress Horsemen and Trophy Board Annual Benefit Fashion Spectacular in 1975. In 1980, Wilson began her successful entrepreneurial career with the opening of Dori Wilson Public Relations, a firm whose clients have included the City of Chicago, Tiffany & Co., and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The following year, Wilson helped form The Chicago Academy for the Arts.

Wilson has been a member of the Girl Scouts of Chicago’s Association Board for over thirty years. She has also been listed in Who’s Who Among Black Americans and in Donna Ballard’s book, Doing It For Ourselves: Success Stories of African American Women in Business, which was published in 1997. In 2008, she was honored in an evening of recognition at the Stanley Paul/Raelene Mittelman Scholarship Benefit.

Wilson lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Dori Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 25, 2010 and July 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2010.029

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/25/2010 |and| 07/16/2017

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Lincoln Elementary School

John Farren Elementary School

Ariel Community Academy

Hyde Park Academy High School

Roosevelt University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Dori

Birth City, State, Country

Winona

HM ID

WIL53

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

I'm Just Saying... And It Is What It Is And Whatever

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/15/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers, French Fries

Short Description

Public relations executive and model Dori Wilson (1943 - ) was the founder of Dori Wilson Public Relations and the first African American runway model in Chicago, Illinois.

Employment

Woolworth's Department Store

Goldblatt's

Compton Advertising

Foote, Cone and Belding

Dori Wilson Public Relations

WMAQ-TV

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue, Bright Colors, Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dori Wilson's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson lists her favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson talks about her parents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson talks about her elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers her childhood homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson describes her early interest in fashion and beauty

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her early career in advertising

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson describes how she became a professional fashion model

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson recalls her appearance on 'The Dating Game'

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the black is beautiful movement

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her community involvement in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about her positions at the Foote, Cone and Belding advertising agency

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson remembers her talk show, 'Memorandum,' pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers her talk show, 'Memorandum,' pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson recalls founding Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes the clientele of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her relationship with Oprah Winfrey

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her decision not to pursue a television career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about the public relations industry

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her involvement in political campaigns

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson recalls her public relations work with The HistoryMakers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson reflects upon the future of her career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her parents' opinion of her career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson narrates her photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Dori Wilson's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson lists her favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson remembers her early experiences in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson recalls her early experiences in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her siblings

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers the holidays

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson describes her early aspirations

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Dori Wilson remembers moving to Highland Park, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers living with her mother's white employers

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson recalls her experiences of discrimination in the Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson remembers the Shakespeare School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about her early work in the retail industry

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes how she came to work for Compton Advertising, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson recalls her first professional modeling job

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her modeling career in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about 'The Dating Game'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson talks about the advertising industry in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson describes her experiences as an African American model

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the elite society of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson remembers her transition to the public relations industry

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson remembers the nightlife of the 1970s in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson remembers meeting Potter Palmer IV

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson talks about her social circle

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers notable figures from the entertainment industries of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson remembers Barbara Gardner Proctor

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the advertising agencies in Chicago's River North

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes how she came to work at Foote, Cone and Belding

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson recalls the initial investments in the Dori Wilson Public Relations firm

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson recalls the early years of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson remembers the events organized by Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her friendship with Oprah Winfrey

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson remembers her role in Oprah Winfrey's early career

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about Oprah Winfrey's career

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson talks about the importance of networking in public relations

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the challenges of small business ownership

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her career in public relations

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about segregation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson describes her involvement on the boards of civic organizations

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson describes her role at the Chicago Academy for the Arts in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about her public relations projects

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson describes how she became her nephew's guardian

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson talks about the challenges of parenthood

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson talks about the future of Dori Wilson Public Relations

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Dori Wilson talks about her service on women's boards

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Dori Wilson describes the fashion industry in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Dori Wilson remembers Nena Ivon and Marilyn Miglin

Tape: 10 Story: 11 - Dori Wilson talks about the Lawson House YMCA in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Dori Wilson talks about her relationship with Ann Dibble Jordan

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Dori Wilson talks about her work with Columbia College President Mirron Alexandroff

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her experiences in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Dori Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her life

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Dori Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Dori Wilson reflects upon her legacy, pt. 3

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$8

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Dori Wilson describes how she became a professional fashion model
Dori Wilson describes how she came to work at Foote, Cone and Belding
Transcript
But on this job I was working for Shepp Chartok [ph.], who was the executive TV producer. And Shepp was, again, a very wonderful liberal Jewish fellow and liked me and saw something in me and I said to him, "I want to learn what you do," because I knew that he was always going on photo shoots and on filming shoots and so it was--it was Shepp Chartok who took me on, on some of his filming for commercials. And I remember that we were at Reyeye Studio, R-E-Y-E-Y-E studio in Evanston, Illinois, and we were--because one of the accounts that I worked on, that my boss worked on at Compton Advertising [Compton Advertising, Inc.; Saatchi and Saatchi] was Alberto Culver [Alberto Culver Company; Unilever]. And during those years Alberto Culver did lots and lots of TV commercials and they were for what was called (unclear) testing, so we did hundreds of commercials and the ones that would hit the air would be the ones that tested properly. But we were always in casting sessions for models with great hair. So it was on one of these pre-shooting, pre-filming casting sessions, Shirley Hamilton was there, who was a large agent in town, and Shirley Hamilton saw that I was tall and thin and said to my boss, "I'd like to send her on an audition," and I remember my boss saying at the time, "Well, let's just hope she gets it." So, I did and that's how I started in that.$$Okay. Were you excited about that?$$I think it was a job and it was a chance of getting more money and I'm--I'm sure that I was somewhat excited about that, and I'm not sure whether at this time Shepp Chartok was my boss because Shepp subsequently left or whether it was Jack Davis who was at this boss--my boss at that point. But I remember that I would get off from work at four o'clock, run outside and catch the bus in order to be on the--the first audition that I had was for the auto show [Chicago Auto Show]--the first job that I had was for the auto show. And so I would work to be on the floor and I'd work the five to eleven [o'clock] shift at the auto show. And because I could speak, you know, our backgrounds came in handy, I was talking about Chevrolet cars, I remember that. And during the intermissions, when we were having our breaks, I met lots of other models who said you should be doing runway work, and I did not really know what runway work meant, but I subsequently learned. And I went and auditioned, I was at 111 East Jackson [Boulevard], as I said, which was very close to State Street and Marshall Field's [Marshall Field and Company Building, Chicago, Illinois] was holding auditions every month for the models to do there, at that time weekly, they were called tea room shows that were in the Narcissus Room on the seventh floor of Marshall Field's. And I went on those auditions for a year before I finally got a chance to do the work, but I became involved in other things in the city that gave me the visibility to do other work.$$Now, let me ask you, in these early days, were you the only black model out there doing these things at the auto show, for instance, were you the only black model there?$$No, I wouldn't say I was the only black model, there were a few, because remember some of them--some of the models traveled. And certainly I wasn't--so there were other models, there weren't very many, and there weren't very many who were aggressive to want to take it to the next step, because I didn't want to do just the auto show, I wanted to do the other things that I heard about. And I remembered that there was a model, and I don't know whether or not you know her, whose name is Ann Jones, who is just extraordinary; very short, but with wonderful hair and very chiseled features. I think maybe half Indian [Native American]. And so Ann Jones was the photo model at that time because that was the look that was in for models that you couldn't really tell quite what they were. In the runway business, however, I was accepted for being different and for being tall and for being skinny and for being dark because fashion guys create--love that, you know it makes--a dark skin is better for showcasing their clothes. So what had been considered a liability for me when I was growing up became an asset. Though I will say that when I started modeling, I sent my picture to one of the major traveling shows, and they sent my picture back to me because I did not look like the look that they were--were looking for. On the other hand when the designers came in from Paris [France], I was what they were looking for.$So you're at Foote, Cone and Belding and are you--I have you as director of fashion and casting and so what are you doing in that regard then?$$Well, Foote, Cone and Belding recruited me after reading a story about Dori [HistoryMaker Dori Wilson], and I think Dori's work with the film festival [Chicago International Film Festival], and, and as I mentioned, I had gained some notoriety while with Compton Advertising [Compton Advertising, Inc.; Saatchi and Saatchi], and CBS 2 [WBBM-TV, Chicago, Illinois] called up and, and asked me to, to take over--there was a very popular show called 'The Lee Phillip Show.' And I hosted 'The Lee Phillip Show' for two weeks while Lee [Lee Phillip Bell] took a holiday, which was just unheard of. And so there was an article written about that, of the various clothes that I wore, and here's what Dori's doing on this show and whatever. And so Al Weisman [Albert P. Weisman] from Foote, Cone and Belding called up and said, "You know, you're in the advertising business. You've got, at this point, four years under your belt, and we need you to--we'd like to talk to you about coming to work for us." Well, I had also been doing my modeling, and I'm wearing my top eyelashes and bottom eyelashes, and, and my wigs, and I'm running to do my fashion shows after work. And I said, "Nah, I'm not interested. I wanna become a big model, a big, black model." And those were the days of Naomi Sims in New York [New York] and Naomi was indeed my color, and had made wonderful strides, and that's what I wanted to do. And so John--I mean, excuse me, so Al Weisman said, "Well, I just want you to come and talk to somebody." So it ends up that I met with John O'Toole, who was president of, of Foote, Cone and Belding. And I didn't really realize the significance of that. And so I remember arriving for our breakfast with my wig case in my hand and lots of stuff on because I had a fashion show that day. And John, in essence, said to me, "Okay, you've got four years of experience under your belt. We need African Americans. We need women, so don't you wanna become more than just a pretty face?" And I said, "How dare you say that to me?" He said, "Well, I mean your pretty face, you know you're not making--it's not really doing anything important, but you can come and work for us and really make a difference, and I will still allow you to pursue your fashion shows." And so I did. I went (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So what did you learn, what--$$And then I got in trouble for doing my modeling because when I went there, because I'd had experience with, with TV production, Foote, Cone had picked up millions and millions of dollars in billing in Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.], the Sears business. And Sears would make, what we called regional commercials, like they would make dresses and shoes and this--whatever they had on sale, they would make little short commercials, and those commercials ran in different markets. You know, Texas could be dresses. Ohio could be shoes. So they were really doing retail only in TV commercials. And there was a unit of us that traveled around doing commercials. You know, in the winter, we worked in Florida or in California. In, in the good months, we worked in Chicago [Illinois]. So our little retail unit did some six or seven hundred commercials. My job in that was fashion director, fashion and casting. So if, indeed, Sears says, we're gonna be selling these dresses, then I would arrange for casting sessions to bring the models in, and then make sure that they were fitted properly. That they looked good, that they were accessorized properly, of course, working with seamstresses and things. But, therefore, the title, casting and fashion because they felt--Foote, Cone felt that that would give me--that would be a way for me to use whatever knowledge I had learned in the fashion business. And so it was a title that they created for me.$$I see. So you were there--is it, you said--$$Fourteen years.$$Fourteen years, okay.$$And I left there only to open my own business [Dori Wilson Public Relations, Chicago, Illinois]. And during that time, it was a wonderful experience, again, because traveling with a unit, and the unit being a TV producer, associate producer, a writer, an art director, a copy--I mean a copywriter and an account executive. And so it was a wonderful learning experience too. And, again, you learn about the work that goes into making these little commercials that we may or may not remember. It's a huge, huge business.$$So what--well, it's a huge business, and that's when really things were staffed, you know--$$Oh, yeah.$$--because you had--$$Yes.$$--you know, I mean that's when jingle writers, you know, or singers (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Exactly.$$--even could make a lot of money--$$Oh, yeah, and we worked so much with those jingle writers and, and the singers and the voiceover people and I still hear voices on TV that I recognize. Joel Corey was a very big one, and I still hear Joel doing McDonald's [McDonald's Corporation] and things around town.

Louis Dodd

Insurance executive Louis Price Dodd was born on February 15, 1944, in Winona, Mississippi, to Willie and Corene Dodd. Dodd graduated valedictorian from Chicago’s Dunbar Vocational High School in 1959. He received his B.A. degree in education from Chicago State University in 1963 and has also taken advanced courses at Northeastern Illinois University.

Dodd worked as a Language Arts teacher for the Chicago Board of Education from 1966 to 1971 and was the Director of General Education for Chicago Youth Centers from 1969 to 1971. During this same time period, he was also the Co-Owner and Vice President of Marketing for Bailey’s Stamp Works. Since 1971, Dodd has been in the insurance business as an independent agency affiliate of Allstate Insurance. Throughout this time, he has been president and CEO of Dodd’s Insurance Agency. Dodd has received numerous awards for his work in the insurance industry and has been Allstate’s leading sales agent for the Chicago Metro Region for over fifteen years. From 1977 through 2003, Dodd was the director of Highland Community Bank in Chicago. Building on his success in the insurance industry, Dodd entered the hotel business and is co-owner of three Chicago hotels, The Amber Inn, The Dew Central Motel, and the South Parkway Inn. He is also a partner in two other enterprises, the Rolls Royce Car Wash and Kermit Coleman Medical Center.

Dodd is married to fellow insurance agent Alma Dodd. They have three children: Robert Dodd, Kimberly Yelverton, and Courtney Dodd.

Accession Number

A2008.140

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/21/2008

Last Name

Dodd

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Price

Occupation
Schools

Dunbar Vocational Career Academy High School

Chicago State University

Edmund Burke Elementary School

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Winona High School

First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Winona

HM ID

DOD03

Favorite Season

Birthday

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami, Florida

Favorite Quote

It Is Not Easy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/15/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sole

Short Description

Insurance executive Louis Dodd (1944 - ) was president and CEO of Dodd’s Insurance Agency since 1971. A former teacher, Dodd was also co-owner in three Chicago hotels, and was the director of Highland Community Bank in Chicago from 1977 through 2003.

Employment

Allstate Corporation

Louis Dodd Insurance Agency

Bailey's Stamp Works

Forrestville Upper Grade Center

Montgomery Ward

Esquire Lounge

Rolls Royce Car Wash

The Amber Inn

Dew Central Motel

Chicago South Loop Hotel

Kermit Coleman Medical Center

Dodd's Insurance Agency

Highland Community Bank

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:336,15:21694,354:24360,415:32784,495:38976,590:39320,595:40524,613:42158,643:42846,653:44394,677:47146,711:55634,753:60298,815:86383,1099:90002,1151:97240,1329:104848,1377:107170,1407:109578,1429:109922,1434:113050,1546:113690,1557:114090,1563:114570,1575:119405,1656:119713,1661:120021,1666:124333,1736:176095,2465:178687,2494:179497,2505:180955,2527:195626,2678:198958,2736:199230,2741:200250,2751:201542,2767:203038,2792:206310,2799$0,0:13650,195:15690,221:23880,280:24564,290:26502,312:27186,319:28212,328:33018,337:33846,347:35410,361:35910,366:37285,379:38035,386:38660,392:42910,432:62314,569:62682,574:63142,580:63602,586:74180,701:74596,706:75324,715:76156,723:80030,748:80302,753:83682,794:84540,811:85320,825:86178,842:87192,858:87972,871:88362,878:91092,932:103974,1055:123440,1242:126212,1264:140747,1454:141314,1470:141881,1481:143501,1505:144878,1524:146660,1554:149495,1602:149900,1608:153640,1618:154914,1635:157735,1674:158190,1680:158554,1685:160829,1718:161739,1741:162376,1751:163013,1760:163832,1770:166107,1805:168109,1839:182810,2037
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louis Dodd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes his siblings and maternal aunt and uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd remembers his father's car

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his childhood home in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandfather's role as a pastor

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd recalls his family's move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Louis Dodd remembers his first impressions of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's career

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his father's occupation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd talks about his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd remembers the death of his father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd recalls his return to Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers Winona High School in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes Edmund Burke Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd remembers Dunbar Vocational High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his activities in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd remembers his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd recalls his guidance counselor at Dunbar Vocational High School

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Louis Dodd describes his activities at Dunbar Vocational High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd recalls his interest in athletics

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd remembers his scholarship to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd remembers the Chicago Teachers College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes the founding of Bailey's Stamp Works

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd talks about the Chicago Board of Education examinations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd remembers the Forrestville Upper Grade Center in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his students at the Forrestville Upper Grade Center

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd recalls the uprisings on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd talks about his rubber stamp business

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd remembers his introduction to the insurance industry

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd describes his position at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd recalls his experiences of discrimination at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes his work at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers moving to Matteson, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes the changes in the insurance industry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd talks about his role at the Highland Community Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd talks about the practice of redlining

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd talks about the role of African American banks

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd describes his Rolls Royce Car Wash business

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his business partners

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd describes his mentorship at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd describes his advice to aspiring insurance agents

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd recalls his first venture in the hospitality industry

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers the Kermit Coleman Medical Center

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd talks about the Michigan Plaza Hotel investment group, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd recalls his first investment in the hotel industry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd talks about the Michigan Plaza Hotel investment group, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his land acquisitions

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd talks about the Amber Inn in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his activities in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd talks about St. Ailbe Catholic Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes the South Loop Hotel in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd reflects upon his business philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his decision to share his story

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$8

DATitle
Louis Dodd recalls the uprisings on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois
Louis Dodd talks about the practice of redlining
Transcript
Now, this is a pretty exciting period, or a changing period in Chicago's [Chicago, Illinois] history during that time. You had--$$The riots.$$--the riots.$$Sure.$$Tell me what, what are your remembrances of that and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--if you had any involvement?$$The riots in '68 [1968] I remember vividly, I had just left the teaching situation, I had gone to Wards [Montgomery Ward] to work. And they made that announcement of what was taking place and the streets were, particularly downtown were shut down. The areas particularly on the immediate West Side were just being looted like you wouldn't believe and smoke and fire was everywhere and people were frightened and almost like panic throughout. And, and that had really certainly been fueled a lot by the frustrations of the inequities at the time and a, a numb realization of society of what was brewing as far as people being held back and the issues of what was impending in their minds and in their bodies.$$Now, when you say the inequities can you elaborate a little on that?$$Well, keep in mind even at that time in Chicago there was still areas that you could not live in, Bridgeport [Chicago, Illinois] was one and you knew not to go over there and that was where the mayor [Richard J. Daley] lived. There were other areas too by which you know you would not welcomed. Keep in mind too that during the time that I graduated from high school [Dunbar Vocational High School; Dunbar Vocational Career Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois], it was only a few years before that that you could not have a prom in the Loop [Chicago, Illinois]. So those things were such that the disparities, the inequities, the prejudicial situations were such, were still perpetuated.$$Where was your prom?$$The prom that we had was on the North Side in a hotel that I, I, I can't recall but right on the lake [Lake Michigan].$$But it wasn't down, it was (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It was not downtown.$$--it was in an acceptable area?$$Yeah, right, on the Near North Side, right, uh-huh.$$So I'm sorry go ahead.$$No. But again, the riots were certainly a intimidating time and a time by which, you know, you recognized what was going on and you somewhat stayed close to home but the issue of the time though, I guess no one would ever condone that type of thing and certainly I wouldn't, but immediately afterwards there was change and you could see it. Not that it was a, a thing by which one could say tremendous progress was made but change was in the process of being made. In other words opportunities by Corporate America, you could see differences in terms of how they viewed the situation as far as opportunities were concerned and they were taking on minorities as a project to integrate the system.$Tell me about, if you don't mind, the situation with Highland Bank [Highland Community Bank, Chicago, Illinois] and Allstate [Allstate Corporation] with the redlining? Wasn't there a problem--$$Well--$$At--$$--insurance companies have been accused of redlining for a lot, a long number of years. And what that really means is that the companies have what has been described as unfair rules that not allows certain segments of the community to be insured. And that historically has been a problem. And the reconcilement of the problem today has been that they don't have these rules that you quote unquote, are out there, but they price you out. In other words, rather than to say there is a rule that will not allow a community to be insured, they will raise the price in that zip code by which you cannot afford or you will not pay, so indirectly they force you to make a decision as to whether you want to pay that price and stay with them or to get a, a better price and go to another suitor.$$And during this period though when there was a issue with Englewood [Chicago, Illinois], with the Englewood communities specifically, you were with Allstate as well as with the bank, so how did you, how did that, tell us a little bit about that?$$Well, with the bank that's the easy part in the sense that Highland is a black bank from the standpoint of ownership from the posture of Allstate, you don't make the rules, you interpret the rules and you work within the rules. So consequently one had to market the product that they put out there. The companies don't ask your opinion as to what you think about any situation. They explicitly describe what they have and under what circumstance they want to market this product. So, you know, you have two different hats. And when I'm in the banking industry have one hat, I'm in the insurance industry have on a different hat, so it, you, you separate the two and you move forward. And the issue is that you look for progress and accomplishments depending on what hat you have on.