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Terisa Griffin

Singer Terisa Griffin was born on August 25, 1969 in Monroe, Louisiana. She graduated Wossman High School in Monroe, Louisiana and attended Northeastern Louisiana University in Monroe, Louisiana on a music scholarship where she studied operatic singing.

Griffin relocated to Chicago, Illinois and sang backup for Diana Ross on a telecast of The Oprah Winfrey Show. She also toured with R&B legend Jerry Butler. Griffin worked for various Chicago advertising agencies recording jingles for commercials. In 1997, Griffin established her own independent music company, My Naked Soul Productions where she wrote, produced and starred in a series of one-woman shows including: One Voice, One Woman, Fantasy-A Tribute to the Divas of Song and Stage: Josephine Baker, Lena Horne, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughn, Queens of R & B- A Tribute to the Queens of Rhythm and Blues: Dinah Washington, Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Donna Summers and Tina Turner, and Songs Divas – A Tribute to FamousSong.

In 1998, Griffin released her first album Songbird as an introduction of original and cover works showcasing her vocal skills. In 2002, she toured with Patti LaBelle and performed background vocals. That same year, Griffin produced and presented her one-woman show, One Woman. One Voice: A Musical Tribute to the Queens of Song. She also produced and presented Fantasy: The Divas of Song and Stage, a tribute to Josephine Baker, Eartha Kitt, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Lena Horne. Griffin debuted her first full-length release, My Naked Soul showcasing her talents as a songwriter and producer. In 2007, Griffin established the nonprofit organization, Better Love Yourself, Inc. and served as its CEO and president. In 2011, Griffin provided the title song and appeared in the independent short film The Truth, directed by Hill Harper. She also released her sophomore double-disc, Soulzophrenic ‘Personalities of Soul' R&B and Dance releases. In 2012, Terisa Griffin auditioned for the NBC television reality series The Voice with a performance of Adele’s Someone Like You where she was selected as a contestant on NBC’s The Voice Season 3. In 2015, Griffin made Billboard Charts with her CD Revival of Soul which peaked at #33 on August 27, 2016. In 2016, Griffin and Better Love Yourself, Inc. celebrated ten years of service.

Terisa Griffin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 11, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.142

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2018

Last Name

Griffin

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Terisa

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

GRI12

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

Better Love Yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/25/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Pork Chops, Rice, Gravy

Short Description

Singer Terisa Griffin (1969- ) has recorded numerous commercial jingles for popular brands and toured with music legends Jerry Butler and Patti LaBelle. She established My Naked Soul Productions, as owner and president in 1997.

Favorite Color

Pink

Cal Williams

Community activist Cal Williams was born on November 30, 1941 in Monroe, Louisiana. A college graduate, Williams served in Vietnam in the United States Air Force during the early 1960s and participated in the historic March on Washington and was affiliated with the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). In 1965, he moved from Louisiana to Alaska, seeking job opportunities, racial integration and a better life. In Alaska, Williams continued his political and civic activism working with the AdHoc Democrats organization in Alaska. He was named President of the Alaska Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He also served as a member of the Alaska Delegation at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. In 2012, Williams ran for the Alaska House of Representatives District 17-serving the communities of Mountain View, Airport Heights, and Russian Jack in the Anchorage area, and was defeated by opponent Geran Tarr in the August 28th Democratic primary. Williams served as the Filipino choir director at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, and also as the Chappie James American Legion Post 34 chaplain in Anchorage. He worked as a photographer and also helped to exhibit the collection of the late Alaskan historian George Harper, who documented the history of African Americans in Alaska, including the black U.S. Army troops who worked on the Alaska Highway. Williams was elected to the board of directors for Anchorage Senior Activity Center in 2016.

Williams was named in the Anchorage Municipal Assembly for his contributions to the growth and strength to the State of Alaska. In 2017, Williams was the recipient of the St. Francis of Assisi Award. Williams has served as Grand Knight of the Council of Knights of Columbus at St. Patrick's Church in Anchorage, as well as in 2018, he served as the District 22 chair for the Alaska Democratic Party.

Cal Williams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 19, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.097

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/19/2018

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Grambling State University

University of California, Los Angeles

Los Angeles City College

First Name

Cal

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

WIL84

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans

Favorite Quote

That's What I'm Trying To Tell You

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alaska

Birth Date

11/30/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Anchorage

Favorite Food

Cat fish

Short Description

Community activist Cal Williams (1941- ) named chair of the Alaska Democratic Party District 22 in 2018, had served as President of the Alaska Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Employment

Municipality of Anchorage

Alaska Housing

State Farm Insurance

Favorite Color

Yellow

Christine Darden

Aerospace engineer and mathematician Christine M. Darden was born on September 10, 1942 in Monroe, North Carolina. Darden was the youngest of five children born to Noah Horace Sr., an insurance agent, and Desma Chaney Mann, an elementary school teacher. Darden attended Winchester Avenue High School and then transferred to Allen High School, a Methodist boarding school (formerly the Allen School for Negro Girls), in Asheville, North Carolina. She graduated from Allen High School in 1958 as the class valedictorian and received a scholarship to attend Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute. In 1962, Darden received her B.S. degree in mathematics education and her teaching certification from Hampton Institute. She went on to earn her M.S. degree in applied mathematics from Virginia State College in 1967, and her D.Sc. degree in mechanical engineering with a specialty in fluid mechanics from George Washington University in 1983.

From 1962 to 1963, Darden was a mathematics instructor at Russell High School in Lawrenceville, Virginia. She continued teaching at Norcom High School in Portsmouth from 1964 to 1965. After completing her M.S. degree program, Darden became a data analyst for NASA at its Langley Research Center. In 1973, Darden was promoted to the position of aerospace engineer; and, in 1989, she was appointed as the technical leader of NASA’s Sonic Boom Group of the Vehicle Integration Branch of the High Speed Research Program where she was responsible for developing the sonic boom research program internally at NASA. She also maintained partnerships with and led an advisory team composed of representatives from industrial manufacturers and academic institutions. In October of 1994, Darden became the deputy program manager of The TU-144 Experiments Program, an element of NASA’s High Speed Research Program; and, in 1999, she was appointed as the director in the Program Management Office of the Aerospace Performing Center at Langley Research Center where she was responsible for Langley research in air traffic management and other aeronautics programs managed at other NASA Centers. In addition, Darden served as technical consultant on numerous government and private projects, and she is the author of more than fifty publications in the field of high lift wing design in supersonic flow, flap design, sonic boom prediction, and sonic boom minimization.

Darden received the Dr. A. T. Weathers Technical Achievement Award from the National Technical Association in 1985. She was awarded the Senior Executive Career Development Fellowship from Simmons College in 1994. NASA recognized Darden with the Certificate of Outstanding Performance ten times between 1973 and 2003. Not only has Darden received the NASA medals for equal opportunity and for achievement in leading the sonic boom program, she is also the recipient of the 1987 Candace Award for Science and Technology from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, and the 1988 Black Engineer of the Year Award from the publishers of U.S. Black Engineer & Technology magazine.

Aerospace engineer and mathematician Christine M. Darden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 26, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.045

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/26/2013

Last Name

Darden

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Hampton University

Virginia State University

George Washington University

Simmons College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Christine

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

DAR06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mountains

Favorite Quote

All things work together for the good of those that love the Lord and are called according to his purpose.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

9/10/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hampton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Jambalaya, Vegetables, Greens, Salads

Short Description

Aerospace engineer Christine Darden (1942 - ) former Director of the Aerospace Performing Center Program Office at NASA’s Langley Research Center, conducted research in sonic boom minimization and led the development of the national sonic boom program for much of her career.

Employment

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center

Favorite Color

Green

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Christine Darden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Christine Darden lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Christine Darden talks about her mother's growing up and her education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Christine Darden describes her father's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Christine Darden describes her father's family background - part two

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Christine Darden talks about her parents attending Knoxville Academy and Knoxville College

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Christine Darden talks about her parents' employment as teachers in Georgia in the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks her parents dating in Knoxville College

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Christine Darden talks about her family's life near Charlotte, North Carolina in the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Christine Darden describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Christine Darden talks about her siblings and their families, and her mother finding her runaway brother in 1947

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Christine Darden talks about her family reunions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Christine Darden talks about her childhood household and the house where she grew up in Monroe, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Christine Darden talks about her parents building a new home in Monroe, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Christine Darden talks about growing up during segregation in Monroe, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Christine Darden talks about starting the second grade at the age of five

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Christine Darden talks about her family's emphasis on the importance of education and her interests as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Christine Darden describes her experience in school in Monroe, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks about attending Allen High School in Asheville, North Carolina, her interest in mathematics, and her math teacher, Ruth Walther

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Christine Darden describes her experience in boarding school at Allen High School in Asheville, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Christine Darden describes her decision to attend Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Christine Darden describes her experience at Hampton University, and her interest in the physical sciences

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Christine Darden talks about her education at Hampton University - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Christine Darden talks about her education at Hampton University - part two

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks about graduating from Hampton University, and her first job

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Christine Darden talks about meeting her husband, Walter Darden, and taking math classes at Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Christine Darden talks about starting studies for her master's degree in aerosol physics and taking math courses at Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Christine Darden describes her master's thesis on calculating light scattering, and her early experience using computers

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Christine Darden describes her experience at Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Christine Darden talks about being recruited to work at NASA's Langley Research Center in 1967

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Christine Darden describes her relationship with HistoryMaker Katherine Johnson

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Christine Darden talks about NASA's "West Computers," and segregation at NASA in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Christine Darden describes her early experience at NASA's Langley Research Center in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks about how she got her first promotion at NASA's Langley Research Center, and her early work on the sonic boom problem

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Christine Darden describes the sonic boom problem - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Christine Darden describes the sonic boom problem - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Christine Darden talks about the Tu-144 supersonic airliners

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Christine Darden talks about the Concorde supersonic airliners

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Christine Darden describes her work on the sonic boom problem - part one

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Christine Darden describes her work on the sonic boom problem - part two

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Christine Darden talks about the collaborative nature of the work on the sonic boom problem

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Christine Darden describes her Ph.D. dissertation at George Washington University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Christine Darden talks about well known mathematicians who worked on the sonic boom problem

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Christine Darden talks about her colleagues at NASA's Langley Research Center

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Christine Darden describes her service and leadership roles at NASA's Langley Research Center

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Christine Darden describes her leadership in the Presbyterian Church, and how it applied to her career at NASA's Langley Research Center

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Christine Darden talks about becoming the director of strategic communications and education at NASA's Langley Research Center

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Christine Darden shares her perspectives on NASA and the problems with funding

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Christine Darden reflects upon her life and career as well as the politics of science

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Christine Darden describes her concerns for the African American community and for the current American educational system

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Christine Darden talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Christine Darden talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Christine Darden describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$8

DATitle
Christine Darden describes her experience in boarding school at Allen High School in Asheville, North Carolina
Christine Darden talks about being recruited to work at NASA's Langley Research Center in 1967
Transcript
Now Asheville [North Carolina] is certainly a beautiful part the country.$$It's a beautiful part of the country and I think that's why I am partial to mountains instead of the seashore. I do like mountains. Our dormitory [Allen High School, Asheville] used to look out at some of the mountains right there by Asheville right outside our window. We used to go on picnics up in the mountains; we always took the ride on Blue Ridge Parkway in the fall. We would go to Chimney Rock, we would actually have cookouts in the water on rocks in the water. We would have cookouts and so we did a lot of things in the mountains; lot of picnics and things in the mountains which just leaves me with very fond memories. We of course went to Cherokee [North Carolina] which is right near there. I had a lot of great times. They would convert the dormitory into a haunted house at Halloween and then we would go on a scavenger hunt in that whole area of town. I guess one of the benefits for me was everybody had the same rules. So everybody had the same rules and the only time they made an exception for me my senior year--you had to be fifteen when you came there in September to be able to have male company on Sunday afternoon and I was not fifteen when I went back because my birthday is in September. So I wasn't quite fifteen yet. So they made the exception for me to take company my senior year when I went there. But it eased the burden on my parents [Desma Cheney Mann and Noah Horace Mann, Sr.] because now all my classmates had the same rules; they would have dances but they would screen, they would have certain people from the high school there Stephens-Lee [High School]--.$$They would chaperone them.$$They chaperone them, they would know who was on the guest list. They would invite certain young men to the dances; they would walk us across the street to the dances and on Friday nights they would take us to a football game or to the drugstore and things like that. So everybody did the same thing, and so I didn't have that same, you know, "Everybody else is doing it. Why can't I do it?" And that took the load off my parents. But I was homesick, I was extremely homesick. I think I cried every day for a semester. One day I decided I wasn't going to school. I said we all had duty work, we also had to clean our room every morning we had to go through inspection for dress going to school. I did everything I had to do and then I went back to my room and sat down. And by the time they checked roll in school and found out I wasn't there and they checked the infirmary and found out I wasn't sick, one of the dorm counselors came and said, "Well the principal wants to see you." So I went to the principal's office, and she told me I was just messing up a perfectly good record and you know she started crying and she had me crying and you know, "Is your father coming for you?" I said, "Well no my father doesn't know anything about this." So I guess that was the crisis and I got through that semester and Mother told me much later after I had probably finished college that she had decided that she was going to let me come home at the end of the first semester. The first semester was in January then, but she said when the first semester ended I called her and I said, "Send me some money, I want to buy a new dress because we are having a dance Saturday night." And she said I never mentioned coming home, and she said she never mentioned it and that was the end of that and so from then on everything was great. I guess it was a hard lesson on me but it was probably one of the best lessons for me, you know, to stay at that school and go through that hardship and realize being able to go to the County Fair at the end of September was not the most important thing in my life which I was missing, you know, I wanted to go the County Fair. I was missing that but I think I had exposure in some things perhaps that--I certainly gained some independence at that school and study habits. We had study hall every night; we had sports and whatever activities in the afternoon and then went back for another hour and a half after dinner for study hall. We had duty work that seniors always had; we had family style eating in the cafeteria. We always had to take a turn serving the teachers, serving the table we sat at. So there was some discipline involved in getting those things done and doing those things; in cleaning the bathrooms, in cleaning a teacher's room; we all had to do those things. So I think that was probably good for me. But the discipline of studying and getting my work done I think served me well when I went to college because I would get my work done and I would have it done before dinner every day.$$Okay. Now what level of math did they teach?$$Did I teach?$$No did you get when you were in--(simultaneous) (unclear).$$Okay at Allen there was nothing but geometry. They didn't teach anything higher than that. So I didn't have anything higher than plain geometry.$And so it was when I finished my master's at Virginia State [College, now Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia]--$$So this was 1967?$$I finished in '67 [1967] and I went to the placement office. By that time, my husband [Walter Darden] had gone back to [I.C.] Norcom [High School, Portsmouth, Virginia] to teach. So I applied at--I went to the placement office I was thinking of applying at Norfolk State [University, Norfolk, Virginia] and at Hampton University [Hampton, Virginia] because I actually did some teaching while I was at Virginia State too. But I went to the placement office and they said we wish you'd been here yesterday because NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] was here interviewing and so she gave me the standard SF 171 government application and told me to fill it out and bring it back the next day, which I did. She sent that down to whoever had been here during the interviewing and I got an offer from NASA to come. When I went to NASA and you know, of course, that was at Hampton [Virginia], I guess I knew NASA [Langley Research Center] was at Hampton and I remember parades with the original astronauts and everything but they didn't have much of any interface with Hampton [University] or anything, you know, like so many of the universities now actually work and send interns and things like that over there and there was not very much interface with NASA.$$(Unclear)--which is different today.$$Very different so--I got to NASA and I was assigned to what they called a computer pool and that was--as I said, they still didn't--programming was just getting in. When I went to this computer pool, I was given a Friden mechanical, not even an electronic machine, a mechanical Friden which had a carriage about so long and you sat there and that carriage would move back and forth and everything. And, so, I learned how to do the Friden and I guess--this office was a support office for the engineers on the floor. And so there were no computers to do their plots so when they did papers and they had to do plots you had to do these plots and so you had all of these French curves and you learned how to do the plots. And there was a lady sitting there with a Leroy machine, I didn't even know what she was doing for days. She would just sit there all day doing something; but she was actually doing the lettering for the plots and everything that would go in their papers.

Trachette Jackson

Mathematician and professor of mathematics Trachette Jackson was born on July 24, 1972. She attended a large public high school and spent her summers at a math-science honors program hosted by Arizona State University where she developed her passion for mathematics. Jackson was an excellent student and graduated in the top twenty of her class. In 1994, she received her B.S. degree in mathematics from Arizona State University. Jackson earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington in 1996 and 1998, respectively. Her Ph.D. thesis was entitled “Mathematical Models in Two-Step Cancer Chemotherapy.” She completed postdoctoral positions with the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications at the University of Minnesota, and at Duke University.

In 2000, Jackson joined the faculty at the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in the mathematics department. She was promoted to associate professor in 2003. In 2006, Jackson was appointed as the co-principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded University of Michigan SUBMERGE (Supplying Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics Education Research Group Experiences) program. SUBMERGE is an interdisciplinary program in math and biology that exposes undergraduates to experimental biology within mathematical modeling and gives exposure to quantitative analysis in biology courses. In 2008, she became a full professor in Michigan’s mathematics department. Jackson is the co-founder, and is the co-director, of the the Mathematics Biology Research Group (MBRG). The group organizes lectures, conferences, and workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, among other activities. The main focus of her research in mathematical oncology is combining mathematical modeling and in vivo tumor vascularization to gain deeper understanding of tumor growth and the vascular structure of molecular, cellular and tissue levels.

Jackson has published numerous papers on the subject of mathematical oncology and her work has received international attention. In 2008, Jackson served as senior editor for the academic journal, Cancer Research, and has reviewed articles for the Journal of Mathematical Biology and the National Academy of Sciences. Jackson has received many awards including the Blackwell Tapia Award (2010) and the Arizona State University's Medallion of Merit Award. Trachette Jackson is married to Patrick Nelson and they have two sons, Joshua and Noah.

Trachette Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on 10/22/2012.

Accession Number

A2012.184

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/22/2012

Last Name

Jackson

Middle Name

Levon

Schools

Arizona State University

University of Washington

Mesa High School

Powell Junior High School

First Name

Trachette

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

JAC31

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

No matter how far the river flows, it never forgets it's source.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

7/24/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Ann Arbor

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Southern Food

Short Description

Mathematician and math professor Trachette Jackson (1972 - ) , is the co-founder and co-director of the Mathematics Biology Research Group at the University of Michigan.

Employment

University of Michigan

Duke University

National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory

University of Minnesota

University of Washington, Department of Applied Mathematics

Arizona State University

Favorite Color

Mauve, Deep Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:1732,18:4548,51:4988,57:6044,70:9330,98:10030,109:10800,122:12410,147:12830,154:13110,159:13670,168:16190,214:16470,219:16820,226:17590,240:18640,257:19130,265:19480,271:20180,282:23400,341:23750,350:24310,359:24870,369:25990,392:31103,410:31607,419:31859,424:32174,430:32867,444:34316,469:34757,478:36647,510:36899,515:38474,534:39923,562:40427,571:40742,577:42317,614:42758,623:43325,633:43955,644:48650,669:49980,681:50455,687:55788,731:56244,738:57612,760:58220,770:58676,778:61994,796:62378,804:64874,847:65258,854:68010,898:68522,907:69098,919:69738,931:70186,940:70954,954:71210,959:71594,967:72362,984:73002,998:73450,1008:73770,1014:74026,1019:74282,1024:76394,1069:77162,1084:77418,1089:77738,1095:79978,1144:80298,1150:81258,1172:81770,1181:83626,1220:84778,1242:85226,1250:85994,1266:91340,1272:93550,1302:99326,1368:109070,1482:109478,1489:109750,1494:110770,1511:111858,1533:112266,1540:112538,1545:113286,1559:113558,1564:114170,1574:118046,1657:118318,1662:118794,1671:125008,1729:125470,1737:126394,1754:127252,1770:127714,1778:128176,1786:129430,1807:131740,1861:132136,1869:133390,1900:133654,1905:134314,1917:135568,1957:136030,1966:137350,2001:141478,2019:141790,2024:142804,2043:143818,2056:144520,2066:145222,2086:147172,2115:151870,2123:157275,2172:166890,2318:168150,2336:168600,2343:169050,2349:173016,2377:173808,2389:175248,2411:176616,2436:177048,2443:178200,2464:178704,2474:179280,2483:185328,2577:186192,2590:186480,2595:187704,2613:188208,2623:193451,2645:194035,2654:194546,2662:195057,2670:195714,2681:196371,2691:196809,2698:197539,2722:198488,2737:198853,2749:199218,2756:199948,2769:200751,2782:206502,2823:206940,2830:207597,2841:208108,2862:208911,2874:209276,2880:209641,2886:210079,2893:211174,2913:211539,2919:212196,2929:212488,2934:212999,2943:213729,2955:214605,2968:215481,2984:215919,2992:218328,3023:222268,3046:222560,3051:223947,3075:227232,3126:227670,3133:231242,3177:231647,3183:232538,3198:234887,3254:238289,3317:238613,3322:239099,3330:239828,3340:240233,3347:242096,3370:242825,3382:243797,3395:251122,3454:253268,3481:254452,3496:255118,3508:255858,3519:257116,3551:257412,3556:259262,3585:260816,3613:261260,3620:261926,3630:262222,3635:262518,3640:265540,3647:266222,3660:267152,3679:267462,3685:267896,3694:268330,3702:268826,3711:269074,3716:269446,3723:270314,3743:270562,3748:270934,3755:273010,3770:273310,3776:275470,3812:275710,3817:275950,3822:276430,3831:276730,3837:277210,3846:277450,3851:277930,3864:278410,3873:278830,3882:281710,3940:282310,3955:283690,3989:283990,3995:284350,4002:285370,4025:285730,4032:286030,4038:286870,4056:287530,4072:287830,4078:292737,4095:293021,4100:293305,4105:295435,4134:296074,4145:296571,4153:298559,4188:299411,4203:300121,4209:300831,4222:302038,4242:302393,4248:302819,4253:303174,4259:303884,4273:304239,4279:304523,4284:305233,4295:305730,4303:306014,4308:306298,4313:306795,4322:307150,4328:311630,4345:313310,4372:313660,4379:315340,4400:315760,4408:316040,4413:316320,4418:318000,4451:318630,4462:319190,4471:321010,4505:321920,4523:322480,4533:323040,4544:323530,4554:325490,4589:325910,4596:326190,4601:327240,4620:328780,4650:329340,4659:329620,4664:330390,4684:332280,4721:333680,4751:334240,4764:335080,4777:337530,4807:347780,4850:348428,4862:349076,4871:349400,4876:350048,4886:352073,4925:352478,4931:353693,4950:354179,4958:354665,4966:359076,4976:360079,4992:360669,5003:361318,5017:363914,5081:364386,5091:364622,5096:365035,5105:365566,5115:367041,5141:367277,5146:369047,5191:370168,5218:370463,5224:370876,5233:371230,5240:372764,5289:373000,5294:373649,5306:377520,5312:377885,5318:378396,5327:379783,5358:380367,5369:381462,5386:389988,5446:391044,5455:404680,5565$0,0:4922,42:5618,51:6227,59:7097,70:14514,282:14949,288:15819,300:16689,312:18516,340:22810,359:23066,364:23322,369:23642,375:25306,409:26138,423:27098,445:27546,453:28378,467:31258,528:31514,533:32986,560:33690,573:34138,581:34394,586:36506,631:37338,646:38554,668:39258,681:40026,694:45053,717:45605,726:45881,731:46157,736:46502,742:47192,753:48158,773:48848,785:50228,796:50918,804:53402,855:53816,863:54299,880:54575,885:55127,894:55403,899:56369,915:56921,924:57197,929:57680,937:58232,947:58784,952:59267,960:59543,965:60509,981:60992,989:61268,994:63890,1047:64649,1060:69919,1072:70795,1084:71525,1096:72182,1106:73496,1126:73934,1137:74810,1159:75394,1168:78022,1230:78679,1245:79117,1253:79409,1258:79774,1264:80066,1269:80723,1279:81891,1299:82183,1304:84300,1338:85395,1358:85687,1363:86563,1375:105766,1561:106086,1567:107174,1584:108262,1604:108902,1616:109158,1621:109542,1628:109926,1635:110566,1648:111142,1659:111654,1675:112358,1694:112806,1702:113062,1707:114662,1731:114982,1737:115302,1743:115750,1748:116006,1753:116646,1764:119206,1783:119590,1791:120678,1808:121126,1816:121510,1834:122470,1852:122918,1860:123494,1871:123750,1876:124006,1881:124262,1886:124774,1895:131014,1911:131476,1919:132730,1941:135568,1989:136756,2002:138208,2025:138538,2031:138802,2036:140848,2079:144410,2087
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Trachette Jackson slates the interview and shares her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Trachette Jackson talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Trachette Jackson talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Trachette Jackson talks about her parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Trachette Jackson talks about her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Trachette Jackson talks about her experiences growing up with her family who moved a lot

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Trachette Jackson talks about growing up in Italy

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Trachette Jackson talks about her teenage years and academic interests

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Trachette Jackson shares her experience as a minority in the academic setting

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Trachette Jackson talks about her high school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Trachette Jackson talks about her experience at Arizona State University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Trachette Jackson talks about her college experience

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Trachette Jackson talks about her graduate school experience

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Trachette Jackson talks about her doctoral research at the University of Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Trachette Jackson talks about her husband, son and her post-doctoral experience at the University of Minnesota

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Trachette Jackson talks about her post-doctoral research at Duke University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Trachette Jackson talks about her career at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Trachette Jackson talks about the focus of her career research

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Trachette Jackson describes how she spends her work day

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Trachette Jackson talks about the SUBMERGE Program at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Trachette Jackson talks about her CCMB Pilot Grant funding

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Trachette Jackson talks about the SIAM association and her professional activities

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Trachette Jackson talks about her professional activities and reflects on her career

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Trachette Jackson reflects on the impact of her career and talks about her hopes and concerns for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Trachette Jackson talks about her family and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Trachette Jackson talks about her doctoral research at the University of Washington
Trachette Jackson talks about the SUBMERGE Program at the University of Michigan
Transcript
Okay. Now I hear that you published a paper, your first professional publication, in 1997 called Population Dynamics and Competition in Chemostat Models with Adaptive Nutrient Uptake.$$Yeah, yeah. So this is the work that I started as an undergraduate at Arizona State University with Betty Tang, and it was sort of looking at a chemostat model of bacteria which was designed to, you know, look at-- sort of resemble what would happen in the stomach or in the gut in terms of bacteria uptake. And so we did some different nutrient applications to see how the bacteria would survive and how they would thrive if they had different conditions within that setting, and that was my first publication.$$Okay. So were you then--like you're measuring the--you're trying to come up with a--I guess a rate of growth of bacteria?$$Right. So one of the inputs into the model is how bacteria--the rate of bacteria growth, but there's all kinds of influences on that rate of growth. And one thing is, you know, the space they have available, the amount of nutrients they have available, how many other bacteria are around them, so competition--all of these things feed into that eventual growth rate. And so we were track and time the population's changes based on all of these influences on how the rate of change is affected.$$Okay. Okay. I know I've heard it said that some of these modern anti-bacterial applica--sprays and--(simultaneous)$$--and so (unclear) and all of--$$--yeah, create more space by killing general bacteria off, create more space for the more resistant bacteria --(simultaneous)$$--that's actually--it is true. So definitely they're a good thing to have, you know, these anti-bacteria's, but not to be used without caution I guess, because you are killing general bacteria and not all bacteria is bad. There are some good bacteria's that even in your stomach, in the lining of your stomach and intestines, some of the bacteria that's there is good. So you don't wanna kill off everything. It's just certain bacteria's that are the dangerous ones that you don't need in your system.$$Right, right. Okay, so I guess--you finished your PhD and your work in '97' [1997]? Is that true?$$Ah, '98' [1998]. I got my PhD in '98' [1998].$$--(simultaneous) '98' [1998]? Okay. And tell us about your dissertation. We have a title here. I guess--this is the Theoretical Analysis of Conjugate Localization in Two-Step Cancer Chemotherapy, with a brief yet detailed description of how tumors can form an afflicted--in an afflicted person's body.$$Yeah. So my dissertation came about in actually kind of a strange way. I was a graduate student looking around for different topics that I thought would be interesting to work on. I knew I wanted to do something in cancer, and so I went and researched and looked around the Seattle [Washington] area to see who's doing cancer chemotherapy, who's doing something that might be amenable to mathematical modeling, and I found a group at a bio--pharmaceutical company, I guess. And they were sort of developing these new drugs, a new drug targeting strategy for cancer chemotherapy, and they came in and the lead guy's name was Peter Center. He came in and gave a talk in our Applied Math department, and immediately I knew, based on what he had said, that this is something that I thought I could use my skills as a mathematical model or mathematician, to sort of address. So we started collaborating on trying to figure out the best way to administer these targeting strategies. So what these are is--so traditional chemotherapy, you know, you inject some drug into your body. This drug is supposed to act on cells that are rapidly dividing like cancer cells would be, but they cannot distinguish if those cells that are rapidly dividing are your hair cells or other cells in your body. So it destroys cells in general. The idea behind the mechanisms of the therapies they wanted to give were to target--sort of this magic bullet idea, of targeting the cancer cells specifically, and leaving all the other cells alone. So what they wanted to do was give--first inject the patient with a pro drug, a drug that's not harmful to any other cells in the body, but that drug would find tumor cells. So it would bind particular markers that only exist on tumor cells. And then they would give an enzyme, again, completely non-toxic enzyme, that only when it found the pro drug would catalyze a reaction that made a drug. So the idea is that the pro drug finds the cancer and marks it, highlights it in red, and then the enzyme goes directly there and only there does it catalyze a reaction that makes drug. So you make drug at a tumor site instead of injecting drug throughout the body. So we developed an extensive set of equations to model the delivery of these to anti-cancer agents, the reaction that makes the drug, the binding and targeting of the tumor cells, and we were able to come up with some special optimal situations where you get more drug created in the tumor than you do in the blood, and we could say what kinds of treatment strategies, you know, how much should you give, how long should you wait to give the next dose, all of those kinds of things based on these mathematical models. So we could make predictions about those kinds of things. So that was kinda the crux of my dissertation was modeling this new therapy for cancer.$$Okay. Okay. So you received your PhD in 1998, right?$$Em hm.$$And now, did you do a--your advisor was James Murray?$$He was, he was, yeah.$Okay. Okay. Now in 2006, you received a National Science Foundation grant for University of Michigan SUBMERGE Program.$$Yeah.$$Can you tell us what SUBMERGE [Supplying Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics Education and Research Group Experience] is about?$$Yeah. So SUBMERGE is about merging the subjects of mathematics and biology for undergraduates and this came about because of, you know, my love for undergraduate education and I'd had several undergraduate students who'd worked with me over the summers who were very very good. And I just wanted a mechanism to support more students in this way, give more students the opportunity to really get a hands-on knowledge of mathematical biology early on. So, together with some other faculty on campus, we put in a proposal to have a--to develop research groups of undergraduates where they would work in teams. We would have students from mathematics and students from biology paired up with faculty from mathematics and faculty from biology, so we'd have this inter-disciplinary mix of students and faculty and they'd work together on long-term projects. Not just during the summer but during the academic year, and really sort of get an idea of--give the students an idea of how to talk to each other from different disciplines, how to work together on an inter-disciplinary project, and how to make progress on something within math biology. Hopefully, leading towards a publication for them.$$Okay. Okay. So that was (unclear) so did they publish--$$Yeah, so we had--we had cohorts of four to eight students come in every year, and the program has been really really successful. Almost all teams that have worked through the program have published a paper. Our first group that came through in around 2006, 2007, many of them went off to medical school. The ones that didn't go to medical school got into very good graduate schools, we had several best poster prizes at national conferences, so the students and their research was very well-received and we're very proud of the students who came through the program.

J. K. Haynes

Biologist and academic administrator John K. “J.K.” Haynes was born on October 30, 1943 in Monroe, Louisiana to John and Grace Haynes. His mother was a teacher and his father was the principal of Lincoln High School in Ruston, Louisiana. Haynes began first grade when he was four years old. When he was six, his family moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Haynes began attending Southern University Laboratory School. He attended Morehouse College when he was seventeen and he received his B.S. degree in biology in 1964. Haynes aspired to attend medical school. However, a professor advised him to apply to graduate school and he went on to attend Brown University, where he obtained his Ph.D. degree in biology in 1970.

Haynes completed his first year of postdoctoral research at Brown University, where he worked on restriction enzymes. During this time, he became interested in sickle cell anemia, which led to a second postdoctoral appointment in biochemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he worked with Vernon Ingram, the scientist who discovered the amino acid difference between normal and sickle cell hemoglobin. In 1973, Haynes joined the faculty at the Meharry Medical School as a junior faculty member in the department of genetics and molecular medicine and the department of anatomy. His research was focused on why sickle cells were less deformable than normal. In 1979, he returned to Morehouse College as an associate professor of biology as well as the director of the Office of Health Professions. As part of his work, Haynes created a program for high school students interested in medical school. Haynes has also helped recruit minority students into science with the assistance of agencies like the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Haynes became the endowed David E. Packard Chair in Science at Morehouse College and chairman of the biology department in 1985. In 1991, he took a sabbatical and went to Brown University to continue his work on sickle cells. Since 1999, he has served as Dean of Science and Mathematics at Morehouse College.

Under Haynes administrative leadership, new buildings for both chemistry and biology were built at Morehouse College as well as a curriculum with an emphasis on lab work. Haynes has published papers on cell biology as well as on undergraduate STEM education.

J. K. Haynes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 14, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.013

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/14/2011

Last Name

Haynes

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Kermit

Schools

Southern University Laboratory School

Morehouse College

Brown University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

HAY12

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

We're Building A House At The House.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/30/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lamb

Short Description

Academic administrator and biologist J. K. Haynes (1943 - ) developed methods for detecting and preventing sickle cell anemia. He joined the faculty of Morehouse College in 1979 and later became Dean of the Division of Science and Mathematics.

Employment

Meharry Medical College

Morehouse College

Brown University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3029,36:5320,119:9033,184:15200,260:20140,375:20748,384:21964,402:36644,604:37232,613:39416,647:53116,845:55428,883:63870,1026:65040,1047:65352,1052:67810,1057:69640,1066:72810,1117:74630,1192:102459,1581:103089,1592:105357,1645:109880,1687:111988,1736:123810,1937:128080,2036:128850,2049:129270,2056:139160,2181:143316,2221:145087,2257:147474,2307:150169,2364:150554,2370:152017,2414:160924,2522:169586,2614:175549,2692:176353,2708:183284,2776:185156,2820:185804,2830:189417,2868:189886,2876:198375,3034:209050,3231:210022,3244:210589,3253:214938,3297:222558,3375:224702,3428:239610,3591$0,0:12120,145:13055,156:13990,167:15690,197:16370,208:19175,255:19515,260:28600,368:28925,374:29640,391:30550,412:31265,425:32760,456:33605,472:34255,484:34515,491:36205,533:37505,556:43550,696:44785,720:45435,728:45695,733:46085,764:53270,828:58198,935:62108,993:67291,1095:70722,1180:71525,1193:73131,1225:74737,1267:75175,1274:76124,1295:77219,1316:88180,1478:94387,1532:94751,1537:95115,1542:95570,1549:97390,1579:98118,1588:102625,1622:103275,1634:103535,1639:119418,1986:122822,2067:123488,2078:140640,2342:140900,2347:141940,2365:142200,2407:152455,2533:156089,2659:175900,2846:176960,2858
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of J.K. Haynes' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes recalls his childhood in Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about himself as a student

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes explains his family's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes recalls his father's funeral home business

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - J.K. Haynes recounts his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - J.K. Haynes talks about his interests during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his experience in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about resemblance to certain family members

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes recalls his experience at Morehouse College under President Benjamin Mays

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes recalls student activism in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about the influential science faculty at Morehouse College, part 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about the influential science faculty at Morehouse College, part 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes talks about his graduate school experience at Brown University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about sickle cell anemia and relates his Ph.D. dissertation topic

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes describes his postdoctoral molecular biology research at Brown University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes responds to a question about his work as a biologist

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes discusses the nature of post doctoral research

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about financial problems at the Meharry Medical College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his achievements in sickle cell anemia research, part 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes talks about his achievements in sickle cell anemia research, part 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes discusses his reaction to the first reported sickle cell anemia cure

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his research in sickle cell anemia, part 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about his research in sickle cell anemia, part 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes discusses the nature of his scientific research and funding

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes describes Project Kaleidoscope

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes describes the history of the Nabrit-Mapp-McBay building at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his involvement with the American Society for Cell Biology Minorities Affairs Committee

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes recalls Walter Massey's presidency at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes talks about the sickle cell anemia drugs and treatments

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes reflects on the wisdom of his parents

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about his academic promotions at Morehouse College

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes discusses health issues in the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes reflects on balancing his administrative, research, and teaching responsibilities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about the changing focus of sickle cell anemia research

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his involvement with the World Learning School for International Training

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes describes his concept for a program to develop new science faculty

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes shares his hopes for Morehouse College's future

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - J.K. Haynes talks about what he would have done differently in his career

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - J.K. Haynes discusses the impact of advice from his mentors

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - J.K. Haynes reflects on his life's accomplishments

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his family and his likeness to Ebony editor, Lerone Bennett

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes responds to a question about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes talks about his interest in art and music

DASession

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DAStory

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DATitle
J.K. Haynes talks about the influential science faculty at Morehouse College, part 1
J.K. Haynes recalls Walter Massey's presidency at Morehouse College
Transcript
Some people like Lonnie King, and I think that Lonnie King may have been here. He may have been a senior when I was a freshman so Lonnie was one of these guys with Julian [Bonds] and others. That's what they spent their time doing.$$Now, was David Satcher a biology major too?$$Yes.$$Okay, so did you see a lot of him in the biology department?$$Yeah, yeah. So one of the powerful influences on the biology majors during that time was a guy by the name of Roy Hunter. And so Roy Hunter was one of, Roy loved David Satcher, and so when I came along under Roy Hunter, and so when I give talks about my mentors, he's the one who I always mention first at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia].$$Now, why was Dr. Hunter so important?$$He was a powerful, powerful instructor. So he was a guy who had polio when he was a kid, and so he spent his life on crutches before he moved to a motorized cart. But when he taught at Morehouse, he was on crutches. Yet he could draw these beautiful diagrams of anatomy and embryos on the board, and he'd talk with such facility about the subject. And so for those--it turns out that he and Dr. [Frederick E.] Mapp who was the chair of the department at that time, did not necessarily get along. And so Roy Hunter's tenure at Morehouse was short-lived. But for those of us who came along during the time that he was there, or here, he was a tremendous influence on us.$$Now, where did he go when he left Morehouse, do you know?$$I think he became chair of the Department of Biology at Morgan State [University, Baltimore, Maryland]. And he eventually became chair of the Department of Biology at Atlanta University, and at some point, he went to work for Lou Sullivan at the Morehouse School of Medicine as an administrator.$$Okay.$$So one of the things that I regret most is not bringing him back to the faculty at Morehouse when I became chair of biology. He and I used to talk about that. I just couldn't pull it off. So one of the things that I did as chair of biology was to move in the direction of hiring people who not only taught but did research. So Roy was way beyond doing research, but he was such a giant that I wanted to have him in the midst just to have that history and tradition and the power that he conveyed just talking to students. And I just didn't pull it off. And he always reminded me, I'm still waiting for you to invite me back. I just, just couldn't do it.$$So, he's passed now?$$Yeah, he died, I guess, about ten years ago.$$Okay, okay, but a great mentor.$$Powerful mentor.$$Okay, now we always hear a lot about Henry McBay. Did you have him for--$$I took him for, I had him in general chemistry class, and was also powerfully influenced by him. People were more frightened by Henry McBay. So he's known for either producing chemists or producing politicians or ministers. So Maynard Jackson used to tell the story that the reason--because Maynard Jackson apparently wanted to be a physician when he came here. And so Henry McBay turned him towards politics.$$So in other words, he, you either succeeded sort of--$$That's right.$$--big time here or he pushed out of--$$That's right, right. So he was very demanding, put a lot of emphasis on the mathematical basis of chemistry. He would fill up the board with just equations, and he wrote beautifully. And his, he had sort of an extreme attitude about things, and so he frightened a lot of students. I mean I thought he was a great instructor. I enjoyed his style of lecturing. And I don't think I felt intimidated by him.$$That's interesting. Okay.$Okay. So in '95 [1995], Walter Massey becomes the ninth president of Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia]. He's a physicist.$$Right.$$Did his presidency facilitate science at Morehouse?$$Not as much as we thought it would, although Walter [Massey] was very supportive of a number of things that we did. So one of the important things that Walter did was to create three divisions at the college. So we have Business and Economics, Social Sciences and Humanities, and Science and Math. That was his idea, and so we've split the college now into about three equal parts. With about a thousand students--at the time, he was here, we had about three thousand students. And so his idea was to reduce the scale of the college more like it looked, and to make it more like it looked when he was a student here, so when I was a student, there were only eight hundred students at Morehouse. So he was trying to promote faculty-faculty interaction, faculty-student interactions, etc. And that actually had a transformative effect. So when we created, when we brought the three--six departments together that constitute the Division of Science and Math, it's been a, there was an explosion of activity. And so we meet, as a faculty, every month. People are talking across disciplines. And at some point, students finishing the division will have a more interdisciplinary education, which is where we wanna go. We're developing interdisciplinary curricula, interdisciplinary research and so I think while, at the time, it didn't seem like such a momentous deal, it has had an enormous impact. We began the Division of Science and Math with a grant that we got from the Packard Foundation. Walter was on the board of the Packard Foundation. So that's very helpful. So Walter is connected to the titans of American industry. So he brought the heads of GE [General Electric, Fairfield, Connecticut], Motorola [Inc., Schaumburg, Illinois]. Walter is more of a scholar than he is a business person. So he's not known for twisting arms. And so they didn't leave perhaps as much money as they might, but they came to know about us. And so the current president [Robert M. Franklin] I think is more of an arm twister, and I think, so we're gonna reap the benefits of what Walter has established. But Walter had to deal--you know, people have said about Walter that he's a guy who thinks very broadly. He's now the president of the Art Institute of Chicago, right, so (laughter). So he's had a very broad prospective, and so I think that he was a wonderful president at Morehouse. I don't know that he could afford, because we had a number of problems that he had to deal with. I don't know that he could afford to just tackle the sciences. So I think what he did was to seed something. And the fruits of that will be manifested in the years ahead.

Janette Hoston Harris

City historian Dr. Janette Hoston Harris was born on September 7, 1939, in Monroe, Louisiana; her mother, Maud Marrie Hoston, was a homemaker and her father, Eluin Homer Hoston, was a printer and businessman who opened the first shoe store in Louisiana for African Americans, "Hoston's Shoes and Bootery." In 1956, Harris earned her high school diploma from Carroll High School in Monroe, Louisiana, where she was a member of the English and spelling bee clubs and the basketball team. From 1956 until 1960, Harris attended Southern University, where she was active in the Methodist club, a co-founder of Gamma Sigma Sigma sorority, and captain of the drill team. In 1960, during her senior year, Harris and six other students were arrested for attempting to desegregate an all-white lunch counter. The arrest resulted in her expulsion from Southern University and, by order of the governor, her being prohibited from attending any college in the state of Louisiana. Harris completed her education at Central State University in Ohio, where she earned her B.A. degree in psychology in 1962.

While attending Central State in 1960, Harris's case challenging segregation, "Hoston v. the State of Louisiana," went to the Louisiana Supreme Court. Harris's case eventually became part of a larger court challenge, "Garner v. Louisiana," that was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1961; the case was argued and won by future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall in 1962.

After her graduation, Harris worked in the selection division of the Peace Corps. From 1964 until 1970, Harris had a career in education, teaching second, fourth, fifth and sixth grades in Washington, D.C. public schools. From 1970 until 1972, Harris worked as a research associate for the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History. Harris earned her master's degree in history in 1972 from Howard University, and her Ph.D. degree in 1975. In 1975, Harris began teaching history at Federal City College, now known as the University of the District of Columbia. That same year she established a consulting firm, JOR Associates. From 1979 until 1980, Harris served as campaign manager for the Carter / Mondale Re-election Campaign. In 1991, Harris was appointed director of educational affairs for Washington, D.C., where she remained for a year. For the next three years, Harris served as director of the Office of Intergovernmental Relations in the Mayor's Office; in 1998, she was appointed city historian for Washington, D.C., the first person to hold the post.

Harris continued to serve as city historian; over the course of her career, she was the recipient of numerous awards for her civic and educational commitment. In 2004, Harris, along with her fellow sit-in students, was invited back to Southern University to receive the degree she was denied in 1960.

Harris passed away on November 2, 2018.

Dr. Janette Hoston Harris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 10, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.122

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/10/2004

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Middle Name

Hoston

Occupation
Schools

Carroll High School

Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Central State University

Mt. Nebo

First Name

Janette

Birth City, State, Country

Monroe

HM ID

HAR09

Favorite Season

December

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Puerto Rico

Favorite Quote

Each One Teach One.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/7/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Death Date

11/2/2018

Short Description

City historian Janette Hoston Harris (1939 - 2018) and six other students were arrested for attempting to desegregate an all-white lunch counter; the arrest resulted in her expulsion from Southern University, and by order of the governor, her being prohibited from attending any college in the state of Louisiana. Harris's case became part of the Supreme Court case, Garner v. Louisiana. Harris went on to become the first city historian for Washington, D.C.

Employment

United States Peace Corps

District of Columbia Public Schools

Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)

Federal City College

JOR Associates

District of Columbia

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Janette Hoston Harris's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Janette Hoston Harris lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her mother's background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her mother's background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about challenges her mother faced as a light-skinned African American woman

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her mother's activities and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her father's activism

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her father's shoe business

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her maternal and paternal ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her maternal and paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Janette Hoston Harris remembers holiday traditions during her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Janette Hoston Harris describes daily life during her childhood in Monroe, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Janette Hoston Harris lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Janette Hoston Harris describes the community where she was raised in Monroe, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Monroe, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her activism during her youth in the South

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her elementary school experiences at Mt. Nebo in Monroe, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her favorite childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her first job as the accountant for a local cotton seller, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her first job as the accountant for a local cotton seller, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Janette Hoston Harris describes learning to defend herself in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her aspirations of becoming a movie star

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Janette Hoston Harris descirbes her decision to attend Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruling during her high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Janette Hoston Harris names notable teachers and mentors at Carroll High School in Monroe, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her activities at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Janette Hoston Harris describes leading demonstrations for better cafeteria food at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls preparations for protesting segregation in solidarity with students from North Carolina A&T

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her experience at the the sit-in at S. H. Kress department store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her experiences in jail following the sit-in in which she participated in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her experiences in jail following the sit-in at S. H. Kress department store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Janette Hoston Harris describes the NAACP's involvement in releasing the S. H. Kress & Co. Department Store sit-in participants from jail

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Janette Hoston Harris describes Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College's reaction to the student protests

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls her parents' reactions to her arrest for participating in a sit-in

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls her expulsion from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Janette Hoston Harris describes the success of the 1961 U.S. Supreme Court case, Garner v. Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls starting a youth chapter of the NAACP in Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Janette Hoston Harris explains how she completed her undergraduate education at Central State College in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her move to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Janette Hoston Harris explains how she came to work for the Peace Corps in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Janette Hoston Harris describes obtaining her master's degree and Ph.D. from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Janette Hoston Harris describes returning to school with a husband and children

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Janette Hoston Harris remembers her experiences as Washington, D.C. campaign manager for the Carter/Mondale re-election campaign in 1979

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Janette Hoston Harris recalls her teaching experiences at Federal City College in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her work in HistoryMaker Sharon Pratt's executive office

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon HistoryMaker Sharon Pratt's mayoral tenure

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her accomplishments as city historian for Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about the Washington, D.C.'s history and its connection to African American history

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Janette Hoston Harris shares her goals as Washington, D.C.'s city historian

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954 decision

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Janette Hoston Harris compares the educational experience at Carroll High School fifty years later with hers in the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her experience attending the 2004 commencement at Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for commencement

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon the impact of her sit-in participation in the early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon the importance of learning about history

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her sister's decision to attend Central State College in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about the reasons for sharing her story

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about the activism of younger generations

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her involvement in scholarship funds throughout Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Janette Hoston Harris talks about her involvement in Washington, D.C. social organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Janette Hoston Harris describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Janette Hoston Harris describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon her life, pt. 3

Tape: 4 Story: 19 - Janette Hoston Harris reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 20 - Janette Hoston Harris details her contributions to her community in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Janette Hoston Harris narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Janette Hoston Harris narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Janette Hoston Harris narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

14$3

DATitle
Janette Hoston Harris describes her experience at the the sit-in at S. H. Kress department store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Janette Hoston Harris talks about Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College's reaction to the student protests
Transcript
And how many of you were there?$$Seven of us. And they said, "Look, we're going to go to S. H. Kress [& Co.], you're going to go in and purchase something, make a purchase"--$$S. H. Kress was a department store?$$It's a five-and-dime.$$Uh-huh.$$So we went in there and we all purchased something. I purchased some cosmetics or whatever. Everybody purchased something. One guy purchased some socks and then we decided to sit down at the lunch counter and have something to eat. I ordered oh I think a cup of tea. And I didn't know I was sitting next to a manager, had no clue. And so I just sat there next to this guy he was turning red and red and redder, and I was smiling. You know, and I ordered this cup of tea. And then the woman said, oh she got so flustered she said, "Oh no--oh no, no, oh no, no." I said, "Oh yes, yes here's my money, I want a cup of tea." And so the manager sitting next to me never talked to me, he talked to her through me. He kept saying, tell her that she cannot be served here. And I said, well ask him why. And she said, well you'll have to go over there. There was a little curtain in the back, and we knew where the curtain was and this little round table and you buy your tea, your cup of tea or your sandwich, whatever it is and you go to the curtain and eat it over in the corner. Only two people or three people could stand there at a time. A small table, tall table. And I said, "No," I said, "we're not going over there." I said, "We're going to eat right here." And she said, "He says, you cannot eat here." I said, "Tell him we can, 'cause we are customers. We just made some purchases and we can eat here, this is for customers am I correct?" And some man came out the back and said, "You cannot eat here, you have to leave, you have to leave. You causing trouble." "We're not causing any trouble. We're not disturbing the peace. We're sitting like everybody else. We dressed nicely just like he is," you know. We had on our little outfits and we're students. So he said if we don't leave they going to call the police and we just sat there and they didn't want to bring us our tea. I said, "I'd like to have my cup of tea," which never came. And the paddy wagon came and the police came in, you know, with the big stick on his shoulder, his arm on his other hip and he's walking all, you know, very in control.$$And what were you feeling at that moment, what were you thinking?$$I said, oh well we going to get our heads cracked in today. Because he kept holding his stick and the other guy was on me, I said, "Well this is our day." I said, "We might not get back home." He said, "Yeah I know." And we just sitting there, you know, wondering what's going to happen next. Again, he kept fidgeting with the stick, you know. So I just thought he was going to crack us across the head. But he says, "Get up you can't sit here." And we said, "Why." And he said because I, "The owner said you cannot." That's why I believe it was the owner. "The owner said you cannot sit here, that you're disturbing the peace." "But we're not disturbing the peace." He said, "Get up." By that time we decided we better get up. So (laughter) we got up. And they just ushered us right on out of the store into the paddy wagon--to the paddy wagon. One of the guys had--had a--has artificial leg. And so they were shoving him around 'cause he had to lift his leg up to walk, you know. They were shoving him around and moving him around. So we got in the paddy wagon and oh they drove us off, I mean fast and turning corners and turning corners. We were sliding--the seats in a paddy wagon are metal on the side. So we just sliding off and they did it on purpose, just turning real fast and we were falling off the seats--$When you got back on campus [Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana] what was the atmosphere like on campus?$$Oh, it was unbelievable. Southern had a population of ten thousand students, and six thousand must have been out on campus waiting for our return and standing around a huge yellow bus. So we all--they stood up on the bus. The women couldn't get up that high, but we were on the side of the bus and the men sit on top of the bus. And we addressed the student body. And told 'em what had happened. And the next morning the president [Dr. Felton Grandison Clark] wanted to see us. So we went to the president's house. And he said he had been told by the Board of--the Louisiana State Board of Education [sic. Louisiana Department of Education] that we were to be expelled from school. That we could no longer be students at Southern University. So we went back to our dormitories that whole day and they were plotting to get us out before the students knew we were leaving. We didn't know that, but my momma's [Maud Marrie Hoston] friend was on the switchboard, Mrs. Higgins [ph.]. And she heard the message that they had bought the train tickets and when it--as soon as it became dark they were gonna go get us where, from where--find out where we would be and put us on the train and send our bags later. And she called me and said, "Pack up as much as you can pack up and I'm going to send Rodney [ph.] to pick you up," that's her son. And Rodney came in a station wagon and picked me up, a little friends of my parents, and said get down on the floor, which I did. And put my bags and took me to her house. So they couldn't find me. Some of the others went other places. We all went some places, but we all decided we'd call and get--call Ms. Higgins and find out where each person was and we can come back together, and we did. And so they put us up and the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] put us up in a hotel down in Baton Rouge [Louisiana], and that's where we stayed. But we didn't come out until night. The NAACP and those persons would not meet with us until night, late at night.$$How come?$$They were afraid of what would happen to them. Because this first time this had ever happened in the State of Louisiana. Remember this is a first. So at nine o'clock at night, 9:30, they'd come get us in the car and we'd go to (unclear) basement and they would come and we'd meet and strategize. They'd go back to the hotel. The next day we'd go to court. There were all these court dates. The NAACP had to work with our lawyer, Johnnie Jones, to address the court. So we'd go sit in the court all day long to wait to be heard. And then we'd come back and eat and talk about where we were and then we'd go back at night and meet. So it was that kind, it was really--