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Sheryll D. Cashin

Professor Sheryll Cashin was born on December 15, 1961 in Huntsville, Alabama to Joan and John L. Cashin, Jr. She received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1984, her M.S.c degree in English Law from Oxford University in England in 1986, and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1989.

In 1989, Cashin served as a law clerk for Judge Abner Mikva for the U.S. Court of Appeal, D.C. Circuit. The following year, she served as a law clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1993, Cashin served as director of community development for The White House during the Clinton administration. As director of community development for the National Economic Council, she oversaw urban policy and community development initiatives and advised on community development in inner-city neighborhoods. She also worked as an advisor on urban and economic policy with a focus on community empowerment programs. As staff director for the Community Empowerment Board in the Office of Vice President Al Gore, Cashin worked on community-based revitalization strategies for urban and rural communities. In 1996, Cashin left public service and joined the faculty at Georgetown University Law Center, where she has taught Constitutional Law, Race and American Law, and other subjects. In 2018 she was installed as the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Civil Rights and Social Justice.

In 2004, Cashin published The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class Are Undermining The American Dream. Then, in 2006, she published The Agitator’s Daughter: A Memoir of Four Generations of One Extraordinary African American Family, which chronicles her family history from slavery to the post-civil rights era. In 2014, she published Place Not Race: A New Version of Opportunity in America; and, in 2017, Cashin published Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy. The following year, her book The Descendants, which focused on the role of segregation in subordinating African Americans, was released. She has also written commentaries for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media.

In 2004, her book, The Failures of Integration was an Editors’ Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a three-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction in 2005, 2009, and 2018. In 2014, her book Place Not Race was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction.

Sheryll Cashin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.006

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/21/2019

Last Name

Cashin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Schools

Vanderbilt University

University of Oxford

Harvard Law School

First Name

Sheryll

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

CAS04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Morocco

Favorite Quote

Power Concedes Nothing Without A Demand, Never Did Never Will

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/15/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Cuban

Short Description

Lawyer and professor Sheryll Cashin (1962 - ) served as the White House’s director of community development during the first Clinton administration before publishing several books and becoming a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Employment

U.S. Court of Appeals

U.S. Supreme Court

The White House

National Economic Council

Office of the Vice President of the United States

Georgetown University Law Center

Favorite Color

Aqua

The Honorable Terri A. Sewell

Lawyer and political official Terri A. Sewell was born on January 1, 1965 in Huntsville, Alabama to Andrew A. Sewell and Nancy Gardner Sewell. She graduated from Selma High School in 1982, and received her B.A. degree from Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey in 1986. In 1988, Sewell received her M.A. degree from Oxford University. She then went on to attend Harvard Law School, where she earned her J.D. degree in 1992.

Sewell began her political career working for Congressman Richard Shelby and Senator Howell Helfin. After graduating from Harvard Law School, Sewell served as a law clerk to Chief Judge U.W. Clemon of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama. In 1994, Sewell began working at the law firm of Davis, Polk, & Wardwell, where she served as a securities lawyer for more than a decade. She returned to Alabama in 2004 and took a position as partner at the law offices of Maynard, Cooper, & Gale, P.C. Sewell distinguished herself as one of the few African American public finance lawyers in the State of Alabama. Her clients included the City of Selma, Dallas County Water Authority, Alabama State University, and Stillman College. In 2010, Sewell was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a representative from Alabama’s 7th District and as the first African American woman to serve in the Alabama Congressional delegation. Sewell was reelected to the House of Representatives three more times.

Sewell has served in numerous organizations, including as the chair and treasurer of St. Vincent’s Foundation’s board, as a board member of the Girl Scouts of Cahaba Council, as a board member of the Alabama Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, on the Community Advisory Board for the University of Alabama-Birmingham Minority Health and Research Center, on the Governing Board of the Alabama Council on Economic Education, and as a member of the Corporate Council for the Birmingham Art Museum. Sewell has also provided free legal services to the homeless, mentored girls of color through Dreams into Action, and served on the Alumni Advisory Board of Sponsors of Educational Opportunity.

Sewell has been awarded for her successful career and contributions to her community. In 2005, she was named one of the “Top Birmingham Women” by the Birmingham Business Journal. Sewell has also been listed in the magazine, Alabama Super Lawyers, and was named a “Woman of Influence” by Alabama Today. She was also awarded the Minority Business Rising Star Award by the Birmingham Business Journal in 2007.

Terri A. Sewell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 3, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.096

Sex

Female

Interview Date

05/05/2017

Last Name

Sewell

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Schools

Cedar Park Elementary School

R.B. Hudson Middle School

Selma High School

Princeton University

University of Oxford

Harvard Law School

First Name

Terri

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

SEW01

Favorite Season

Spring, Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beach

Favorite Quote

As A Person Thinks So Is He.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Birth Date

1/1/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Birmingham

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Smothered Pork Chops

Short Description

Lawyer and political official Terri A. Sewell (1965 - ) was partner at the Birmingham law firm of Maynard, Cooper & Gale, P.C. and was the first African American woman to serve in the Alabama delegation of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Employment

Morgan Stanley

Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, LLP

State of Alabama

Firstone Library

U.S. Congress

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Terri A. Sewell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about her maternal family's roots in Lowndes County, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell lists her mother's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her father's early influences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about her father's legacy

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell lists her father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes the sights and sounds of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her parents' betrothal

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her family's reasons for moving to Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her home in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her twin brothers' mischief making

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls the start of her education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her community in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers Cedar Park Elementary School in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers the civil rights leaders in her community in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls visiting the Selma Public Library

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about her early interest in reading

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls trying to fit in at Westside Junior High School in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers losing her academic awards because of poor conduct

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell describes her achievements at Selma High School in Selma, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about her mother's influence

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls being approached by Julian McPhillips

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her admission to Princeton University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her early interest in law

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers enrolling at Princeton University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls being elected vice president of her freshman class

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her friendship with Michelle Obama

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell talks about her summer employment on Capitol Hill

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her time at Princeton University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls her graduation from Princeton University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her bachelor's thesis

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers enrolling at the University of Oxford

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her production of 'For Colored Girls' at the University of Oxford

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers publishing her master's thesis

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls her experiences at Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers protesting for a black female professor at Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her deferment from Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell recalls her work after completing her law degree

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her clerkship under Judge U. W. Clemon, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her clerkship under Judge U. W. Clemon, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

9$8

DATitle
The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers the civil rights leaders in her community in Selma, Alabama
The Honorable Terri A. Sewell remembers her clerkship under Judge U. W. Clemon, pt. 2
Transcript
(Simultaneous) Did you have any black friends?$$ I did. I had lots of black friends who were usually friends--they were usually children of my parents' friends. Remember my parents [Nancy Gardner Sewell and Andrew Sewell] were, my parents were educators in the school system. And, and I think middle class black Selma [Alabama] were educators, they were teachers, they were, they worked for the government. They were preachers. And, and so growing up I, I don't think I really realized how poor, or (pronunciation) poor my parents were until I went to Princeton [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey]. I kind of grew up thinking that we were doing okay (laughter). And, because my parents were well respected in the community, I didn't feel like there were any limitations on my ability to do or be anything. That's a real credit to my parents. But, it's also a credit to the community that nurtured me, and that, that community re- consisted of blacks and whites. And so yeah, so I can remember when the Cedar Park [Cedar Park Elementary School, Selma, Alabama] was integrated. And I also--it's interesting to me, my, my sixth grade teacher was Miss Jackson [Richie Jean Sherrod Jackson]. Well, Miss Jackson I, I grow up to learn that Miss Jackson and her husband [Sullivan Jackson] would entertain Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] in their house. And Miss Jackson's house was where they gathered to, to you know, to really map the march from Selma [Alabama] to Montgomery [Alabama]. (Gesture) Miss Jackson mi- Jean Jackson my--Jean Jackson who taught me in sixth grade. It's interesting that you can live your life surrounded by people who are legendary in the Civil Rights Movement. I guess growing up in Selma that's, that's--I'm--it never ceases to amaze me to find out about the people who I saw as teachers and my preacher [at Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church, Selma, Alabama] or my you know, the, you know the grocery store owners. And to find out that they were iconic or, or very pivotal in the Civil Rights Movement.$And I took serious when he said, "We're the judge," and he said, "I want you all to brief, brief me on the trials that are coming up." And one of the things that the federal judges have to do, they have to review the social security cases that are on appeals. And so, it's mostly about disability. And I will never forget spending a whole weekend on the first case that I had to brief him on. I concluded that the person who was the plaintiff could walk. That the person did not deserve to have disab- disability insurance. Because, because this, while the doctors all said it in favor of her, I found this special piece of evidence and 'cause I had spent all weekend long trying to. And you know, Judge Clemon [HistoryMaker U.W. Clemon] just, he was awesome. I come in with this you know, twenty page opinion about a social security case, that I had worked all weekend long. And my conclusion was that the lower court, the, had was, you know, the administrative court had--findings were true and that she should be denied social security benefits, disability benefits. So, he looks at me he says, "Sewell [HistoryMaker Terri A. Sewell]," he looks, peers over his glass he says, "I have three questions for you. First, did you go to medical school? What medical degree do you have? Second question, in all of this evidence that you poured over was there medical proof that she had had a disability? That she was disabled?" I said, "Well yes, her doctor said this, but this doctor said that and this nurse said that. This doctor--," so I'm trying to make up. And he says he stops me and he says, "And my final question, how many years did she work for this company? Twenty-three." He closed his book, he closed my, he took my paper and put it in his file, closed the file and he said, "Give the woman her money." The lesson I learned, aside from that I didn't need to spend a whole weekend on a social security case, the lesson I learned was that tremendous power in being a judge and we see evidence, facts through the lenses of our own experience. And that it matters who's, who our judges are. Diversity on the bench is important, diversity not only in gender and race, but in experience. Having someone who's been a public defender as a federal judge or as a [U.S.] Supreme Court justice is important. We see, we see and review facts and evidence I mean, through the lens by which we live our life. So, having judges and having lawyers and having them with different backgrounds and experiences matters. There's a lot that Judge Clemon taught me but I learned a lot that day. And I'm very blessed my dad [Andrew Sewell] had a series of strokes that left him in a wheelchair and I can truly say for the fifteen years that my dad was unable to put up curtains or hang pictures that Judge Clemon really stood, stood in the gap. And I'm very grateful to him for that. And so, when I decided to run for [U.S.] Congress there were two people that I talked to about it before I made my mind up and Judge Clemon was one of them. And he stood by me even thought that I was--that I was raising way too much money and not shaking enough hands. Very--he was very old school politician shaking enough hands, and meeting enough people, knocking on enough doors. Not--I didn't have a big enough sign out there. And he hung in there with me. And I'm a member of Congress today because my mentor believed in me and didn't leave me, didn't leave me all those thirty years ago when I was a law intern, and he hasn't left me now, and I feel very blessed to have him as a, as a, as a mentor and as a, as a, a real father figure.

Andrea Bradford

Opera singer Andrea Bradford was born on December 19, 1949 in Huntsville, Alabama, to Dr. Henry Bradford, Jr. and Nell Lane Bradford. Bradford attended St. Francis De Sales High School, an all-black boarding school in Powhatan, Virginia. She began her musical training at the age of five with the study of piano for fifteen years. A soprano, Bradford then began her vocal training in high school with Sister Mary Elise S.B.S., the co-founder of Opera Ebony in New York City. Upon graduating in 1966, she attended Oakwood College in Huntsville, before receiving her B.M. degree in vocal performance from Oberlin College Conservatory of Music in Oberlin, Ohio in 1970. She then earned her M.M.A. degree from Boston University College of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts in 1973.

Bradford joined the Opera Company of Boston in 1975, touring with its founder and conductor, Sarah Caldwell, throughout New England and Europe. During this period, Bradford also performed as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops Orchestra. Bradford appeared in productions of La traviata, The Barber of Seville, Madame Butterfly, Leroy Jenkins’ The Negro Burial Ground, and Three Willies. Between 1984 and 1988, Bradford worked as the manager of college recruiting for Bain & Company. In 1988, she became the vice president and executive recruiter for Isaacson, Miller. Then, in 1990, Bradford performed in the Opera Company of Boston’s production of The Balcony by Robert Di Domenica, originating the role of Chantal for the world premiere. She performed at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, Russia in 1991, and in the Boston Lyric Opera production of Lost in the Stars in 1992. From 1992 to 1994, Bradford worked as the assistant director of admissions for Berklee College of Music in Boston, before serving as director of minority and multicultural affairs at Columbia Business School in New York City. She then worked as the national director of college recruiting for KPMG from 1996 to 1997. Bradford was hired as the operations administrator for West Park Presbyterian Church in 1997, as well as vice president of organizational consulting and career management at Right Management Consultants, both in New York City. Bradford went on to work for Career Central LLC from 2008 to 2009, Partners in Human Resources from 2009 to 2010, and Amnesty International USA from 2010 to 2012, before becoming director of human resources for Ms. Foundation for Women in 2012.

Andrea Bradford was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 3, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.050

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/3/2016 |and| 10/25/2016

Last Name

Bradford

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Oakwood University

Oberlin College

Boston University College of Fine Arts

First Name

Andrea

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

BRA16

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Martin

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/19/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Opera singer and corporate executive Andrea Bradford (1949 - ) toured with the Opera Company of Boston and performed productions of The Balcony, The Barber of Seville and Leroy Jenkins’ Three Willies. In 2012, she became director of human resources for Ms. Foundation of Women.

Employment

Opera Company of Boston

Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston Pops Orchestra

Bain & Company

Isaacson, Miller

Berklee College of Music

Columbia Business School

KPMG Peat Marwick

Right Management Consultants

Ms. Foundation for Women

Favorite Color

Red

Louis Jones

Louis Jones is president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. and serves on the Board of Directors for the Black Contractors United. He was born on July 1, 1946 in Hunstville, Alabama to Arthur and Alberta Jones. His father was a farmer and construction worker in the South, but when his family moved to Chicago his father became a baker with the A&P grocery chain factories. Jones attended Tilden Technical High School before earning his Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle in 1973. In 1969, Jones began working for Skidmore, Owings and Merrill architects. In 1973, Jones began working for McKee-Berger-Mansueto as a School Rehab Manager.

In 1975, Jones became a licensed architect and moved to San Francisco, where he worked for a private consulting firm. He moved back to Chicago three years later and began working for Schal Associates. Between 1978 and 1984, Schal Associates built the Avondale Center, Madison Plaza, the Chicago Tribune Printing Plant, and the Magnificent Mile. In 1984, Jones became president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., specializing in engineering, construction, management, consulting, and architecture. The following year, Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. was part of the $1.7 billion renovation and expansion of O’Hare International Airport. The firm also was hired to work on Provident Hospital in 1990 and McCormick Place in 1997. In 2008, Jones' firm was hired to be part of the team to build the University of Illinois’, the James Stukel Towers student housing complex.

Since 1986, Jones sat on the Board of Directors for Black Contractors United and was elected Chairman of the Board in 1998. He was also selected to serve on the Mayor of Chicago’s Task Force for Minority & Women Business Development in 2005. Jones was a member of the Illinois Capital Development Board and has served as president pro tempore of the Illinois Department of Employment Security Advisory Board.

Louis Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 27, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.030

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/27/2010

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Bret Harte Math and Science Magnet Cluster School

Edward Tilden Career Community Academy High School

University of Illinois at Chicago

First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

JON23

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Fishing

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

7/1/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Estero

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Architect and corporate chief executive Louis Jones (1946 - ) was president of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. and served on the board of directors for the Black Contractors United.

Employment

Skidmore Owings & Merrill

McKee, Berger & Mansueto

Schal Associates

Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company

Regal Theater

Johnson and Jones Architects

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louis Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louis Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louis Jones describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louis Jones remembers his paternal uncle, James Jones, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about his family's history of enslavement

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes his father's work at The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louis Jones describes his family's community in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louis Jones describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Louis Jones recalls his homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louis Jones lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louis Jones describes his experiences at Bret Harte Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louis Jones recalls his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louis Jones recalls his friends at Bret Harte Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louis Jones remembers his near drowning at the Hyde Park YMCA in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes his experiences at Tilden Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louis Jones talks about his part time job at the Regal Theater in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louis Jones remembers his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his decision to attend the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Louis Jones remembers the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Louis Jones recalls his peers and professors at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about the visiting professors at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Louis Jones describes his architectural thesis

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about his favorite architectural style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes his part time position at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Louis Jones recalls his graduation from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Louis Jones describes his organizational involvement at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his duties at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Louis Jones remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his transition to McKee Berger Mansueto, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Louis Jones describes the role of a construction manager

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his construction projects in California and Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes his building projects with Schal Associates, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes the founding of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Louis Jones talks about his early projects at Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Louis Jones talks about the redevelopment of the Provident Hospital of Cook County in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Louis Jones recalls his work on the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Louis Jones talks about the construction of the McCormick Place South Building in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about his involvement with the Rainbow PUSH Coalition and the Black Contractors United

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his children

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Louis Jones talks about the success of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Louis Jones remembers the contracts secured by Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Louis Jones describes his current projects at Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Louis Jones reflects upon the specialty of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Louis Jones describes his role in the construction of ACE Technical Charter High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Louis Jones talks about his work at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Louis Jones talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Louis Jones describes the changes in building design after September 11, 2001

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Louis Jones describes the process of building a hospital

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Louis Jones describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Louis Jones talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Louis Jones reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Louis Jones narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Louis Jones describes the founding of Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc.
Louis Jones recalls his work on the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
And from Schal [Schal Associates, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], where did you go? And what year was this?$$Well Schal, I came to work for Schal in, in June of 1978 from, from San Francisco [California], and worked on 200 South Wacker [200 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois], Tribune plant [Freedom Center, Chicago, Illinois]. Then Schal joint ventured with McHugh [James McHugh Construction Company, Chicago, Illinois] and I was the project director for the North Hall of McCormick Place [McCormick Place North Building, Chicago, Illinois]. And that went through a couple iterations where it went way over budget and they, they started trying to pull it back and work on it. And at that time, a friend of mine, Eric Johnson, who I went to school with [at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle; University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois], we had a side business that was Johnson and Jones Architects [ph.]. So in the evening I would leave Schal, go around the corner and I had the license, I had gotten my architect's license. So I would look at the drawings that were being done, seal them, sign them, go home. So Schal kind of got wind of it. And this was in the era when there was big affirmative action pushes and Harold Washington, you know, was, was, was getting, getting in--in line to be mayor, you know, it was like in eighty--'82 [1982], '83 [1983] or something like that. So we started talking and they became a mentor company and they wanted to ow- hold a third of the deal and we were going to create Louis Jones Enterprises [Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]. So I said okay, I don't wanna be accused of fronting for a big white company, so I gotta get somebody to look at this. So Sam Hurley [Samuel Hurley] was first deputy director, he's African American engineer, he's first deputy director of public works for the City of Chicago [Illinois]. And he was also on the city's affirmative action committee. Now they call it affirmative action. So I had Sam look at it. And he said, "Well, I know you Lou [HistoryMaker Louis Jones], I know you from Schal and all that, you know what you're doing, you're for real and all that kind of stuff. So why don't you, you know, move forward with it and see what." So then I turned it over to [HistoryMaker] Earl Neal who gave it to Anne Fredd [Anne L. Fredd] in his office to evaluate.$$Earl Neal was a black attorney?$$Yeah. And then they kind of got Ja- [HistoryMaker] James Lowry involved. And so Lowry help promulgate it as a good mentor protege thing. So I went with it. And so--and the 29th of February it was incorporated as Louis Jones Enterprises. I was living in Oak Park, Illinois and so they had my home address for a while, and then I had a small office at 440 North Wells [Street]. And so that's how I started a company. And we had a five year buyout deal and all that. In about three years, I bought them out because we were, you know, just something we wanted to do. So we started out working on McCormick Place North to bring it back, because they had sort of mothballed the job because the legislature had not funded it. And then the O'Hare Development Program came about. And by the fall of that year, in 1984, when I opened the company, by the fall of that year I had ten employees and they were all working at O'Hare field [Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois]. And I had been spending quite a bit of time in the prior year as an employee of Schal and then later on as a consultant helping the team that was doing all the budgeting for the O'Hare Development Program. What is the United terminal [United Airlines Terminal 1] gonna cost. What's the inner outer taxi way relocation and widening gonna be, the second taxi way bridge. Did a lot of analysis and studies and stuff on that. And so Dick Unsulman [ph.] was the executive director of the O'Hare Development Program and he sent out a--like an ultimatum, "Either Lou Jones is full time working with me on the O'Hare program," because he was involved with McCormick Place somehow, "or he's working on McCormick Place, which is it." Well my business and my employees were all at O'Hare, so I moved to the O'Hare thing and let the McCormick Place thing go. And I became deputy director of construction management for the O'Hare Development Program. So all of the facilities stuff, they had a deputy director for facilities and a deputy director for infrastructure. So this guy, Dan Kaiser [ph.], was over all the civil stuff like runways and roads, and stuff like that. And I was over all the buildings, like the terminal buildings, the crash fire rescue stations, that kind of stuff. And within a couple years I had twenty-five or thirty employees out there and me spending full time there when I started to pick up other work was getting to be a strain, so I brought in Joe Doddy [ph.] who's still working out there for somebody else, who's a classmate of mine, to be the deputy director for facilities.$What was the next big project that your, your firm [Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc., Chicago, Illinois] had? You had Provident [Provident Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois], you had O'Hare [Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois]?$$The Harold Washington Library [Harold Washington Library Center, Chicago, Illinois] came up and McCormick Place South [McCormick Place South Building, Chicago, Illinois] in the '90s [1990s]. Both were, were done--they had international design competition design build--they wanted design build. And we teamed with a group that call themselves the SEBUS Group, it was Schal [Schal Associates, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], Epstein [A. Epstein and Sons International, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], U.S. Equities [U.S. Equities Realty LLC; CBRE Group, Inc.] and I forget what the B in there was [Hammond, Beeby and Babka, Inc.; Hammond, Beeby, Rupert, Ainge, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]. But we did something like 10, 15 percent of the deal. We had the union crew that--a construction manager operates sort a like general contractor, they have what they call temporary facilities and controls or general conditions. We had a crew of about fifteen laborers, carpenters and one operator, and Barb [Jones' wife, Barbara M. Jones] went through a lot of people because we insisted on hiring African Americans, and we had some issues with that, and we had to really go to--we actually had to do some stuff. 'Cause I wrote a very ugly letter that everybody asked me to burn or shred because if it got to the Sun-Times [Chicago Sun-Times] or something--'cause I was threatening them that they were mani- manipulating me into laying off black folks and hiring Mexicans and white people unfairly. Because I would put a black carpenter out there and--or a black laborer and, and the, the other firms that were involved wou- would complain that they were, they were too slow, they didn't know what they was doing or something. And I said, you know, you're trying to tell me that a journeyman carpenter doesn't know what he's doing, you know, give me a break, you know. So finally--when you start a construction job there's ebbs and flows. At the beginning there is some site work. They're, they're doing the foundations and stuff and you need some laborers around there to do cleanup. You might have a little bit of safety with a carpenter or whatnot, and maybe those guys will get three weeks work or a couple months work, then they get laid off because there's a lull. And then when that thing starts to come out of the ground and it's a project that's big as Harold Washington Library, then you need a full time cleanup crew and you need a couple of people there to do backup safety where the subcontractors don't do the barriers where people might fall, you know. And if you're the general or you're the construction manager you better see that they're done. And even if it's somebody else's duty and then you just back charge them for it. So we had those kind of people. And so that came to nearly fifteen people, and I think we had one white person and one Hispanic, everybody else was black. And there was always some issue. So finally I wrote a letter and I said, "Look, you know, you've manipulated me into laying off my whole crew and then you call and said you wanted these people back and you recommended its people that wasn't black." "We don't want--we don't want that written down, where are the rest of those letters." And so then the edict came down, leave Lou [HistoryMaker Louis Jones] alone, let him hire the people that, you know, he sees fit, as long as they're doing the job.

Dr. John Cashin

Dentist and political activist Dr. John Logan Cashin, Jr. was born on April 16, 1928 in Huntsville, Alabama to Grace Brandon Cashin, a school principal, and Dr. John Logan Cashin, Sr., a dentist. He and his older brother, Herschel, who were always in the same year at school, were co-valedictorians of their Alabama A&M High School graduating class. He spent two years at Fisk University and then attended Tennessee State University, both located in Nashville, Tennessee. Cashin then received his D.D.S. degree from Meharry Medical School in Nashville, Tennessee in 1952.

Immediately after Cashin graduated from medical school, he was drafted into the U.S. Army, where he was made a first lieutenant and Chief of Dental Services for soldiers stationed near Fountainebleu, France. While in France, Cashin became familiar with a number of African American expatriates, including writer Richard Wright and Ollie Stewart, from the "Chicago Defender."

After two years in the U.S. Army, Cashin returned to the United States, where he became active in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1967, he helped found the National Democratic Party of Alabama (NDPA) and was elected as the organization’s first party chairman. He led a delegation to the Democratic National Convention in 1968, challenging the representative nature of the regular delegation and its loyalty to the national Democratic Party.

Cashin ran for Mayor of Huntsville, and in 1970, he was the NDPA’s candidate for governor, where he ran against George Wallace. He received more than sixteen-percent of the votes in that election. Between 1968 and 1974, the NDPA facilitated the election of more than a hundred African Americans to public office in Alabama. In 1974, the Alabama Democratic Party surrendered and integrated their ballot.

Cashin passed away on March 23, 2011 at age 82.

Accession Number

A2007.158

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/24/2007

Last Name

Cashin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Logan

Schools

Alabama A&M High School

Fisk University

Tennessee State University

Meharry Medical College

William Hooper Councill High School

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

CAS03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alabama

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/16/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fruit

Death Date

3/23/2011

Short Description

Political activist and dentist Dr. John Cashin (1928 - 2011 ) helped found the National Democratic Party of Alabama, and led a delegation to the Democratic National Convention in 1968. Cashin also served as Chief of Dental Services for U.S. Army soldiers stationed in France in the 1950s.

Employment

United States Army

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. John Cashin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. John Cashin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. John Cashin describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. John Cashin describes the history of Brandontown in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. John Cashin describes his maternal family's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. John Cashin describes the black business community in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. John Cashin describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. John Cashin describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. John Cashin remembers his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. John Cashin describes his paternal grandfather's book, 'Under Fire with the Tenth U.S. Cavalry'

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. John Cashin talks about his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. John Cashin describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. John Cashin describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. John Cashin describes his relationship with his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. John Cashin remembers his childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. John Cashin recalls the end of his relationship with his white playmates

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. John Cashin remembers the Grove neighborhood of Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. John Cashin describes his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. John Cashin remembers Alabama A and M High School in Normal, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. John Cashin talks about the Alabama Constitution of 1901

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. John Cashin describes his childhood pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his experience of discrimination at the YMCA in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. John Cashin describes his involvement at the Lakeside United Methodist Church in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. John Cashin describes his educational influences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. John Cashin recalls attending Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his reason for leaving Fisk University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. John Cashin remembers the Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. John Cashin remembers learning to fly airplanes

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his workload at the Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. John Cashin recalls taking courses at Fisk University and Tennessee State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. John Cashin remembers his admission to Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. John Cashin remembers his admission to Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. John Cashin recalls being drafted into the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. John Cashin remembers the American expatriate community in France

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his friendship with Richard Wright

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his decision to leave the U.S. Army

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his classmate, Robert Ellis

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his decision to join the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. John Cashin recalls meeting his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. John Cashin recalls his commitment to civil rights

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. John Cashin remembers his marriage

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$2

DAStory

3$5

DATitle
Dr. John Cashin recalls his decision to join the Civil Rights Movement
Dr. John Cashin recalls the end of his relationship with his white playmates
Transcript
Well let's, let's get back to you going home (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) In other, in other words--$$Let's get back to you going home from, from France. What--$$It was a come down.$$Okay, (laughter) tell me why.$$Well, having lived in a society where race, race didn't matter, it was quite a shock to me 'cause I didn't know people could get along like that, and I enjoyed being a human being. Fifty million Frenchmen can't be all that wrong.$$So you decided to come home. Did you know what you would do or how you would participate in what was going on--$$Yeah.$$--in America? Tell me (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I knew, I knew. As a matter of fact, one of the first things when I hit the doggone concrete was right across from my office, Dr. Fearn, Helen Fearn, our next door across the street neighbor. Told me when I was knocking on the door, within thirty days of the time I got back and Helen Fearn who was a high school principal, looked at me with tears in her eyes, said, "John [HistoryMaker Dr. John Cashin], I don't want you to get in any trouble now. You don't need to get involved in all of that old stuff." This is principal of the high school [William Hooper Councill High School, Huntsville, Alabama]. That I'm not man enough to take care of myself. She don't know me at all. The [U.S.] Army made a killer out of me, but they don't know that. And nobody directs it but me. So, I knew that I was going to take some active role, and I did. And since I was a reformed Army officer, I was privy to a whole lot of things that they don't particularly care for any officers to make.$Up comes eleven, eleven and twelve years old. And at age twelve Herschel [Herschel Cashin] and I were confronted with this racist image that they were white and we were black and if we're going to keep this thing together, we gonna have to call, y'all call Dick [Richard McCullough] and Squirt [James Euclid (ph.)] mister, when that announcement was made by Shelby McCullough, a grocer. Herschel and I started laughing and I don't think we quit laughing yet.$$So you had played with these boys all your life and then when you become eleven and twelve, was it their father's idea to tell them that they needed to start calling (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It was their father, their whole family.$$The whole family. Okay. So they decided that you needed to call them Mr. So and So.$$Mr. Euclid and Mr.--what, I can't remember what Dick's, Richard, that was Dick's name. It's funny.$$Did that stop the friendship because you refused to call them mister?$$Of course. Like I said, it was all over but the laughing.$$Okay.$$It was funny. So, oh man.$$Okay. We were talking about the community. So you had this group even though you played together, even though you were--$$Up to the point that we were lectured by the white grocer's wife, to be sure they understood that we were colored and they were white and Herschel and I, if we were gonna keep your group together, you have to call them mister.$$Where did you play together?$$All over the backyard. We had a big backyard [in Huntsville, Alabama].$$Okay. So they came to your house?$$Yeah, house, like I said our house was the--$$Was the place to hang out.$$--it was the headquarters.$$Okay. All right.$$(SHERYLL CASHIN): How was your house compared to the other houses on the block?$$We were two story brick.$$(SHERYLL CASHIN): Were there any other houses like that?$$Not two story brick, no.$$So think of the, a square block of where you lived. Tell me what you see or what you smelled or what you hear if you walk that square block from your house all the way around the block.$$Well I'll say--I'm still trying to get around the, the language handicap.$$Okay.$$Like I said, mixed in with that laughter. (Laughter) These idiots couldn't draw a straight line without referring to me and Herschel and here we have to call them mister. Where did they get this from? Heck, the only place they could get it from was from the white supremacists. Yeah. And these people actually believed that crap (laughter).

Reverend Dr. Joseph Lowery

Outspoken civil rights activist the Reverend Joseph Lowery was born on October 6, 1921, in Huntsville, Alabama. Considered the dean of the Civil Rights Movement, Lowery began his education in Huntsville, spending his middle school years in Chicago before returning to Huntsville to complete high school. From there, Lowery attended Knoxville College, Payne College and Theological Seminary, and the Chicago Ecumenical Institute. Lowery earned his doctorate of divinity as well.

Lowery began his work with civil rights in the early 1950s in Mobile, Alabama, where he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association, an organization devoted to the desegregation of buses and public places. During this time, the state of Alabama sued Lowery, along with several other prominent ministers, on charges of libel, seizing his property. The Supreme Court sided with the ministers, and Lowery's seized property was returned. In 1957, Lowery and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., formed the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and Lowery was named vice president. H Lowery led the famous 1965 Selma to Montgomery March - the Bloody Sunday march - at the time that George Wallace was governor of Alabama.

Lowery was co-founder and former president of the Black Leadership Forum, a consortium of black advocacy groups. The Forum began protesting apartheid in South Africa in the mid-1970s, and continued their activities in that region until the election of Nelson Mandela. In 1979, during a rash of disappearances of Atlanta's African American youth, Lowery provided a calm voice to a frightened community. In 1990, Lowery was invited by the FBI to meet with director William Sessions to conduct a seminar on African Americans and the image of the FBI.

After serving his community for more than forty-five years, Lowery retired from the pulpit in 1997. Lowery also retired in 1998 from the SCLC as president and CEO. Despite his retirement, Lowery still remaind active; he worked to encourage African Americans to vote, and even recorded a rap with artist NATE the Great to help spread this message.

Lowery received numerous awards, including an NAACP Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Martin Luther King Center Peace Award. Essence twice named Lowery as one of the Fifteen Greatest Black Preachers. Lowery's wife, Evelyn Gibson Lowery, was also an activist in her own right.

Accession Number

A2003.185

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/13/2003

Last Name

Lowery

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
First Name

Joseph

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

LOW03

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

Let's turn to each other and not on each other.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/6/1921

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Rice, Gravy, Collard Greens

Short Description

Civil rights leader, minister, and nonprofit chief executive Reverend Dr. Joseph Lowery (1921 - ) was co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and led the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965.

Employment

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

Black Leadership Forum

Favorite Color

Black, Gold, Green, Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joseph Lowery interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery discusses his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joseph Lowery describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joseph Lowery remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joseph Lowery remembers his father's stories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joseph Lowery describes his childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery describes his childhood environs, Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery shares memories from his school life

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joseph Lowery discusses his early occupational options

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joseph Lowery recalls his years at Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joseph Lowery recalls being called to the ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joseph Lowery discusses his college transfer

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery recalls his employment pursuits following college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery describes his Civil Rights efforts in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joseph Lowery recalls the beginnings of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joseph Lowery recalls the New York Times Company v. Sullivan Supreme Court ruling of 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joseph Lowery discusses his Civil Rights participation in Birmingham, Alabama, early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joseph Lowery remembers the Selma to Montgomery civil rights march, 1965

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery discusses past and present issues regarding voters' rights

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery reflects on the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joseph Lowery recalls a clash with the Ku Klux Klan at a 1979 protest march, Decatur, Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery describes his collaboration with the FBI

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery describes boycotts against South African companies during the apartheid era, late 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joseph Lowery offers a pessimistic view on current domestic and international events

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joseph Lowery shares political reflections on the 2000 and upcoming 2004 election cycle

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joseph Lowery discusses the role of social justice in organized religion

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joseph Lowery contrasts the lives of Nelson Mandela and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joseph Lowery compares and contrasts religion and spirituality

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joseph Lowery considers his legacy

Delories Ricks-Wallace

Businesswoman Delories Dell Ricks-Wallace was born on August 28, 1933, in Huntsville, Alabama. She moved with her family to Fort Wayne, Indiana, when she was 10 years old. By the age of 11, Ricks-Wallace was earning money by altering clothes in her uncle Norvel Ricks' dry cleaning business. She has combined her innate creative talents and sharp business acumen to become a true entrepreneur.

After high school, Ricks-Wallace attended Lockharts Tailoring School and obtained the skills needed to open her first sewing business. Her business prospered, and Wallace's business expanded to include a designer men's clothing line, WenDell's World Manufacturing Co. in Indianapolis, Indiana. The garments created there were sold in clothing stores she owned in Indianapolis and Bloomington, Indiana. In 1975, Ricks-Wallace founded Impulse Florist in Fort Wayne and showed the world yet another talent.

Ricks-Wallace's son, Kim, died in 1982. She closed her businesses, but two years later opened Luxury Limousine, Fort Wayne's first limousine service. Together with her husband Charles "Charlie Bob," Ricks-Wallace has owned and operated many other businesses, including Charlie's Tap, Kim's Korner, Wallace Maintenance, Club Zimmer and Blackman Prairie Subdivision-a collection of single-family homes located in Fremont, Indiana.

Over the years, Ricks-Wallace has been active at Turner Chapel A.M.E. Church, the Old Fort YMCA, the Fort Wayne Urban League Guild and the Ladell Traveling Club. Wallace and her husband raised seven children: Yvonne, Charles, Kim, LeeAnn, Emmett, Clifton and Wendell, as well as Kim's three children: Tara, Kim Jr. and Delories. Their grandchildren number twenty-four, not counting their seventeen great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.

Ricks-Wallace passed away on February 15, 2011.

Accession Number

A2002.138

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/29/2002

Last Name

Ricks-Wallace

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dell

Schools

Winston Street Elementary School

James H. Smart School

Lockhart's Tailoring School

First Name

Delories

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

RIC04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alaska, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Plan Your Work And Work Your Plan.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Birth Date

8/28/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Indianapolis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Death Date

2/15/2011

Short Description

Transportation entrepreneur Delories Ricks-Wallace (1933 - 2011 ) owns and operates a limousine company.

Employment

Wendell's World Manufacturing Co.

Impulse Florist

Luxury Limousine, Inc.

Charlie's Taphouse & Café

Kim's Korner

Wallace Maintenance

Club Zimmer

Blackman Prairie Subdivision

Dee-Lee's

Mr. Adrian

Favorite Color

Lime Green, Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Delories Ricks-Wallace's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Delories Ricks-Wallace lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes her parents' family backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about her maternal family homestead on Tenth Calvary Hill in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about her maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes how her maternal family ended up in Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about being related to Dr. Vance Marchbanks

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about growing up in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about her grandfather's job as a mason

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about moving to Fort Wayne, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes her childhood interests and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes how she learned to sew and tailor clothes

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Delories Ricks-Wallace shares her thoughts about school

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about her favorite teacher at Winston Street School in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 18 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about what excited her as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about attending Lockhart's Tailoring School

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about getting married and having children

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes how she came to attend Lockhart's Tailoring School in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about proving her success to those who expected her to fail

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes what inspired her to open her first store

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about the challenges blacks faced getting jobs in Fort Wayne, Indiana's department stores

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about opening her second store, Mr. Adrian, in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes the threats and robberies she encountered upon opening her second store, Mr. Adrian

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about the lawsuit she was involved in and closing her store, Mr. Adrian

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about opening and later selling her floral shop, Impulse Florist

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about starting her limousine business, Luxury Limousine

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes the clientele for her limousine service, Luxury Limousine

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes Luxury Limousine's celebrity clientele, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Delories Ricks-Wallace describes Luxury Limousine's celebrity clientele, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Slating of Delories Ricks-Wallace's talks about the Fort Wayne African/African American Historical Society Museum building

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Slating of Delories Ricks-Wallace's talks about her civic involvement and the "Old Fort Wayne" neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Delories Ricks-Wallace shares her concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Delories Ricks-Wallace shares her concerns for today's youth

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Delories Ricks-Wallace shares her concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Delories Ricks-Wallace talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Delories Ricks-Wallace narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Delories Ricks-Wallace narrates her photographs, pt. 2