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Curtis H. Tearte

Business executive and consultant Curtis H. Tearte was born on September 18, 1951 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Gwendolyn Tearte and Curtis Tearte Sr. Tearte graduated from South Philadelphia High School in 1969, and received his B.A degree in African and African American Studies from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts in 1973. He went on to earn his J.D. degree from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1978. Tearte also studied political science and international affairs at Howard University and the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School.

Tearte began his career in sales and marketing at International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) in 1979. From 2001 to 2004, Tearte served as the general manager of global public sector industries at IBM in Bethesda, Maryland. He was promoted to general manager of industry and systems growth initiatives in Somers, New York in 2005. In 2007, Tearte managed the sale of IBM Printing Systems to the Ricoh Company. Tearte became IBM’s worldwide general manager for the storage systems unit in 2009, where he led the sales team responsible for the success of IBM’s XIV disk system design. The following year, Tearte served as IBM’s managing director for the State of Georgia. In this role, he managed the largest infrastructure technology transformation in the United States, and oversaw the integration of IBM’s storage development and global sales teams. In 2012, Tearte and his wife, Jylla Moore Tearte, co-founded the Tearte Family Foundation, a nonprofit that provided scholarships, coaching, and mentoring to promising high school and college student. He served as its chief executive officer. In 2013, Tearte founded Tearte Associates, Inc., a firm that provided investment management and business consulting through the Tearte Family Foundation.

Tearte served on numerous boards, including the board of the University of Connecticut School of Law Foundation, the Brandeis Alumni Association board, as well as the board of trustees at Brandeis University, which he joined in 2014. Tearte also chaired the Southeast Advisory Committee of the Jackie Robinson Foundation.

Teatre is married to Jylla Moore Tearte. He has two daughters, Cherice Barr and Anjylla Foster.

Curtis H. Tearte was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.032

Sex

Male

Interview Date
3/6/2018
Last Name

Tearte

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Schools
South Philadelphia High School
Brandeis University
University of Connecticut School of Law

Howard University

First Name

Curtis

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

TEA02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Laguna Beach, California

Favorite Quote

You See Things And You Say Why? I Dream Things That Never Were And Say Why Not?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/18/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Favorite Food

Salmon and Grouper

Short Description

Business executive and consultant Curtis H. Tearte (1951 - ) was a senior executive at IBM for over thirty years, and the co-founder of the Tearte Family Foundation and Tearte Associates.

Employment
IBM
Tearte Family Foundation
Tearte Association Inc.
Favorite Color

Purple & Blue

Sheila Talton

Technology executive and entrepreneur Sheila G. Talton was born on October 12, 1952 in Cleveland, Ohio. As a teenager, she became involved in the civil rights movement in Rockford, Illinois. Talton went on to graduate from Northern Illinois University with her B.S. degree in business administration and speech communications in 1980

Upon graduation, Talton was hired as a sales trainee at NCR Corporation. She became head of Midwest sales for Data Group Systems in Chicago in 1982, moving on to a position as team leader in the sales department of Applied Data Research (ADR) in 1984. Taking advantage of a void left by the breakup of AT&T, Talton founded Unisource Network Services, a provider of voice, data and video networking consultation and support services, in 1987. In 1996, while still leading Unisource, she helped establish the Information Technology Senior Management Forum, a mentoring group that cultivates executive talent among African American IT professionals. Talton sold her stake in Unisource in 2000, and was hired as the vice president of Cap Gemini, Ernst & Young’s Midwest technology consulting practice. In 2002, she was named president of global business innovation services for Electronic Data Systems (EDS). Talton was hired by the computer networking company Cisco Systems Inc. in 2004 where she became vice president of advisory services in the Customer Advocacy Group. She was promoted to a role as vice president of Cisco’s Office of Globalization in 2008 and helped the company identify growth opportunities in emerging markets around the world. She left Cisco in 2012 to found the consulting firm SGT, Ltd. In 2013, Talton established Gray Matter Analytics, Inc., a business providing consulting services and cloud hosting service for analytics.

Talton has served as a member of the board of directors of the ACCO Brands Corporation, the Wintrust Financial Corporation, the Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Foundation, the Lighthouse for the Blind, and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her honors include selection as a Congressional appointee on the US White House Women’s Business Council, as one of the “Top 10 Women in Technology” by Enterprising Women, and as “Entrepreneur of the Year” by the National Federation of Black Women Business Owners. She is also a recipient of the “Entrepreneurial Excellence Award” from Working Woman magazine and a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award. She was named a 2007 “Woman Worth Watching” by Profiles in Diversity Journal, received a 2008 Egretha Award from the African American Women’s Business and Career Conference, and was named a 2009 Business Leader of Color by Chicago United. In 2010 she was honored as a Woman of Achievement by the Anti-Defamation League, and as the Outstanding College Alumni of the Year by the Business School of Northern Illinois University. In 2011 she was named one of “25 Influential Black Women in Business” by The Network Journal and received the “Diamond Leadership Award” from the Information Technology Senior Management Forum.

Sheila G. Talton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 23, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.216

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/23/2013

Last Name

Talton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Gayle

Schools

Harvard Business School

Northern Illinois University

West High School

Rock Valley College

Roosevelt-Perry Elementary School

Franklin School

First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

TAL01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Vail, Colorado

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/12/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Technology executive Sheila Talton (1952 - ) had extensive global operations experience as a business leader and entrepreneur in the information technology industry. She founded Gray Matter Analytics in 2013.

Employment

Gray Matter Analytics, Inc.

Sterling Partners

Sgt, LTD. (Sheila Talton, LTD.)

CISCO Systems

EDS

CAP Gemini Ernst & Young

Unisource Network Services

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheila Talton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton describes her mother's personality and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton talks about her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton lists her father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton recalls living in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sheila Talton remembers Perry Elementary School in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sheila Talton describes her home life in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Sheila Talton describes her home life in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Sheila Talton remembers the holidays

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes her family life in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes the Hough neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton recalls visits from her father after her parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton remembers moving to Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers the Franklin School in Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers her parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton talks about the African American community in Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers reconnecting with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton recalls her involvement in the Black Power movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton remembers her teenage years

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes her experiences at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about the Black Panther Party in Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton recalls her decision to attend Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers leaving Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers entering the secretarial workforce

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton recalls her return to Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers studying business administration at Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton describes her motivation for completing her college education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton remembers joining the NCR Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton recalls her decision to leave the NCR Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about her technological aptitude and training

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton describes her salesmanship skills

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers her role at Data Group Systems

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Applied Data Research

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers her prejudiced manager at Applied Data Research

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers founding Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes what she learned at Applied Data Research

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton remembers her divorce

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about her daughter

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton remembers running Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers leaving Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton describes her role at Ernst and Young

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers working at Ernst and Young

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton describes her civic involvement in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton recalls her transition from Capgemini SE to Electronic Data Systems

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton talks about the importance of community service

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton talks about her role as a mentor

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton remembers her second marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton remembers being hired at Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton recalls working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in China

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton talks about challenges for African Americans in Silicon Valley

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in Mexico

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in Brazil and Chile

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton talks about her interest in big data

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton remembers founding Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes the workplace culture at Sterling Partners

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes her business plan for Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton describes her hopes for Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her values

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton shares her advice to young people

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her parents' lessons

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$3

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
Sheila Talton remembers founding Gray Matter Analytics
Sheila Talton recalls her return to Northern Illinois University
Transcript
And when I went back out there I started looking around, who was investing in all the big data and then where the money was going, and it was pretty much going all in software; and I thought to myself, hm, that's probably not a good thing 'cause I think that there's an opportunity for the services piece, which is really more important because it's having the people that can read what the data's telling them. I ended up landing at a private equity firm here [Sterling Partners] that had not done a lot in technology but they said that they wanted to, and quite frankly, I believe because of the discrimination in those firms, I didn't have a lot of options. I mean, I wasn't getting firms, "Oh, yeah, Sheila [HistoryMaker Sheila Talton], come on in, come on in," but there was an African American principal at this firm and he wanted me to come into this firm. So I did. I joined the firm as, what they call an executive in residence, which means that, you're not making much money but you're looking to invest where you might end up running the new entity that they invested in. So, I wrote an investment thesis, spent about eight months doing that and I was becoming very, very bored and then I probably brought them about four different deals. They didn't like any of them.$$Right.$$And I went back out to California this past March and met with some old Cisco [Cisco Systems, Inc.] colleagues, met with some venture funds and told them all about this investment thesis I wrote and how I know that this is the sweet spot in big data, where there's a void. Consistently, I got asked, "So why aren't you launching the company?" I said, I don't know. Came back to Chicago [Illinois], thought about that, went skiing out in Vail [Colorado] with a couple of friends, talked to them about my investment thesis and they said, "So why aren't you launching it?" And I said, you know, I think I will. So, I came back to Chicago and started Gray Matter Analytics and we're nine people now, office in Silicon Valley, office in Chicago, thinking about whether we need one on the East Coast because right now our biggest customer is out there on the East Coast.$$Okay.$$I sit on a couple of public company boards and still on the Northwestern Memorial Hospital [Chicago, Illinois] board, Chicago Urban League board and the Shakespeare Theatre [Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Chicago, Illinois] board, so I've got a full life.$Then in, let's see, 1975, 1975, I met my husband--maybe '74 [1974]. And we were married and he was a machinist at a factory in Belvidere, Illinois and I was still working at the printing place, and then I became pregnant and I had my daughter. And when I had my daughter, life changed for me. I did not go back to work at the printing place, I went to work at a place called Allis-Chalmers [Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company], they manufactured forklifts and I was a clerk there. And my daughter was young, a baby, and there was a salesman there, first name Greg [ph.], I cannot think of his last name, white guy, and I had been working there for about, say maybe a year or so, and he says to me one day, he says, "Why are you working here?" And me being as militant as I am, I'm thinking, and why are you asking me that? And he said, "You're capable of so much more, why is it that you're a clerk here at this showroom?" And I said, "Well, I have to work, my husband works, we have a daughter." And he says, "Well, why didn't you go to college?" I said, "Oh, I did." I said, "That didn't work so well." He says, "What do you mean?" And I said, "Oh, I partied a lot, I was on academic probation." He says, "Why don't you go back?" I said, "Well they're not going to take me back." He says, "They would take you back." And I said, "What do you mean they would take me back?" He says, "Well, if you would go to a junior college and you take calculus and quantitative analysis, some really tough classes and ace those, they'd take you back at Northern [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois]." And I said, (makes sound), I said, "Well, you know, I've never been really good at math." He says, "Well, I'll tutor you." So I took his advice. I went and enrolled in classes at Rock Valley junior college [Rock Valley College, Rockford, Illinois] and he kept his word. I would go to his house, his wife and he, and he would tutor me. I ended up taking about, I don't know, twelve hours there and then I reapplied back at Northern. I had a young child at this time. They accepted me back. I quit that job. I got a loan and a scholarship, a grant from Sundstrand [Sundstrand Corporation; UTC Aerospace Systems], it was one of them where I had worked as a secretary, and I was on the dean's list every semester.$$Can we hold that for a minute 'cause you're, you're going to where I'm going to be in a few minutes, but let's back up just a hair. You ended up getting married in 1970--$$I think we got married, my daughter was born in '77 [1977], so we must have got married maybe in '74 [1974], '75 [1975].$$Okay, and your husband's name?$$Henry [Henry Talton].$$Henry, thank you, and your daughter's name?$$Shannel [Shannel Talton].$$Shannel, thank you. These are important details, I want to make sure I get them.$$Ex-husband.$$Ex-husband, okay, no, I can deal with then-husband, later on, ex-husband. And this salesman, I'm sorry, what was his name?$$Greg was his first name. I wish I, I actually wish I could find him, but Greg was his first name.$$All right, and he just, so he took you under, under his wing (unclear)?$$Right.$$He's white?$$Um-hm.

Victor McCrary

Chemist and education administrator Victor R. McCrary was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland and graduated from DeMatha Catholic High School in Hyattsville, Maryland in 1973. After receiving his B.A. degree in chemistry from The Catholic University of America in 1978, McCrary enrolled in Howard University and graduated with his Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry in 1985. He also earned his M.S. degree in engineering and technology management from the University of Pennsylvania in 1995.

In 1985, McCrary was hired as a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories where he conducted research on crystal growth of semiconductor lasers. From 1995 to 2003, he served as chief of the Convergent Information Systems Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). While there, McCrary headed the research & development program as well as the development of technical standards in areas such as biometrics, digital preservation, DVD reliability, digital TV, quantum communications, and electronic books. McCrary was employed at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) from 2003 to 2012. He was then appointed as vice president for Research and Economic Development at Morgan State University. In this position, McCrary was responsible for developing a comprehensive research strategy for Morgan State University and undertook such initiatives as encouraging cross disciplinary research, expanding the current base of external research programs, and developing opportunities to increase the University’s intellectual property portfolio.

McCrary has served as the chair and past-president for the Open Electronic Book Forum, an industry group dedicated to the development and promotion of standards for electronic books. He served on the advisory boards for several technology centers, including the Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials at the University of Puerto Rico and the Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing at the University of Massachusetts. McCrary organized the world’s first conference on electronic books in October 1998, and was elected national president of NOBCChE in 2007.

McCrary has received numerous awards, including the Gold Medal from the Department of Commerce, the Percy E. Julian Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE). In 2005, he was featured in Science Spectrum magazine as one of the Top 50 Minorities in Science; and, in 2007, McCrary was elected to the 2007 DVD Hall of Fame by the DVD Association. U.S. Black Engineer & Information Technology magazine selected McCrary as the “Scientist of the Year” in the Black Engineer of the Year Awards in 2011. McCrary is a member of the Library of Congress’ National Digital Strategy Advisory Board He is a Fellow of the African Science Institute and a lecturer in the University of Pennsylvania's Executive Masters of Technology Management program. Victor has authored or co-authored over 60 technical papers in refereed journals and co-edited two books.

Victor R. McCrary was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.218

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/5/2013 |and| 8/10/2013

Last Name

McCrary

Maker Category
Middle Name

Rex

Organizations
Schools

University of Pennsylvania

Catholic University of America

Howard University

First Name

Victor

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MCC15

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Those who fail to plan, plan to fail.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

5/16/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Technology executive Victor McCrary (1955 - ) served as vice president for Research and Economic Development at Morgan State University. In 1998, McCrary organized the world’s first conference on electronic books. He was elected national president of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) in 2007.

Employment

Morgan State University

Johns Hopkins University

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Bell Laboratories

Favorite Color

Green

Paul McDonald

Technology entrepreneur and technology executive Paul Gregory McDonald was born on February 23, 1949 in Chicago, Illinois to Josephine McDonald and Frederick Douglas McDonald, an evangelical minister. McDonald grew up in Chicago, down the street from his mentor, Major League Baseball Hall of Famer, Ernie Banks. McDonald attended Hirsch High School in Chicago, where he was heavily involved in Operation Breadbasket and became the business manager for the Young Pushers, an offshoot of Jesse Jackson’s Operation Push organization.

In 1967, McDonald graduated from Hirsch High School and was drafted by the Chicago Cubs. However, his baseball career was interrupted when he was drafted by the United States military. McDonald served in the Vietnam War as a television cameraman, flying over the country filming the terrain. Although he did not attend college, McDonald took management courses with Xerox, IBM, Minolta and Fidelity Union Life Insurance. With this experience, McDonald founded a series of companies aimed at researching infrastructure and systems development, including Creative Systems Business Development Foundation, The Pilot Business Corporation, Global Business Development Architects, Common Communications Commission, the Cooperative Sports Incubator and CyberPark, U.S.A. McDonald also led a partnership with downtown Los Angeles’ community development agencies in order to foster business development in the area. In 1991, McDonald founded Global Business Incubation, Inc. (GBI), and became its Chief Research Officer. The company was started as a joint venture with Loyola Marymount University to connect California businesses with technology and manufacturing opportunities. As Chief Research Officer, McDonald oversaw technology and multi-media infrastructure development. In 1993, GBI and Loyola Marymount joined the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences in creating an Advanced Manufacturing Science and Technology Center.

McDonald is also responsible for the Lou Myers Scenario Motion Picture Institute Theater, which helped 100 inner city youth apprentices in the building of a film studio. In 2000, McDonald received the White House Millennium Council Award for encouraging business development in Los Angeles.

Paul McDonald was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 19, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.151

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/19/2007

Last Name

McDonald

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Hirsch Metropolitan High School

Harvard Elementary School

Arthur J. Dixon Elementary School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Paul

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

MCD04

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

I'm Into Cooperating To Compete.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

2/23/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Black Chicken

Short Description

Technology entrepreneur and technology executive Paul McDonald (1949 - ) founded a series of companies aimed at researching infrastructure and systems development, including Creative Systems Business Development Foundation and The Pilot Business Corporation.

Employment

Creative Systems Business Development Foundation

Pilot Business Corporation

Global Business Development Architects

Cooperative Sports Incubator

Global Business Incubation, Inc.

CyperPark, USA

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:2403,35:3560,50:4361,61:7494,84:10938,139:14300,197:14956,206:15530,216:21230,302:24529,339:24924,345:25240,350:25635,357:28420,375:31540,481:33590,495:36772,536:40470,589:40798,594:51622,758:52032,764:59114,814:59630,821:59974,826:61952,862:62296,867:63070,879:69638,934:70665,951:71771,963:72798,980:73746,994:74141,1000:74457,1005:75405,1013:85696,1118:90934,1180:95900,1198:97264,1212:101375,1244:110360,1313:110680,1318:111160,1326:112440,1344:113080,1353:118440,1464:124760,1535:125490,1548:126804,1572:127096,1577:128994,1608:130381,1632:131403,1652:132790,1682:135970,1687:136516,1695:137062,1702:138609,1719:144652,1823:145182,1829:153841,1864:161870,1946:174635,2082:176690,2089:177346,2099:177838,2107:180298,2137:180790,2146:181610,2159:182348,2169:184640,2176:191136,2228:192984,2248:193572,2257:194244,2267:194664,2273:195336,2283:198816,2298:203330,2353:206569,2402:206885,2407:207359,2414:208939,2445:226624,2707:226888,2712:227548,2726:230910,2764:251748,3018:252178,3024:253554,3042:257682,3094:259488,3126:260176,3136:260606,3142:268530,3181:268906,3186:269658,3196:270504,3206:272854,3237:281950,3282:285070,3305:286390,3340:287030,3345$0,0:3870,52:4550,63:11010,144:19432,192:31002,358:32693,381:33583,393:39329,420:51021,548:55088,609:55669,618:66962,764:67406,771:67702,776:68886,796:70292,820:70810,828:74658,905:75916,926:76360,933:104720,1248:108630,1277:109206,1287:109854,1298:116489,1373:118193,1409:119187,1421:119471,1426:129630,1552:131482,1563:132698,1590:133594,1610:134490,1638:135194,1651:135962,1666:136410,1674:138586,1716:139930,1745:140890,1767:141338,1775:142170,1797:155810,1976:163410,2066:164710,2084:167410,2117:174086,2185:178750,2245:195000,2473:196615,2494:197720,2510:198230,2517:198825,2526:199590,2536:205820,2595:206140,2600:208200,2613:211140,2666:212330,2682:216740,2762:224442,2844:224778,2849:225702,2863:226374,2873:227046,2883:228726,2906:239780,3000:240632,3013:241271,3024:246490,3088:247190,3096:249901,3119:250565,3128:252059,3151:252474,3157:261106,3293:264970,3300:265340,3307:265710,3313:266006,3318:266376,3324:271240,3376
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Paul McDonald's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Paul McDonald lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Paul McDonald describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Paul McDonald describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Paul McDonald lists his siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Paul McDonald lists his siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Paul McDonald lists his siblings, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Paul McDonald describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Paul McDonald recalls the influence of Emmett Till's funeral

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Paul McDonald remembers meeting Ernie Banks

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Paul McDonald describes his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Paul McDonald describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Paul McDonald describes his father's work with the Chicago Daily Defender

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Paul McDonald remembers meeting Walt Disney

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Paul McDonald describes the Common Communications Commission, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Paul McDonald describes the Common Communications Commission, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Paul McDonald recalls an assignment at the Common Communications Commission

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Paul McDonald talks about his work in the music industry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Paul McDonald describes the business model for Global Business Incubation, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Paul McDonald talks about Global Business Incubation, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Paul McDonald describes the expansion of Global Business Incubation, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Paul McDonald reflects upon the black business community

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Paul McDonald talks about the Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood, California

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Paul McDonald talks about African American business leaders

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Paul McDonald describes his plans for the future of Global Business Incubation, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Paul McDonald talks about the founding of Global Business Incubation, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Paul McDonald remembers Harold K. Brown

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Paul McDonald talks about cooperative business models

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Paul McDonald talks about his wife and father

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Paul McDonald describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Paul McDonald remembers meeting Reverend Jesse L. Jackson and Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Paul McDonald recalls the influence of Emmett Till's funeral
Paul McDonald talks about his work in the music industry
Transcript
You were horrified at that funeral because of the sights and sounds of that period. Many of the people at that funeral, I'm sure, felt and expressed what you were feeling there. So, do you want to continue with that feeling or did you want to (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, I, I think, I think that, that feeling was as if for the first time that I didn't feel safe. When you have a mother [Josephine Harper McDonald] and father [Frederick McDonald, Sr.], especially older parents, they were like your incubator. They made sure that you felt good. Your brothers and sisters, being much older than yourself, they were like my surrogate parents, so I would go out with them and I felt safe and I think after that funeral and it seemed like there was a sense that it wasn't, I didn't understand color but the people that were speaking at the funeral seemed like they had no control over the destiny and I, I probably, actualized that maybe a few years later because I was so determined to fight that monster that I, I told my father that I wanted to be a minister. And so, I, I think I practiced at six years old that I was going to get up and I was going to, I was going to speak to the, the people at the church and I, they, I asked for some time to get up and preach. And they, I, I could remember moving from side to side and watching people's eyes and somehow it got exciting for me to get up there and talking. I don't know if I knew what I was talking about but I saw women, you know, shouting, I saw people falling on the ground and I decided that it was too much power. At that moment I said I would not be a minister because I could not understand that kind of power that just by saying some encouraging words, I had to do it, so at six I wanted to write about people. And so, my father gave me a journal to write about why do people, through other people, get excited when they say something that's inspirational. It doesn't mean that I really mean it but I can excite people with what I say to them and that scared me. I had a gift at that time that I could excite people about the future, about what we had to do and I would, I would try to transform myself into somebody who was a leader. And so, it became a challenge for me to learn as much as I could about who might be those people that did that to Emmett Till.$$So you could not express yourself there at that funeral but your, your father gave you a diary--$$Yes.$$--in which (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And a book to read.$$--and, okay.$$And the book had on it 1888--$$Okay.$$--and it was my [maternal] grandfather [Russell Harper], had written it and he had written it and he had written it in longhand and he had written it with symbols, with pictures, and was really easy to read because it would have a, a paragraph and then it would have a definition and then it would have a symbol or picture of it. And what he was doing was drawing a diagram of an institution. So, so he was the first one in 1888 got me to understanding that if we're going to win as a people, that we have to be institution builders and then, I guess, the balance came because I never really let on to, between six and ten, that there was something wrong out there that I saw our people experiencing. I, I couldn't, I had no dialogue on why I felt like there was a difference in the land.$So I, I became a promoter in, in the music industry when I was like fourteen and that's when I met Mr. Eddie Thomas, a HistoryMaker, and he was like somebody that I watched who founded Curtom Records with Curtis Mayfield and he had a studio, he had an institution. And so we would go into his institution and we worked with Leroy Hutson, who was part of his institution and it was powerful to create a product, see, see writers and see producers and see musicians, see singers, coming together to pull together a product and then to hear it on the radio as a finished product was a very exciting childhood in terms of starting as an entrepreneur as a young age in the music industry. So, it was, it was great. Got a chance to meet people like James Brown and, and people like that and do jingles with them and, and, and working behind the scenes and watching Eddie Thomas work behind the scenes at Curtom Records and how many people that he launched, millionaires that he launched in his career.$$Okay, though, so the institution became, at first, a part of the record promotion business, am I correct (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, when it, it first became, what does an institution looks like? What does an institution look like? How come people who have institutions solve the problem of community 'cause in our society, maybe the institution in our, in our life today is the church but outside the church, the only other institution that we really know about, besides education, is jail.$$Right.$$So we don't own the institution called, the bank, as a community. I'm not talking about there's a few people say you got a little ownership or something. I'm talking about in Davis, California, is one of our examples. They own the cable station, they own the grocery store. If you look at television, you see orange juice companies where they say they own the land, own the trees. So I studied Sunkist [Sunkist Growers, Inc.]. When I studied Sunkist, I saw sixty-five hundred farmers owning the company called, Sunkist. I saw Sunkist being an incubator or a corporation or an institution and I saw sixty-five hundred self-employee farmers who pooled their limited resources in terms of the ownership, the member ownership of Sunkist and when you see the cooperative industry and back in the day when I started studying it through, through the, through the college we set up [Common Communications Commission]. Cooperative, I saw that it was an interchangeable word that some government officials, when people tried to cooperate that way, they called it communism. So, sometimes when you said cooperation, they mis- they misread what you said and thought you said communism. There's a big difference in a cooperative and communism.$$Absolutely.$$One is a belief and the other is a methodology. So, I, I found that to be a subject matter that allowed me to travel to school to school and to, to be a spokesperson for why cooperation is different than communism. And so, I, I showcase different cooperatives around the world that was successful for its, for its community and that I thought that the black African American community should think about operating as a cooperative. So, so I put that into my hopper, so to speak, and, and that is one of the, the, what I call, pieces of the puzzle that I think that would change the future if we model and simulate it today.

Kenneth L. Coleman

Silicon Valley executive Kenneth Louis Coleman was born to Louis Boyd Coleman and Katie Owens Coleman on December 1, 1942 in Centralia, Illinois. Boyd was a factory worker and Katie a maid. Both parents strongly emphasized education. Coleman enjoyed sports at Lincoln Elementary School and at Centralia High School, where he was co-captain of the basketball team in his senior year. Coleman attended and graduated from The Ohio State University in 1965 with a BS in Industrial Management. Coleman’s part time student employment as a key punch and computer operator at the OSU Research Center led to an interest in computers. After graduation Coleman attended Officer’s Training School and was commissioned at Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. He went on to acquire his M.B.A. degree from The Ohio State University in 1972.

Coleman served in South Korea at the time of the Pueblo Crisis. While in Korea Lieutenant Coleman helped effectively defuse a potential race riot on the base. This led to an assignment to establish an Office for Affirmative Action and Drug Abuse Rehabilitation at Hamilton Air Force Base in Marin County, California. After separating as a Captain in 1972, Coleman was introduced to the Hewlett–Packard Company by Roy Clay (the first and only black mayor of Palo Alto, CA). At HP Coleman held several senior management positions, including a two year assignment in Northern Europe. In 1982, Coleman joined Activision, Inc., where he became Vice President of Product Development. Coleman joined Silicon Graphics (SGI) in 1987. During his fourteen years at Silicon Graphics, Coleman held several executive level positions. His last position at SGI was Executive Vice president of Sales, Services, and Marketing where he managed an organization with 4,000 employees in thirty-seven countries.

In 1999, Coleman was named one of the ten most influential African Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area, and in 2001, one of the top 25 Black executives in technology by Black Enterprise magazine. Retiring that same year, and after consultation with his friend and mentor Dr. Price Cobbs, Coleman founded and became CEO of ITM Software in Mountain View, California. Over the following 5 years Coleman was able to raise venture capital in ITM of a $20 million. It was important to Coleman that he make available the opportunity for African American investors to participate. Five years after its founding ITM was sold to BMC Software.

In 2006 Coleman was appointed chairman of Accelrys, Inc., scientific informatics software and services company for life sciences, chemical and materials R&D. Accelrys enables its customers to both accelerate their research process to more rapidly discover new therapeutics, materials and compounds; and to introduce new efficiencies into the process that drive lower costs.

In the spring of 2010 he was appointed to a special government advisory group on U.S./India Trade Policy. The Private Sector Advisory Group (PSAG) is an adjunct to the United States-India Trade Policy Forum (TPF) that provides strategic counsel to U.S. Trade Representative Ambassador Ron Kirk on enhancing bilateral trade and investment between the two nations.

Coleman is a member of the Boards of Directors of City National Bank, MIPS Technologies, and United Online. Coleman is also the recipient of numerous honors, including the Ohio State University Distinguished Service Award; the National Alliance of Black School Educators Living Legend Award; the American Leadership Forum of Silicon Valley Exemplary Leader Award; the One Hundred Black Men of Silicon Valley Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Silicon Valley Junior Achievement Business Hall of Fame.

Coleman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 13, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.135

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/13/2007

Last Name

Coleman

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Centralia High School

Lincoln School

The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University Max M. Fisher College of Business

First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

Centralia

HM ID

COL14

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Leaders Lead.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

12/1/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Altos

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Technology executive Kenneth L. Coleman (1942 - ) held positions at Activision, Inc., Silicon Graphics, Information Technology Management, Accelyrs, City National Bank, MIPS Technologies, and United Online.

Employment

The Hewlett Packard Company

Activision Publishing, Inc.

Silicon Graphics

ITM Software Corporation

Accelrys, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2945,105:5035,126:5985,138:9820,182:14950,255:22690,402:23500,416:25480,446:26020,461:27640,490:33862,522:40310,601:41990,629:46150,715:48310,774:53794,856:59380,938:59660,943:60080,950:69162,1117:69430,1122:69966,1134:87840,1529:91984,1576:95411,1602:96104,1612:98568,1666:103958,1795:104728,1808:107577,1883:107962,1889:117913,2013:120839,2066:124073,2127:124381,2132:125305,2144:127846,2226:139146,2319:140644,2374:153804,2484:159612,2614:160052,2628:171826,2811:180252,2856:180684,2863:180972,2868:183650,2882:183970,2887:187570,2961:204205,3217:204800,3225:207180,3273:208965,3295:212110,3341:212875,3352:227668,3583:228448,3594:231724,3665:232660,3685:233908,3707:239710,3742:239958,3747:241263,3755:243960,3800:244518,3808:249050,3848:255540,3907$0,0:1620,53:7454,142:7834,148:8366,156:15434,335:20526,437:29987,531:30332,537:32333,582:34679,615:35011,620:35758,630:37584,657:38165,667:52344,859:53096,868:54224,882:58830,1016:59300,1023:67577,1099:68241,1114:69901,1140:79098,1245:79554,1252:82214,1313:94936,1418:96388,1486:96982,1496:98038,1522:99886,1573:103985,1618:105685,1650:117738,1838:119560,1865
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth L. Coleman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his mother's upbringing in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his first experience of southern racism

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's upbringing in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his community in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his early responsibilities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the Lincoln School in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his academic success

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his transition to the integrated Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about segregation in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers Roland Burris

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the influence of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the entertainment of his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the athletics program at Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences of discrimination at Centralia High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his discriminatory history teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his early exposure to African American professionals

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls transferring to The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences at The Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his activities at The Ohio State University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers the events of the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his influences at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the African American community in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his decision to attend graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his program at The Ohio State University College of Administrative Science

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers being drafted into the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the racial discrimination in the U.S. military

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his experiences in the U.S. military

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his decision to leave the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls joining the Hewlett-Packard Company

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers Roy L. Clay, Sr.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences at the Hewlett-Packard Company

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his experiences of discrimination in Europe

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his work in the commercial computing industry

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers the HP 3000 computer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his parents' view of his success

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes lessons from his time at the Hewlett-Packard Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls joining Activision Publishing, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers joining Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers leaving Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls founding the ITM Software Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his corporate board membership

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the initial investments in the ITM Software Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his role at Accelrys, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his charitable work

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman shares his advice to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Kenneth L. Coleman narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the athletics program at Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois
Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his work in the commercial computing industry
Transcript
You played basketball for the high school [Centralia High School, Centralia, Illinois], right?$$Yeah, in high school I played basketball, football, I ran track for two years, played baseball for two years. And I was, I went from a town that's famous for basketball in Illinois, and it's historically has had, at least when I was. Prior to me and post me, had very good basketball teams, and I played four years of basketball and was captain my senior year in basketball. Our teams were, were, were not great teams. My junior year we had a good basketball team, but not great. The only other, the time I played, our football teams in Centralia [Illinois] the time I played were, were exceptional. When I was a junior we were ranked sixth in the nation as a high school football team by Parade magazine.$$Really, that's, that's, pretty good.$$Yeah, we were only one score, we're undefeated and the one score I think, in four years in high school football I only played in one losing football game. And so we had very good football, I was a guard in basketball, and I was a point guard in basketball, and I was a wide receiver in football. The year (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So you were on point guard on, on the basketball team, which is interesting.$$Yeah I was point guard in basketball.$$In an integrated basketball team.$$Yes, integrated basketball team, integrated football.$$So they must've really respected you, to--$$Yeah so it's really interesting I thought about this 'cause you see the reason people talk about it and, and I kind of knew this. In, in basketball there was this unwritten rule that now I understand that people kind of talked about it, but you didn't, it wasn't again, it wasn't, this image that was right here in your face. But you kind of knew it, and that was you know on a basketball team on the floor you tend to never have no more than three blacks at any one time. It was just kind of unwritten thing, but you, but you had blacks, but you couldn't win and winning mattered, okay. In football we just didn't have the numbers, so you would never you know have a chance of having more blacks than white on a football team at one time. We just didn't have enough numbers, it's a numbers game, but, but athletics was a very important part of my growing up. The ability to compete, the ability of teamwork, you know operating a team, the relationship with hard work and results really kept you out of trouble. So there were lots of good things happened for me as a kid being, being an athlete.$$I mean (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Highly, I highly recommend that young men and women be involved in sports. There are many lessons in life that are really important in being in--part of a sport and the things you might learn from that experience.$$Now were you close with your coach?$$Well we, it's a, was pretty much impossible in that environment to be close to coach where there was a feeling that coach was like God (laughter) okay. And so, so, so I was not what I consider, or I think any of the kids white or black, would be close to the coach. Now because I was quote, a good kid, that is I worked ca- I mean I was a successful athlete through hard work and through dedication and through a reasonably intelligent athlete, versus super skills, okay. And so I think coaches respect people who work hard, are coachable okay. They, you know they liked great athletes okay, but they respect I think people who kind of approach sports the way I became a good athlete through that. And when--so like I said I was captain of the basketball team and so I was a good athlete, very coachable and coaches liked and respected and would listen to you. But I wasn't close to them when I was in high school, closer after I became an adult actually with some of them. But again it was a very positive experience for me and my, and who I've become, no question.$So how long did you live in Europe?$$Two years.$$Two years, okay, all right. Now, what, what brought you back?$$Yeah I was scheduled to live there another couple years but HP [Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California] decided to create a business around the commercial computing business. And the person who became the general manager called me and said, "Would you come back and be on my management team?" And we help build HP first big billion dollar business the HP 3000 commercial computing business. And it was a, a great opportunity I was the third employee in that division and we built a business from zero to a billion dollars over, over five, six years. And so it, it was very important meaningful opportunity for me and a chance to do something important, and I was involved in that, and enjoyed it a lot.$$Now these are the days before personal computers and small computers and you, you had (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) These, this--$$--people.$$So yes, yes these are the days of the, we were a leader in the mini computer business. And so until that time the computing world had been dominated by two kinds of technology. One was well basically one technology, the mainframe computer, the big computers. And, and people connected terminals to big computers to do work, but all the processing was done in big computers and called mainframe. HP was a leader along with Digital Equipment Corporation and Data General [Data General Corporation] a few other companies were a leader in what was called midsize computers. In those days they were called mini computers, and they were smaller computers that could be used by departments rather than by the corporate headquarters or smaller companies who couldn't afford the big computers. And so the HP 3000 was a, a leader in that sort of computing and we help build that business for HP.