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David R. Jones

Investment banker David R. Jones was born on May 4, 1964 in Dayton, Ohio to David L. and Alease Caldwell Jones. His mother worked as an educator and his father was the first African American certified public accountant in Ohio and co-founded Unity State Bank, Ohio’s first African American owned bank. Jones graduated from the Miami Valley School in 1982 before receiving his B.S. degree from Boston University in 1986, and his M.B.A. degree from The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in 1993.

Before earning his M.B.A. degree, Jones was a trust officer at Fifth Third Bank and Wachovia Corporation. After graduating in 1993, he joined Merrill Lynch as a senior associate in the investment banking department. In 1998, he was hired by Blaylock & Partners as head of the investment banking and capital markets departments. In this role, Jones was involved in transactions that enabled the firm to become the nation’s largest Black-owned investment bank handling over $8 billion in deals. In 2006, he co-founded CastleOak Securities and served as CEO of the firm. In 2017, CastleOak partnered with Bloomberg to launch DirectPool, a platform for electronic corporate bond trading.

Jones was appointed to Boston University’s Board of Overseers in 2013, and to the Executive Graduate Board of The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in 2014. The next year, he was elected to the Ohio National Financial Services board of directors.

In 2010, Jones received the distinguished alumni award from Boston University School of Management. The following year, he was named as one of the 75 Most Powerful Blacks on Wall Street by Black Enterprise Magazine. In 2012, Jones was named One of the Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs by Goldman Sachs. CastleOak Securities ranked number one by Black Enterprise as Top Minority-Owned Investment Bank in Taxable Securities in 2014; and, in 2017, they were named the Financial Company of the Year by Black Enterprise.

Jones and his wife, Tammye Tillman Jones, reside in New Jersey and have three children: Jillian, Harrison, and Kathryn.

David R. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 26, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.018

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/26/2019

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Schools

Jefferson Elementary School

Miami Valley School

Boston University

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

JON44

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head

Favorite Quote

We're In A Can-Do Business

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/4/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Investment banker David R. Jones (1964 - ) was head of investment banking and capital markets at Blaylock & Partners before co-founding CastleOak Securities where he was president and CEO.

Employment

Fifth Third Bank

Wachovia Corporation

Merrill Lynch

Blaylock & Partners

CastleOak Securities L.P.

Favorite Color

Blue

Joe Madison

Radio host Joe Madison was born on June 16, 1949 in Dayton, Ohio to Nancy Stone and Felix Madison. He graduated from Roosevelt High School in 1967 in Dayton. Madison enrolled at University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, in 1967, but received his B.A. degree in sociology in 1971 from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

He worked in public relations at General Motors Corporation, in Detroit, Michigan from 1969 to 1970 and also worked as a statistician for the Saint Louis Cardinals football club, in St Louis, Missouri in 1970. He served as a communications associate for Mead Corporation, in Dayton, during the 1970s, and worked as associate director in urban affairs at Seymour & Lundy Associates, a public relations firm in Detroit from 1971 to 1974. Madison was selected to serve as executive director of Detroit's NAACP branch at the age of twenty four, the youngest person to be appointed to the position, serving from 1974 to 1978. Appointed by NAACP executive director Benjamin Hooks, Madison then served as NAACP national political director from 1978 to 1986. He began his broadcasting career at Detroit's WXYZ-AM radio station in 1980, and later worked at FM talk station WWDB in Philadelphia. Madison joined WWRC-AM in Washington, D.C., from 1988 to 1989 where he developed “a crossover appeal” handling issues that included race, but were aimed at the station's multicultural audience. From 1989 to 2007, he worked as a broadcaster at Radio One. In 1998, Madison left WWRC-AM to start an online chat show. He joined urban talk radio station WOL-AM, in Washington, D.C., serving as broadcaster and program director from 1999 to 2013. He joined SiriusXM in 2007. A radio talk show host and civil rights activist, widely known as “The Black Eagle,” Madison can be heard on his SiriusXM Urban View titular weekday morning show, The Joe Madison Show

Joe Madison was elected to the board of directors for the NAACP, and served from 1986 to 1999 and he also was appointed chairman of the NAACP Image Awards.

Madison and his wife Sharon have four children including Michelle, Shawna, Jason and Monesha, and five grandchildren.

Joe Madison was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.158

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/17/2018

8/17/2018 |and| 8/14/2019

Last Name

Madison

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Roosevelt High School

Washington University in St Louis

Jackson Elementary School

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

First Name

Joe

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

MAD06

Favorite Season

Early Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

N/A

Favorite Quote

What Are You Going To Do About It?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/16/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United State of America

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Radio host Joe Madison (1949- ) joined SiriusXM in 2007, hosting SiriusXM Urban View’s weekday morning show, The Joe Madison Show, as “The Black Eagle.”

Employment

Seymour & Lundy

Mead Corp.

Detroit NAACP

NAACP

WXYT-AM Detroit

WWRC-AM DC

Radio One

Sirius XM

Favorite Color

Black

Ellenae Fairhurst

Automobile sales entrepreneur Ellenae Fairhurst was born on January 6, 1943 in Dayton, Ohio to Jack J. Hart Sr. and Ellen Nora Hart. Fairhurst graduated from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Dayton, Ohio in 1961. She earned her B.S. degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio in 1965, and her M.A. degree in social and consumer psychology from the University of Detroit in 1973.

Fairhurst worked as a secretary for Motown Records and for the law firm of Goodman, Eden, & Robb, before she was hired in 1968 as a secretary at the Ford Motor Company. Fairhurst remained at Ford for seventeen years, where she served as a marketing research analyst and was promoted to project manager. She left her position in 1986, and joined the Chrysler Corporation, retail dealer development program. After two years with Chrysler, Fairhurst was named president and general manager of the Cumberland Chrysler-Plymouth dealership in Fayetteville, North Carolina. In 1992, she sold her shares in the Chrysler-Plymouth dealership and purchased a Dodge dealership in Huntsville, Alabama. Fairhurst then purchased a Nissan Infiniti dealership in 1999 and became the first African American female in North America to own an Infiniti dealership. The same year, she became the first African American female owner of a Lexus dealership, which was located in Huntsville, Alabama.

Fairhurst’s success as an automotive dealership owner was widely recognized. In 2001, Fairhurst’s “autoplex” was ranked at ninety-five on Black Enterprise magazine’s “Auto Dealer 100” list. The following year, the company was ranked at number fifty-six on the list. By 2013, the “autoplex” was moved to fifty-four on the “Auto Dealer 100” list. Fairhurst has been also awarded the Daimler-Chrysler Five Star Award, and Elite of Lexus Status for most years she’s been in operation.

Fairhurst served on the board of directors for the Chrysler Minority Dealers Association, the Huntsville Downtown Rescue Mission, and the Huntsville Chamber of Commerce. Fairhurst is also a member of the National Automobile Dealers Association and the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers.

Ellenae Fairhurst was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.148

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/14/2017

Last Name

Fairhurst

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Willard Elementary School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Miami University

University of Detroit Mercy

First Name

Ellenae

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

FAI06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anything with a beach

Favorite Quote

The bad news is not the last news.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Birth Date

1/6/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Birmingham

Country

United States

Favorite Food

No

Short Description

Automobile sales entrepreneur Elleanae Fairhurst (1943 - ) was the first African American female owner of a Lexus car dealership.

Employment

Lexus of Huntsville

Huntsville Dodge

Ford Motor Company

Cumberland Chrysler

Favorite Color

Green

Clarence Page

Pulitzer Prize-winning news columnist Clarence Page was born in Dayton, Ohio on June 2, 1947, to Clarence Hannibal Page, a factory worker, and Maggie Page, the owner of a catering service. During his senior year of high school, Page served as feature editor at the school’s biweekly newspaper. In 1965, he won his first award from the Southeast Ohio High School Newspaper Association for the year's best feature article. It was at this point that Page, under the guidance of Mrs. Mary Kendall, his high school newspaper instructor, became very interested in journalism. He graduated from Middletown High School in 1965, and that summer, he earned his first pay as a journalist by selling freelance photos and stories to the Middletown Journal and Cincinnati Enquirer. In 1969, he received his B.S. degree in journalism from Ohio University, where he worked on the student newspaper while at college.

That same year, Page joined the Chicago Tribune as one of its few African American reporters. Six months later, he was drafted into the military, where he served in the press office at the 212th Artillery Group, Fort Lewis, Washington. In 1971, Page returned to the
Chicago Tribune, where he covered a variety of topics, including police, religion, and neighborhood news, with freelance assignments as a rock music critic for the Tempo section at night. In 1976, he became a foreign correspondent in Africa, and in 1980, after eleven years at the Chicago Tribune, he joined WBBM-TV, a CBS-owned station, in August 1980, and while working there, was assigned the Harold Washington mayoral campaign. In 1984, Page returned to the Chicago Tribune as a columnist and a member of the editorial board. Three years later, his column became syndicated nationally, and in May 1987, he married Lisa Johnson. Their first and only son, Grady Jonathan, was born on June 3, 1989, and in 1991, they moved to Washington, DC.

The recipient of honorary doctorates from Columbia College in Chicago, Chicago Theological Seminary, and Ohio University, Page is a regular contributor of essays to "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" and an occasional commentator on National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition
Sunday." In 1972, he participated in a Chicago Tribune Task Force series on voter fraud that won him a Pulitzer Prize. Four years later, he won the Edward Scott Beck Award for overseas reporting on the changing politics of Southern Africa. An investigative series written by
Page, "The Black Tax," was awarded the 1980 Illinois UPI award for Community Service. In 1989, Page’s column won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, and in 1992, he was inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame. In 1996, Page published his first book, Showing My
Color: Impolite Essays on Race and Identity
.

Clarence Page was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 28, 2010 and March 6, 2012.

Accession Number

A2010.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/28/2010 |and| 3/7/2012 |and| 5/22/2014

Last Name

Page

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Garfield Elementary School

McKinley Junior High School

Middletown High School

Ohio University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Clarence

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

PAG02

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

You Must Think Money Grows On Trees.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/2/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue Ribs

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Clarence Page (1947 - ) was one of the most prominent nationally syndicated journalists in the country.

Employment

Chicago Tribune

Dayton Journal Herald

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Clarence Page lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes his biological mother's family background and talks about his adoption

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Clarence Page describes his adoptive mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Clarence Page discusses his adoptive parents' migration to the north, his mother's job as a housekeeper, and how she met his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his mother's employers and their close relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his mother's restaurant and catering business

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about a lynching in his mother's hometown of Carrollton, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about being adopted and not knowing the identity of his biological father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Clarence Page describes his adoptive father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his grand-uncle, Monroe Page

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Clarence Page describes his father's growing up in Elba, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his father's family's move to Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about why his parents adopted him

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his father's influence on his life

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about race relations in Middletown, Ohio, while he was growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about race relations in Middletown, Ohio, while he was growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Clarence Page describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Clarence Page describes his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about watching television while growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about becoming aware of segregation as a young boy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his exposure to segregation, which taught him to see the world with empathy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about the desegregation of the North in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his positive attitude in school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about well-known people who come from Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about becoming interested in pursuing journalism in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about frequenting the Middletown public library

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about the first black reporters on national news networks, and watching political conventions on TV in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Clarence Page reflects upon changes in media trends since the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about how television changed media coverage in America since the late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about Louis Lomax and Mike Wallace

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes his first experience as a journalist

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Clarence Page discusses African American publications

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about businessman and publisher, John H. Johnson, as a role model

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about the black media

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his decision to attend Ohio University to study journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about news reporters in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about stuttering as a child

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about how he and others overcome their stutter

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about working at the Ohio University college newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the bands and entertainers who came to Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interview with Bill Cosby and his opportunity to attend Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about the number of journalists trained at Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his social life at Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about the political changes in the African American community in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks the political scene at Ohio University in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about black students at Ohio University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about Ohio University in the aftermath of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about teaching a black literature course at Ohio University as an undergraduate student

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about reading Malcolm X's autobiography

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about being drafted into the Vietnam War and his views on the war

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his decision to join the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about mainstream newspapers and the African American newspapers in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his mentor, HistoryMaker Vernon Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about his early days at the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about HistoryMaker Joseph Boyce, who was the first black reporter in the newsroom at the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about spending two years in the U.S. Army

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting assignments in the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about politics in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about Chicago's influence on his journalism

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about being a journalist in Chicago, Illinois, in the late 1960s and the 1970s

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about HistoryMakers Lu Palmer and Vernon Jarett

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about reporting on the Black Panthers in Chicago

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about the student killings at Kent State University and Jackson State University

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Clarence Page talks working undercover as an election worker in the primary of 1972

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Clarence Page talks about Chicago politics and the murder of Fred Hampton and Mark Clark of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his experience in reporting Chicago politics

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about being assigned to become the Chicago Tribune's foreign correspondent to South Africa in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about finding out about his adoption

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his experience in South Africa and Rhodesia in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Clarence Page describes the city of Soweto, South Africa, and his experience there in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about the Soweto uprising

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about black journalists in South Africa and local black publications

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his trip to South Africa in 1976 and prominent South African political figures at the time

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his work as an assistant city editor at the 'Chicago Tribune', and his desire to work as a columnist

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the poor representation of African Americans on television shows prior to the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about the increase in black television talk show hosts in the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's suicide, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's suicide, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Clarence Page discusses the suicide rate in the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his investigative series, 'The Black Tax', pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his investigative series, 'The Black Tax', pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the progress made by the African American community in the 1970s and 1980s

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his experience at WBBM-TV in Chicago, Illinois, and the boycott of Chicago Fest

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about covering Harold Washington's mayoral campaign at WBBM-TV in Chicago, and returning to the 'Chicago Tribune' in 1984

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Clarence Page discusses Harold Washington's mayoral campaign, and his win in the Chicago Democratic primary elections, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Clarence Page discusses Harold Washington's mayoral campaign, and his win in the Chicago Democratic primary elections, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his relationship with Bernie Epton, the Republican mayoral candidate against Harold Washington in 1983 in Chicago

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about Reverend Jesse Jackson's presidential run in 1984

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interview with Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's articles, and the black middle class, and its social divide

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Clarence Page discusses the similarities and differences in the background of he and his first wife, Leanita McClain

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview, session 3

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Clarence Page recalls meeting his wife for the first time

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Clarence Page remembers the transition of his column to national syndication

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his favorite columnists

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Clarence Page describes his writing style

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about African American recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Clarence Page describes his experience of winning the Pulitzer Prize

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Clarence Page recalls his reporting on the administration of Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Clarence Page remembers moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Clarence Page recalls being inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting on social issues, pt. 1

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting on social issues, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interest in economic justice

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Clarence Page reflects upon the recent political changes

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his television appearances

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about the relationship between the African American community and bi-partisan politics

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about his political affiliation

Tape: 13 Story: 9 - Clarence Page describes his essay collection, 'Showing My Color'

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Clarence Page remembers the Million Man March in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about the presidency of Bill Clinton

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Clarence Page remembers the National Rifle Association campaign against Al Gore

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his coverage of reverends Al Sharpton and Jesse L. Jackson

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about President Barack Obama

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Clarence Page describes Washington, D.C.

Tape: 14 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about overcoming his stutter

Tape: 14 Story: 8 - Clarence Page reflects upon the changes to the news media industry

Tape: 14 Story: 9 - Clarence Page reflects upon his life

Tape: 14 Story: 10 - Clarence Page talks about his film appearances

Tape: 14 Story: 11 - Clarence Page reflects upon the state of black media

Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Clarence Page reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his parents' support

Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

7$8

DAStory

8$6

DATitle
Clarence Page talks about reporting on the Black Panthers in Chicago
Clarence Page talks about the Soweto uprising
Transcript
But anyway, enough of my grand old man reminiscing, back to the [Black] Panther days, I got to know the Panthers really on my own. Nobody ever assigned me to go out and cover the Panthers--maybe once. They were doing a food give-a-way one Saturday, a slow news day. I was sent out undercover. But mostly, I went out on my own and got to know the Panthers, and I also got to know some of the SDS [Students for a Democratic Society] folks. I met Bernadine Dohrn and Bill Ayers way back then, before they became Weather underground fugitives. And that's another story, we can go into if you want, but I--what really broke my heart was I was in basic training in Fort Dix, New Jersey when I got the news that Fred Hampton and Mark Clark had been killed. And I felt like, you know, I said right away, this was murder for one thing. It was early in the morning, and ain't no black folks around plotting any revolution (laughter) at four o'clock in the morning in a West Side apartment like this. I mean even in Fort Dix, New Jersey, just what I could read of the piece, I knew this was a setup. I wasn't as paranoid as the Panthers were. Panthers had always been telling me about, "Well, our phone's tapped, listen to the click," and blah, blah, blah. And I said, "Yeah, right, everybody's phone is tapped," it's the '60s [1960s] and all this. Little did I know, we found out when the COINTELPRO files were revealed, J. Edgar Hoover's entire plot, it really was a--sometimes there really is a conspiracy when people have a conspiracy theory.$$What they called the Red Squad in Chicago--$$That wasn't even part of the Federal effort, but he did work with the Red Squad, yeah. Yeah, the Red Squad was Keystone Cops by comparison. I mean, it's significant in that, I don't know how many departments had an actual, what, anti-subversion division they called the Red Squad, you know, (laughter) but Chicago had it. But they were kind of a joke with a lot of people. I remember the SDS convention in 1969 where the, at the old Chicago Coliseum, which was "the" place where the Weather Underground was born in that convention. There was, it was very high profile. They were, you know, us reporters were sent down there and did news conferences with the Weather underground folks, and everybody could look across the street and wave at the Red Squad folks in the abandoned building across the street there. You could see 'em up there with their cameras, you know, blah, blah, blah. And so like I say, it was kind of a joke. And the, a lot of things were kind of a joke. I mean the Weather, the SDS folks were so proud of all the press they were getting, and they said, "Well, we ought to use this to help the people or something." And Bernadine Dohrn announced they were gonna charge reporters like $25 (laughter) or something, the major press, to pay $25 per reporter or photographer and the Chicago Seed, the underground paper, and said, "Well, what about us? We don't have any money." They said, "Well, you can get by free and the others"--I said, "Well, that's not fair, you know," blah, blah, blah, "Here I'll pay your $5." And that finally passed. But it shows you how unprofessional (laughter) all of this was and how it was kind of a combination of, well, politics for the hell of it as Abbie Hoffman used to say, the Yippies and all that. I say the fun went out of it all when folks found out you could get killed doing this. The Panthers got killed. The Panthers were conspired against.$But you asked about the Soweto [South Africa] uprising. Yeah, just the Soweto uprising occurred because school children led it in response to a government order that all the black children would have to learn how to read and write and speak Afrikaans. Until then, it was kind of understood that most of the black folks did not wanna, didn't want to learn Afrikaans because, for one thing, that was the language of the oppressor. It was the Afrikaners, when they got into power, and I should, again, define Afrikaners. They're primarily Dutch, historically, Dutch. As I mentioned, there'd been white folks in South Africa since, you know, 400 years. The initial settlers were Dutch. These were merchants, just like the U.S. At the same time the Dutch landed in New Amsterdam, now known as New York, they were landing in Cape, what we know as Cape Town, down there in the Cape of South Africa. And they were Dutch and French Huguenot came along afterwards. They were fleeing Europe, etc. And then when the Brits finally came, made war with the Boers as the, what we now call Afrikaners, drove them inland, that became most, what, most of the white South Africans were and I think are still Afrikaans speakers. But English became the language of money. So blacks then and now wanted to learn English 'cause that's the language that you're gonna really, you know, go somewhere with. And so this order came down in '76 [1976] like other orders do in saying, you will now have to learn Afrikaans. Well, it was like that was the last straw. A lot of the black kids, their beginning was Soweto, and the kids took to the streets. And then the authorities came out. The police came out, many of them black police, and shot some of these kids. It was like Sharpeville all over again, and the pictures flashed around the world of these dead school children in their school uniforms and all this. And that was the beginning of the Soweto uprising. And it never stopped after that. It was like, there was constant--the ANC [African National Congress] kicked up their terrorist activities, as it was called. The working South African and Rhodesia, I learned the old saying, "One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter," and I could see it first hand, you know. This was, the situation after Soweto, and we, it was suddenly Afrikaans--excuse me, Apartheid was thrust in front of the world in a whole new way after that. And we saw things happening on a lot of different fronts. Of course, there in the '80s [1980s] Americans, led by black Americans and their liberal allies began doing sit-ins at the South African Embassy during the [President Ronald] Reagan administration because Reagan's policy changed to one of what they called, constructive engagement. And this was viewed by liberal activists as being another sell out to the South Africans and all. Constructive engagement diplomatically proved to be a failure, but it did work in Southwest Africa in Namibia, right next door, which was a sister country, you could say, to South Africa. Separate development did work there in transferring that country from white rule, white minority rule to black rule. But South Africa itself, you didn't see the real change come about until the '80s [1980s] after the protests here in the U.S. and around the world in support of the same movement that led to the Soweto uprising.

Bernice Irene Sumlin

The 19th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Sorority, Inc., Bernice Irene Sumlin (1974-1978) was born on November 29, 1926, in Dayton, Ohio, to Wright R. and Gussie Bingham Sumlin.

Sumlin was initiated into the Zeta Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., at Wilberforce College in 1946. After graduating with her B.S. degree in 1948, Sumlin transferred her Sorority membership to the Beta Eta Omega Chapter in Dayton. She furthered her education by graduating from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where she earned her M.A. degree. Sumlin then began her career in education. She served as a high school teacher, guidance counselor, community counselor and secondary principal before retiring. She then worked as an industrial consultant for Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

In 1962, Sumlin succeeded LaRue Walter Frederick as Great Lakes Regional Director of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., in Detroit, Michigan. Following a productive four year term she was appointed as chairman of the Sorority’s National Standards Committee in 1966. In 1972, Sumlin was elected First Supreme Anti-Basileus at the 45th Boule in Denver, Colorado.

In 1974, Sumlin was elected the 19th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Sumlin’s administration donated $25,000 to Central State University for the restoration of the Hallie Q. Brown Collection of rare books by and about blacks, which had been damaged by a tornado. Additionally, during her tenure, AKA contributed half a million dollars to the United Negro College Fund. On October 25, 1974, Sumlin answered a challenge given by retiring Executive Director Carey B. Preston and initiated the Alpha Kappa Alpha Reading Experience, a national program offering individualized tutoring to undereducated inner-city youth.

In 1975, at the invitation of President and Mrs. Gerald Ford, Sumlin represented the Sorority at a reception held at the White House launching the International Women’s Year Conference. Later, she represented the Sorority at the International Women’s Year Conference in Mexico, City. In addition, Sumlin’s administration saw the installation of the Sorority’s Founders’ Window at Howard University in Rankin Chapel. She also began the recognition of sorority members with twenty-five years of service as Silver Sorors and those with fifty years of service as Golden Sorors.

Sumlin was a presenter at the Fourth African American Summit in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1997, and attended the 1999 Summit in Ghana. Her involvement in civic, educational and professional services has brought her many awards and citations, including an honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Central State University. She has also been cited for outstanding service by the National Council of Negro Women, the Continental Society, the A.M.E. church and Outstanding Women of Dayton.

Sumlin passed away on January 11, 2018.

Accession Number

A2008.030

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/26/2008

Last Name

Sumlin

Maker Category
Middle Name

Irene

Schools

Weaver Elementary School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Central State University

Wilberforce University

First Name

Bernice

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

SUM01

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Alpha Kappa Alpha

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

11/29/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dayton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

1/11/2018

Short Description

Association chief executive and educator Bernice Irene Sumlin (1926 - 2018) was the 19th International President of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She served as a high school teacher, guidance counselor, community counselor and secondary principal. After retiring from education, she worked as an industrial consultant for Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Employment

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Pink and Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernice Irene Sumlin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her election as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her administration of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her leadership style at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls lessons from her tenure at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her challenges at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers Barbara McKinzie

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bernice Irene Sumlin reflects upon her time as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers her successes as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers sponsoring the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes the importance of scholarship at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin talks about the future of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin reflects upon the importance of sisterhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes the story of her birth

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes how she takes after her father

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers the Weaver neighborhood of Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls the Wayman Chapel A.M.E. Church in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers segregation in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls the shopping district of Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her early interest in oratory

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her elementary education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers her influences at Weaver Elementary School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her interests at Weaver Elementary School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her teachers at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her activities at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers her high school classmates

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her relationship with her brother

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers when her brother was drafted

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her theatre involvement in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers her commencement speech

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls the Combined Normal and Industrial Department at Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her work for Charles H. Wesley

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers Hallie Quinn Brown

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls the termination of Charles H. Wesley, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls the termination of Charles H. Wesley, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls joining Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes how she became a public school teacher

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers teaching at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers becoming a public school administrator

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her support of William Harrison

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her student, James E. Farmer

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers becoming supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bernice Irene Sumlin recalls her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bernice Irene Sumlin reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers school desegregation in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bernice Irene Sumlin reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bernice Irene Sumlin talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes her involvement at the Wayman Chapel A.M.E. Church in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Bernice Irene Sumlin describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$1

DAStory

2$10

DATitle
Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers becoming supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
Bernice Irene Sumlin remembers her successes as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
Transcript
Now in 1974 you became the supreme basileus of the national organization of, of Alpha Kappa Alpha [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.], right?$$That is correct.$$And can you tell us about how that happened? I know you were, you know, just tell us a little bit about that.$$I was asked by a past supreme to run for the national office. At that time Alpha Kappa Alpha was carrying thirty or forty thousand members. And I said, oh, I don't know whether I can do that or not but they told me go on and run. So Larzette Hale [HistoryMaker Larzette Hale-Wilson], the past national president, encouraged me to run. And she was a CPA [certified public accountant] within her own rights and she was Dr. Hale. They were formerly from Oklahoma. And so I did and I won. And I kind of surprised myself. And it was one of the most memorable experiences I believe I've ever had in my life. And I had excellent cooperation the whole four years that I served as international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha. And I was one of the first supremes out, well, to tell you the truth I was the first supreme out of, I started to say the State of Ohio but that wasn't true because we had L. Pearl [Lottie Pearl Mitchell] up in Cleveland [Ohio] but Dayton, Ohio. And I have to laugh at myself because when they elected me, everybody said, "We never heard of national presidents coming out of Dayton, Ohio." I said, "Well, you got one now (laughter)." And we laughed about that, you know. I said, "Little old Dayton had a--," so then I told one of my friends I said, "We have established the planes for the United States of America." I said, "The Wright brothers [Orville Wright and Wilbur Wright] are from Dayton, Ohio." And they said, "What?" I said, "The Wright brothers who established the planes that you fly on are from Dayton, Ohio." And I said, "And that's where I'm from." They said, "Dayton, Ohio." I said, "So now you can note that there is great performers from Dayton, Ohio."$It is said that we do not remember days, we remember moments. As supreme basileus what was your greatest moment, your proudest moment, your happiest moment?$$I think one of the happiest moments I had was when I brought all of the national presidents who were living and able to come to the national headquarters and I brought them and they were so thrilled. We had, at that time we had a national president that was a, that was moving toward a 102 years old, and I brought all of them together at our, at our headquarters. And they enjoyed that meeting. We had a meeting in which they sat down and they had a chance to talk to one another. That's the first time we had had them together and to have them all together at our national headquarters in Chicago [Illinois], they were very elated and excited and they never forgot talking about it, would forget talking about it or thanking me for that opportunity of bringing them all together. And they had a chance to go to the then dinner and we just rode them around Chicago, our national headquarters, and they were so elated. They were women then that was eighty, most of them were in their nineties, and we had some that was moving toward a hundred and we were able to have them all in Chicago.$$Now, were these ladies the founders of AKA [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.]?$$They were national presidents.$$Okay.$$I think we had one founder living or I buried the last of our founders during my administration. And we buried her in Washington, D.C. But I buried two of our founders during my administration.

Margaret Peters

Educator, African American history specialist, Margaret Peters was born March 12, 1936 in Dayton, Ohio. Her parents, Mary Margaret Smith Peters, and building contactor, Joseph Andrew Peters, were stalwarts of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Attending Irving School, Peters graduated from Dayton Roosevelt High School in 1954. At the University of Dayton, she earned a B.A. degree in 1959 and a B.S. degree in 1963. Peters also received her M.A. degree in 1972 and a supervisors certificate from the University of Dayton in 1974.

Peters began her teaching career at Roth High School in 1963. In 1968, as the black community continued agitated for African American history, Peters was appointed Black History Resource Teacher for the Dayton Public Schools. In 1969, she produced Striving to Overcome: Negro Achievers, which was published by Dayton Public Schools. Johnson Publishing released Peters’ Ebony Book of Black Achievement in 1970. She co-authored with her encyclopedic brother, Wendell Peters, the article “Blacks in Ohio History” in 1980. Her writing also includes numerous articles for the Dayton Weekly News, an African American newspaper, and since 1995, a column, “From The Root,” for the DaytonWeekly News culminating in a 1995 column called “From The Roots.” Also in 1995, the Donning Company published her treasury of African American history called Dayton’s African American Heritage, which has gone into an expanded edition. She was also co-editor of A History of Race Relations in the Miami Valley in 2001. Peters also served as instructor at Sinclair Community College and at Central State University West. Since retiring from Colonel White High School in 1993, she has served as coordinator of the free after-school tutorial program at Zion Baptist Church.

Peters was the recipient of the 1991 Excellence in Teaching Award for the Midwest Region from the National Conference of Negro Women; the National Education Association’s 1993 Dr. Carter G. Woodson Award; the 1993 Meritorious Award from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and was their 2005 Education Breakfast speaker. From 1993 to 1995, she was elected to the National Executive Council of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Peters is the recipient of many local awards including Dayton Public Schools’ Teacher of the Year in 1982 and the 2003 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Dayton Chapter of the National Forum for Black Administrators. Cited as one of Dayton’s Top Ten Women, Peters is a board member of the Dayton African American Legacy Institute, Inc. (DAALI) and has earned a block on Dayton’s Wright-Dunbar Walk of Fame.

Accession Number

A2006.043

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/20/2006

Last Name

Peters

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Roosevelt High School

Irving Elementary School

University of Dayton

First Name

Margaret

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

PET06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rural Retreat, Virginia

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ That Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

3/12/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dayton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

High school teacher and historian Margaret Peters (1936 - ) was appointed as the Black History Resource Teacher for Dayton Public Schools. In 1970, Johnson Publishing released Peters’ book entitled, Ebony Book of Black Achievement and later the Donning Company published Dayton’s, African American Heritage.

Employment

Thurgood Marshall High School

Dayton Public Schools

Zion Baptist Church

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:2495,43:3574,100:3906,105:6977,157:8222,174:8720,181:9550,193:10961,216:11625,225:12206,233:12953,244:13700,256:14032,261:14530,268:15194,277:15858,287:17103,313:17518,319:20091,356:20755,393:21336,401:22000,410:23660,432:33630,539:34260,551:34680,558:34960,563:35590,573:36570,591:36920,597:37690,613:39020,634:39510,643:40350,658:41960,687:42310,693:47140,798:47490,805:48050,814:49940,832:50430,840:53790,893:63717,956:64162,962:64963,974:68256,1031:71442,1064:71832,1070:72144,1075:73002,1089:74562,1120:75186,1129:76590,1159:105765,1852:106515,1865:107040,1874:107865,1889:110790,1957:115808,1992:117222,2024:123686,2155:124292,2167:128231,2225:131060,2258:131485,2264:135225,2330:137440,2335:139316,2374:141192,2419:146418,2554:147490,2576:149433,2628:150907,2660:151242,2666:151644,2673:151912,2678:152381,2686:160038,2759:160731,2772:161424,2783:161963,2791:167207,2857:167746,2865:168208,2872:171057,2923:171365,2928:171750,2934:172289,2943:174368,2977:174984,2986:176986,3023:182148,3057:182562,3064:184080,3086:185480,3092:188432,3156:190400,3187:206550,3405$0,0:7524,155:12236,292:23660,459:26380,507:26720,512:30290,570:38450,741:41340,797:42020,808:44740,864:45250,871:52960,973:53935,997:54195,1002:54650,1011:55430,1025:63360,1189:63880,1198:64335,1206:64985,1218:65960,1245:66610,1256:67260,1268:75095,1347:75530,1353:92380,1625:92725,1637:93691,1655:94243,1664:98107,1759:99832,1862:102661,1940:106594,2034:107077,2043:115230,2189:119980,2223
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Margaret Peters' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Margaret Peters lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Margaret Peters describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Margaret Peters describes her mother's experience at Roosevelt High School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Margaret Peters describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Margaret Peters describes segregation in the Dayton Public Schools during the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Margaret Peters talks about her father's role in writing the architectural history of Zion Baptist Church in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Margaret Peters describes her family and her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Margaret Peters describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Margaret Peters talks about the Classic Theater in Dayton, Ohio and Paul Robeson's legacy

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Margaret Peters narrates her photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Margaret Peters talks about the black business district in Dayton, Ohio during the early 20th century

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Margaret Peters talks about the destruction of Dayton, Ohio's historically black communities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Margaret Peters describes the contributions of African Americans from Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Margaret Peters talks about her education at Irving Elementary School and learning black history at church

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Margaret Peters talks about Dunbar High School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Margaret Peters talks about Dayton, Ohio's Roosevelt High School in the 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Margaret Peters talks about her extracurricular activities and her mentors at Roosevelt High School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Margaret Peters talks about her undergraduate experience at the University of Dayton in the 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Margaret Peters describes becoming the Negro History Resource Teacher for the Dayton Public Schools in 1968

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Margaret Peters narrates her photographs

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Margaret Peters describes her interest in black history as a graduate student at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Margaret Peters talks about reading 'Your History: From the Beginning of Time to the Present' by J.A. Rogers as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Margaret Peters talks about the publication of the 'Ebony Book of Black Achievement' in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Margaret Peters describes the curriculum she developed as Negro History Resource Teacher for the Dayton Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Margaret Peters describes resistance to black history education

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Margaret Peters talks about the teaching of black history in schools and churches

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Margaret Peters talks about her involvement with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Margaret Peters talks about the 1974 dissolution of the Negro History Resource office and lobbying for a more inclusive world history curriculum in Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Margaret Peters narrates her photos

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Margaret Peters talks about the relationship between Ancient African history and Christianity

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Margaret Peters details her involvement with the Wallpaper Project during the 1990s and the 2000s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Margaret Peters talks about the history of Dayton's West Side and the establishment of the Dayton African American Legacy Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Margaret Peters recalls a story about the Dayton Marcos and the Great Dayton Flood of 1913

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Margaret Peters talks about notable Dayton individuals and families

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Margaret Peters talks about the future of black history education in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Margaret Peters describes efforts to commemorate prominent African Americans from Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Margaret Peters describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Margaret Peters talks about teaching religion in public schools

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Margaret Peters narrates her photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Margaret Peters talks about the role of the family

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Margaret Peters talks about the first edition of 'Dayton's African American Heritage'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Margaret Peters talks about the second edition of 'Dayton's African American Heritage'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Margaret Peters talks about the Chicken Bone Express and the Freeman Field Mutiny

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Margaret Peters talks about her involvement in black history organizations in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Margaret Peters considers what she would have done differently in life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Margaret Peters reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Margaret Peters talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Margaret Peters describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Margaret Peters narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

9$3

DATitle
Margaret Peters describes becoming the Negro History Resource Teacher for the Dayton Public Schools in 1968
Margaret Peters talks about the publication of the 'Ebony Book of Black Achievement' in 1970
Transcript
Okay. So where did you start teaching?$$I started at Roth [High School, Dayton, Ohio], which was a high school at that point--and though my teaching fields were English and social studies and Spanish, I started out teaching reading because so many of the high school students could not read, or couldn't read at grade level. So I took some coursework at Miami [University, Oxford, Ohio] and started teaching reading at Roth. And then about '67 [1967], [Arthur] Art Thomas was one of the teachers at Roth at that point, and he and I and some of the others were concerned about the lack of black history. So we started going to the Board of Education, and pushing for the inclusion of black history in the Dayton Public Schools. And the superintendent was Dr. Wayne Carle, and so he arranged to have a citywide meeting where Dr. Charles Wesley was going to be the keynote speaker. But Dr. Wesley was ill and didn't come. And so I stood in for him and spoke about black history. You know, some of the major phases, why it was important to include it. And so after that meeting I was appointed as the Negro History Resource Teacher for the Dayton Public Schools.$$Now, that's quite a--we may have skipped over a lot of ground here to get there, but to be able to substitute for--$$Dr. Charles Wesley, yes.$$Who was the president of Central State [University, Wilberforce, Ohio]--$$Right, and he was president of ASALH [Association for the Study of African American Life and History].$$The confidant and co-Author with--$$Dr. Woodson.$$Dr. Carter G. Woodson of many black history books, a national recognized--$$Oh, yeah, brilliant man.$$--Leader of black history. I mean to be able to substitute for him is quite a--I mean how did you get to that point? I mean you just didn't jump up and--$$Well, I always loved history and I had done a lot of reading, and this was about the time that [HM] Lerone Bennett [Jr.] was doing a lot of writing for Ebony Magazine. A couple of years after that, The Dayton Daily News had serialized his, "'Before the Mayflower[: A History of Black America, 1619-1962]' and they asked me to write a biography to go with each of the twenty chapters. And I had done a lot of speaking in the community on different phases of black history. And so, he--when he asked me to speak, I was able to do that without a whole lot of preparation. I have a very good memory also, and so I could start with, you know, Africa the home of man and talk about Egypt is in Africa even though a lot of people would prefer that it not be there. And we'd talk about the fact that when [Christopher] Columbus got here, not knowing where he was, black people were already here. And we could kind of go chronologically and hit a lot of the main points. And because so much of that was new to a lot of the teachers who had come through just a regular school system, they simply didn't know what we considered just basic facts of history. And so as Negro History Resource Teacher, I would do workshops in the area. We prepared newsletters, we talked about how you include black culture regardless of what subject you're teaching whether it's science or math or literature. That we belong in all of those, it's not just history. So I worked in that area from '68 [1968] to '74 [1974], then in '74 [1974], I went to Colonel White High School [now Thurgood Marshall High School, Dayton, Ohio].$'Cause you're--the biographies that you wrote for the [Dayton] Daily News were I guess compiled to make the 'Ebony Book of Black Achievement?'$$Yes. What happened is, you know, 'Before the Mayflower[: A History of Black America, 1619-1962'] is an excellent book, but there's not much on any individual in it. So the news ran at twenty episodes. And with each episode, they asked me to write a biography of someone who lived during that time period. So we started with Mansa Musa, you know, the ruler in West Africa. And then we just went chronologically up through people like, you know, [Frederick] Douglass and I think we had Crispus Attucks in there. And Paul Cuffee and Mary McLeod Bethune and Mr. [Charles Clinton] Spaulding, the businessman and we ended with W.E.B. Du Bois. And then those were compiled in a book--a booklet, which went to the Dayton Public Schools ['Striving to Overcome: Negro Achievers']. And I took a few of them and sent them to Johnson Publishers and asked if they would be interested in publishing them. And they published it as the 'Ebony Book of Black Achievement' in 1970. And a lot of schools began to use it and some still use it to supplement American History because the biographies are, you know, relatively short. The illustrations by Cecil [L.] Ferguson are excellent. And so it's, that was the first published book.$$Now we were--when we found out that someone from Dayton [Ohio] did that, we were very proud. I mean, you know, in Dayton.$$Oh yeah. We got a lot of good comments on it. I did an interview some time ago in Yellow Springs [Ohio] with a young man who was from out of state, and he was familiar with the book because his teacher had used it when he was in the eighth grade. And when I was teaching at Colonel White [High School, now Thurgood Marshall High School, Dayton, Ohio], the book was there and the students would look at the picture in the back where I have all this black hair, and they would say, "Is that you Miss Peters?" I said, "Well, yes it is but that was back in 1970." So--$$The students assumed you always had grey hair?$$Oh, yeah. They can't--it's hard for them to imagine teachers being younger than they actually see them, yeah.

Manning Marable

Author and director of the Institute for the Research in African American Studies at Columbia University, Manning Marable is one of America’s most widely read scholars. Born on May 13, 1950, in Dayton, Ohio, Marable received his A.B. degree from Earlham College in 1971, his M.A. degree in American history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1972, and his Ph.D. in American history from the University of Maryland in 1976.

Marable’s academic career began in 1980 with a position as the senior research associate of Africana Studies at Cornell University. In 1982, Marable became a professor of history and economics, and Director of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University. As a professor of sociology at Colgate University in 1983, Marable was the founding director of its Africana and Latin American Studies Program, and in 1987, he moved to The Ohio State University to become the Chair of the Black Studies Department. From 1989 to 1993, Marable served as the professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. In 1993, Marable became the founding director of the Institute for the Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University.

Since 1976, Marable has written Along the Color Line, a syndicated commentary series on African American politics and public affairs, which was published in newspapers and magazines in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, the Caribbean, and India. Marable is a prolific author that has written over 200 articles in academic journals and edited volumes. Marable has also written over twenty books, including co-editing with Myrlie Evers-Williams The Autobiography of Medgar Evers: A Hero’s Life and Legacy Revealed Through His Writings, Letters, and Speeches, which was published by Basic Civitas Books in 2005. At the time of his interview, Marable had several books in progress, including one entitled Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, which is due to be published by Viking in 2009.

In 2002, Marable established the Center for Contemporary Black History at Columbia University, which produced Souls, a quarterly academic journal of African-American studies. In 2005, Marable and members of his Malcolm X Biography Project designed the content for the multimedia educational kiosks featured at the Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center at the historic Audubon Ballroom in Manhattan, the site of Malcolm X’s 1965 assassination.

Marable passed away on April 1, 2011.

Accession Number

A2005.228

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/4/2005 |and| 10/5/2005 |and| 12/5/2005

Last Name

Marable

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Earlham College

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Maryland

First Name

Manning

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

MAR11

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

John Marshall Law School

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Knowledge Is Power.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/13/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni, Cheese

Death Date

4/1/2011

Short Description

Academic administrator and african american studies professor Manning Marable (1950 - 2011 ) is the founding director of the Institute for the Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Since 1976, Marable has written Along the Color Line, a syndicated commentary series on African American politics and public affairs.

Employment

Smith College

Tuskegee Institute

Fisk University

Purdue University

Colgate University

Ohio State University

University of Colorado at Boulder

Columbia University

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Manning Marable reflects upon the importance of knowing your heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Manning Marable's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Manning Marable lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Manning Marable recalls his mother's influence on his interest in history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Manning Marable recalls his great grandfather, Reverend Jack W. Morehead

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Manning Marable describes the history of the African American bourgeoisie

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Manning Marable talks about his mother's support of integration

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Manning Marable talks about his mother's view of being American

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Manning Marable describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Manning Marable describes his paternal great grandfather, an escaped slave

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Manning Marable talks about his paternal great grandfather and grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes his father's growing up and the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Manning Marable describes how his parents met and married

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Manning Marable describes his father's education and workload

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Manning Marable describes the de facto segregation of Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Manning Marable describes his father's black nationalism

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Manning Marable describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Manning Marable describes growing up in Jefferson Township, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Manning Marable talks about his experience at Jefferson Township High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes his decision to attend Earlham College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes his experience at Earlham College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Manning Marable recalls formulating his political activism in college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Manning Marable describes his experience in Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Manning Marable describes the founding of the African National Congress

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Manning Marable talks about his mentor, Louis R. Harlan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Manning Marable recalls his experiences of discrimination as a graduate student in Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Manning Marable reflects upon his role as a historian and a teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Manning Marable reflects upon the impact of his newspaper column

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Manning Marable recalls his early experience in academia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Manning Marable recalls his early experience with political activism

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Manning Marable reflects upon black political activism in the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Manning Marable reflects upon the dearth of black political activism in the 2000s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Manning Marable reflects upon the effects of deindustrialization

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Manning Marable reflects upon popular culture in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Manning Marable reflects upon the effect of trauma on memory

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes the sights and smells of growing up

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes the founding of Tuskegee Institute in 1881

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes his family's housing development work in Tuskegee

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Manning Marable recalls Congresswoman Shirley Chisolm's presidential campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Manning Marable talks about historical efforts to found an all-black state

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Manning Marable recalls his experience at Fisk University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Manning Marable describes his experience at Colgate University

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Manning Marable talks about Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential bid

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Manning Marable describes the impact of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential bid, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes the impact of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential bid, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes the emergence of the black underclass

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Manning Marable recalls his most notable publications from the 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Manning Marable describes his experience at The Ohio State University

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Manning Marable explains transformation, an alternative to integration or separatism

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Manning Marable describes his theoretical and activist work on behalf of the black community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Manning Marable remembers his diagnosis with sarcoidosis

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes how he met his second wife, Leith Mullings

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes his wife's involvement in his treatment for sarcoidosis

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Manning Marable reflects upon racial discrimination in healthcare

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Manning Marable reflects upon the underlying cause of the Los Angeles riots

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Manning Marable remembers his breakthrough to mainstream audiences

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Manning Marable talks about African American intellectuals' media access

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Manning Marable talks about his associations with other black intellectuals

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Manning Marable describes his vision for black studies

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Manning Marable talks about affirmative action policy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Manning Marable recalls Harold Washington's mayoral victory in Chicago

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Manning Marable recalls Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential campaign

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Manning Marable recalls his academic productivity at Colgate University

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes the revival of black political activism in the 1980s

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Manning Marable recalls the challenges he faced at The Ohio State University

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Manning Marable talks about suffering from sarcoidosis

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Manning Marable recalls his move to the University of Colorado Boulder

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Manning Marable remembers the disintegration of the Rainbow Coalition

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Manning Marable describes changes in the leadership of the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Manning Marable recalls black leaders' failure to address the crises of the early 1990s

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Manning Marable talks about the spread of crack cocaine addiction

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Manning Marable describes governmental neglect of the crack cocaine epidemic

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Manning Marable recalls his hope to revive W.E.B. Du Bois' Atlanta University studies

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes his decision to work at Columbia University

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Manning Marable talks about his second wife, Leith Mullings

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Manning Marable talks about his wife's involvement in his treatment

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Manning Marable talks about his book, 'Beyond Black and White'

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Manning Marable recalls reaching mainstream audiences with 'Beyond Black and White'

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Manning Marable recalls the Los Angeles riots and the Million Man March

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Manning Marable recalls his publications at Columbia University

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes the stratification of the black community, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Manning Marable describes the stratification of the black community, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Manning Marable talks about the Black Radical Congress

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Manning Marable critiques President Bill Clinton's policies

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Manning Marable talks about the gentrification of Harlem in New York City

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Manning Marable explains the concept of neoliberalism

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Manning Marable describes his experience at Sing Sing Correctional Facility

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Manning Marable talks about founding Souls Journal

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Manning Marable describes his work with graduate students of color at Columbia University

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Manning Marable remembers the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Manning Marable talks about the side effects of his medication, chloroquine

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Manning Marable talks about his work on a biography of Malcolm X

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Manning Marable describes his academic and journalistic goals

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Manning Marable describes the neglect of the black victims of Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Manning Marable reflects upon the progress of the African American community

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

6$7

DATitle
Manning Marable describes the founding of the African National Congress
Manning Marable describes his theoretical and activist work on behalf of the black community
Transcript
And one other event; there was an event that occurred in, at the University of Nairobi [Nairobi, Kenya], one of those half dozen events that changes your life. It was in a class, in a lecture, people were bored. The instructor was K.J. King, Kenneth J. King. He was a Scott, and he was a lecturing in the college and he mentioned something that woke me up, got my attention. He kept mispronouncing Tuskegee [Alabama]. Now you know my family is from now--my--Mar, the Marables relocated and moved everything to Tuskegee in the '50s [1950s]. So, as a kid every summer I went down and I spent time with my [paternal] granny [Fannie Heard Marable], and because I was named for her husband [Manning Marable], I was a pet, Manning, Manning [HistoryMaker Manning Marable]. And family reunion the first weekend in August; Marable, Manning Marable's reunion on Saturday, the first Saturday; Morris Marable's reunion on the first Sunday of August. So Morris Marable and Manning Marable. And those reunions still exist to this day, both, right, okay, for the two great mean. Okay, he pronounced it Tuskagee [ph.] instead of Tuskegee. I said hold, what, hold up K.J. (laughter). I said you're not pronouncing it right. But, he talked about a brother named John Langalibalele Dube, he's a Zulu born in 1871. He was a Kiowa. He was an African, Christian African, second generation of an elite. James Dube was his father, first minister of the Congregational church, sent his kid to Oberlin College [Oberlin, Ohio] where he went to school for a couple of years, 1887, 1889, then he travelled around the United states raising money, came back to the U.S. in 1897 and he gave a graduation address at Tuskegee Institute [Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama] in 18--in the spring of 1897. He saw Tuskegee, it blew his mind, and he said, Dube said, the guy is twenty-six, he said what you have here I wanna take back to South Africa and duplicate. I wanna be the Booker T. Washington in South Africa, that's what I wanna do. So get this, Dube raises money, travels around with John Chilembwe, another African who, whose later claim to fame is that he leads a bloody revolt against the British in the Nyasaland, Malawi, in 1915, raises money, goes back in 1899 to South Africa. By 1901, he establishes the Zulu Christian Industrial School, which is now Ohlange Institute, just outside of Durban [South Africa], about fifteen miles outside of Durban in Zululand. In 1901, he founds Ilanga lase Natal, lase Natal, first Zulu language newspaper in South Africa. In 1903, he sends his cousin, Pixley ka Isaka Seme, 1901, to be educated in the United States and he attends Columbia University [New York, New York] and in 1905 Pixley ka Isaka Seme wins the university's prize, grand prize, for oratory, and he's the first black person to graduate from law school at Columbia University, in history, in 1905. Well anyway, Dube and Seme did--go back and they're so frustrated and fed up with the racism they had to deal with, in January 190- 1912 in Bloemfontein in Orange Free State [Free State, South Africa], they have a meeting of other African Americ- Africans about what can we do to develop something. And they looked at the United States as a model. They said well you know got the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]. Let's develop an organization that will advocate native, educated native rights and fight for equal justice. Let's call it the African National Congress [ANC], and Dube becomes the first president and Seme becomes the first secretary general, right. Interesting story right, Dube becomes the founder of the ANC and all that is traced back to South Africa. K.J. King is talking about this story. I'm finding this very fascinating. I decide to do, in effect that becomes my dissertation topic. I'm a senior, listening to this story, and I said has anybody written on this guy. No. So, I go to grad school and that became my topic.$And the living history it's still living because it's (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, yeah.$$Yeah, you've done remarkable projects using that same template.$$I wanted--selfishly I wanted to remake the field in many ways because I felt that there was an intellectual impasse in black studies. But in '90 [1990], late '90s [1990s], mid-'90s [1990s] it was very clear to me that there was increasingly a disconnect between the black intelligentsia and what I would call the professional managerial black elite, and the situation of the masses of our people and that black scholars had to intervene with a deep commitment to the empowerment and the full emancipation of the masses of our people.$$How are we breaking off? What were the, I mean, how--$$You see it everywhere.$$Okay.$$I mean from bling, bling to the kind of predatory notions of how blackness can be manipulated and marketed, to the disturbing forms of denigration of African American women that are promoted within the reactionary current of hip hop. I'm not one of these people that just denigrates all of, all of hip hop indiscriminately. Much of hip hop is extraordinary and brilliant and de- and profoundly progressive. There is a wing of it, that is. Then there is part of hip hop that is also brilliant. I guess for me the best hip hop, the most brilliant hip hop practitioner has to be Tupac Shakur, but the young brother was deeply divided. The brilliant great work and profoundly misogynistic, profoundly reactionary work as well, and then there's the gangster rap and the other element of it and then the more recent currents that are even more reactionary than gangster rap from the early '90s [1990s] was. So, but--$$What year-- I'm sorry, but go ahead.$$The main thing that I have, when I came here to Columbia [Columbia University, New York, New York] my goal was to create, recreate what Du Bois [W.E.B. Du Bois] did in Atlanta [Georgia]. In the late 1890s, Du Bois once a year and for a number of years until around 1913 at the end, the last weekend of May held the Atlanta University conferences [Atlanta University studies] where you would take up an issue to explore that year and you would produce, bring a whole series of scholars to Atlanta, read papers, and then bind it together and produce a volume. So, if you go to the library and you look for the Atlanta University series, there are these series of sterling volumes interrogating the Negro in business, the college bred Negro, I believe 1901, economics, education, all of those issues, healthcare, educ- you know, and Du Bois created the foundations of African American studies. Everything we do rest on the foundation of Du Bois, and I wanted to build another scaffold, another floor of that for the 21st century, and so we too did conferences and brought in people. We developed innovative conferences and courses and initiatives. So, we have a course where we teach at Rikers Island [New York, New York], at Rikers High [Austin H. MacCormick Island Academy, New York, New York] with four, with fifteen, sixteen, seventeen-year-old black and Hispanic young men. We successfully received seven hundred dollar, seven hundred thousand dollars from the George Soros foundation of the Open Society Institute [Open Society Foundations] to fund that. We are engaged in a project trying to develop a black theory of justice. I call it imagining justice. It simply asks the question if black folk had justice what would it look like, you see 'cause we've never had it. What would it look like? And so my argument is, is that black people within our material culture, that is, our print culture and our manifestos and writings, over a period of two hundred years, we have devised a theory of justice. It has to be gleaned from the print culture and then expressed as a theory. Now as you know, any theory, a legal theory can be used in a court of law. We have an alternative theory of the meaning of justice that can help shape law review articles, it can help shape an argument in court. And so that's one of the projects that we're pursuing; the black theory of justice.

Howard Armstrong

Howard "Louie Bluie" Armstrong was born on March 4, 1909, in Dayton, Tennessee, to Daisy and Thomas Armstrong. Armstrong's great-grandfather was a slave owner, and his grandparents were slaves. His father, a gifted musician, artist and preacher, worked as a furnace man at the LaFollette Iron and Coal Company in eastern Tennessee to support his wife and nine children. He taught his children to play a variety of musical instruments, and Armstrong learned to play the mandolin, fiddle and guitar, among others during his childhood. Armstrong's father had a gift for languages and learned to speak Italian, German, Polish and Spanish from the European immigrants working at the blast furnace. Armstrong shared this gift with his father. It was during his childhood that Armstrong also started drawing and painting, using homemade paints and brushes.

As a teenager Armstrong played blues, country, hokum and ragtime with his brothers in local bands, and in 1929 he recorded with bluesman Sleepy John Estes and string band leader Yank Rachell. With Ted Bogan and Carl Martin he formed the Martin, Bogan & Armstrong Trio and in 1933 they migrated north to Chicago, performing at the World's Fair, working as street musicians and recording music.

After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Armstrong worked as an assembly-line spot welder for the Chrysler Corporation in Detroit to support his family. After he retired in 1971, the Martin, Bogan & Armstrong Trio reunited, performing and recording several albums throughout the decade until Martin's death in 1979.

Armstrong was fluent in seven languages and was know for his fiddle and mandolin playing, but could play twenty-two different instruments. He was the subject of two documentary films, Louie Bluie (1985) and Sweet Old Song (2002), and received a National Heritage award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Armstrong passed away June 30, 2003 at age 94.

Accession Number

A2003.077

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/12/2003

Last Name

Armstrong

Maker Category
Middle Name

Howard Taft

Organizations
Schools

La Follette Colored High School

Tennessee State University

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

ARM01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Thank you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/4/1909

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

7/30/2003

Short Description

Painter and country and blues musician Howard Armstrong (1909 - 2003 ) was one of the world's greatest fiddle players. Armstrong played a total of twenty-two instruments and was fluent in seven languages. Two PBS documentary films were made about Armstrong including, "Louie Bluie."

Employment

Chrysler Corporation

Favorite Color

Dark Colors

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Howard Armstrong interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Howard Armstrong lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Howard Armstrong recalls his family origins

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his family origins

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Howard Armstrong recalls his grandparents and tells a Bible story

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Howard Armstrong talks about his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Howard Armstrong talks about his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Howard Armstrong talks about his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Howard Armstrong talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Howard Armstrong reflects on his childhood and learning to play music

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Howard Armstrong talks more about learning music

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Howard Armstrong recalls meeting the opera singer, Grace Moore

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Howard Armstrong discusses his experiences in school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Howard Armstrong talks about his college experience

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his college experience

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Howard Armstrong talks about his childhood in Dayton, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his childhoood in Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Howard Armstrong recalls his religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Howard Armstrong talks about his music career

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his music career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Howard Armstrong talks about performing on the radio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Howard Armstrong talks about leaving school and performing music full time

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Howard Armstrong recalls travelling to Chicago to perform

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Howard Armstrong talks more about performing in Chicago's Century of Progress

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Howard Armstrong talks about performing in foreign languages

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Howard Armstrong speaks briefly on his travels to Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his experience in Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Howard Armstrong recalls his move from Chicago and his move to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Howard Armstrong recalls the bombing of Pearl Harbor

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Howard Armstrong talks more about Pearl Harbor and his return to Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Howard Armstrong details how he met his first wife

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his ex-wife

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Howard Armstrong returns to talking about his Chicago experience

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Howard Armstrong returns to talking about his ex-wife

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Howard Armstrong talks about what it's like to be a musician

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Howard Armstrong discusses his thoughts about modern black music

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Howard Armstrong reflects on his hopes for the black community and his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Howard Armstrong talks about his philosophy about marriage

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Howard Armstrong talks more about his marriage philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Howard Armstrong recalls the reunion with his musical group

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Howard Armstrong discusses how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Howard Armstrong and sister Robbie at La Follette Colored High School, La Follette, Tennessee, ca. 1920s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - Classmate of Howard Armstrong's, ca. 1930s

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Howard Armstrong performing at WJBK radio, 1928

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Howard Armstrong with Ted Bogan in Fort Wayne, Indiana, ca. 1930s

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Howard Armstrong with Frances Childrey and unidentified man, Fort Wayne, Indiana, ca. 1930s

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's bassist, Bill Ballinger, with others, late 1930s

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's ex-wife, Celestine Crook Armstrong, ca. 1930s

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Photo - Howard Armstrong, his son, Tommy Lee and ex-wife Celestine Crook Armstrong, Sparta, Tennessee, 1938

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of him and his wife, Mary Majit, ca. 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of him and his wife, Mary Majit, ca. 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Photo - Howard Armstrong in Chicago, circa 1944

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Photo - The Armstrong Brothers String Band, La Follette, Tennessee, 1925

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Photo - Howard Armstrong performing at the Club Passim, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1999

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Photo - Howard Armstrong at age sixteen, La Follette, Tennessee, 1925

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of "The Old Homestead," La Follette, Tennessee, 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of the voodoo woman at the village pump, La Follette, Tennessee, 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of Reverend John Moore in La Follette, Tennessee, 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of the shooting of Sam Wade by Sheriff Dick Gaylor, La Follette, Tennessee, 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of La Follette Coal and Iron Company's blast furnaces, La Follette, Tennessee, 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of his father, Reverend Thomas Franklin Armstrong

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - Photo - Three photos of a church

Tape: 6 Story: 15 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's great uncle, Edward Armstrong

Tape: 6 Story: 16 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's uncle, Tennessee 'Tim' Armstrong

Tape: 6 Story: 17 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of his mother, Daisy Ann Milam Armstrong

Tape: 6 Story: 18 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing for his mother, ca. 1920

Tape: 6 Story: 19 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of the Armstrong Family Band

Tape: 6 Story: 20 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's drawing of his sisters Robbie and Clara, Clara's husband 'Cheese', and Howard at the piano

Tape: 6 Story: 21 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's photo of his sister Ella Mae Armstrong Coulter, ca. 1920s

Tape: 6 Story: 22 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's brother Tommie, ca. 1920s

Tape: 6 Story: 23 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's two drawings of Old Mammy Satterfield ('Mammy Batts'), and his brother Tommie watching Mammy Batts's funeral hearse

Tape: 6 Story: 24 - Photo - Howard Armstrong and his band, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 25 - Photo - Howard Armstrong at age sixty-three, 1972

Tape: 6 Story: 26 - Photo - Howard Armstrong posing with a painter's palette in his apartment/art studio in Detroit, Michigan, 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 27 - Photo - Howard Armstrong in his apartment/art studio in Detroit, Michigan 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 28 - Photo - Howard Armstrong playing guitar, 1970

Tape: 6 Story: 29 - Photo - Photo/Collage of Howard Armstrong created by Barbara Ward Armstrong, ca. 1960s

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Photo - Poster for the Fulton County Development Corporation benefit concert, Boston, Massachusetts, 1983

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Photo - Howard Armstrong, Tommie Lee Armstrong and Ted Bogan, Washington D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Photo - Howard Armstrong and Barbara Ward Armstrong

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Photo - Illustration of Howard Armstrong by R. Crumb; album cover art for the soundtrack to the movie 'Louie Bluie', by Terry Zwigoff, 1985

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Photo - Howard Armstrong performing in Tucson, Arizona, 1995

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Photo - Howard Armstrong and Barbara Ward Armstrong, San Francisco, California, 1997

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Photo - Howard Armstrong performing in Augusta, Georgia, 1994

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Photo - Photo of Howard Armstrong by John A. Gallagher, 1996

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Photo - Howard Armstrong at his home in Boston, Massachusetts, 1990s

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Photo - Howard Armstrong performing at Yoshi's Jazz House, Oakland, California, 1990s

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Photo - Promotional flyer for documentary film about Howard Armstrong, 'Sweet Old Song,' 2002

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Photo - Howard Armstrong's wife, Barbara Ward Armstrong, 2000s

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Photo - Howard Armstrong and Barbara Ward Armstrong in their home, Boston, Massachusetts, 2000s