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L. Duane Jackson

Architect L. Duane Jackson was born on October 13, 1949 in Brooklyn, New York to Annie Belton Jackson and Marion Robinson. He attended Andrew Jackson High School and graduated from Hampton Institute. He earned his M.C.P. degree and M.Arch. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971 and 1978 respectively. From 1993 to 1994, he was a Loeb Fellow of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

From 1978 to 1980, Jackson worked as an architectural designer at Wallace, Floyd, Ellenzweig, Moore, Inc. He then joined the architectural firm of Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc., followed by Mintz Associates Architects/Planners, Inc. in 1981. That same year, he established is own firm, which he named Lewis Jackson and Associates, Inc. In 1985, Jackson and fellow architect Fernando A. Migliassi, AIA co-founded Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. Their clients included film director Spike Lee and Peter Norton of Norton Utilities. Also, in 1985, Jackson became the president and CEO of the real estate development company Urban Investment Associates, Inc. His involvement with the Demonstration Disposition Initiative began in the 1990s, at which time he assisted in the rehabilitation of public housing structures such as the Franklin Park Housing Development, the Washington Heights Housing Development, and the Sonoma/Maple Schuyler Housing Development. In addition to his work on the construction of the Lucerne Gardens in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Jackson also acted as general manager of Parmelee Court, a mixed income housing development in Boston’s South End neighborhood. In 2007, Jackson reorganized Urban Investment Associates, Inc. and Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. into Alinea Capital Partners, LLC, focusing exclusively on real estate development, where he served as a managing member and founder. There, he oversaw the development of Grove Hall’s Mecca retail center, and the Warren/Palmer Building, a mixed-use facility in Roxbury.

Jackson served as a director on numerous non-profit and public boards, such as serving as vice chairman of the Massachusetts Port Authority and chair of the Real Estate and Strategic Initiatives Committee, where he established an historic diversity and inclusion policy to provide ownership and professional participation in the Agency’s real estate projects. In 2017, he was awarded the Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner Advocacy Award by the Vineyard Chapter of the NAACP.

Jackson and his wife, Deborah C. Jackson, live in Milton, Massachusetts. They are the proud parents of sons, Leigh Dana and Jeffrey Brian Jackson.

L. Duane Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.164

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/21/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Duane

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

L.

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

JAC45

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

There But By The Grace Of God Go I Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

10/13/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Architect L. Duane Jackson (1949- ) co-founded Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. and Urban Investment Associates, Inc., reorganizing them both into the real estate development company Alinea Capital Partners, LLC.

Favorite Color

Blue

Robert T. Coles

Architect Robert T. Coles was born on August 24, 1929 in Buffalo, New York to George Edwards and Helena Vesta Traynham Coles. After graduating from Buffalo Technical High School, Coles enrolled at the Hampton Institute. He transferred to the University of Minnesota in 1949, where he co-founded the university’s NAACP chapter. Coles received his B.A. degree in 1951, and his B.Arch. degree in 1953; and went on to earn his M.Arch. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1955.

In 1955, Coles studied in Europe, having received the Rotch Traveling Scholarship from the Boston Society of Architects. Upon returning to the United States in 1956, Coles was hired at the Boston architectural firm of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean in Boston, Massachusetts. One year later, Coles joined the Boston firm of Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott. After spending the next several years at Carl Koch and Associates and working as an architect and custom design manager for Techbuilt, Inc., Coles returned to Buffalo to design the John F. Kennedy Recreation Center. In 1963, he founded his own architectural firm, Robert Traynham Coles, Architect, P.C.; and the following year, he founded the East Side Community Organization. Coles designed the Joseph J. Kelly Gardens Housing for the Elderly in Buffalo in 1967, and the Health, Physical Education and Recreation Complex at the University of Buffalo's Amherst Campus in 1968. In 1972, Coles completed the Urban Park Housing Development in Rochester and founded the Community Planning Assistance Center of Western New York. Coles also served as the American Institute of Architects’ deputy vice president for minority affairs. In 1981, he became a fellow at the American Institute of Architects. Coles designed the Providence, Rhode Island Railroad Station in 1984, and the Frank Reeves Center for Municipal Affairs in Washington, D.C. in 1986. Coles also taught as a professor of architecture at the University of Kansas, and later worked as an associate professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University. In 1994, he became the first African American chancellor of the American Institute of Architect’s College of Fellows; and in 2006, Coles designed Buffalo’s Frank E. Merriweather, Jr. Branch Library. Coles published his memoir Architecture and Advocacy in 2016.

Coles received an honorary doctorate of letters degree from Medaille College in 1977; and in 1981, he was awarded the Whitney M. Young Jr. Citation from the American Institute of Architects. Coles also received the James Williams Kideney Award from the New York State Association of Architects in 2004; the Robert and Louise Bethune Award in 2009 from the Buffalo/Western New York Chapter, AIA; the Fellows Award from the 2011 Honors Awards Jury, New York State AIA; and in 2016 the Diversity Award from the Buffalo/Western New York Chapter, AIA. In 2011, his home in Buffalo, which he designed, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Coles and his wife, Sylvia Meyn Coles, have a son, Darcy, and a daughter, Marion.

Robert T. Coles was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.077

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/22/2018

Last Name

Coles

Maker Category
Middle Name

T.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Follow Through Magnet School

Hutchinson Central Technical High School

Hampton University

University of Minnesota

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

COL36

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

I See.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/24/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Buffalo

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Architect Robert T. Coles (1929 - ) founded Robert Traynham Coles, Architect, P.C. in 1963. He also co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects, and taught at the University of Kansas and at Carnegie Mellon University.

Favorite Color

Brown

William Whitley

Architect and business executive William N. Whitley was born on April 29, 1934 in Rochester, New York and raised in Warren and Cleveland, Ohio. Whitley’s father was a chemist; his mother an actress. He graduated from Kent State University in 1957 with his B.S. degree in architecture, and went on to serve as a captain in the United States Air Force from 1958 until 1960.

In the 1960s, Whitley joined his brother, James, in operating Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC, a full service architectural and planning firm specializing in institutional design, sport facility design, and commercial housing design, where he served as vice president and project principal. Whitley/Whitley Architects has provided a substantial amount of work in Cleveland and the State of Ohio for various city and state public agencies, as well as services for cities and community groups in cities throughout the United States, including Saint Louis, Missouri; Indianapolis, Indiana; Fort Wayne, Indiana; Gary, Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; Saginaw, Michigan; Buffalo, New York; Rochester, New York; New York City, New York; Orlando, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Reading, Pennsylvania; Washington, D.C. and San Diego, California. Whitley/Whitley was involved with work on Cleveland’s Tower City Center, the Cleveland State University Convocation Center, Lincoln Junior High School, the Lee-Harvard Branch of Cleveland Public Library, the Central Area Multi-Service Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Guesthouse development. Other projects have included Kent State University's Fashion Museum, Cuyahoga County Community College's Learning Center, and Cleveland’s John F. Kennedy Recreation Center. Whitley’s firm has also designed numerous housing units and worked on several rehabilitation projects.

Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC has received many awards and honors, including the Progressive Architecture Design Award, the HUD Biennial Design Award, Burlington Awards, the House and Home Award, the Ohio Prestressed Concrete Design Award, the Ohio Masonry Council/ASO Award for Excellence in Masonry Design, the Cleveland Chapter of Architect’s Building Design Award, the East Ohio Energy Conservation Award, and the ASO Honor Awards Certificate of Merit.

Whitley has three children: Kyle, Kym and Scott.

William Whitley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.036

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/12/2014

Last Name

Whitley

Maker Category
Middle Name

Nivens

Organizations
Schools

Kent State University

Nathaniel Rochester School No. 3

Roosevelt Elementary School

Rawlings Junior High School

Alexander Hamilton Junior High School

John Adams High School

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Rochester

HM ID

WHI20

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

4/29/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Catfish

Short Description

Architect and business chief executive William Whitley (1934 - ) served as vice principal and project principal of Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC.

Employment

Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC

United States Air Force

Joseph Baker and Associates

Damon, Worley, Samuels and Associates

Dalton and Dalton

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
0,0:720,13:1440,38:1680,43:23622,298:25446,325:31284,397:32363,423:34770,477:36513,508:36845,513:50750,700:52730,719:56020,731:58780,780:59585,789:63384,838:80870,1057:81600,1065:82038,1072:82330,1077:82622,1082:82987,1088:90786,1221:91122,1226:95540,1293:103754,1375:104164,1381:114900,1532:115220,1538:116180,1561:118090,1575:126370,1722:129730,1799:130360,1809:131480,1834:137632,1902:138070,1909:139165,1991:147920,2078:148760,2091:150356,2179:178645,2562:179919,2583:190130,2700:190704,2737:192426,2766:192836,2772:193738,2797:194230,2804:194804,2812:195378,2830:195706,2835:196280,2844:209316,3213:245708,3580:248704,3642:252150,3687$0,0:2108,48:4624,134:11900,294:15904,308:42220,698:43750,730:44110,735:45100,754:46000,766:57966,926:58542,935:60054,977:60414,983:66376,1049:68812,1121:69595,1132:70291,1143:72118,1188:74206,1221:74554,1226:82870,1341:85595,1346:86216,1359:90910,1403:91330,1411:95084,1464:108110,1677:112486,1700:112946,1706:126024,1822:131029,1924:141072,2042:142318,2055:149378,2156:159634,2257:168414,2396:169757,2423:172048,2479:179022,2587:192930,2810:204060,2950:205760,2977
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Whitley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Whitley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Whitley describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Whitley talks about his mother's career aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Whitley talks about his father's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Whitley describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Whitley describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Whitley talks about his siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Whitley talks about his siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Whitley describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - William Whitley remembers his family's move to Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Whitley remembers his early awareness of race

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Whitley describes his experiences as a twin

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Whitley describes his early education in Warren, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Whitley describes his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Whitley talks about his neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Whitley remembers his early interest in architecture

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Whitley remembers playing sports in junior high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Whitley recalls playing football at John Adams High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - William Whitley remembers his early instruction in architecture

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - William Whitley recalls his decision to attend Kent State University in Kent, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - William Whitley remembers his football teammates at John Adams High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Whitley talks about the Black Economic Union of Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Whitley recalls his experiences at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Whitley remembers meeting his wife at Kent State University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Whitley describes his experiences in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Whitley remembers his internship with Robert P. Madison

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Whitley recalls the start of his career as an architect

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Whitley recalls the founding of Whitley and Whitley, Architects and Planners

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - William Whitley talks about the impact of Mayor Carl Stokes' election

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Whitley talks about his experiences of racial discrimination in the architecture field

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Whitley remembers the development of Whitley and Whitley, Architects and Planners

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Whitley talks about how decisions are made in the architecture industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Whitley talks about mayoral politics in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Whitley describes his international travels

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Whitley remembers winning a Progressive Architecture Award

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Whitley talks about the role of risk taking in architectural design

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Whitley talks about the importance of listening to clients

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - William Whitley recalls his work with the East Cleveland City School District, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Whitley recalls his work with the East Cleveland City School District, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Whitley talks about building the Wolstein Center at Cleveland State University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Whitley talks about mandated architecture requirements

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Whitley talks about forging relationships with tradespeople

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Whitley talks about the staff of Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Whitley talks about securing architectural contracts

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Whitley reflects upon his career

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - William Whitley describes his advice to aspiring African American architects

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - William Whitley talks about the black architecture community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - William Whitley describes the material selection process

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - William Whitley describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - William Whitley talks about the leadership of Mayor Carl Stokes

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - William Whitley talks about his daughter, Kym Whitley

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - William Whitley describes his sons

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Whitley reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - William Whitley talks about his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - William Whitley describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - William Whitley narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

6$1

DATitle
William Whitley remembers his early interest in architecture
William Whitley talks about his experiences of racial discrimination in the architecture field
Transcript
When did you ever, I mean was there a time when you were a youth, did you think of becoming an architect?$$Oh, well, you know architecture was--I didn't think about becoming an architect but I found out what I liked. When I lived in Warren, Ohio we used to make huts, and we used to go out in the woods and chop down little trees about that big around and we could--that was our timber, laid the floor out and we made the walls out of that. Made the roof out like that, come inside take mud and smooth and make your plaster inside. We were, we built a hut; then we got to the point, we said now, let's not--let's make a village, not just a hut, a village. My mother [Beatrice Nivens Whitley] had given us a--at the time it was Army goods and it was a little, a little hatchet that the soldiers had. It came with the--you went to the Army Navy store and got you a little hatchet and you could take, you could take a tree down with one good hatch--hack at it. So, I was in architecture then, I got a feel for it and I enjoyed it; and then we used to go play in houses that were being built, and we'd get run off, but you know there was a little sense there. But what turned on us on was I went to a movie ['Tycoon'] with John Wayne and he was an engineer, civil engineer. He was a civil engineer down in Brazil and you know at the end he got the girl, right? He built these bridges and things like that but at the end he won the girl. We said this looks kind of nice, maybe I'll be a civil engineer. So, I started thinking about being a civil engineer first; then I went to another movie, I gotta come up with his name, but he was an architect.$$This is Gary Cooper, right?$$Gary Cooper was sitting on top of the building, the wind was blowing through him, his--and he blew up a few of the buildings that he didn't like that people didn't build it the way he was supposed to build it. I said that's it's I'm gonna be an architect; and that was it, from then forward (makes sound), that was it.$$Yeah, that's 'The Fountainhead.'$$'Fountainhead,' 'Fountainhead.'$$Yeah, based on the novel ['The Fountainhead'] by Ayn Rand.$$That's it, 'Fountainhead' did it; saw that and that was--there was no turning back then. Started off in the tenth grade and said hey, they asked me what I wanted to do, I told 'em. They brought in an architect he told me, said, "Hey you, let me tell you, you unh-uh, you two, you two forget it."$$Now this is career day, right? When--$$Career day.$$--when--$$But they had broken us up: people that wanna be architects go here, people that wanna be doctors go there, pe- you know et cetera; dentists go over here, talk to these people.$$So this is, now you and your brother [HistoryMaker James Whitley] often go, you've done it for three years I think, go to the public schools here.$$Um-hm.$$In this area and encourage kids to become architects, right?$$That's right. That's right$$So, here's when flash back to your youth.$$Yeah, they were doing that but they were turning me, turning me around instead of turning me forward--trying to turn me around I don't know, but they actually they felt they were doing me a favor, they thought they were doing me--"Hey, don't go there, you're gonna have a problem."$$They knew I guess (laughter).$$They knew I was gonna have a problem; and I had a problem.$$Okay, so, these are the times, the times have changed.$$Yeah, times have changed but you know, you know the world had to change.$$Right, right. So, so you're in the seventh grade when this happens, right?$$Seventh grade.$$Seventh grade, you're twelve years old I guess?$$No, when I got the speech I was in just the tenth grade, so I was about fifteen.$All right, yeah I--off camera I was just saying that--$$Yeah.$$--people often say that Harold Washington in Chicago [Illinois] as the first black mayor made the process fair, and you had a reaction to that?$$Well, it's impossible, making it fair doesn't mean anything. President of the United States, who's that, Johnson [President Lyndon Baines Johnson], he made it fair, put it in the law. I went down to the Navy department [U.S. Department of the Navy] in, in where is Hampton [sic. Arlington, Virginia]? Hampton, Vir-?$$Yeah, Virginia. Yeah.$$Virginia--Hampton, Virginia. I walk in there and the guy says, "Hey?" I said, "I'm, here's my application. I wanna participate on these [U.S.] Navy jobs." They were building like crazy, I'm talking billions of dollars they're spending. I just want a little piece. Well, you know you're in Virginia now, and we got rules. You know the laws says you gotta do this, you gotta do that. (Unclear) no, no, don't worry about those rules. We got rules, you gotta go down and talk to So and So and then the AIA [American Institute of Architects] in the state has to say you're all right, and this is--you're blocked. There are too many people with a rule, there're too many people below that rule that control. So, you're not gonna, you know just by putting a rule, they had the law. At that time, it was mandatory. Nope, unh-huh the gates did not open up because the rules were changed. No; and that's true federal, state, everywhere. Every time I go--I can go anywhere and ask for a job. James [Whitley's brother, HistoryMaker James Whitley] may have told you about I had a buddy that was head of--classmate, got him through calculus. His final grade was dependent on, (whispers) "What's number three?" Helped him through calculus, he passed the course. They made him--he went on to be head of Kent State's [Kent State University, Kent Ohio] architectural--the school, the university, he was a university architect that controlled--he could say that he has developed millions of work for the campus. He went from there to Marriott hotels [Marriott International, Inc.] all over the world. I call him up and say, "Hey, you're doing all these hotels, how about giving me one?" Never happened, never happened, but after it was all said and done he called me. He said, "Hey, let me tell you the truth. I couldn't." And it wasn't a matter of you can't do the work, he said that, "These guys around here, they would question my judgment." That's what he told me, he said, "Man they would que-," I would be out of here just based on judgment, so that's true everywhere. It's not, and then the guy didn't even want to do it. The law can say, "Do it." (Makes sounds) That's what you--you're fighting. That's a head wind that you're fighting and it's a reality.$$Yeah, and that's a lot to go against.$$That's a lot to go against you know. Everybody is--"Hey, how will I look when I do this," you know (laughter)?

James Whitley

Architect and business executive James M. Whitley was born on April 29, 1934 in Rochester, New York and raised in Warren and Cleveland, Ohio. Whitley’s father was a chemist; his mother an actress. He graduated from Kent State University in 1957 with his B.S. degree in architecture.

In 1963, Whitley founded Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC, a full service architectural and planning firm specializing in institutional design, sport facility design, and commercial housing design, where he has served as president and designer. He went on to expand the firm alongside his brother, William, and his sister, Joyce, and moved Whitley/Whitley Architects to Shaker Heights, Cleveland in 1969.

Whitley/Whitley Architects has provided a substantial amount of work in Cleveland and the State of Ohio for various city and state public agencies, as well as services for cities and community groups in cities throughout the United States, including Saint Louis, Missouri; Indianapolis, Indiana; Fort Wayne, Indiana; Gary, Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; Saginaw, Michigan; Buffalo, New York; Rochester, New York; New York City, New York; Orlando, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Reading, Pennsylvania; Washington, D.C. and San Diego, California. Whitley/Whitley was involved with work on Cleveland’s Tower City Center, the Cleveland State University Convocation Center, Lincoln Junior High School, the Lee-Harvard Branch of Cleveland Public Library, the Central Area Multi-Service Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Guesthouse development. Other projects have included Kent State University's Fashion Museum, Cuyahoga County Community College's Learning Center, and Cleveland’s John F. Kennedy Recreation Center. Whitley’s firm has also designed numerous housing units and worked on several rehabilitation projects.

Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC has received many awards and honors, including the Progressive Architecture Design Award, the HUD Biennial Design Award, Burlington Awards, the House and Home Award, the Ohio Prestressed Concrete Design Award, the Ohio Masonry Council/ASO Award for Excellence in Masonry Design, the Cleveland Chapter of Architect’s Building Design Award, the East Ohio Energy Conservation Award, and the ASO Honor Awards Certificate of Merit.

Whitley’s son, Kent, is a project manager and architect at Whitley/Whitley.

James Whitley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.035

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/12/2014

Last Name

Whitley

Maker Category
Middle Name

M

Schools

Kent State University

Roosevelt Elementary School

John Adams High School

Alexander Hamilton Junior High School

Rawlings Junior High School

Nathaniel Rochester School No. 3

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Rochester

HM ID

WHI19

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

4/29/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Architect and business chief executive James Whitley (1934 - ) founded Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC.

Employment

Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC

Joseph Baker Associates

Keith Haag

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:11340,255:19020,334:23306,375:27954,420:30738,484:31602,504:33138,529:44230,734:62280,1108:72910,1232:78304,1309:96106,1573:101605,1657:104720,1677:105926,1704:114750,1773:115550,1787:127965,1950:134070,2032:135474,2069:137190,2113:139998,2174:146680,2241:146960,2247:148290,2279:148640,2285:149130,2293:177181,2630:183040,2825:183390,2831:183880,2839:185420,2872:207656,3191:208792,3270:216200,3466$0,0:6555,95:19100,220:31714,414:34298,481:48151,652:52797,799:55742,942:76643,1143:84442,1256:97434,1459:97702,1464:117164,1739:117448,1759:119791,1849:120075,1854:120856,1867:121637,1883:123909,1921:124264,1927:126039,1974:126607,1983:128027,2022:128311,2027:129092,2040:137220,2140:137520,2146:138060,2211:138420,2216:143971,2291:147832,2353:149911,2395:150406,2401:154160,2428:154640,2435:161234,2534:161502,2539:161770,2544:163244,2581:168510,2674
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Whitley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Whitley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Whitley describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Whitley talks about his mother's education and occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Whitley describes the community of Marked Tree, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Whitley describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Whitley describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Whitley describes his parents' move Rochester, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Whitley lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Whitley describes his family's move to Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James Whitley describes his younger sister

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James Whitley describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - James Whitley describes his experiences as a twin

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - James Whitley describes his neighborhood in Rochester, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Whitley describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Whitley recalls his favorite childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Whitley remembers Rawlings Junior High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Whitley recalls transferring to Alexander Hamilton Junior High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Whitley describes his influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Whitley describes his coursework at John Adams High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Whitley describes the history of football in Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Whitley describes his activities at John Adams High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Whitley recalls his decision to become an architect

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - James Whitley recalls his decision to attend Kent State University in Kent, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - James Whitley describes his architectural training at Kent State University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Whitley recalls his internship with Robert P. Madison

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Whitley recalls his experiences at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Whitley describes his decision to join the track and football teams

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Whitley remembers his mentors at Kent State University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Whitley recalls joining the firm of Joseph Baker and Associates

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Whitley remembers serving in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Whitley recalls founding Whitley and Whitley, Architects and Planners

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Whitley describes his sister's career as an urban planner

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James Whitley recalls the growth of black business during the Black Power movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Whitley recalls the election of Mayor Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Whitley talks about the importance of networking in the construction industry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Whitley remembers developing his architectural firm

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Whitley recalls his contract with the Cleveland Clinic

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Whitley describes his approach to architectural design

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Whitley describes the obstacles to innovation in architectural design

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Whitley describes the challenges facing African American architects

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Whitley describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Whitley reflects upon the African American leaders of Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Whitley describes his relationship with Robert P. Madison

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Whitley recalls building facilities for the East Cleveland City School District

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Whitley describes the challenges faced by architectural firms

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Whitley remembers winning a Progressive Architecture Award

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Whitley recalls his work with the General Services Administration

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Whitley describes his relationship with the American Institute of Architects

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Whitley talks about his mentorship of young architects

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James Whitley describes the role of lawyers in the construction industry

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - James Whitley describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - James Whitley reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - James Whitley shares his advice to aspiring architects

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - James Whitley talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - James Whitley describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
James Whitley describes his sister's career as an urban planner
James Whitley recalls his favorite childhood activities
Transcript
So your brother just came on over from--$$No, he just left, he just--but see, the fre- I'm single, I was single at this time. William [HistoryMaker William Whitley] was married [to Kaysonia Whitley] with children. I, I can live, I knew I could live six months and, and the fee was six thousand dollars no way, I mean. I was quite, quite free and able to do and with, with that, he came along. 'Cause the fee was set could do what he had to do.$$Okay, so where did you set up your offices?$$It's, the first offices was at Lee Road and, and Chagrin Boulevard.$$It's in, in Cleveland [Ohio]?$$In Cl- Shaker Heights [Ohio], really but--$$Shaker Heights (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) Cleveland, yeah.$$All right, and now, now your sister Joyce [Joyce Whitley] is I guess involved at some point. Does she--$$Now, here's what happened, then there's the (unclear). Now, now we're architects. My sister majored in anthropology. Case Western Reserve [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio]. She went to Fisk [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee] though, she went to Fisk. But, she smoked, so my mother [Beatrice Nivens Whitley] took her out of there. So, she finished at Reserve, anthropology. But, when she finishes school she says--and, and I don't know, happenstance, whatever. Urban, urban planning is a big deal at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois]. Well, she somehow gets hooked up and take- goes to University of Chicago. Takes up planning city planning, all right. Comes out and she's working for a guy named Meltzer [Jack Meltzer] in Chicago [Illinois]. And as all of this comes together, I'm leave- I'm, we're going into architecture. She's getting trained as a city planner. The riots occur, the riots occur. Now when the riots occur all the federal funds go to solve that problem. But, to solve the problem you have to have a plan, you have to have a plan to solve the problem. Meltzer is, is right in position to do it. And he jumps on it immediately. Now, Joyce is in there with, with him and sees how it's done, and it's all over the country. I mean it's all over the, planning is all over the country. Joyce comes out city planner and works- experience with Meltzer every, every major city. Cleveland. So, all of a sudden she's getting work, Cleveland, Buffalo [New York], St. Louis [Missouri], Fort Wayne [Indiana], Cincinnati [Ohio], Chinatown in Washington D.C., New York City [New York, New York], New York City, Roosevelt Island, Roosevelt Island. I mean it was all over the place. But, when you get a planning, what comes after planning? Buildings. Now we're in a position, now we're in a position--we're open [as Whitley and Whitley, Architects and Planners; Whitley/Whitley Architects and Planners LLC], now this opportunity starts. Now, all over the, all these federal buildings I mean and I'm talking about multifamily, multifamily structures are going up in all the--where, where these plans are. So, then we're up and rolling then, I mean then, you know. We were knocking those things out, you know three or four a year, for many years. And the planning studies.$$So, so, so you get started in '63 [1963] but your, your sister gets involved in the late '60s [1960s] I guess--$$Yeah, it was the late '60s [1960s], '60s [1960s] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Around when the riots are happening--$$That's right, that's right, that's right.$$--and post riots.$$And when that start happening--$What were you interested in as a little kid?$$Small, real s- just playing and--oh I'll say one thing the Warren [Ohio] experience I think probably was the most memorable. But we, we lived at--Warren's a small, you know, small basically a rural kind of community. And we lived close to the edge of town. So, the woods and the trees and all of that was accessible to us, and oh we played that to death. We played that to death. I mean it was just, just pure freedom, I mean pure freedom. And we ran out the door, you ran, you ran out to woods. You could do anything you want out there, you know what I'm saying. And that's what we did. And, I, I would say maybe that's when one of the start of the creative side, anyway. During the war [World War II, WWII], we're playing war. And you could play war in the woods. You can dig, you can dig trenches, you can build, build huts. And then we, we were famous 'cause we--tree huts. We'd have 'em swing the tree. And they had a popular tree which was about a inch and half, two inch diameter. Oh you could cut down with one or two hacks, tie 'em together or nail them together. Tied 'em together was basically what we did. And you could make anything you wanted. And we had a, a cement, we found a cement mixer--hands. Boy we made that a boat. We both--and had a creek out there. You could go down the creek and the creek is maybe, say it's eight foot wide. But, but enough to float and you know, play with what you had to do. And you, we knew how to swim, so we weren't afraid of water. But, as I think back on it those experiences were very, very nice, I mean that was a--you were free to do what you wanted to do. And it's kind of of nice, but I felt I was living in the city, I didn't feel like I was living in the country. It was a city life but freedom at the edge. You could play baseball out there, you know build yourself a--it's funny. Yeah we built baseball diamonds, it's not like there was the baseball diamond out there. But, you could put that together and play. And I remember the people that--but that was basically a white community. We were in a, all those people I remember those were, were white kids.$$Okay.$$Yeah, and none those problems in the South. I mean no southern kind of problems at all. That was like, you know I remember Paul Picerelli [ph.] lived behind me. I could come down with those, those guys names, you know. The pretty girl was Shirley Novak [ph.], you know, what I'm saying. But, a good experience, and Warren was a very good experience. Then we came to the big city, Cleveland [Ohio]. Now, that's the big difference. There's a big difference there now.

Louis Jones

Louis Jones is president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. and serves on the Board of Directors for the Black Contractors United. He was born on July 1, 1946 in Hunstville, Alabama to Arthur and Alberta Jones. His father was a farmer and construction worker in the South, but when his family moved to Chicago his father became a baker with the A&P grocery chain factories. Jones attended Tilden Technical High School before earning his Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle in 1973. In 1969, Jones began working for Skidmore, Owings and Merrill architects. In 1973, Jones began working for McKee-Berger-Mansueto as a School Rehab Manager.

In 1975, Jones became a licensed architect and moved to San Francisco, where he worked for a private consulting firm. He moved back to Chicago three years later and began working for Schal Associates. Between 1978 and 1984, Schal Associates built the Avondale Center, Madison Plaza, the Chicago Tribune Printing Plant, and the Magnificent Mile. In 1984, Jones became president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., specializing in engineering, construction, management, consulting, and architecture. The following year, Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. was part of the $1.7 billion renovation and expansion of O’Hare International Airport. The firm also was hired to work on Provident Hospital in 1990 and McCormick Place in 1997. In 2008, Jones' firm was hired to be part of the team to build the University of Illinois’, the James Stukel Towers student housing complex.

Since 1986, Jones sat on the Board of Directors for Black Contractors United and was elected Chairman of the Board in 1998. He was also selected to serve on the Mayor of Chicago’s Task Force for Minority & Women Business Development in 2005. Jones was a member of the Illinois Capital Development Board and has served as president pro tempore of the Illinois Department of Employment Security Advisory Board.

Louis Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 27, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.030

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/27/2010

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Bret Harte Math and Science Magnet Cluster School

Edward Tilden Career Community Academy High School

University of Illinois at Chicago

First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

JON23

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Fishing

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

7/1/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Estero

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Architect and corporate chief executive Louis Jones (1946 - ) was president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. and served on the board of directors for the Black Contractors United.

Employment

Skidmore Owings & Merrill

McKee, Berger & Mansueto

Schal Associates

Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company

Regal Theater

Johnson and Jones Architects

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louis Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louis Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louis Jones describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louis Jones remembers his paternal uncle, James Jones, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about his family's history of enslavement

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes his father's work at The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louis Jones describes his family's community in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louis Jones describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Louis Jones recalls his homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louis Jones lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louis Jones describes his experiences at Bret Harte Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louis Jones recalls his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louis Jones recalls his friends at Bret Harte Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louis Jones remembers his near drowning at the Hyde Park YMCA in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes his experiences at Tilden Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louis Jones talks about his part time job at the Regal Theater in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louis Jones remembers his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his decision to attend the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Louis Jones remembers the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Louis Jones recalls his peers and professors at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about the visiting professors at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Louis Jones describes his architectural thesis

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about his favorite architectural style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes his part time position at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Louis Jones recalls his graduation from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Louis Jones describes his organizational involvement at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his duties at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Louis Jones remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his transition to McKee Berger Mansueto, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Louis Jones describes the role of a construction manager

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his construction projects in California and Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes his building projects with Schal Associates, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes the founding of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Louis Jones talks about his early projects at Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Louis Jones talks about the redevelopment of the Provident Hospital of Cook County in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Louis Jones recalls his work on the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Louis Jones talks about the construction of the McCormick Place South Building in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about his involvement with the Rainbow PUSH Coalition and the Black Contractors United

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his children

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about the success of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Louis Jones remembers the contracts secured by Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his current projects at Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Louis Jones reflects upon the specialty of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his role in the construction of ACE Technical Charter High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about his work at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes the changes in building design after September 11, 2001

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes the process of building a hospital

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Louis Jones describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Louis Jones talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Louis Jones reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Louis Jones narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Louis Jones describes the founding of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.
Louis Jones recalls his work on the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
And from Schal [Schal Associates, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], where did you go? And what year was this?$$Well Schal, I came to work for Schal in, in June of 1978 from, from San Francisco [California], and worked on 200 South Wacker [200 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois], Tribune plant [Freedom Center, Chicago, Illinois]. Then Schal joint ventured with McHugh [James McHugh Construction Company, Chicago, Illinois] and I was the project director for the North Hall of McCormick Place [McCormick Place North Building, Chicago, Illinois]. And that went through a couple iterations where it went way over budget and they, they started trying to pull it back and work on it. And at that time, a friend of mine, Eric Johnson, who I went to school with [at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle; University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois], we had a side business that was Johnson and Jones Architects [ph.]. So in the evening I would leave Schal, go around the corner and I had the license, I had gotten my architect's license. So I would look at the drawings that were being done, seal them, sign them, go home. So Schal kind of got wind of it. And this was in the era when there was big affirmative action pushes and Harold Washington, you know, was, was, was getting, getting in--in line to be mayor, you know, it was like in eighty--'82 [1982], '83 [1983] or something like that. So we started talking and they became a mentor company and they wanted to ow- hold a third of the deal and we were going to create Louis Jones Enterprises [Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]. So I said okay, I don't wanna be accused of fronting for a big white company, so I gotta get somebody to look at this. So Sam Hurley [Samuel Hurley] was first deputy director, he's African American engineer, he's first deputy director of public works for the City of Chicago [Illinois]. And he was also on the city's affirmative action committee. Now they call it affirmative action. So I had Sam look at it. And he said, "Well, I know you Lou [HistoryMaker Louis Jones], I know you from Schal and all that, you know what you're doing, you're for real and all that kind of stuff. So why don't you, you know, move forward with it and see what." So then I turned it over to [HistoryMaker] Earl Neal who gave it to Anne Fredd [Anne L. Fredd] in his office to evaluate.$$Earl Neal was a black attorney?$$Yeah. And then they kind of got Ja- [HistoryMaker] James Lowry involved. And so Lowry help promulgate it as a good mentor protege thing. So I went with it. And so--and the 29th of February it was incorporated as Louis Jones Enterprises. I was living in Oak Park, Illinois and so they had my home address for a while, and then I had a small office at 440 North Wells [Street]. And so that's how I started a company. And we had a five year buyout deal and all that. In about three years, I bought them out because we were, you know, just something we wanted to do. So we started out working on McCormick Place North to bring it back, because they had sort of mothballed the job because the legislature had not funded it. And then the O'Hare Development Program came about. And by the fall of that year, in 1984, when I opened the company, by the fall of that year I had ten employees and they were all working at O'Hare field [Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois]. And I had been spending quite a bit of time in the prior year as an employee of Schal and then later on as a consultant helping the team that was doing all the budgeting for the O'Hare Development Program. What is the United terminal [United Airlines Terminal 1] gonna cost. What's the inner outer taxi way relocation and widening gonna be, the second taxi way bridge. Did a lot of analysis and studies and stuff on that. And so Dick Unsulman [ph.] was the executive director of the O'Hare Development Program and he sent out a--like an ultimatum, "Either Lou Jones is full time working with me on the O'Hare program," because he was involved with McCormick Place somehow, "or he's working on McCormick Place, which is it." Well my business and my employees were all at O'Hare, so I moved to the O'Hare thing and let the McCormick Place thing go. And I became deputy director of construction management for the O'Hare Development Program. So all of the facilities stuff, they had a deputy director for facilities and a deputy director for infrastructure. So this guy, Dan Kaiser [ph.], was over all the civil stuff like runways and roads, and stuff like that. And I was over all the buildings, like the terminal buildings, the crash fire rescue stations, that kind of stuff. And within a couple years I had twenty-five or thirty employees out there and me spending full time there when I started to pick up other work was getting to be a strain, so I brought in Joe Doddy [ph.] who's still working out there for somebody else, who's a classmate of mine, to be the deputy director for facilities.$What was the next big project that your, your firm [Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., Chicago, Illinois] had? You had Provident [Provident Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois], you had O'Hare [Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois]?$$The Harold Washington Library [Harold Washington Library Center, Chicago, Illinois] came up and McCormick Place South [McCormick Place South Building, Chicago, Illinois] in the '90s [1990s]. Both were, were done--they had international design competition design build--they wanted design build. And we teamed with a group that call themselves the SEBUS Group, it was Schal [Schal Associates, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], Epstein [A. Epstein and Sons International, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], U.S. Equities [U.S. Equities Realty LLC; CBRE Group, Inc.] and I forget what the B in there was [Hammond, Beeby and Babka, Inc.; Hammond, Beeby, Rupert, Ainge, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]. But we did something like 10, 15 percent of the deal. We had the union crew that--a construction manager operates sort a like general contractor, they have what they call temporary facilities and controls or general conditions. We had a crew of about fifteen laborers, carpenters and one operator, and Barb [Jones' wife, Barbara M. Jones] went through a lot of people because we insisted on hiring African Americans, and we had some issues with that, and we had to really go to--we actually had to do some stuff. 'Cause I wrote a very ugly letter that everybody asked me to burn or shred because if it got to the Sun-Times [Chicago Sun-Times] or something--'cause I was threatening them that they were mani- manipulating me into laying off black folks and hiring Mexicans and white people unfairly. Because I would put a black carpenter out there and--or a black laborer and, and the, the other firms that were involved wou- would complain that they were, they were too slow, they didn't know what they was doing or something. And I said, you know, you're trying to tell me that a journeyman carpenter doesn't know what he's doing, you know, give me a break, you know. So finally--when you start a construction job there's ebbs and flows. At the beginning there is some site work. They're, they're doing the foundations and stuff and you need some laborers around there to do cleanup. You might have a little bit of safety with a carpenter or whatnot, and maybe those guys will get three weeks work or a couple months work, then they get laid off because there's a lull. And then when that thing starts to come out of the ground and it's a project that's big as Harold Washington Library, then you need a full time cleanup crew and you need a couple of people there to do backup safety where the subcontractors don't do the barriers where people might fall, you know. And if you're the general or you're the construction manager you better see that they're done. And even if it's somebody else's duty and then you just back charge them for it. So we had those kind of people. And so that came to nearly fifteen people, and I think we had one white person and one Hispanic, everybody else was black. And there was always some issue. So finally I wrote a letter and I said, "Look, you know, you've manipulated me into laying off my whole crew and then you call and said you wanted these people back and you recommended its people that wasn't black." "We don't want--we don't want that written down, where are the rest of those letters." And so then the edict came down, leave Lou [HistoryMaker Louis Jones] alone, let him hire the people that, you know, he sees fit, as long as they're doing the job.

Nathan Jones

Artist and inventor Nathan Jones was born on June 27, 1942, in Shreveport, Louisiana, to Bertha Lee Jones and Eunice Jones. When Jones was young, his family moved to West Dallas, Texas, where he lived with his cousin, Helen. With the encouragement of his mother, he began painting at the age of seven. Jones attended George Washington Carver grade school, then CF Carr, and Fanny C. Harris schools. Jones went to James Madison High School, where he met his future wife. After his high school graduation, Jones attended Texas Southern University, where he first became aware of another black artist, Dr. John Biggers.

After attending Texas Southern University, Jones moved to Columbus College of Art and Design, where he learned about art history and theory. He entered the University of Texas at Arlington, where he studied two years of architecture, earning a two-year certification in architecture; he also earned his B.F.A. degree while attending the University of Texas at Arlington. Jones also attended El Centro College,the University of Dallas for special training in lithography, Eastfield College in order to study printing and also Richland College. He spent a total of ten years in school studying. In 1975, Jones’s first museum show was held at the Midland Museum of Fine Arts; he was an instant success, selling around twenty-five paintings for $30,000. Jones continued to have shows in Houston throughout the 1970s and became financially successful.

In 1981, Jones designed a commemorative U.S. postage stamp for Dr. Charles Drew; that same year, Jones became the creator of the cover for the 1981-82 Southwestern Bell Telephone Directory. Jones had been interested in inventions since childhood, and as an adult began to strive towards patenting some of his own. Jones invented a simple device called the Multi Caddy, which cleans most golf equipment; he then founded MultiGolf Systems International of Texas, LP, a company devoted to selling his invention. Subsequently Jones has patented a total of five inventions which have gone into production for commercial retail. In 1992, Jones founded N.J.K. Properties, Inc., beginning his own architectural business and designing a number of buildings in Texas, which include the Fitzhugh Apartment Complex. Jones has also developed an authentic historical art series, the Buffalo Soldier Series, based on nine years of research into the history of African American soldiers.

Accession Number

A2007.237

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/14/2007

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

James Madison High School

George Washington Carver Grade School

CF Carr School

Fannie C. Harris School

University of Texas at Arlington

Columbus College of Art and Design

Texas Southern University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Nathan

Birth City, State, Country

Shreveport

HM ID

JON17

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/27/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Painter, architect, and inventor Nathan Jones (1942 - ) had a lucrative art career nationally and internationally. Jones held seven patents, including one for the Multicaddie, a device that cleans most golf equipment. Jones was also a successful architect; he was the founder of N.J.K. Properties, Inc., an architectural firm that designed a number of buildings in Texas.

Employment

MultiGolf Systems International

N.J.K. Properties, Inc.

Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
0,0:7856,197:9650,348:17840,596:43406,908:46091,930:51237,1067:52067,1109:84910,1520:85354,1527:89868,1615:93715,1629:95080,1665:95340,1670:98462,1709:99266,1716:100338,1725:101072,1736:104102,1774:107946,1799:108298,1804:118548,1996:125745,2048:126255,2055:128125,2084:130250,2232:149922,2433:169806,2684:170422,2694:192550,2968:196528,3017:202970,3108:206640,3141:220124,3310:227006,3439:247856,3738:253610,3793:263770,3941:284554,4222:287592,4275:288180,4282:288964,4291:293864,4349:294452,4356:321160,4765$0,0:18519,309:19266,358:20843,537:59294,990:61469,1028:62600,1050:66406,1073:72938,1139:80076,1258:81321,1284:82870,1289:83146,1294:94319,1490:96145,1537:103263,1586:103895,1597:106581,1673:128660,2006:129444,2016:135380,2068:138605,2142:148954,2293:155910,2391:171030,2728:189275,2883:207975,3143:220828,3317:229774,3558:241958,3706:244390,3747:244846,3776:248570,3827:250698,3865:251002,3870:272900,4087:290270,4294:298820,4397
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nathan Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones recalls his paternal grandfather, who was born into slavery

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones talks about his family's land in Shreveport, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones describes his family community in Shreveport, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nathan Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nathan Jones describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nathan Jones remembers his early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nathan Jones describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones talks about the racial demographics of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones talks about housing segregation in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones describes his family's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones talks about the mass incarceration of African Americans in Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nathan Jones remembers his early interest in art

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Nathan Jones describes his elementary schools in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nathan Jones recalls his early artistic influences

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones remembers lessons from his schoolteachers

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones describes the start of his painting career

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones recalls enrolling at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones recalls transferring to the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones describes his experiences at the Columbus College of Art and Design

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nathan Jones recalls his medical exemption from U.S. military service

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Nathan Jones remembers earning his degree in art

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones recalls studying architecture at the University of Texas at Arlington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones remembers his professional aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones recalls his art show at Reverchon Park in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones talks about earning a living as an artist

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones describes his beliefs about material goods

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nathan Jones describes his artistic style and process

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nathan Jones describes the chemicals he uses in painting

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nathan Jones talks about researching the subjects of his paintings

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones describes his postage stamp designs

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones recalls his commission to paint 'Now What Did I Do With That Nutmeg?'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones remembers inventing the Multicaddie

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones talks about the success of the Multicaddie

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones describes his ambitions for Multigolf Systems International

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Nathan Jones talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Nathan Jones describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Nathan Jones reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Nathan Jones reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Nathan Jones talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Nathan Jones describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Nathan Jones narrates his photographs and paintings

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
Nathan Jones recalls his art show at Reverchon Park in Dallas, Texas
Nathan Jones remembers inventing the Multicaddie
Transcript
Okay. Well you see, what I'm trying to do, is trying to find out in a chronological way what you did next. So we're jumping too--we're jumping around too much I think. So I'm trying to find out what you did after you got out of the University of Texas [University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas].$$Well after I got out of University of Texas, I continued to--that's when I did my Reverchon [Reverchon Park, Dallas, Texas] art show and made all this money, and then after that (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well tell me the story of that--okay, yeah all right.$$See I--$$Let's tell that story and then--$$Well, the way that happened, a girl by the name of Delores Martin is the one that intro- asked me to participate in this show. And I said, "Delores, I shouldn't do it because it's in--right there in Highland Park [Texas]," where it's the most prejudiced place in the United States I feel right there. And she said, "No Nathan [HistoryMaker Nathan Jones], I think you ought to do it 'cause, you know, they're a little bit open-minded." And I was very hesitant. And I went down and I did that show, and it was a three-day show. First day only lasted about a half day, sold all of my paintings except one. So I was rich (laughter). I felt rich. I had money, lots of it when I bought me a Continental [Lincoln Continental] and all kinds of stuff. But that was my beginning right there. So, and my wife and I got to move from Oak Cliff [Dallas, Texas] to North Dallas [Dallas, Texas] and--and we played with the money and we--I mean, it was just a real exciting. You know, we made all that money. And I kept this one painting--$$About how much money are we talking about?$$Oh, about thirty thousand dollars at least.$$And off of how many paintings sold?$$I probably had no more than probably twenty-five paintings. My paintings was never inexpensive. People used to laugh at me (laughter), but my teacher told me, Mrs. Collins, Gladys Collins [Gladys I. Collins], she said, "Set your price and don't negotiate it." She always said it, set your price. So what I always--what I do I put the price that I think it's worth and then I put the price that you can get it for. Now if you don't like the price that you can get it for, I go back and tell you, look, here's what you're getting. Here is the actual price. Now I got two prices, I got one. I used to have these six thousand--I was hung up on six thousand dollar prices way back then. Tell you what happened, while I was out--I was out--while I was on the Reverchon--out at Reverchon Park, here's how I made a lot of that money. A guy called me after I had gotten home and I had paintings that I would not take out of the house 'cause I didn't think I was gonna do any good with those. But these were my private things. Guy named Ray Ives [ph.] called me and he says, "Nathan, my brother," that's the way he talked. Nathan, my brother. And he's a white guy. He says, "I love your work and I wanna buy some." Now this guy's rich, okay. Lived on Turtle Creek [Dallas, Texas] in Highland Park again. So, he says--I said, "Well, what do you want." What, do you want an appointment or whatever. He said, "No," said, "I'm gonna leave it to you." He said, "You pick out me four paintings and bring them to me." And I said, "Well what price range?" He says, "Whatever you think." Now I'm really messed up because I don't wanna take him the most expensive paintings obviously and I don't wanna take him something that's gonna offend him. So I'm really messed up. And so all the time I'm sitting here thinking now how much, what should I do with this guy. I don't know, I really don't. So I put--I took some paintings that--these are my love things that I mean, I don't wanna sell. But here's an opportunity. So I took about two paintings for--from three thousand to five and then the highest one I took was seventeen thousand. Why not, it's seventeen thousand, that's what it's valued. And when I got there, he wrote me a check. He didn't say nothing. Just wrote me a check for those paintings. And he and I became friends, friends for years, years and years. I don't care where he go in the world, he calls me. But that was one thing that took my way up approximately thirty thousand dollars. And a--and a Lincoln Continental back then cost around eight or nine. So and you can get it loaded for everything. So, I'm just telling you how money, you know, money will buy a lot, thirty thousand dollars would buy a lot. In fact, that house over there that I was telling you that I couldn't buy, it was thirty-two thousand. But, anyway we was able to buy anything, we paid cash. We got plenty of cash, we just bought stuff. So that was my first big break.$Can you tell us now about the Multigolf [Multigolf Systems International] and how did you become an inventor, now you're an architect and artist and businessman (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Actually I've been wanting to invent all my life, ever since I was a kid. I said, if I invent one thing, I'm gonna just get rich. I would see--I didn't--you know, that's putting it a little before--cart before the horse. But I said, I'm gonna get rich if I--and so I used to write just all kinds of inventions. I got a whole file of things that I've invented. I invented this calendar and I said I'm gonna get rich with this thing because it's real unique. It's got pockets, it's just a big thing, it's got pockets and it's got dates and they're interchangeable, each. And so next month, all you do is interchange--just change the date, okay. And so you don't have to ever buy another calendar. You change the dates and you change the month. And this thing's got big pockets. Now these pockets are for, say for instance you want to mail a letter today and but you know that it's not due until three weeks from now or two weeks and you want your money to stay in your account. If you mail the check now they're gonna cash it, right. So what you do, you stick this letter in this slot when you're gonna mail it. So meanwhile four or five, ten days pass, you don't have to worry about it getting there late because it's sticking in this pouch, right. So when that time comes, you just take it out and you mail it. It gets there on time, your money stayed in the bank longer. So, this was a great calendar, I use it. I got one right now in front of my desk. I made this calendar, I went to get it--apply for a patent from one of these people, attorneys and things. And when they finished telling me how much money it was gonna cost me, I said, "No forget it, I'll just use it myself." So that's how I got involved with the patent things. And I did the--I went to play golf here about--it's been about ten years ago, maybe eight years ago. I was playing--I started playing golf 'cause I said, "I don't why anybody'd hit a ball and chase it for five hundred miles--for five hundred yards before they get to the green." So I didn't understand that. I didn't wanna play golf. But I started playing golf and when I got on the course, I had these new clubs and there was nothing to clean them up with 'cause I hit, you know, these golf course are moist, stay moisture--they keep moisture in the ground because what they do, they irrigate them all the time, they got to, to keep them pretty. So the grass is soft, and there's usually a little mud underneath the grass once you hit down. So I went to golf stores and I wanted to buy something to keep my clubs clean. Couldn't find a thing. So I had a patent search done by an attorney, nothing existed. So I then, that's when I went on through with my design. I designed this product that does ten things. Cleans balls, cleans clubs, cleans shoes, cleans grip, cleans hats, cleans--and provides water. So, this was a good product because all you do is take this product and you slide it on your golf bag. It's very small, does all these things. Not cumbersome, easy to install in just seconds. When you're finished, you just slide it off, put it in your golf bag, tighten it up and you got it. But then again, the functionality of it, you'd--you know, you need to know what it does, you know, all these ten things. But basically you need to clean your clubs. So everybody wants to clean their clubs. They pay--you pay eleven hundred dollars, eight hundred dollars for a set of golf clubs, you don't clean them, the dirt really grinds into the metal and wears your clubs out, wears on your clubs. So you need them clean. So, I designed this product that does all these things. So since I've done that, I got really seven--I got six patents, and I got seven or eight products that I've--two of them are not patented.$$Okay, now the golf product is called Multigolf, right?$$It's called the Multicaddie, yeah. The company that I established is called Multigolf Systems International and it looks like--it looks like this product should do really well on the market 'cause it--it's innovative, there's nothing like it and every golfer needs to clean. There's not a golfer that plays golf on earth that doesn't need to clean.

Jose J. Mapily

Retired architecture professor and artist Jose Julian Mapily was born on August 13, 1941 in Washington, D.C. to Gladys Mines Mapily, a clerk, and William Mapily, a master sheet metal mechanic. Mapily attended and graduated from Howard University in 1965, earning his B.A. degree in architecture. In 1972, Mapily earned his M.A. degree in city and regional planning, also from Howard University.

Mapily started his career at Morgan State University as an associate professor of architecture and city planning on the graduate level program. He then returned to his alma mater, Howard University, in 1980 again serving as associate professor of architecture and city planning. While serving as an educator, Mapily also worked at a local architectural firm, Bryant and Bryant Architects and Planners. He served as the principal architect in charge of designs for some Washington, D.C. building projects including the Charles Hamilton Houston Neighborhood Center, the Mary McLeod Bethune House and the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church. Mapily also completed designs for a $20 million project for the University of the District of Columbia, Van Ness campus.

Mapily has also begun a career as an artist. His artwork can be described as gridlike paintings made out of white dots on a dark ground that resemble schematic drawings of buildings or circuit diagrams for electrical components. In 2002, Mapily’s artwork appeared at the Gala Auction Exhibition at the WPA/Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. In 2004, he participated in the exhibition, Medusa Muse Artists at North Carolina Wesleyan College Gallery in Rocky Mount, North Carolina.

Mapily was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.165

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/26/2007

Last Name

Mapily

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Julian

Schools

Kelly Miller Ms

Nalle Elementary School

Spingarn STAY High School

Bruce-Monroe Elementary School

Richardson Elementary School

Howard University

First Name

Jose

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MAP01

Favorite Season

None

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere New

Favorite Quote

It Is All Leslie's Fault.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/13/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Architect and architecture professor Jose J. Mapily (1941 - ) was an associate professor of architecture at Morgan State University and Howard University. He also served as principal architect in charge of designs for some Washington, D.C. building projects, including the Charles Hamilton Houston Neighborhood Center and the Mary McLeod Bethune House.

Employment

Bryant and Bryant Architects and Planners

Mapily Associates Architects and Planners

Turner Associates

Anthony N. Johns Archtects

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:8228,162:8954,167:12783,176:13671,185:14670,194:16446,226:17001,232:17556,239:18444,249:18999,254:20331,267:26610,282:27546,297:28716,319:32460,366:32850,372:35112,415:35424,420:36204,431:36828,441:37452,448:41196,506:41976,536:42288,541:48171,570:49134,581:54717,605:55466,613:58890,646:59425,652:60495,664:60923,669:69921,731:71104,747:71741,755:72105,760:72469,765:87960,956:88660,968:90660,986:94949,1001:95265,1006:96687,1025:97635,1038:99294,1065:105190,1079:109150,1088:109550,1094:111179,1103:111415,1108:111710,1115:121127,1191:127740,1332$0,0:676,3:4720,21:5165,27:5877,35:7301,59:10238,102:12285,124:12997,132:13709,141:16201,157:23100,281:44706,492:45798,506:46981,522:59407,631:60908,655:61935,670:62962,691:63278,696:65253,732:65727,743:66517,754:71390,775:72218,782:73184,790:78890,821:84350,869:87343,970:88438,1003:88730,1008:90482,1056:93329,1127:93767,1134:94424,1146:102950,1246:116330,1430:119769,1440:124920,1472:125376,1479:127504,1518:127884,1524:130012,1563:134952,1693:137384,1752:137764,1758:138068,1763:142960,1786:143660,1799:152220,1877:152780,1887:155696,1914:156398,1926:156866,1933:160432,1962:161116,1973:164004,2021:164916,2039:170084,2126:171832,2155:178110,2199:178485,2205:178785,2210:179160,2216:180060,2230:185280,2283:186307,2302:186939,2312:187334,2318:191945,2355:192490,2361:193362,2370:194125,2378:194670,2384:202057,2500:203242,2520:213604,2645:214048,2653:217090,2692
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jose J. Mapily's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily talks about the history of slavery in New York

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jose J. Mapily describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jose J. Mapily describes his father's occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes how he takes after his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his experiences as a Boy Scout

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his neighbors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily recalls the technology of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily remembers repairing his family's television set

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes the practical skills he learned as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his elementary schools

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his dyslexia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his experiences with dyslexia in school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his early mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily describes the Episcopal Church of the Atonement in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily remembers professional basketball players from his neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily recalls running track at Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his decision to become an architect

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily lists influential African American architects

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about William H. Moses, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily describes the challenges faced by African American architects

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes his experiences with dyslexia as an adult

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his influences at Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily recalls being discouraged by his guidance counselor

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily recalls SNCC members at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily recalls the alumni of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes his studies at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his early career in architecture

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers founding Turner Associates, PC

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers working on the Logan Circle historic district in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily remembers designing mass transit systems

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his challenges as an architect

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes the impact of computers on the architecture industry

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes the Charles Houston Community Center in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily remembers building the Charles Houston Community Center

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his designs for the University of the District of Columbia, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his designs for the University of the District of Columbia, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes the courses he taught at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his teaching experiences

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns for his students

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns about the educational system

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his architectural style

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his architectural style

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his painting career

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his partnership with Leslie King-Hammond

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily talks about 'The Magic Birdhouse'

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily describes his other collaborations with Leslie King-Hammond

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes his son

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns for the architecture industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Jose J. Mapily recalls his decision to become an architect
Jose J. Mapily remembers building the Charles Houston Community Center
Transcript
What was your concentration in high school [Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School, Washington, D.C.]? Did you--$$In, in high school, in the ninth grade was the year that the Russians launched Sputnik [Sputnik 1] and was the first time I heard the term aeronautical engineer. So, myself and one other friend, the one other Eagle Scout, Otis Young, he was, Otis is three years older than I am so he was already in high school and wanted to pursue aeronautical engineering so I asked him what do I need to take, you know, when I get to high school. So, his, one of the courses he said was drafting and I started drafting, my drafting course the first semester in high school and it was taught by an architect who happened to be a classmate of my parents from high school. Dave Brown, as soon as he saw the last name, he said, "I know you, Billy [William Mapily] and Gladys' [Gladys Mines Mapily] son," I said, "Yep." Well, he gave me permission to come over to his office and that's when I changed from deciding to pursue aeronautical engineering to becoming an architect and from the tenth grade, I knew what I wanted to be.$$Okay.$$Okay.$$Now was the, I just wondered, was the, was the National Organization of Minority Architects (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) No, not yet.$$No, yeah.$$It was around, I didn't know about it.$We were, I think the first African American firm that they hired and one of the reasons they hired us because it was in the African American community. The community needed this facility [Charles Houston Community Center; Charles Houston Recreation Center, Alexandria, Virginia], however, it was one extremely tight budget and the individual that I had as a project manager, actually had, (laughter) had less experience than I did, okay. He was a younger guy than I was and when I finished designing the building and we were submitting it for what we call, bids, that means that you're about to give the drawings and the written documents to a bunch of contractors to determine, you know, what they would build the facility for. Well, this particular person looked at the square footage that we had and he went into a cost estimating book and looked at what was the average cost and came to me and said, "Jose [HistoryMaker Jose J. Mapily], your building is going to cost, you know, it's going to be over budget." I said, "No it's not." I said, "I've never designed anything over budget." He said, "It's going to be over budget based on my calculations." I said, "Well, my estimator says that here's what it's going to cost and it's below budget." He didn't want to believe me and was going to hold up our pay request, said, you have too much square footage. So, you know, being a problem solving kind of individual, you know, I'm looking at, I got, I have about twenty folks that are going to be looking for their paychecks soon and this guy's going to hold it up 'cause he doesn't want to believe me. On the way back to the office [of Turner Associates, PC], I said, I know how to solve this. I've got to get the square footage down. So, there were certain build--certain parts of the building along the perimeter that, I said, okay, if I cut off one foot by the length of this element, I can get it down to the square footage. I went back to the office and told my draftsman, "Look, change this dimension down by one foot, this one down by one foot." "Why?" I told him what happened. I said, "And then run a fresh set of prints and that tomorrow I want you to take these drawings, along with these calculations, over to this guy and turn 'em in." We did, I got my payment and then a couple of weeks later when the bids came out, it was forty thousand dollars below what my estimator said it was going to be. So, you know, you asked me my favorite, favorite is a nice great little building done for a community that badly needed this kind of facility and I was able to prove, you know, my point that, you know, no, I'm right, this is under the budget. That's one favorite.

Herbert DeCosta, Jr.

Architect and building contractor Herbert Alexander DeCosta, Jr. was born on March 17, 1923 in Charleston, South Carolina to Herbert A. DeCosta, Sr. and Julia Craft DeCosta. DeCosta’s interest in architecture began when he was thirteen years old while working for the family construction business which was founded in 1899 by his grandfather Benjamin DeCosta. He graduated high school from the Avery Institute in Charleston in 1940 and went on to receive his B.A. degree from Iowa State College in architectural engineering in 1944.

Prior to joining the family business in 1947, DeCosta worked as an architectural engineer for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, now known as NASA). He returned to the DeCosta Company as Vice President and became President, serving there until his retirement in 1989. Under his leadership, the company undertook major renovation projects to preserve the historical landscape of Charleston and other areas. One of his most notable projects was the restoration of the Herndon Mansion in Atlanta, Georgia. This mansion was owned by one of the wealthiest African American men in America, Alonzo Herndon, founder of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company.

The H.A. DeCosta Company was named one of the top 100 black businesses in the nation by Black Enterprise magazine in 1979. Upon his retirement in 1989, DeCosta continued to be active in the field of preservation as a restoration consultant and project manager.

DeCosta’s work has been featured in various magazines and newspapers across the country. He has received various awards and recognitions for his contribution to Charleston, including South Carolina’s Governor’s Award and the Frances R. Edmunds Award for Historic Preservation. DeCosta passed away on December 28, 2008.

Accession Number

A2007.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/2/2007

Last Name

DeCosta

Maker Category
Middle Name

Alexander

Schools

Avery Normal Institute

Immaculate Conception School

Iowa State University

First Name

Herbert

Birth City, State, Country

Charleston

HM ID

DEC02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Europe, South Africa

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

3/17/1923

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Charleston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish

Death Date

12/28/2008

Short Description

Construction chief executive and architect Herbert DeCosta, Jr. (1923 - 2008 ) joined his family's business in 1947, a construction company that was in existence from 1899.

Employment

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Langley Field

H.A. DeCosta Company

Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
0,0:1752,26:2920,43:6980,57:26650,207:30554,288:31018,303:44668,410:98136,904:99394,926:106015,996:117491,1124:123280,1181:125906,1192:136719,1316:152510,1387:163680,1466:166630,1495:189670,1657:202356,1783:202728,1788:224222,2001:227100,2019:232765,2083:233500,2092:266310,2378$0,0:1080,8:1512,13:2700,25:14883,284:22278,378:22614,383:23118,391:23706,400:30390,485:47422,698:56070,776:56880,786:70695,1034:71500,1042:83258,1115:83554,1120:119257,1472:131716,1585:134708,1631:144244,1738:144492,1743:144740,1748:145422,1786:145794,1793:149258,1860:155682,1940:156218,1945:164574,1995:166788,2012:167895,2017:168510,2023:169740,2034:211045,2267:217702,2317:218908,2332:222094,2359:228246,2427:241243,2530:242990,2537:249220,2633:250120,2837:259270,3091:317795,3374:318159,3384:325872,3454:329100,3481:333600,3539
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Herbert DeCosta, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandparents' escape from slavery

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandparents' life as freemen

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. talks about his maternal relatives

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing and personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his maternal ancestors

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls his father's contracting business

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his neighborhood in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers the Avery Normal Institute in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his experiences at the Avery Normal Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls the music curriculum at the Avery Normal Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his decision to attend the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his college housing, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his college housing, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls his upbringing in a wealthy family

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls his influences at the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls his early career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. recalls joining his father's construction business

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his construction projects, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his construction projects, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his construction projects, pt. 3

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his renovation work throughout the South

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers the Citizens Committee of Charleston County

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his civil rights activities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers the assassinations of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his daughters

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. talks about his marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. talks about selling his construction company

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his advice to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Herbert DeCosta, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

4$5

DATitle
Herbert DeCosta, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandparents' escape from slavery
Herbert DeCosta, Jr. remembers his construction projects, pt. 1
Transcript
Well, they were both born slaves in Macon, Georgia. And decided, they were still young, and I believe they were married in Macon, I'm not sure, but anyway, they had decided that they, no I don't think they were married, they wanted to get married and have children, but under the law at that time, the children would be slaves, you see. So they didn't want their children born as slaves so they decided that they would escape, and Ellen [Ellen Craft] was a seamstress and William [William Craft] was a carpenter and so, and she decided to disguise herself as a white gentleman. You see, she was very fair and she looked like a white person, so that's what she disguised herself as. And she had, they bought a top hat, then she had her arm in a sling and wore dark glasses, and then a bandage around her mouth because see she couldn't speak in, you know, good English, and she didn't want to be asked questions you see, so that was the reason for the bandage around the mouth so she would not have to talk. So they decided and, of course, William to be her slave, and they were supposed to be going, now they told their owners that they were going to visit their relatives and friends on Christmas Day on some nearby plantation. See, slaves, as I understand it, were permitted to visit relatives and friends on Christmas, so then, so that morning they left and boarded a train, and they ended up in Baltimore [Maryland]. Now Baltimore was the last stop before Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], which was, you know, in a free state, so the officials were very careful, you know, about slaves traveling into freed states. So then they asked for all kind of identification and they almost got caught. So it was Christmas Eve and they said, somebody told them, they said, "I traveled with them, or with him, this gentleman all the way from Macon, Georgia, and he's all right, it's Christmas Eve, just let them go on," and so that's how they got past the customs in Baltimore, and then they ended up in Philadelphia, and they lived in someone's farmhouse, and then they were taught to read and write, but things were sort of, hot you might say, so to speak, in Philadelphia, so they thought they better move on to Boston [Massachusetts]. So some friends helped them to get to Boston and while in Boston, William opened a carpenter shop or cabinet shop and Ellen continued to sew.$You had some information about buildings that you worked on early on (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah. It was my early days here [at H.A. DeCosta Company]. One, we built the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance [North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company] building, corner of Coming [Street] and Cannon Street. I designed that and built that. And that was designed to take care of adding a second story if they wanted to, but they, the Clemmons [ph.] family just sold it the other day, I see, and the father died, and the two boys inherited, of course they're not boys, they are grown men, and they decided to sell the building 'cause they got a good price for it so they sold that. And then rebuilt an educational building on Johns Island [South Carolina] for the Methodist church. See Johns Island back in those days was really kind of rural see. There wasn't any Kiawah [Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island, South Carolina] down there, or one on the other end, and nothing like that. It was just a sort of rural country place, and they built this building to take care of the people so they'd have some place to go up for recreation, and you know, have meetings and programs and things of that type. So that's what we built. And then we also remodeled the Carolina Savings Bank, and that was one of the banks, one of the big banks in Charleston [South Carolina]. We remodeled that. Put in new counters, a new safety deposit vault, and did things, that type of thing. Then I remember I did the drawings for the vault and then also built a parish house for our church. One of the first things we did.$$And this was St. Mark's Church [St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Charleston, South Carolina]?$$Yes.$$So you worked with your father [Herbert DeCosta, Sr.] and you become president in what year (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Nineteen--$$Nineteen sixty [1960]?$$Sixty [1960]. I think that's what it was.$$And tell me what happened after that.$$Well--$$Did you become more into undertaking more major renovation projects?$$Well, we did major renovations, you know, when he was, that was the main thing that he was interested in, you see. See then, I'm looking at this little sheet that had--(pause) we did a lot of work for a storage house and foundation. See that's the foremost preservation society in the city, and we knew a lot of people who were members of that. So when they organized about sixty years ago, we did a lot of their work. See we did 61 Laurens Street, 82 Anson Street. These were all houses that we did before the foundation and then we also did a house at 25 East Battery [Street], and that was the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Drayton [Emily Beatty Drayton and Charles H. Drayton, Jr.]. He was a very wealthy northerner, who married a Charleston girl, and we, they had this big house that we renovated for them. Course it used to be a planter's townhouse and he had a house in the country and then they had beautiful townhouses. It was a beautiful townhouse that he lived in, and we, and it was someplace and we restored this, and then they also had in the back a place for servants or guests 'cause that was a two-story residence. And whether they used that, I mean, 'cause I didn't see any other places on the property that slaves could live 'cause this was, they built this place just before the Civil War see. So that must have been their house but that was a nice house, and then there was a little land, we restored a small kitchen building. It was behind that house you see.

Donald Stull

Architect Donald L. Stull, was born on May 16, 1937, in Springfield, Ohio. His family moved to Columbus, Ohio in 1949, where he graduated from East High School in 1955. He attended Ohio State University, earning a B.S. degree in architecture in 1961. Two years later, he received a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. For the next four years he developed his skills and knowledge with the Architects Collaborative in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Samuel Glaser Associates in Boston, as a designer and project manager.

Stull, a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (FAIA), is the founding partner, owner, and president of the architectural firm, Stull and Lee Associates, Inc. Founded in 1966 as Stull Associates, in Boston, Massachusetts, his architectural and urban design and planning firm has been recognized throughout New England and nationally and internationally. Stull’s broad experience and contributions include the design of educational, health care and correctional facilities, highway infrastructure, transit stations and multi-family housing. Stull has also been a leader by bringing attention to the unique contributions of African American architects and urban designers across America with New DesigNation. The first New DesigNation Conference was held in Philadelphia in November 1996. Over 500 designers of color examined issues faced by African Americans in the design profession

In the mid-1960s, Stull established himself as a solo architect and planner for both public and private agencies to meet the needs of a “new Boston,” as a case of urban renewal. In 1990, M. David Lee, a graduate of Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, joined Stull, and the firm became Stull and Lee Associates, Inc. With co-partner Lee and a staff of forty design professionals – Stull and Lee grew from residential design to major building projects in Boston including the Roxbury Community College, the Harriet Tubman House, and the Ruggles Street Station of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).

Stull and Lee’s most recent awards include the Boston Society of Architects (BSA) Award for Excellence in Architecture for the Boston Police Headquarters; the American Institute of Architects Honor Award for Architecture for the Ted Williams Tunnel (to Boston’s Logan Airport); the BSA’s Honor Award for Design of the Williams Tunnel; and the American Planning Association/Massachusetts Chapter Social Advocacy Award.

Stull is the father of three: Cydney, vice-president and treasurer of a Florida trucking business; Robert, a noted comic book illustrator; and Gia, an art school student.

Donald Stull was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 3, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.246

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/3/2004 |and| 1/25/2005

Last Name

Stull

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

East High School

The Ohio State University

Harvard University

Fulton Elementary School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Donald

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

STU01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Architecture, Urban Design, Artistic Pursuit

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: $3000-5000
Preferred Audience: Architecture, Urban Design, Artistic Pursuit

Sponsor

Turner Construction Company

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Frequently, People Do Bad Things For The Right Reasons.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

5/16/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Clam Chowder, Seafood

Short Description

Architect and architecture chief executive Donald Stull (1937 - ) established Stull and Lee Associates, Inc. in Boston. Stull’s architecture, urban design and planning have profoundly impacted the physical landscape of Boston and other urban areas.

Employment

Stull Associates, Inc.

Stull and Lee Associates, Inc.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:22606,258:23212,265:39330,441:44370,512:45450,527:125140,1506:125815,1517:172315,2105:172882,2113:173206,2118:174097,2130:199407,2456:211510,2679$0,0:2720,34:4420,86:4930,93:6120,110:7990,145:8330,150:11657,183:16218,244:16694,252:17102,259:17578,268:18054,277:20568,290:20948,296:44900,477:45656,486:46196,492:51234,515:52026,525:53434,544:62606,643:78760,791:79950,796:85669,845:88428,884:89318,896:102690,1034:102998,1041:106232,1102:106848,1111:107464,1120:112660,1175:112940,1180:114130,1201:126716,1357:126972,1362:127548,1373:131867,1423:132403,1432:137830,1530:139237,1553:142654,1625:143257,1635:155906,1768:156720,1780:158348,1803:158644,1808:158940,1813:159606,1823:178804,2051:181444,2086:183556,2108:218390,2551:223740,2582:225500,2615:232323,2698:236630,2775:248922,2925:251730,2951
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donald Stull's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donald Stull lists his favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donald Stull lists his favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes his maternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donald Stull describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donald Stull describes his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes his father's employment

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donald Stull describes his younger sister's experience in the Peace Corps

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Donald Stull remembers his younger sister's death, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donald Stull remembers his younger sister's death, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donald Stull describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donald Stull describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donald Stull reflects upon his family life growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes his earliest childhood memories, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donald Stull describes his earliest childhood memories, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donald Stull describes his early interest in architecture, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes his early interest in architecture, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his success at The Ohio State University

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donald Stull describes his education in Springfield, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donald Stull recalls his interest in geometry

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Donald Stull describes his literary interests, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donald Stull describes his literary interests, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donald Stull recalls his gang involvement at East High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donald Stull describes his experience at The Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes cues division

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes the impact of cues division

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donald Stull recalls the lack of African Americans in the field when he entered the architecture profession

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donald Stull recalls receiving The Ohio State University's Outstanding Alumnus Award

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes The Ohio State University's Alumni Award ceremony

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his time at Harvard Graduate School of Design

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Donald Stull recalls graduating from Harvard Graduate School of Design

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Donald Stull recalls joining The Architects' Collaborative

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donald Stull describes his introduction to the architectural profession

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donald Stull describes Stull Associates in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donald Stull describes Stull Associates' transition period

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes his involvement with Yale University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donald Stull recalls how the Civil Rights Movement impacted his career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donald Stull recalls passing the architectural registration exam

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donald Stull remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes his firm's community development contributions

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his firm's innovation in technology

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Donald Stull remembers designing schools in New England, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donald Stull remembers designing schools in New England, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donald Stull describes the I-95 extension project

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donald Stull describes superhighway development

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes the proposed Interstate 95 extension

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes Massachusetts Governor Francis W. Sargent's highway development moratorium

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donald Stull describes highway alternatives

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donald Stull describes Boston's Orange Line

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes his firm's Boston development projects, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his firm's Boston development projects, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Donald Stull talks about urban design

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Donald Stull describes the development of Boston's Roxbury Community College

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Donald Stull describes Roxbury Community College's design

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes Ruggles Station and the Boston Police Headquarters

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes the Boston Police Headquarters

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Donald Stull recalls his housing development projects

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Donald Stull describes his firm's innovation in housing design

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes his paper, 'The Being in Blackness'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes his son, HistoryMaker Robert Stull's, international renown

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Donald Stull describes environmentalist Julia Allen Field, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Donald Stull describes environmentalist Julia Allen Field, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Donald Stull explains his stance against revitalizing Boston's Franklin Park Zoo

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes the impetus for the Middle Passage Memorial

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes the Middle Passage Memorial's development

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Donald Stull describes the Middle Passage Memorial's prospective location on Spectacle Island

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Donald Stull describes famous memorials that inspired his designs

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Donald Stull describes the Middle Passage Memorial

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Donald Stull describes the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Donald Stull describes Stull and Lee, Inc.'s gallery

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Donald Stull describes honors that he received

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Donald Stull reflects upon his life, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Donald Stull reflects upon his life, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Donald Stull describes his goals

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Donald Stull describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Donald Stull reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Donald Stull narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Donald Stull narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Donald Stull narrates his photographs, pt. 3

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Donald Stull narrates his photographs, pt. 4

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Donald Stull narrates his photographs, pt. 5

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Donald Stull shares his scale model for the Middle Passage Memorial

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Donald Stull describes cues division
Donald Stull describes Roxbury Community College's design
Transcript
Sometime in that process, a person named Rich Miller [Richard A. Miller], who was associate editor at Architectural Forum in New York, came to [The] Ohio State University [Columbus, Ohio] as a visiting professor, and he put together a special project in our senior year to--urban design was just becoming a discipline. Dean [Josep] Lluis Sert, the Spanish architect who came to Harvard [Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, Massachusetts] from Spain, he was a disciple of Le Corbusier, was the--introduced the first academic program in urban design in this country, though he often said, it, it doesn't matter what you call it, everything is architecture. The--but, but, Rich Miller brought the concept of urban design to Ohio State University in this special program, and it was to take a look at an old section of center city called Germantown [German Village, Columbus, Ohio], which had these quaint little buildings and they--and little houses and so on. And it subsequently became famous. It became a major school project. I was one of the members in the--in the team that went into Germantown and analyzed it using cues division, drawn directly from gestalt psychology, which I mentioned before is one of the bases for the way I think and work. So, when you--what, what you do is you, you look to understand the generic characteristics of the thing visually and--before the gingerbread and the--or--and--that--that's what any given period of architecture has a underlying generic skeleton, or structure, that defines it in that period in time, whether it's Victorian or art deco or whatever. And we developed what we called a series of cues division. For example, you can look at the John, John Hancock [Tower, Boston, Massachusetts] building under certain light situations, you, you don't see it, something happens called--there's a cue division, something happens called environmental fusion. And so the glass planes of the wall--of the wall, they blend with the sky units. So, so we developed--so then Perry [Borcher] in the architectural history department had me analyze some of the world's most outstanding architecture using the cues division that we had developed. So, the Parthenon [Athens, Greece], analyzed the Parthenon, relative to things like continuation of edge and environmental fusion, and so on. So, we took a section of his slide collection that he used for teaching and set up a subdivision within it that had to do with that. And that was my beginning. We won a fellowship from the Bruner Foundation in New York City [New York, New York] to do additional research in perceptual psychology, and that's what developed these cues division.$As you designed Roxbury Community College [Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts], you were always sensitive to the users and, of course, the users in this case are the students, the adult students, and there are adults, many of them. What were the special things that you tried to build in for these users?$$Yeah. The, the--I, I have to go--I think a bit into philosophically the way I think about design. The--if, if one is going to design an educational facility, it's my view that you first need to ask and answer questions regarding, what is education, what is learning? And then begin to evolve a design that's responding to and answering those questions. When I did Roxbury Community College, the question for me at the time was that learning--the conclusion I arrived at was that--is that learning is an interactive process, that it's an interaction between student and books, student and teacher, teacher and teacher, student and student, student and environment. For example, in a learning objective in design, we know that from a physical point of view, from a scientific point of view, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. Therefore, the most efficient way to get from one place to another place is that way. However, if that is in a learning environment, the critical question is not how quickly you can get there but what happens to your mind on the way? And so that may not be the shortest distance or the fastest way to get there. You may decide to take the line through a labyrinth of learning experiences. That's one of the reasons Roxbury Community College is not one big mega structure building, but a--but a campus. And so I looked for ways to create the, the places within that environment where one could enjoy the interactive process of learning at very many different levels. We've got some sculptures sitting in different places, places where you can sit outside quietly and contemplate the places and all the buildings where in--that kind of interactive process can happen. The, the dialogue with the community also influenced that because the site happens to be along the foothill of Highland Park [Boston, Massachusetts] where the, the top of the hill is the old standpipe, which--the fort [Roxbury High Fort, Boston, Massachusetts]. And historically, the people who basically were the movers and shakers of Boston [Massachusetts] built their suburb places on the hillsides and the hillside places overlooked the mills down in the valley in Lower Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts] that were fueled by Stony Brook. So, in that valley, historically, there were New England mill buildings. And so we used that reference for the individual structures of the--of the college. They take on the characteristics and the proportions of, of the mill buildings, and they provide visual vistas from the hill out to the various other parts of the city without looking at one enormous massive building.

John S. Chase

Architect John Saunders Chase was born January 23, 1925, in Annapolis, Maryland. When his parents, Viola Hall Chase, a teacher and cook, and John S. Chase, Sr., a school principal and postal worker, separated, Chase was raised primarily by his mother. Every year at the United States Naval Academy graduation, Chase could earn $25 for each tossed hat he retrieved. At Bates High School, his teacher, Mr. Marchand, introduced Chase to architecture; he earned his B.S. degree from Hampton University in 1948, and became the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture in 1952.

Chase's professional career began the same year as his graduation when he was appointed assistant professor of architectural drafting at Texas Southern University, and founded John S. Chase, AIA Architect. Chase's early designs were for churches, schools, homes, and small public buildings.

Chase became the first African American licensed to practice architecture in the state of Texas, and later was the first African American to be admitted to the Texas Society of Architects, and the Houston Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Chase co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) along with 12 other black architects at the AIA convention in Detroit in 1971. When President Jimmy Carter selected him in 1980, Chase became the first African American to serve on the United States Commission on Fine Arts. Projects designed by Chase’s firm include: the George R. Brown Convention Center, the Washington Technical Institute, Links, Inc., National Headquarters, Delta Sigma Theta National Headquarters, the Harris County Astrodome Renovation, the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. School of Humanities at Texas Southern University. Chase was later awarded a commission to design the United States Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia; a fifty million dollar complex.

Chase was elected to the AIA College of Fellows, was awarded the AIA Whitney M. Young Citation, and was the recipient of the NOMA Design for Excellence Award for four consecutive years. Chase also received the commendation for Meritorious Service by the Houston Independent School District, and the Honor Award for Architectural Excellence in School Design by the Texas Association of School Boards for his design of the Booker T. Washington High School. Chase and his wife, Drucie, raised three children together: John, Anthony and Saundria.

Chase passed away on March 29, 2012 at age 87.

Accession Number

A2004.223

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/1/2004

Last Name

Chase

Maker Category
Middle Name

Saunders

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Bates High School

Wiley H. Bates High School

Hampton University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

CHA06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Pebble Beach, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

1/23/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Corn

Death Date

3/29/2012

Short Description

Architect and federal government appointee John S. Chase (1925 - 2012 ) was the first African American licensed to practice architecture in the state of Texas, and later was the first African American to be admitted to the Texas Society of Architects and the Houston Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Chase co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects, in addition to becoming the first African American to serve on the United States Commission on Fine Arts during the Carter Administration.

Employment

Texas Southern University

John S. Chase, AIA Architect

National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA)

United States Commission on Fine Arts

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating for John S. Chase's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John S. Chase lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John S. Chase describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John S. Chase talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John S. Chase describes his father's personality and career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about his sister's family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John S. Chase describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John S. Chase recalls the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John S. Chase remembers his influential elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John S. Chase remembers discovering his aspiration to be an architect

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John S. Chase recalls his architectural mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John S. Chase remembers making his grandmother's tombstone

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John S. Chase recalls collaborating with John T. Biggers at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John S. Chase describes himself as a young man

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John S. Chase talks about being jailed in Heflin, Alabama, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about being jailed in Heflin, Alabama, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John S. Chase recalls his time at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John S. Chase recalls serving in World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - John S. Chase recalls the segregation in the United States Army during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John S. Chase recalls the mistreatment of Japanese prisoners in World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John S. Chase remembers graduating from Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia and his initial architectural career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about recruiting new clients by visiting churches

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John S. Chase recalls his acceptance to the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas in the wake of Sweatt v. Painter, 1950

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John S. Chase reflects on his experience at the newly integrated University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John S. Chase reflects on being the first African American graduate of University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about his alumni involvement with the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John S. Chase remembers the trials and advantages of graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - John S. Chase tells about his initial professional success in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - John S. Chase describes his political involvement while working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John S. Chase remembers his time in the United Political Organization of Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John S. Chase describes spending time with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John S. Chase remembers working on the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John S. Chase gives his opinion of President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John S. Chase names his architectural works in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John S. Chase talks about his architectural aesthetic

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John S. Chase describes his current and past projects

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John S. Chase describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - John S. Chase reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John S. Chase describes his children

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John S. Chase talks about his wife, Drucie Chase

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about his mother and sister

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John S. Chase reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John S. Chase describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John S. Chase narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
John Chase reflects on his experience at the newly integrated University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas
John Chase remembers working on the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial
Transcript
Let me just set the stage for something else here.$$Um-hm.$$You, give us your personal reflection on this but, in the school of architecture [at University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas] now, you had someone who wanted you there, the dean [Hugh L. McMath] wanted you there, and he was really, and he couldn't let you in because of the law of the State of Tex--Texas--$$That's right.$$--in the beginning. But now he could, but in terms of Herman [Marion] Sweatt, and the four law school, they were before the student's right, that applied to the University of Texas law school [University of Texas at Austin School of Law, Austin, Texas], they were on that suit with him?$$Um-hm.$$They had a pretty rough, the law school didn't really want 'em there, am I right?$$See, had, had the [U.S.] Supreme [Court], I've always said this, I don't know how much truth is in it, but had the Supreme Court decision been Chase [HistoryMaker John Chase] versus Painter, I would have never made it. Sweatt would have probably got in and become a very fine lawyer by now, he was, Sweatt was quite a person now, great speaker, very intelligent, but I really, I couldn't tell you, point to nothing specific there but, I, I, I just believe that had that case been built on me, that I would not have gone in or had I gone in, I would have been flunked out, Sweatt was flunked out, you see, and heck I knew Sweatt well enough to know that Sweatt wasn't supposed to been flunked out of no law school.$$Yeah. The person I was asking you about when I came in off camera we were talking about it, Dr. Jacob Carruthers [HistoryMaker Jacob H. Carruthers, Jr.], he was one of the four students with Sweatt and he ended up becoming a political science professor and getting a Ph.D from the University of Colorado [Boulder, Boulder, Colorado] but he couldn't deal with it either, he couldn't deal with their law school.$$I could understand.$$Once they started, he had to get outta there.$$Yeah, I can, I can--$$He said, he said, he was--$$--understand that.$$--he was so angry--$$Oh yeah.$$--he couldn't really continue.$$Oh yeah. I tell you when, when I worked the walked in that class, the very first day, Life magazine was there among others, Austin [Texas] statesmen and all the rest of 'em and let me tell you, you could pick the friends out right away, you could pick the foes out. Nobody had to tell you, you could tell it, you could tell it. Now, the, I mean the ones that you thought and felt were okay, would do things like, you'd be sitting at your desk drawing and studying and doing on, they'd come in, saw you been working long enough let's go to the union and get a soda or a sandwich or something, come on go with us, you know? See, now that made you feel good, or, or the time that Hollands [ph.] and his wife said, and that, at this time now I'm married see? Said look, why don't you and your wife [Drucie Chase] and, and my wife and I go to the game this weekend, go to the game on campus and, oh we did. And, and the joke there, in fact Holland said, yeah, we in there walking into the stadium and he says, "Boy I'll tell you the eyes of Texas are on you now." (Laughter) yeah.$$So, it wasn't ea--it wasn't easy though, I mean, to try to--I would imagine all the media made--made it difficult I would guess.$$It, it had its affect, it had its affect, I thought at one time these people who were following me around the campus were negative and I had some checking done on them and found out they were [U.S.] Secret Service people.$They were, they were good times, we, we've gotten presidential appointments again in the first category, being first we were the first member of the, the planning commission [U.S. Commission on Fine Arts] for the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.], this is the commission that the, besides the worthiness of such projects as the Vietnam [Veterans] Memorial [Washington, D.C.], that came across their desk when you go look at that and see that in addition to the memorial, you've got a three person statute down there. Have you ever seen the mem--you know those three soldiers in the, that was part of some of the things we did on that commission. We, we said that, see at that time there was a big to do about serving, you know, in, in the service where even the monument itself that Maya Lin designed and she presented that to our commission, even that memorial was a memorial to the dead so they said, it had fifty some thousand names of soldiers who were killed. There's but one living name on that board, so this got a group of veterans very mad because they didn't feel that, they said, good gosh is that some model monument to the dead? And, and so our commission decided well maybe something else is needed to counteract that point and on came the three soldier monument with, in combat clothes with their arms with them, right where the, the "V" is like that on the monument, the statue is right there, you see? Some people, we had said in the meeting, some people are gonna' think well goodness we don't have one monument there, we've got two, you know, and in essence that could or could not be true, I don't know but, at least it's there and that, plus doing a directory at the beginning of the "V," up here, so that if, if you're coming down to that monument to see the name of your husband, or brother, or uncle or father, see the names aren't on there in alphabetical order, they're on there in chronological order of death in Vietnam so, you got fifty something thousand names scattered all over this wall so how do you know what panel to go to? So, we decided that you should have this directory so a person could look up the name, in which would be alphabetized and you'd find that name and across from that name would be the panel and line that the name would, they would find that name. And, so those are some of the things I think politically we, we, we got out of it, many more, but they were some of the highlights--