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Steve Smith

Education administrator Steve Smith was born in 1964 in Albany, Georgia. After graduating from high school, he attended several institutions of higher education. Smith received both his B.A degree in English education and M.A. degree in education administration from the University of Georgia. He also holds an Ed.S. degree in education management from Troy State University. In 2010, Smith earned his M.B.A. degree after completing the executive format of the University of Georgia’s M.B.A. program at Terry College. The program included an international residency to Vietnam and China. In addition, Smith is a graduate of Leadership Atlanta and Leadership Georgia

Smith has over twenty-five years of business leadership experience, ranging from education, marketing and communications to business development and fiscal management. From 1991 to 1997, Smith served as a principal in the Fulton County School System, and was director of administrative services for Georgia Public Broadcasting. Smith served as vice president of corporate responsibility for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS), where he directed the review, selection and funding of community non-profit organizations through TBS, Inc.’s corporate philanthropy program. In 2009, Smith founded and served as principal of Steve Smith Consulting, LLC, and became a founding investor and board member of Atlantic Capital Bank – an $850 million community bank based in Buckhead, Georgia. In 2011, Smith was appointed as the deputy superintendent and chief of staff for Atlanta Public Schools, where he has executive control and direct oversight responsibility for all aspects of the day to day operations of the district.

Smith has also served on the board of directors of numerous organizations, including the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau, Georgia Chamber of Commerce 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education, University of Georgia Trustees, University of Georgia Alumni Association, Metro Atlanta Arts & Culture Coalition, Metro Atlanta YMCA, 191 Club and the Atlanta Business League. He has served as a gubernatorial appointment to the Independent Redistricting Task Force, and was a mayoral appointment to the Atlanta Arts & Cultural Funding Task Force.

Steve and his wife, Dr. Debra Smith, lived in Atlanta with their son, Steven, Jr.

Steve Smith was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 17, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.250

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/17/2012

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Schools

Lee County Elementary School

Lee County High School

Lee County Upper Elementary School

Darton State College

University of Georgia

Troy University

University of Georgia Terry College of Business

First Name

Steve

Birth City, State, Country

Albany

HM ID

SMI26

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Los Angeles, California

Favorite Quote

Stay Flexible So You Don't Get Bent Out Of Shape.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/19/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Biscuits

Short Description

Education administrator Steve Smith (1964 - ) was appointed deputy superintendent of the Atlanta Public Schools in 2011.

Employment

Fulton County School System

Georgia Public Broadcasting

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

Steve Smith Consulting, LLC.

Atlanta Public Schools

Barrow County School System

Lee County Ledger

Albany Herald

WGPC Radio

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1185,31:2123,51:3329,72:5004,104:5607,115:6478,134:12090,197:13190,213:14290,225:17930,240:18400,246:18870,252:19528,260:21690,288:22160,294:22630,300:25544,342:26954,371:27706,381:28364,389:28928,400:29304,405:35895,496:36805,517:39353,571:39808,577:40445,585:41901,642:43175,657:43630,663:47286,677:49934,707:52710,736:53700,749:54060,754:55140,768:58100,783:58905,791:62210,831:63170,836:63490,841:63810,846:64610,858:65650,876:66130,903:66850,916:67730,936:69090,962:69490,968:69970,975:79146,1075:80238,1108:81512,1130:82058,1137:89762,1201:92419,1215:102042,1340:105818,1400:106290,1405:110214,1429:110904,1442:111801,1459:112077,1464:116414,1505:117050,1513:118428,1528:118958,1534:119700,1542:122668,1582:126355,1599:126830,1605:127400,1612:136344,1684:137135,1692:139650,1717:140338,1727:141628,1747:142230,1755:142574,1760:142918,1765:143262,1770:143692,1776:145670,1809:146014,1814:146530,1821:147562,1837:147992,1843:150964,1857:151532,1866:152029,1874:152313,1879:154060,1887:154756,1896:156931,1934:157714,1950:158410,1959:159019,1967:159367,1972:159976,1980:160933,1991:162064,2008:162586,2015:167325,2060:168495,2090:168885,2097:169580,2109$0,0:1826,13:6173,85:9056,124:11474,154:12125,165:12497,170:14171,193:15101,206:20280,293:20945,301:22670,310:23270,319:23570,324:24020,331:25370,358:25745,364:27320,393:28520,410:28970,417:29570,426:30020,433:32950,447:33661,457:34767,473:35952,494:36505,505:40820,598:41260,604:41788,611:42404,619:43020,630:43900,644:44692,655:45220,662:46364,680:47684,701:48212,708:54104,790:54656,797:57860,817:58156,822:58674,830:60302,859:61412,878:62004,892:63188,910:64668,945:65038,951:65852,961:66740,977:67110,983:70772,1003:71592,1015:72166,1023:74298,1048:74872,1057:75610,1070:76184,1077:76512,1082:77086,1091:77414,1098:77988,1106:88180,1201:102048,1265:104032,1355:121880,1449:124850,1475:125276,1482:127193,1549:128940,1578:134924,1678:140580,1727:143268,1737:146098,1761:146722,1768:147450,1780:148074,1787:153211,1852:155059,1884:156291,1902:163170,1985:163650,1992:165560,1998:166144,2003:167290,2010:167800,2017:169160,2037:170690,2059:171625,2072:175068,2112:177580,2146:179080,2172:179480,2177:180180,2185:182330,2197:183050,2209:183450,2215:184010,2224:184410,2230:185050,2239:189290,2315:192570,2375:193050,2382:193610,2393:194010,2399:194650,2408:199926,2434:200880,2445:204105,2462:205260,2472:205785,2480:223550,2711:224030,2725:224894,2735:234862,2893:235186,2898:235591,2915:235915,2920:242258,3027:259789,3178:264690,3244
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Steve Smith's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Steve Smith lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Steve Smith describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Steve Smith describes his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Steve Smith talks about his mother's experiences of racial discrimination in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Steve Smith describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Steve Smith recalls the start of his aspiration to attend college

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Steve Smith describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Steve Smith remembers his mother's honesty about his father's identity

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Steve Smith describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Steve Smith describes his stepfamily

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Steve Smith describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Steve Smith lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Steve Smith describes the sights and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Steve Smith describes his early interests

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Steve Smith remembers his athletic role models

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Steve Smith remembers Lee County Elementary School in Leesburg, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Steve Smith recalls his influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Steve Smith remembers the New Piney Grove Baptist Church in Leesburg, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Steve Smith describes his experiences of academic tracking

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Steve Smith recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Steve Smith talks about his athletic involvement at Lee County High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Steve Smith describes his extracurricular activities at Lee County High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Steve Smith recalls his start at Albany Junior College in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Steve Smith describes his decision to attend Albany Junior College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Steve Smith talks about the racial demographics of the faculty at Lee County High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Steve Smith describes his community in Lee County, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Steve Smith recalls his time at Albany Junior College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Steve Smith describes his early work in the communications industry

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Steve Smith recalls his transition to the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Steve Smith talks about the integration of the University of Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Steve Smith talks about the development of his racial identity during college

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Steve Smith recalls studying under Michael Lomax

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Steve Smith remembers his activities at the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Steve Smith recalls the start of his career as an educator

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Steve Smith remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Steve Smith talks about his graduate education

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Steve Smith recalls serving as the principal of A. Philip Randolph Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Steve Smith remembers his transition to Georgia Public Broadcasting

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Steve Smith describes his time at Georgia Public Broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Steve Smith describes his work at the Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Steve Smith talks about Leadership Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Steve Smith remembers his experiences at Leadership Atlanta and Leadership Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Steve Smith talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Steve Smith remembers earning his M.B.A. degree

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Steve Smith talks about his return to the Atlanta Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Steve Smith describes the cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Steve Smith talks about the carbon monoxide leak at Finch Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Steve Smith describes his professional goals

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Steve Smith describes his advice to aspiring community leaders

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Steve Smith talks about Steve Smith Consulting, LLC.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Steve Smith talks about his family and community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Steve Smith describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Steve Smith reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Steve Smith reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Steve Smith describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Steve Smith narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

11$4

DATitle
Steve Smith remembers the New Piney Grove Baptist Church in Leesburg, Georgia
Steve Smith recalls the start of his career as an educator
Transcript
In your grade school days, now when you were a kid growing up, was, was church very important?$$Oh yes, church was very central to my upbringing. We, we had, you know, we had the, I don't know, I guess you would call it the quintessential small black Baptist church located in the rural South where most of my uncles were the deacons in the church, and you know, out of maybe one hundred people who were members, I, you know, I'd had to say ninety of them were related to me in some way. So we went to that kind of church.$$What was the name of your church?$$New Piney Grove Baptist Church [Leesburg, Georgia].$$New Piney Grove.$$Yeah, the quintessential small church in the country. And grew up and was raised Baptist and you know, religion was very central to my upbringing and remains very central to me in adulthood. But I have very fond memories of growing up and my mother [Lois Smith Rushin] taking us to church and being in church with my uncles and other family members. Yeah, I have very fond memories of growing up and being a part of New Piney Grove Baptist Church.$$Did the church--did the reverend or the other church leaders identify you as a youth as a leader?$$Yes, they did and specifically, specifically my Uncle Buddy, now we sh- his name was Tom Smith. But my Uncle Buddy was the head of the deacon board. And I remember that Uncle Buddy would always call on me to either read scripture or to take up money in the church and or to make announcements. So he and others, in the church, recognized and quite frankly encouraged and helped to, I think, as I reflect on it, I think really empower me to be a leader and to be not only a leader, but I, I got the message from them whether it was direct or indirect, I got the message from them that being smart was okay. They were--they were always proud of me for being smart. And I remember getting that message probably indirectly and they may have meant it directly, but I remember getting that message indirectly from my--from my church family and my, my extended family that being smart was okay, and they were pretty proud of me.$When did you graduate? In--?$$Graduated 1986--$$Okay.$$--and one of the--one of the things that, that led me to a track of administration right away was that I was very fortunate to get a job right out of college [University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia]. And the job that I got right out of college involved teaching high school English part time, and the other half of the day I was at the superintendent's office handling public relations and community relations for a small district right outside of Athens [Georgia], it was Barrow County [Barrow County School System] in Winder, Georgia just about thirty minutes outside of Athens. So I started my career teaching half day English and then the second half I was handling public relations for the small district. And in handling the public relations, I got to work closely alongside the superintendent because in a small district, the superintendent is involved in, you know, essentially every aspect of operations of a small district. So I was involved in working alongside Dr. Hight, who became a friend and a mentor from that job that I started back in 1986.$$Okay, how do you spell the Hight?$$H-I-G-H-T.$$Okay.$$Don Hight. He was quite, quite a little pistol.$$Okay. So you were, so this is the--what school district is this, this is the?$$Barrow County, B-A-R-R-O-W. Barrow County and the county seat is Winder, W-I-N-D-E-R.$$Um-hm, so, Winder, Georgia.$$Um-hm.$$So, I know you went over to the Fulton County school system [Fulton County Schools] at one point and became a principal before you left education--$$Correct.$$--I mean in your early days. So what was going on in Barrow County and how, what was the transition to Fulton?$$To Fulton, yeah. I spent from 1986 until 1991 in Winder in Barrow County, and during that timeframe I was teaching English half time, handling public relations, the other half of my responsibilities, working out of the superintendent's office. And during that timeframe, one of the things that, that became pretty prevalent for me is that I knew I enjoyed being in the community. I enjoyed being--having the flexibility of going to different events and being involved with elected officials. That was my first taste of being involved with the mayor of the city. You know, again in a small town like that, the superintendent is, you know, a bigwig in town. So I got to travel around the small district with him a lot. And as a result, he encouraged me to start, to start a program, if I were going to be in education, he said, "You should go to graduate school and get an educational administration degree." Because if you're gonna be in education you want to be a leader and you should--in order to do that to be an assistant principal and to move to a principalship you gotta have a master's [degree] in educational administration, which is what I--what I subsequently pursued. But that time period, the five years that I spent in Winder were very--it was very--I guess it was an enjoyable time in my life and was a very successful time for me professionally. I got married in 1989, and my wife [Debra Smith] and I worked in Winder for those next two years or three years I guess, before we moved to Atlanta [Georgia]. And I have--

Bernice Johnson Reagon

Born on October 4, 1942, Bernice Johnson Reagon grew up in Albany, Georgia, where she became involved in the civil rights movement. As a student at Albany State College in 1961, Reagon was arrested for participating in a SNCC demonstration. She spent the night in jail singing songs and after her arrest joined the SNCC Freedom Singers to use music as a tool for civic action. Reagon earned her B.A. in history from Spelman College in 1970. In 1973, she founded Sweet Honey in the Rock, an award-winning a cappella quintet that performs traditional African and African American music. Reagon received her doctorate in U.S. history, with a concentration in African American oral history, from Howard University in 1975.

Reagon composed and produced much of the Sweet Honey in the Rock's renowned repertoire. She has also composed music for several film projects, including the Emmy-winning We Shall Overcome. From 1974 to 1993, Reagon worked as a folklorist, program director and curator for the Smithsonian Institute and helped develop the Peabody Award-winning radio program Wade in the Water: African American Sacred Music Traditions for the Smithsonian and National Public Radio. She has been curator emeritus at the Smithsonian since 1993.

Reagon also enjoyed a distinguished career as a professor of history at the American University from 1993 to 2002. Her writings on African American music and the songs of the civil rights movement have been published in a number of journals and books. Bernice Johnson Reagon was the William and Camille Cosby Endowed Professor in the Fine Arts at her alma mater, Spelman College, for the 2002-2003 academic year.

Accession Number

A2003.231

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/22/2003 |and| 11/21/2003

Last Name

Reagon

Maker Category
Middle Name

Johnson

Organizations
Schools

Albany State University

Spelman College

Howard University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Bernice

Birth City, State, Country

Albany

HM ID

REA01

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

She has an exclusive agreement with another speaker' bureau.

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

10/4/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Okra, Watermelon, Greens

Short Description

Curator, music composer, and history professor Bernice Johnson Reagon (1942 - ) founded Sweet Honey in the Rock, an award-winning a cappella quintet that performs traditional African and African American music. She has been curator emeritus at the Smithsonian since 1993. Reagon also enjoyed a distinguished career as a professor of history at American University from 1993 to 2002.

Employment

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

Harambee Singers

Black Repertory Theater

Smithsonian Institute

American University

Sweet Honey in the Rock

Favorite Color

Raspberry, Teal

Timing Pairs
0,0:380,4:1444,23:2432,43:3268,54:11650,161:12280,169:14530,205:16060,228:19124,244:21476,273:22400,289:23072,303:23576,318:24164,326:24584,332:25172,340:25592,348:26096,356:31220,438:31724,450:32144,456:38240,508:38960,518:40400,541:40760,546:42380,586:42830,593:46250,653:47510,670:48140,678:49130,693:53660,706:53992,711:54822,722:57395,761:57976,769:58308,774:59885,796:60466,805:60881,811:61794,834:62126,839:62541,845:63703,858:65031,875:66940,899:69098,980:69430,985:76404,1042:76716,1047:79290,1090:79758,1097:82722,1161:86778,1222:91920,1241:98252,1318:104560,1471:104864,1477:107920,1482:108380,1488:111048,1516:111416,1521:112796,1548:113348,1555:114544,1571:115464,1589:118592,1649:119052,1655:122590,1666:125788,1711:126198,1719:126690,1726:127182,1740:127592,1746:128002,1754:128412,1760:128740,1765:129068,1770:131446,1818:132266,1829:132676,1835:133332,1845:134070,1859:134480,1865:135136,1875:135956,1888:137022,1904:137760,1916:144200,1932:145820,1961:146180,1966:155819,2036:156353,2043:157243,2056:158133,2068:161180,2102:162160,2119:163350,2139:164190,2152:164820,2170:165380,2180:167340,2250:167830,2268:180391,2388:180819,2393:181782,2403:184885,2450:185848,2461:187048,2468$570,0:970,6:4490,87:4810,92:6170,115:6570,121:13076,180:13452,185:15896,218:16554,226:16930,231:17776,243:18246,249:25068,288:25600,294:26360,305:27500,322:31756,412:35140,434:35735,442:39815,512:41090,531:41770,540:42450,550:43470,569:43895,575:44575,585:45340,596:47720,635:48145,641:52225,714:57640,723:58174,732:58886,741:59954,756:62705,776:63240,782:70302,851:73538,871:74259,883:74774,889:75186,894:75598,899:83040,969:83544,976:84720,992:88080,1037:88416,1042:93446,1072:94118,1082:94982,1097:96614,1121:96998,1126:98246,1142:102772,1173:103348,1181:104020,1189:104404,1194:110180,1218:110772,1228:111364,1239:112178,1251:112696,1259:113658,1276:114324,1286:114768,1293:115434,1305:118599,1328:118843,1333:119148,1345:120246,1367:120917,1380:127200,1440:128541,1454:130190,1460:131375,1482:131770,1488:132086,1493:135540,1519:136645,1547:136905,1552:137230,1558:137880,1573:138660,1589:139180,1598:139635,1607:140025,1615:141455,1643:141780,1649:142235,1662:146569,1694:146893,1699:149296,1724:150036,1736:150850,1749:153248,1771:154795,1789:155432,1797:155796,1802:156342,1810:156797,1816:158799,1845:163312,1879:163960,1889:165112,1911:165760,1921:166408,1934:166912,1943:167272,1949:168640,1972:168928,1977:169648,1989:170440,2001:170800,2007:171160,2013:171664,2021:172240,2030:172528,2035:172816,2040:173176,2046:173968,2060:178289,2085:178634,2091:183188,2183:183671,2191:185120,2216:185672,2225:190035,2266
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernice Reagon interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon gives her parents' names and birthdates

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon recalls her mother's family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon describes her father's family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon remembers her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bernice Reagon philosophizes on perception and meaning

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bernice Reagon lists the families in her community

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bernice Reagon reflects on sharecropping and her parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bernice Reagon discusses the value of storytelling in the black community

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bernice Reagon shares memories of her childhood and early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon recalls the segregation and discrimination growing up in Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon compares singing spirituals in school to singing them in church

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon describes her teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon remembers her parents' strictness

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon relates her school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon details her singing background as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon discusses cultures for whom singing is a key component

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon recalls her early career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon relates why she went to Albany State College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon details getting arrested and expelled for her involvement in Civil Rights

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon recounts her experience at Spelman

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon remembers her involvement in the Freedom Singers

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bernice Reagon reflects on the murder of three Civil Rights workers in Neshoba County, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon illustrates the crucial role of music in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon describes her husband and early years of marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon explains how freedom music seeped into popular culture

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon reflects on the history and significance of "We Shall Overcome"

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon recalls organizing cultural activities and the first integrated concerts in the South

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernice Reagon interview, part 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon describes her life in 1960s Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon details the founding of the Harambee Singers

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon remembers learning that Black is Beautiful (part 1)

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon remembers realizing that Black is Beautiful (part 2)

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon reflects on her life in Washington D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bernice recalls her experiences at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon remembers her professors at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon reflects on her graduate studies of oral history

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon describes insight gained through the study of black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon illustrates how songs are cultural artifacts that document history

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon explains how oral history taught what was absent in history books

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon discusses the importance of oral history as a challenge to written history

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon discusses Emancipation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon recalls her successes with the Smithsonian

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon details the founding and trajectory of 'Sweet Honey in the Rock'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon reflects on how Sweet Honey in the Rock celebrates womanhood through dress and costume

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bernice Reagon enjoys being a role model

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bernice Reagon expresses her opinion of rap

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Bernice Reagon recounts the highlights of working with Sweet Honey in the Rock

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Bernice Reagon remembers her work under a MacArthur Foundation grant

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Bernice Reagon discusses her concerns for the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Bernice Reagon considers her legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Bernice Reagon explains how freedom music seeped into popular culture
Bernice Reagon details the founding of the Harambee Singers
Transcript
The programming you're involved in kind of spread the culture of the Civil Rights Movement, did it not?$$It, these conferences--one of the first ones we did, we brought together song leaders from Movement campaigns all over the South. Then we brought topical song writers from New York. These are the people who are writing these popular songs. Then we brought in older, black singers, Georgia C. Allen Singers, Doc Reed, who had done time in the Texas State Pen [Penitentiary]. And together, we swapped songs and stories. And it was a time when I had a chance to listen to Bessie Jones, John and Peter Davis of the Georgia C. Allen Singers. They actually told us stories about songs we were singing that were slave stories. And some of my richest slave stories came from Bessie Jones and John and Peter Davis. They taught us work songs that prison, people in prison sang, and, and then the meaning. And so the [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] Freedom Singers also went to Newport [Rhode Island]. And we had influence on what would be the popular song Movement because almost everybody who performed at Newport, and we're here, talking Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary, Odetta, all of those different singers, they actually--usually would do an a cappella song, and then, this is guitar Movement part, it's, everybody's got a guitar and singing. But we would do an a capella song. And then we'd do a Freedom song. And so it was really a very, very cross fertilization period where, that music culture of the Civil Rights Movement had an impact on the pop culture. Now, the theme song of the Movement, which is "We Shall Overcome," never hit the Top 40 chart. There was sheet music. Nobody looked at the sheet music. There were some recordings. We did a recording of it. But the recordings never broke any records. "We Shall Overcome" would be the most well-known song in the world. But its dissemination is through the news media. It was an important lesson for me as a singer about music not having always to go through the industry; that I could be a field secretary of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee [SNCC], making my contribution to the Movement as a singer. That was really important, that I could be a singer and not be a star. I could be a singer. I could make a record, and it wouldn't sell, you know, 200,000 copies; very important lessons for me that mark and shape the kind of musician I became.$These women who had sung with me knocked on my door. And they said, "we don't want to stop singing." It was Mary Ethel Jones and Mattie Casey. And the three of us began to form what became the Harambee Singers. We usually were five to six black women singers, a capella and it was my first experience actually leading because when I sang with the [SNCC] Freedom Singers, Cordell Reagon was the leader of the group. And I was the contact with the booking person who was Toshi Seeger. So I knew a lot of the business part, but actually forming a group, keeping the group together, making the decisions, the Harambee Singers was my first experience. And one of the first things I had to deal with was, were we going to cost our families anything to do this group? So the first thing we said was, "we'll go anywhere if we can get at least $50.00, plus $50.00 for the group." So there were five people. Then the fee was actually $300.00. And $50.00 would do your ground transportation, your babysitter, and it really didn't impact your family fiscally. And we used that as a base. And the extra fifty went into a bank account for the group. And you'd be surprised about a formula like that, in introducing it where you never took anything in without giving it to the community that's holding you together. And I'm not sure where I got that from. There was something in Kwanzaa, where you were supposed to bring the first harvest home. So the first thing you feed is the thing that sustains you. And it was something you really had to talk about because it was unusual, but it actually ended up being a formula for what I did with Sweet Honey in the Rock. And it really worked for this group. And we, we would perform for schools. We would drive any place that was in a two hundred mile radius, doing concerts. If it was longer, they had to fly us. And it was a wonderful experience. It was a wonderful time to be a group of black women singers. And we were singing for blacks, the first Black Studies programs that were being formed in the country. And all of the black conferences we would, all the protest rallies, we were there. And it, it was an, it was an amazing experience for me, and a learning experience for me as a leader of singers.

The Honorable Bobby Rush

Congressman Bobby Rush, a legendary figure in modern African American politics, exhibited extraordinary leadership long before his 1992 election to Illinois' First Congressional District. Rush was born in Albany, Georgia, in November 23, 1946, under extremely segregated conditions. Rush’s family moved to Chicago in 1953, when he was seven years old.

In 1963, at the age of seventeen, Rush enlisted in the U. S. Army and served honorably until 1968. Later, Rush made history when he formed the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party after having been inspired by the activism of Stokely Carmichael and others. During this time, Rush formed the Free Medical Clinic in Chicago. It was later that Rush would confront the political establishment with a more traditional approach.

Rush ran for alderman of Chicago's Second Ward in 1975, but lost the election. Rush later won that same seat in 1983; and he continued to serve as an alderman until 1992, when he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. Rush participated on the subcommittees on Telecommunications, Trade and Consumer Protections, and Energy and Power, as well as on the House Committee on Commerce. These three entities accounted for three-quarters of all national legislation. During his term, Rush served as member of the U.S. delegation of the North Atlantic Assembly, and sponsored many community-based initiatives.

In 1999, Rush ran for mayor of Chicago, but he lost to Richard M. Daley.

Accession Number

A2000.035

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/23/2000 |and| 1/18/2001 |and| 5/15/2014

Last Name

Rush

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Benjamin Franklin Elementary Fine Arts Center

Wells Community Academy High School

John Marshall Metropolitan High School

Richard T. Crane Medical Preparatory High School

Englewood High School

Roosevelt University

University of Illinois at Chicago

Franklin Academy

McCormick Theological Seminary

First Name

Bobby

Birth City, State, Country

Albany

HM ID

RUS01

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Tanqueray

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Nantucket, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

God Bless You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/23/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Greens

Short Description

Political activist and U.S. congressman The Honorable Bobby Rush (1946 - ) made history when he formed the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party in the late 1960s. Rush became the alderman of Chicago's Second Ward in 1983 and was then elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1992.

Employment

United States Army

Black Panther Party

Chicago City Council

Illinois 1st Congressional District

Beloved Community Christian Church

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Burgundy

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bobby Rush interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bobby Rush's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bobby Rush remembers his parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bobby Rush recalls his early childhood in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bobby Rush recalls his family's move from Georgia to Chicago

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bobby Rush recalls his mixed Near North Side neighborhood in Chicago during his youth

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bobby Rush revisits his now-gentrified childhood neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bobby Rush remembers his childhood heroes and dreams

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Bobby Rush interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bobby Rush talks about the first slaves brought to America

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bobby Rush discusses his teenage interests in sports and music

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bobby Rush describes social networks from his youth in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bobby Rush remembers the musical talent and close-knit community on Chicago's Near North Side

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bobby Rush remembers a dedicated Boy Scout leader

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bobby Rush recalls receiving support from community members

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bobby Rush compares the quality of life for youth in 1950s Chicago with that of today

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bobby Rush discusses leaving high school and enlisting in the military

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bobby Rush recalls his army enlistment and basic training

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bobby Rush talks about his military service and a racist lieutenant

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bobby Rush discusses his involvement with SNCC's Chicago branch

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bobby Rush discusses the rise of black nationalism in SNCC

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bobby Rush describes founding the Black Panther Party's Chicago chapter

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bobby Rush explains how his group became the official Chicago chapter of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bobby Rush recalls Fred Hampton, the Chicago Black Panthers' social programs and the assassination of Hampton and Clark

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bobby Rush discusses the Black Panther Party's direction after 1969

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Bobby Rush's interview, session 3

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about Fred Hampton

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers joining the Black Panther Party

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Bobby Rush recalls opening a Black Panther Party office in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers the arrest of two Black Panther Party members

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Bobby Rush describes the formalization of the Black Panther Party's Illinois chapter

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Bobby Rush describes the programs sponsored by the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers the assassination of Fred Hampton, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the impact of Fred Hampton's assassination, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the naming of Margaret T. Burroughs Beach in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers the assassination of Fred Hampton, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers living under the threat of violence

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Bobby Rush recalls the aftermath of Fred Hampton's assassination

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the impact of Fred Hampton's assassination, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Bobby Rush recalls the changes to the Black Panther Party

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the relationships between the Black Panther Party and other organizations

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Bobby Rush describes the philosophy of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the leadership of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Bobby Rush describes his decision to attend Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers his transition to electoral politics

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the impact of the free breakfast for children program

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about the members of Black Panther Party

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Bobby Rush describes his decision to leave the Black Panther Party

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers the start of his political career

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - The Honorable Bobby Rush talks about Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - The Honorable Bobby Rush remembers the mayoral campaign of Harold Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - The Honorable Bobby Rush reflects upon the leadership of Mayor Harold Washington

DASession

2$2

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Bobby Rush explains how his group became the official Chicago chapter of the Black Panther Party
Bobby Rush recalls Fred Hampton, the Chicago Black Panthers' social programs and the assassination of Hampton and Clark
Transcript
Yeah, we came back and we had the, so we set up an office. I met Fred Hampton at--I think Stokely [Carmichael, later Kwame Ture] came to speak at a place called the Afro Arts Museum which ultimately became the headquarters of the El Rukn street gang at 39th and Drexel. It used to--prior to the El Rukns taking it over it was called the Afro Arts Theater and they had a, a rally and Stokely came to speak. Well I asked, I called Fred and asked Fred to meet us there after the rally and (unclear) and meet Bob Brown and I and we met and we asked him to join with us to organize a chapter of the Black Panther party and he decided to become a member of the Black Panther Party. And so we had the office open, Fred Hampton had become a member and we had the other SNCC people who was, who, who originally were members of SNCC they joined the Panther party also, so we had a functioning little cadre of people here in Chicago. Still didn't have, not had the authorization from [the national leadership of the BPP in] Oakland, California. Well it just so happens that around the first of December of '68 [1968] there were two Panthers on a plane, Landon Williams and Masah (ph.) Hewitt, Raymond Masah Hewitt and they were on their way from New York to Oakland. And they got into this discussion about whether or not this was the same between New York and Oakland and Oakland and Cuba. And so in their naïveté they decided to ask the stewardess. Well when they asked the stewardess during this time you know planes were being hijacked and sent to Cuba and all that. So they went and asked her and she freaked and she called, I mean she went up to the, to the, to the cockpit and told the captain. The captain landed the plane in Chicago rather than going to California. It landed in Chicago, took them off the plane, handcuffed them, put them in jail, all right, in Cook County Jail. They had one phone call, they called Oakland to tell them that they were in Chicago in jail. Oakland had one phone number of anybody in Chicago, not the guys who they said was members of the Panthers. They had our phone number of our headquarters okay, so they had to call us to get these guys out of jail to get you know--so that's how we became an official chapter of the Black Panther party because the--we were the only ones they, who they could contact because we had the, we had the only office, the only operation here and so that's, from that time on we became a recognized chapter of the, of the Black Panther party.$What happened with the whole Fred Hampton and the, you know the Chicago Seven and--?$$Well Fred was a, Fred Hampton was a charismatic, dynamic, courageous, effective, talented spokesman and individual. He was, he had a, had trained himself to speak in the mode of a Baptist preacher so he could move a crowd and he could articulate so well and he could move a crowd and he could simplify complex, complicated ideas and bring them down to a level where the common person could identify with him and be motivated by him. And so, Fred emerged as one of the most dynamic leaders in the, in the [Black] Panther Party based on his leadership or his ability to speak and move people. And so, and the Illinois chapter was becoming so effective through the various programs. We, you know, we used to say that Oakland [California, headquaters of the national leadership] had a lot of theory but Chicago had all the practice okay, and Oakland would come up with these, some of these great ideas and stuff but we were implementing in Chicago. And so we created a vast network of Breakfast for Children programs and we created the, a, a, a very, very strong free medical clinic, actually had a medical clinic here in Chicago on 16th and Avers where the only requirement for people to get service there--through trained professionals, I mean when we talk about medical we just had, we had doctors who during their day were, had their own practice but in the evening they would come over to the free medical clinic. You know we had doctors who were on staff at different hospitals but then they would also be staff in our medical clinics, you know including Quentin, Quentin Young and--there, there were a number of others who I still have very close relationships with. But they would come over and so we had the medical clinic, we had free food programs and various other kinds of programs. So we became a real threat to the power structure here in the city and all across the country and so they, the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation] targeted us. They dispatched a lot of informants into the organization, they raided our office on, on a number of occasions and ultimately they set up a plan to murder Fred and myself. And on December the 4th, 1969, they did in fact come onto the West Side in an apartment where Fred was staying at. I was supposed to have been in that apartment. And they shot that apartment up, killed Fred and a guy out of, a Panther out of Peoria by the name of Mark Clark. They wounded seven Panthers in, in that apartment and so he, he was ultimately killed by--because they used an informant, a guy who ultimately killed himself, committed suicide by running in, out on the expressway, a few years after that, guy by the name of William O'Neal who was the informant for the FBI, but they, they killed Fred Hampton and Mark Clark on December the 4th, 1969.$$And what role did you play in the, I mean were the two of you the most, the most--known?$$Yeah, we were. Right, we were. Fred, I was actually the, what they called a deputy minister of defense for a while and then I ultimately became the Illinois chairman. I was deputy minister of defense because I had the military experience okay, and Fred was the deputy chairman. And during that time Huey [Newton] had defined the state of America, of black America as being at war. So at that time the deputy minister of defense was actually the, the, the wartime leader per se and then the deputy chairman during the, the peacetime era and the deputy chairman would emerge. And so I was the minister of defense and Fred was the chief spokesman for the party and also the spiritual leader of the party, really and truly he was. I was more of a theoretician and a person who could, could implement a lot of the things to, cause--but Fred would be able to move the masses in, in a much more effective way you know.$$So were you stockpiling guns and things like that during that time?$$Oh we had guns, I mean yeah. We had--I wouldn't say we were stockpiling them, you know but, yeah but we had guns, yeah sure, yeah we had guns.$$(Simultaneously) (Unclear) Okay, and then--.$$But only for self defensive purposes.$$And then, but at the same time what's interesting the whole thing was growing, empowering and self-help in many ways?$$Oh absolutely. You know we wanted to make a difference. We wanted to make sure that, you know we, again out of that era of the Panther party I mean look at something like sickle cell anemia which most of us know about today. Well during that time nobody really knew about sickle cell anemia. Doctor's didn't know how to diagnose it because they had not been trained about it. So the Panther party understood the contradiction between here you have a disease like sickle cell anemia that mostly affected black people and a medical profession that did not recognize, nor, recognize it (unclear) so therefore they could not diagnose it right. And so we started an effort to test people for sickle cell anemia to raise the contradiction around sickle cell anemia and we in fact were very successful you know because now it's a recognizable disease, most people know about it. There were, at one time there were a plethora of organizations finally just to deal with it but it all came out because of the Panther party's educational and conscious raising the campaign to teach people about sickle cell anemia. You know, the Breakfast for Children program, you know we embarrassed America with the Breakfast for Children program. You know we embarrassed America with the Breakfast for Children program because we felt as though our community should be self reliant enough to make sure that our children were fed before they went home, went to school to, went to school in order to be educated but that wasn't happening. So we decided to you know rather than pontificate over it, work on the problem. So we developed the Breakfast for Children program. We fed thousands of children, you know. The medical clinic came about, around the same thing, free food give away and this was all about organizing our community into an effective force, you know. A lot of the model was borrowed, borrowed from Saul Alinsky you know and also from the Daley machine, political machine, you know--earning the loyalty of your community by providing services to the community.

Wadsworth A. Jarrell, Sr.

Revolutionary social artist Wadsworth A. Jarrell, Sr. was born in Albany, Georgia, in 1929, the youngest of six children. Jarrell credits his father, a furniture maker, and the rest of his family for supporting his childhood interest in art. After high school, Jarrell enlisted in the army, served in Korea, and then moved to Chicago. In 1954, Jarrell enrolled in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago majoring in advertising art and graphic design. Not long afterward, Jarrell lost interest in commercial art and took more drawing and painting classes.

Graduating from the Art Institute in 1958, Jarrell spent several years working as a commercial artist. By the early 1960s, Jarrell was exhibiting his work widely throughout the Midwest. Meanwhile, the explosive social atmosphere of the era left him wanting to create art that was pertinent to the social movements of the day, the Civil Rights Movement and black liberation struggle. Jarrell joined the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC), a group that created Chicago's Wall of Respect mural, a seminal piece in the 1960s urban mural movement. It was there that he met his future wife, Elaine Annette (Jae) Johnson, a clothing designer. With the eventual breakup of the Artists' Workshop of OBAC, Jarrell and fellow artists Jeff Donaldson and Barbara Jones-Hogu, among others, formed a collective called COBRA-Coalition of Black Revolutionary Artists, which later became AFRI-COBRA, the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists. AFRI-COBRA took as its central tenets black pride, social responsibility and the development of a new diasporic African identity.

In 1971, Jarrell was recruited by fellow AFRI-COBRA founder, Jeff Donaldson to teach at Howard University where he pursued his Master of Fine Arts degree. He continued there until 1977, taking a position at the University of Georgia as Assistant Professor. In 1988, with the interest in his work increasing, Jarrell retired from teaching altogether. Jarrell's work has been shown at numerous places including: the Smithsonian International Gallery, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and at festivals and exhibitions in Nigeria, Germany, Sweden, France, Haiti and Martinique.

Accession Number

A2001.044

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/20/2001

Last Name

Jarrell

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Occupation
Organizations
Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Days, Evenings

First Name

Wadsworth

Birth City, State, Country

Albany

HM ID

JAR01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: $400-500
Preferred Audience: Adults

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Venice, Italy

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

11/20/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables, Shellfish

Short Description

Painter Wadsworth A. Jarrell, Sr. (1929 - ) helped form a collective called COBRA-Coalition of Black Revolutionary Artists, which later became AFRI-COBRA, the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists. AFRI-COBRA took as its central tenets black pride, social responsibility and the development of a new diasporic African identity. Jarrell's work has been shown at numerous places including the Smithsonian International Gallery and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

Employment

Howard University

University of Georgia

Favorite Color

Blue, Orange, Purple, Yellow

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wadsworth Jarrell interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wadsworth Jarrell's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wadsworth Jarrell shares details about his mother's family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wadsworth Jarrell lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wadsworth Jarrell recalls growing up on a farm in Oconee County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses his parents' influence on his siblings and him

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his school years in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wadsworth Jarrell reflects on the impact of his father's death on the family

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his school years in Georgia and early mentors in art

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his time in the Army

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wadsworth Jarrell shares details about going AWOL from the Army

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about moving to Chicago to attend art school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his experience at the Art Institute of Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wadsworth Jarrell identifies some instructors and artists who inspired him while at the Art Institute of Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wadsworth Jarrell explains how he supported himself while in school and discusses how he started a mail-order business with his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses his involvement with the Wall of Respect and AFRICOBRA

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wadsworth Jarrell continues his discussion about the Wall of Respect

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wasdworth Jarrell reflects on the significance of AFRICOBRA

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about AFRI-COBRA membership

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses the work and artistic contribution of AFRI-COBRA

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses his family's brief move to New England in 1971

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses teaching at Howard University and the Univeristy of Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about the evolution of his painting

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wadsworth Jarrell describes his experiences teaching at Howard University and tells why he left

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wadsworth Jarrell reflects on his experience at The University of Georgia, Athens

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his toy business

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about selling his art in Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wadsworth Jarrell discusses his move to New York in 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his wife and children

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wadsworth Jarrell offers his perspective on the importance of art

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about current and future ventures

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wadsworth Jarrell defines the terms black art and the black artist

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wadsworth Jarrell talks about his parents, his legacy, and his wife--the person he most admires