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Pamelya Herndon

Lawyer and nonprofit chief executive Pamelya Herndon was born on November 23, 1952 in Hempstead, Texas to Kathryn and Daniel Norris Herndon. She graduated from Roy Miller High School in 1971, and earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration with a focus in accounting from Howard University in 1975. Herndon then attended the University of Texas Law School where she received her J.D. degree in 1978.

Herndon married fellow lawyer, Alfred Mathewson, in 1978, and the two moved to Denver, Colorado where she worked for a major accounting firm. She was then hired by the Internal Revenue Service as a senior litigation attorney. In 1983, Herndon and her husband moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where Herndon continued to work for the IRS until she was appointed by Attorney General Patricia Madrid to serve in New Mexico’s Litigation Division in 1998. Here, she provided legal representation to state officials and agencies until 2006, before being appointed general counsel for the State Regulation and Licensing Department of New Mexico. In this position, Herndon supervised and managed the legal bureau of the Regulation and Licensing Department, as well as provided advice to the Office of the Superintendent. She remained here until 2009, when she became deputy cabinet secretary for New Mexico’s General Services Department, overseeing the administration of the government agency which housed the Risk Management, Building Services, Property Control, Transportation Services, and Administrative Services Divisions. In February of 2011, Herndon became managing partner of Herndon Legal Services, and served until October of that year. She was then hired by the Southwest Women’s Law Center in 2012 to work as their executive director until October 2018 when she founded the KWH Law Center for Social Justice and Change and became their president and CEO. Herndon also taught courses on the main campus and in the law school of the University of New Mexico. She also helped train paralegals and legal secretaries at Brookline College in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Herndon was elected as a member of the New Mexico Electoral College in 2008, is a member of the Albuquerque chapter of the American Association of University Women, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, and has served on the boards of Emerge New Mexico, the African American Performing Arts Center Foundation, the Con Alma Health Foundation, and the United States Eagle Federal Credit Union. She has also received numerous awards for her work as a lawyer, including the 2012 Public Lawyer of the Year, presented by the Public Law Section of the New Mexico State Bar, the 2015 Lawyer of the Year, presented by the Albuquerque Bar Association, and she was named as a W.K. Kellogg Fellow in 2019. Herndon is also a Certified Public Accountant.

Herndon resides in Albuquerque, New Mexico with her husband, and they have three adult children: Eryn, Amber, and Justin.

Pamelya Herndon was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 26, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.068

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/26/2019

Last Name

Herndon

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Charles W. Crossley Elementary School

Roy Miller High School

Howard University

University of Texas at Austin School of Law

First Name

Pamelya

Birth City, State, Country

Hempstead

HM ID

HER06

Favorite Season

The Time Between The End Of Summer And Beginning Of Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

London, Corpus Christi, and Portugal

Favorite Quote

There Is Nothing That You Can Imagine That You Cannot Do

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Mexico

Birth Date

11/23/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Albuquerque

Favorite Food

Fried Corn

Short Description

Lawyer and nonprofit chief executive Pamelya Herndon (1953 - ) worked for the State of New Mexico for thirteen years before serving as director of the Southwest Women’s Law Center, and later becoming the founding president and CEO of the KWH Law Center for Social Justice and Change.

Employment

KWH Law Center for Social Justice and Change

Southwest Women's Law Center

Herndon Legal Services

State of New Mexico; General Services Department

State of New Mexico; Regulation and Licensing Department

New Mexico Attorney General's Office

IRS; Department of Treasury

Deloitt, Haskins & Sells

Favorite Color

Purple

Monica Haslip

Arts administrator Monica Haslip was born on June 14, 1965 in Birmingham, Alabama to Cleopatra Cleveland Haslip and Willie Haslip. Haslip graduated from the Alabama School of Fine Arts in 1983, and completed two years at Atlanta College of Art. She went on to work in the photography department at Johnson Publishing Company in Chicago, Illinois. In 1989, Haslip was hired as a senior marketing manager for the mid-western region at Black Entertainment Television (BET).

In 1994, Haslip founded Little Black Pearl Art & Design Center, an after school program that she operated out of her home on the South Side of Chicago. She initially employed two artists to instruct children in painting, mosaic, and design from the Hyde Park, Oakland, Kenwood, Woodlawn, and Bronzeville communities. In 2000, Haslip used funding from the Empowerment Zone Initiative to begin expanding the organization. In 2004, Little Black Pearl Art & Design Center moved into a new forty-thousand square foot facility in Bronzeville; and in 2011, Haslip opened Options Laboratory School, a charter school that offered an arts, science, technology, engineering, math, and business centered curriculum to at-risk youth. Haslip secured a contract with Chicago Public Schools in 2013, and the school was renamed The Little Black Pearl Art & Design Academy. As executive director of both the art and design center and the academy, Haslip facilitated sponsorships from the W.K. Kellog Foundation, the Greater Chicago Food Depository and the Jordan Brand.

In addition to receiving a Grio Award in 2011, Haslip was named as a White House “champion of change.” She was also honored by the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, and was featured in O Magazine and in The Chicago Tribute. In 2017, Haslip was included in a mural painted by Kerry James Marshall on the Chicago Cultural Center. She was a recipient of the 2013 Mary McLeod Bethune Living Legends Award from the IDeaL Education Foundation. Additionally, Haslip served as a workforce innovation board member of the Chicago Cook Workforce Partnership.

Haslip and her husband, Leon Haslip, have one son.

Monica Haslip was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 20, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.018

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/20/2018

Last Name

Haslip

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Monica

Birth City, State, Country

Birmingham

HM ID

MON11

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Julia Stasch

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami

Favorite Quote

You Have To Stand In Front Of The Truth.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

6/14/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Arts administrator Monica Haslip (1965 - ) was the founder and executive director of Little Black Pearl Art and Design Center and the Little Black Pearl Art and Design Academy.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Gray

Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Non-profit executive Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey was born on September 25, 1954 in Seattle, Washington to Dr. Blanche Sellers-Lavizzo and Dr. Philip Lavizzo. She attended the University of Washington before transferring to the State University of New York-Stony Brook for two years. Lavizzo-Mourey then continued her education at Harvard Medical School, graduating in 1979. In 1984, she was selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar, and earned her M.B.A. degree in health policy from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1986.

Lavizzo-Mourey joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania as an assistant professor. During her tenure, she served as the director of the Institute on Aging from 1984 to 1992. She took a leave of absence from the university to work as deputy administrator for the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research under President George H.W. Bush’s administration. Lavizzo-Mourey then served as quality of care chair for President Bill Clinton’s panels on health care until 1994, when she returned to the University of Pennsylvania as a professor. Lavizzo-Mourey served as the associate executive vice president for health policy for the health system from 1994 to 2001, and the Sylvan Eisman professor of medicine and health care systems at the university from 1997 to 2002. In 2001, Lavizzo-Mourey was hired as a senior vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and was appointed to serve as the president and CEO of the foundation in 2003. While at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Lavizzo-Mourey continued to see patients at a clinic in New Jersey, and launched an influential campaign against childhood obesity in 2007. The initiative decreased the obesity rate among children aged two to five years and halted its rise among those aged two to nineteen years.

Lavizzo-Mourey was the recipient of numerous awards, including twenty honorary doctorates from institutions like Brown University, the University of Pennsylvania, Tufts University, Morehouse School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. She appeared on Forbes’ list of the most important women in the world eight times, and as one of Modern Healthcare’s one hundred most influential people in health care eleven times.

Lavizzo-Mourey and her husband, Robert Lavizzo-Mourey, have two adult children.

Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 14, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.038

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/14/2016

Last Name

Lavizzo-Mourey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Juanita

Schools

Our Lady of Mount Virgin

John Muir Elementary School

Asa Mercer Middle School

The Bush School

University of Pennsylvania

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Harvard Medical School

Harvard

First Name

Risa

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

LAV03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/25/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Roasted chicken, fresh salad

Short Description

Non-profit executive Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey (1954 - ) advised on health policies for the Bush and Clinton administrations, and became president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2002.

Employment

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Various

University of Pennsylvania

The Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her mother's childhood in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about her mother's aspirations in the medical field

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her father's childhood in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her father's medical paper

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her parents' careers after medical school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her parents' private practice in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers the Mount Baker neighborhood in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers Our Lady of Mount Virgin School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls discrimination in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers her early aspirations to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her family's religious and civic involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her high school education

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her early mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls the economic climate of Seattle, Washington during the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about the recession in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls famous people from Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about the Black Panther Party in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her experience at The Bush School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers her father's death

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her college education

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her influences at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her acceptance to Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about affirmative action

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her experiences at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her mentors at Harvard Medical School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls the controversy involving Dr. Bernard D. Davis

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers her challenges in medical school

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls the racial climate of Boston, Massachusetts during the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about her former classmate, Jill Stein

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her former classmate, Dr. Augustus A. White, III

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her residency at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about health care legislation

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about preventive medicine

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes the challenges of medical residency

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls completing her medical residency

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes the Lewis Katz School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls the history of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her decision to specialize in geriatric medicine

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls attending the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her responsibilities at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers her role as the W.E.B Du Bois College House faculty advisor

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about racial tensions in Philadelphia, Pennslvania during the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers notable students and professors at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her work for the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls working with Hillary Rodham Clinton on The Health Security Act of 1993

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about universal healthcare reform

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about her medical research

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about violence as a public health issue

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls her appointment as Sylvan Eisman Professor of Medicine and Health Care Systems

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes her program to reinstitute house calls

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about alternatives to home health care

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey recalls becoming president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about her campaign to combat childhood obesity

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes the factors of a healthy childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes the factors of a healthy childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about the endowment of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about the health crisis in Flint, Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey reflects upon her family

Tape: 6 Story: 15 - Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey remembers her early aspirations to become a doctor
Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey talks about her campaign to combat childhood obesity
Transcript
I'm thinking you've got two parents [Blanche Sellers Lavizzo and Philip V. Lavizzo] who are physicians, did you spend or did your siblings spend a lot of time in the office?$$Um-hm.$$Or yeah, you know, downtown [Central District, Seattle, Washington]?$$I, that's a, that's a great question, we did, I probably spent more than the others, my fondest memory really is Saturday mornings because Saturday mornings was the special time that I had with my mother, she practiced on Saturday mornings, so a pediatrician, you--good time to be in the office if you're gonna take care of kids right? Saturday mornings, so every Saturday morning she and I would drive down to her office which was about three or four blocks from the YWCA [Young Women's Christian Association] and I would then walk to the Y, get a swimming lesson and after my swimming lesson I'd walk back to her office and hang out for the rest of the morning with her and thinking I was helping out in the lab and, you know, sitting in the waiting room with her patients and just being there and seeing her do her work and how people responded to her. And I think that, that really instilled in me the joy of being a doctor, yeah. There were other times that we spent time with them and those were usually when there was an emergency in the evening and they had to go into the hospital there was, there wasn't anybody who could take care of us, you know? The, they were three thousand miles away from their family and anybody who could really come and, come over and help out in the evening, so when that happened we all piled into the car and went to the emergency room, my parents would do their work and my brother [Philip Lavizzo] and I would hang out at the nurses station and, again that was, that was pure joy for me, I think it was just the opposite for my brother.$$Okay, okay. So, so you--you're learning, I guess directly and vicariously about the profession--$$Um-hm.$$--the medical profession by being around--$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) two doctors.$We've invested in ensuring that kids have a healthy weight, it really--a billion dollars in reversing the epidemic of childhood obesity (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) You know that was a big initiative that was launched soon after you joined Robert Wood (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$The Johnson Foundation [Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey], and one in which the first lady participated in, you know, to a great extent, I mean she was, you know, she made commercials and, and appeared around the country, you know, on behalf of exercise and eating the right foods and--$$Shortly after I became president, I really initiated our commitment to reversing the epidemic of childhood obesity. At the time, there were a lot of debates about whether it was really a problem and we were largely as a country ignoring the, the fact that rates of childhood obesity were steadily going up and the consequences of children being obese at a young age were going to be devastating because all of the illnesses that are associated with obesity like high blood pressure and heart disease and asthma were things that they would start to get at a much younger age. So instead of getting them, these diseases in middle age, they would--we were starting to see diabetes in childhood and in children in their teens and in their early twenties and that of course could lead to a situation where we were producing a generation that was gonna die younger than their parents' generation, in fact, we are seeing now a decrease in life expectancy. So we at the foundation and, and really was a signature program under my administration to address childhood obesity and I remember going to meet with Michelle Obama before she was the first lady, when she was Senator Barack Obama's [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama] wife working in community programs at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois]. And it was very clear that then that she was passionate about this issue and so it was extremely gratifying to see her take that on when she became first lady and to essentially become a champion for good policies for educating parents and for changing the, the ways that communities addressed the health of children.

Geoffrey Canada

Nonprofit executive Geoffrey Canada was born on January 13, 1952 in South Bronx, New York to Mary Canada and McAlister Canada. Canada graduated from Wyandanch Memorial High School in Wyandanch, New York in 1970; and earned his B.A. degree in psychology and sociology from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine in 1974. Canada received his M.S. degree in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1975.

Canada was hired as director of the Robert White School in Boston, Massachusetts in 1975. In 1983, he founded the Chang Moo Kwan Martial Arts School, and became the education director and program director of the truancy prevention program at the Rheedlen Center for Children and Families. He was promoted to president and chief executive officer of the Rheedlen Center in 1990. Under his leadership, Rheedlen opened the first Beacon School at the Countee Cullen Community Center, and launched the Neighborhood Gold program, the Harlem Peacemakers Program, and the Harlem Children’s Zone initiative. The Rheedlen Center changed its name to Harlem Children’s Zone in 2002, and opened its first charter school in 2004. Impressed by Canada’s success with The Harlem Children’s Zone model, President Barack Obama announced in 2008 that he planned to replicate the program in thirty cities across the country. In 2014, Canada stepped down as chief executive officer of the Harlem Children’s Zone, retaining the title of president, he was succeeded by Anne Williams Isom who became chief executive officer.

Canada authored two books: Fist Stick Knife Gun: A Personal History of Violence in America and Reaching Up for Manhood: Transforming the Live of Boys in America. He was also the main subject of the 2010 film Waiting for Superman. Canada served on multiple boards for organizations including the Black Community Crusade for Children at the Children’s Defense Fund, the board of directors of the Fund for the City of New York and Foundation Center as well as in the capacity of co-chair of the New York Commission on Economic Opportunity in 2006, and the New York State Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board in 2007. He received multiple awards for his work including the Heinz Award in the Human Condition and the National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award.

Canada and his wife, Yvonne Canada have four children: Melina, Jerry, Bruce, and Geoffrey, Jr.

Geoffrey Canada was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.144

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/12/2016

Last Name

Canada

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Wyandanch Memorial High School

Bowdoin College

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Morris High School

John Dwyer Junior High School #133

P.S. 99, Dimitrious Myers School

First Name

Geoffrey

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

CAN06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/13/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cherries

Short Description

Nonprofit executive Geoffrey Canada (1952 - ) founded the Harlem Children’s Zone, an initiative following the academic careers of children in a 24 block area of Harlem.

Employment

Camp Freedom

Robert White School

Rheedlen Center for Children and Families' Truancy Prevention Program

Harlem Children's Zone

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:249,11:581,16:1411,85:2656,159:3071,165:3403,170:3735,175:5976,213:6308,218:11620,297:12533,308:18214,371:19852,397:22426,452:22816,458:25390,523:33395,655:37362,683:39637,713:42913,772:50548,904:51052,910:52480,931:52900,937:56008,986:56428,992:58780,1039:62476,1066:62808,1071:63721,1084:64883,1103:65381,1110:65713,1115:67041,1141:71025,1216:73432,1261:86085,1430:86460,1437:86910,1450:89610,1545:101084,1755:101396,1760:102644,1780:109000,1816:114190,1879:120812,1972:128110,2061:130105,2106:130675,2113:134665,2158:138050,2169$0,0:440,20:4312,81:7580,114:20082,390:20646,397:28510,519:32540,696:33324,763:48880,949:49370,957:51960,1019:53360,1051:57070,1214:65608,1296:66211,1456:77744,1604:86389,1761:92980,1848:94684,1877:108622,2133:108934,2138:109792,2161:122022,2389:124198,2452:131121,2527:135275,2635:137419,2694:140233,2793:150211,2934:151862,2955:152394,2963:152698,2968:159714,3075:160634,3090:161002,3095:163118,3122:165786,3160:166246,3166:167442,3180:168362,3195:171306,3246:171674,3251:172042,3256:176550,3265:177630,3295:179502,3359:179862,3376:185046,3531:187638,3614:188142,3623:188574,3630:191454,3697:192102,3709:193542,3731:193974,3738:194334,3744:194766,3751:195054,3756:195486,3763:199032,3777:200208,3800:203736,3862:204240,3869:206340,3904:206676,3909:207012,3914:207348,3919:208356,3941:215947,3996:216601,4004:217037,4009:220089,4071:220743,4078:224296,4134:228655,4165:232584,4237:233404,4249:234798,4303:237586,4368:239390,4404:244020,4446:246900,4487:247220,4492:248580,4519:248900,4524:249300,4529:249860,4538:250980,4554:255160,4642:280037,4894:290441,5001:294567,5072:294891,5077:295296,5088:295782,5095:296187,5101:296916,5113:297564,5123:298455,5133:305650,5212:305950,5219:306500,5231:307460,5274
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geoffrey Canada's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada remembers visiting his mother's community in Kinston, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his mother's education and interests

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada remembers his mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geoffrey Canada remembers learning about his father's ancestry

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geoffrey Canada recalls visiting the land where his paternal ancestors were enslaved

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada recalls the basis of his short memoir, 'Cherries for My Grandma'

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada describes his mother's relationship with his maternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his experiences of violence in the South Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his older brother, John Canada

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geoffrey Canada remembers the athleticism of his brother, John Canada

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his brother, Daniel Canada

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada remembers J.H.S. 133 in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his decision to move to Long Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada recalls hiring Michael Adams at the Harlem Children's Zone

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Geoffrey Canada recalls the basis of his short memoir, 'Cherries for My Grandma'
Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 2
Transcript
Now I'm in high school [Wyandanch Memorial High School, Wyandanch, New York], and my grandmother [Canada's maternal grandmother, Lydia Pearson Williams] and I still have this wonderful sort of relationship; and I talk with her and try to understand her and she told me some of her, you know their challenges growing up [in Kinston, North Carolina] and but the, the thing about me and the cherries happened because and I actually--$$(Unclear).$$--wrote about this and, and actually I, I gave this as a talk and The New York Times ended up printing it as an op-ed. It's called 'Cherries for My Grandmother' ['Cherries for My Grandma,' Geoffrey Canada] was that the, the thing that my grandmother loved the most in life were cherries, but they were so expensive we couldn't afford to get a pound, and she didn't have money, right, I mean the money was to saving the house [in Wyandanch, New York], but she would sequester I will say fifty cents, and she would send me to the store to get fifty cents' worth of cherries and I would come back with those cherries and we just delighted in them and there was always just enough. So, we wished we could have eaten a lot more but we never could and I tell folks, I used to measure our summers by how good the cherries were, and we'd be like, "Aw, this is a great cherry summer, they're really all great this year." And my, and it wasn't even a fantasy but I was absolutely gonna do it. When I went away to college [Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine] and I graduated and got a job and I was gonna have money, I was gonna buy her a crate of cherries. I mean a whole crate, I could see them in the crate and I was gonna sit there and we were gonna eat cherries 'til we didn't want any more which we had never had that experience, and she died my sophomore year in college. Just, never happened. It's interesting to me the sort of love that folks have and when people say you know, I, I love my mother [Mary Williams Canada] and very close to her even 'til this day, but I spent those times with my grandmother and my grandfather [Leonard Williams, Sr.] and they really shaped a lot of my sort of belief structures growing up.$And I tell folk, my first interaction with a gun was when--we had this kid named Gregory [ph.] who said something nasty to one of the women who were on the block, who was a drunk and he said something you know, "You're drunk, or you're ugly or something." So, her nephew who was this huge guy, the guy was--the guy had to be about 6'4" and weighed maybe about 260 [pounds]. We hadn't seen people like that. He came in a car and he came up, we were all sitting on the side and I was fourteen now, maybe. I was--I had wanted then--maybe I was fourteen, thirteen and he said, "I'm looking for Gregory." Two guys then, you know a bunch of teenagers and they was like, "Why?" He said, "'Cause he said something about my aunt, I'm gonna kick his butt." He used a little stronger language, and they were like, "We don't know him." So, Gregory's there and the guy said, "No, I'm looking for this guy. Y'all gotta tell me where he is." And finally, Gregory says, "Here I am, I'm him." So, the guy said, "Now, you said that to my aunt, I'm gonna whip your--." So, Gregory's like, "Come on, let's fight." We knew Greg couldn't fight very well. Well, I was amazed, he gonna fight this huge guy. So, the guys were like, "Oh, this is gonna be good." So, he goes up, Gregory puts up his hands and this guy begins to smack him all over the street. He is so big, Gregory can't do nothing with the guy and then finally Mike [Michael Adams (ph.)] says, "Okay, that's enough." (Unclear) the other guy, "Look, that's enough." And the guy said, "No, that ain't enough. I'm not done." He said, "No, no that's enough, you won, you did your point." And the guy said, "No." So, it was about six of us on the fence. So, all six get up. Now, I'm the youngest one and these are teenagers. I'm like a little skinny kid. I'm like okay, there's six of us, this looks like we can win. This guy is huge, but I guess six against one, we can whip. The guy goes and he gets in his trunk, goes in his trunk and he take out a .22 [caliber] and he takes out the .22 and he says, "Back up." And I said, "This is over. That's enough, let's go sit back down. Let him beat up Gregory, we'll--." He didn't move, just didn't move. Here's the deal and, and Gregory's yelling, "Come on, I ain't (unclear), come on and fight me." The guy puts the gun in his pocket and starts fighting again, everybody gets closer to the guy. He pulls the gun out again. Now, Mike had told me one of these words of wisdom, "A real gangster you shouldn't worry about. They won't shoot you accidentally. It's a person who is scared who will shoot you. So, if you see somebody and you see they're scared with a gun, that's the person you have to be worried about, not a professional who does it for a living, they go stick up people, they--." So, I'm looking and the guy's hand is shaking with this gun and I'm thinking you know, someone's gonna die. Didn't no one back down, they took another step forward and the guy was gonna be forced to either shoot or get jumped and he just jumped in his car and he left and that, that kind of city bravery stuck with me and changed the way I thought about existence and whether or not your group will protect you. Now, this was before guns were around. Nowadays, somebody would have shot all those guys. They wouldn't have thought nothing of it, right. But they back then people didn't shoot folks with guns.$$This is like 1967?$$This is, yeah this is '67 [1967] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, right--$$It was just not, not--$$It was more of a fist thing.$$Yeah, it was more of a fist thing. This was really about fists and maybe a knife, but it really, the gun thing hadn't come in for another you know ten, twelve years before they became prolific, but that was the group and this guy Mike was my hero. He was just a guy who he wouldn't bother anybody, but he, nor would he ever back down from what he thought was a principle, and he both protected me and coached me and made me feel special. Now, I'll tell you a funny thing. You fast forward twenty years, I'm a grown man, I'm working, I come back to New York [New York]. I meet other people. You know what they said to me? "Mike saved me, I was the most special guy Mike--." I said, "No, you weren't the most, I was the most special." This guy was like, "No Mike, I was the most--." This guy had gone through life just reaching in, saving kids, convincing them that he saw something so special in them that they were gonna get out of this mess that was devastating our community. You, fast forward, I'm gonna be sixty-five in a month. Out of all the kids that I grew up with as friends, the guys--I know two who are alive today. One has cancer, and the other is waiting on a kidney transplant, everybody else is gone. Those streets in the Bronx [New York], they destroyed everybody. And some died young, some died middle age, but no one really got to be healthy, and sort of you know, their senior years it was just too devastating all of the stuff that people went through and so, that again when people think about why I wanted to recreate, right, a community. You get a toxic community, it will destroy everybody; and that's essentially what the South Bronx [Bronx, New York] was.

Carol Fulp

Corporate and nonprofit executive Carol Fulp was born on January 28, 1952 in Queens, New York to Paris Nicholson, Jr. and Miriam Nicholson, the first African American female manager at Swissair Airlines. Fulp graduated from Springfield Gardens High School in Queens, New York in 1970. She initially studied at Boston University, but earned her B.S. degree in liberal arts from the State University of New York at Albany in 1974.

Fulp first worked as a customer service representative at the Gillette Company in Boston, Massachusetts. Over the next decade, she was promoted to corporate employee relations manager at Gillette. In 1987, Fulp transitioned to the television industry as a human resource manager at WCVB, Boston’s ABC-TV affiliate, where she was eventually promoted to director of community programming and human resources. In 1998, Fulp left WCVB to become the assistant vice president of community relations at John Hancock Financial Services. She was promoted to vice president of community relations in 2002, and senior vice president of corporate responsibility and brand initiatives in 2009. In 2010, Fulp was selected by President Barack Obama as a representative of the United States to the 65th Session of the United Nations General Assembly. In 2012, Fulp left John Hancock to become president and CEO of The Partnership, Inc., a leadership development organization for executives and professionals of color. She was appointed to the board of trustees of the University of the Virgin Islands by U.S. Virgin Islands Governor John de Jongh, and the board of trustees of Boston Public Library as well as the City of Boston Compensation Advisory Board by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh. Appointed by Governor Deval L. Patrick, Fulp served for five years on the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority Board. She was also appointed to the Massachusetts State Treasurer Deborah Goldberg’s Advisory Committee on Wage Equality, and served on the Harvard Kennedy School Women’s Leadership board. Fulp joined the Boston University Board of Trustees in 2015.

Fulp received numerous awards, including the Eleanor Roosevelt Award and the Patriot’s Award as well as the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 2000 Pinnacle Award and 2017 Distinguished Bostonian Award. In 2003, Fulp was named one of the “50 Most Powerful Women In Boston” by Boston Magazine. Fulp was a founding co-chair of the Massachusetts Conference for Women in 2005, the largest women’s leadership conference in the country with 10,000 attendees. Fulp was the recipient of an honorary doctorate of law from New England Law Boston and an honorary doctorate from Salem State University.

Fulp is married to bank executive C. Bernard Fulp.

Carol Fulp was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.077

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/21/2016

Last Name

Fulp

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Ann

Schools

University of the State of New York

Springfield Gardens High School

P.S. 140 Edward K. Ellington School

J.H.S. 8 Richard S. Grossley School

Boston University

First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

Jamaica, Queens

HM ID

FUL02

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

While We Can.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/28/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pancakes

Short Description

Corporate and nonprofit executive Carol Fulp (1952 - ) worked at the Gillette Company, WCVB-TV in Boston, and John Hancock Financial Services before becoming the president and CEO of The Partnership, Inc. in 2012.

Employment

John Hancock Financial

The Partnership, Inc.

WCVB - Boston's ABC-TV Affiliate

Gillette Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:10400,191:11426,201:14162,240:19482,271:20499,281:32314,416:33770,433:34554,441:40182,514:41370,528:43746,551:44406,557:46122,578:49610,588:50245,594:50880,600:52150,628:90508,1183:91180,1190:91852,1198:95308,1249:101261,1286:104184,1307:107262,1336:121278,1446:139360,1610:140760,1623:143840,1659:145380,1672:147500,1684:148025,1693:148775,1704:150575,1735:151930,1747$0,0:5163,87:5798,93:10624,252:23020,410:27100,619:27740,627:28380,636:29500,654:33790,739:38274,801:38796,808:45669,961:50460,986:51440,1004:51720,1009:52280,1017:55074,1053:56770,1073:57194,1078:74801,1212:75366,1218:76044,1324:76609,1331:82810,1368:83790,1374:88500,1405:93422,1459:95662,1493:113600,1688:117257,1770:130360,1882:130740,1887:131595,1906:133115,1928:150512,2006:155560,2103:160798,2177:161046,2183:163870,2210:164510,2221:169962,2251:192482,2433:194296,2548:198930,2579
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Fulp's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Fulp lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Fulp describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Fulp talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Fulp describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Fulp talks about her mother's career at Gertz in Queens, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Fulp describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Fulp describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Fulp remembers the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol Fulp remembers moving to Rochdale Village in Queens, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carol Fulp remembers visiting her family in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carol Fulp remembers the International Summer Camp Montana in Switzerland

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carol Fulp recalls her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Fulp describes her early interactions with the Jewish community in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Fulp talks about her experiences at International Summer Camp Montana in Switzerland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Fulp recalls her activities at Springfield Gardens High School in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Fulp remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Fulp talks about her father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Fulp recalls the impact of her father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Fulp describes her experiences of epilepsy

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Fulp talks about her early interest in the arts

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Fulp describes her experiences at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carol Fulp recalls working at The Gillette Company

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Fulp describes her first husband's political activities

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Fulp talks about her experiences at WCVB-TV in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Fulp recalls the end of the Federal Communications Commission's fairness doctrine

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Fulp remembers the programming on WCVB-TV in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Fulp talks about combining the human resources and community relations departments at WCVB-TV

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Fulp talks about her experiences at John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Fulp recalls creating the Boston Women Build in the Bayou program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Fulp remembers meeting her husband, C. Bernard Fulp

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carol Fulp describes her promotion to senior vice president at John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carol Fulp talks about her youth advocacy programs at John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Carol Fulp talks about the Boston Marathon's Kenya Project

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Fulp reflects upon her community programming with John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Fulp talks about the Massachusetts Conference for Women

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Fulp recalls the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Fulp remembers winning the Eleanor Roosevelt Award

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Fulp describes her tenure as a trustee of the University of the Virgin Islands

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Fulp talks about her appointment to the United Nations General Assembly

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Fulp describes the history of The Partnership, Inc. in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carol Fulp describes the mission of The Partnership, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carol Fulp talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Carol Fulp describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Carol Fulp talks about the current civil rights efforts in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Carol Fulp describes her family

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Carol Fulp recalls joining the board of Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Carol Fulp talks about her role as a mentor

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Carol Fulp reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Carol Fulp reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Carol Fulp describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Fulp narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
Carol Fulp talks about her experiences at WCVB-TV in Boston, Massachusetts
Carol Fulp talks about her experiences at International Summer Camp Montana in Switzerland
Transcript
Nineteen eighty-seven [1987], now you switched jobs, right, to--you started wor- working at WCVB, right?$$Um-hm, um-hm.$$Okay. Now how did that come about?$$I'm a big believer in, you know, community activities, and obviously married to a politician, you're at a lot of community events, and we had to go to one event, and I happened to sit next to the president of WCVB-TV [Boston, Massachusetts]. We struck up a conversation. I enjoyed talking to him. I learned a lot from him. He shared with me. I shared with him. An opportunity to head up human resources there came available about three months later, and I had the opportunity to interview and got the job.$$Okay.$$Yeah, so it's connections.$$So how did you like the job, and what was the state of employment, I guess, for African Americans at the station at that time (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I really, I loved the job. I tell this story now. I'd say make sure, you know, everyone knows this, but make sure you arrive to an interview early because you get a chance to feel and see the climate. What's, you know, what is the culture like? And culture is very important particularly for African Americans. Is this a culture where I can thrive? And I remember getting to the station early and I saw all sorts of people walk by. You know, I saw people of color, women. My perspective was you had to be, you know, thin, blonde and white to work there. But I saw heavyset people. I saw difference there. And I even saw a man walk by with pink furry slippers so I knew I could, I could do well there. I could be different there. And that was the case, and I've been so fortunate to spend eleven years there making a difference because of the values that the station had.$In the summertime, you're going to Switzerland.$$Through age sixteen.$$Okay.$$And then after that, I'd go to St. Thomas [U.S. Virgin Islands].$$Yeah. What--how, how did, or what did you learn in Switzerland that--I mean, or how did you apply what you learned in Switzerland to the United States, or how did it translate with things you learned there? Because you're having experiences that nobody else is or very few are having. I don't know if anybody else had that kind of experience when you were in high school [Springfield Gardens High School, Queens, New York].$$Well, I made sure that people understood I was African American because it was an international camp [International Summer Camp Montana, Crans-Montana, Switzerland]. They may have thought you were Spanish, so I made sure to let people know I was black. I was Negro. I--Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.]. And, so I was made, I made sure to claim my heritage, so that was important to me because I was the only African American there and, so that--it was important for me to tell people who I was and explain my experience in the states.$$Okay. And what--I mean, what did it--I guess it had to give you a broader world view being there in the summertime and then coming back here, right?$$It gave me a broader worldview, but what I also was exposed to were people who, young people who had wealth and were disrespectful. And I'll tell you a story. So I came back from camp. One of the girls lived in New York City [New York, New York] and was going to have a sleepover of friends and, so my mother [Miriam Riley Nicholson] dropped me off to her house, the--her maid, her babysitter was there, and we were going to, you know, spend the--overnight. I think it was just overnight. And they got so mischievous that they tied up the babysitter. They took the father's penny jar and said they were going to take it and go to the bank and cash it. And I came home on the, on the train.$$So this is behavior that is beyond the pale, I guess, for you.$$Well, what it taught me was they were so wealthy and that, you know, who, someone who hasn't had wealth, I always thought, all that, that could do for you, and when I saw that behavior, wealth doesn't necessarily bring character is what I learned at an early age.$$Yeah. There's a difference--I've had similar experiences where you wonder, you know (laughter)--$$Yeah.$$--why would they--$$Yeah, yeah.$$Yeah.$$Acting out.$$Yeah. I--$$That's what I learned.$$Okay.$$And, so I learned to value the family and the life that I had.

Emmett D. Carson

Nonprofit chief executive Emmett D. Carson was born on October 6, 1959, in Chicago, Illinois to city business inspector Emmett Carson and Chicago Public School's head cook Mary Carson. He graduated from Emil G. Hirsch High School in 1977 and received his B.A. degree in economics from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia in 1980. In 1983, he obtained his M.P.A. degree in international affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, followed by his Ph.D. degree in 1985.

In 1985, Carson became a social legislation analyst at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., before taking a position as a project director at the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies in 1986. There, he designed and directed the first national comparative study of black and white charitable giving and volunteerism in America. He was an adjunct professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park from 1987 until 1989, when he became a program officer at the Ford Foundation in New York City. He managed the foundation’s Rights & Social Justice Program and its Governance & Public Policy Program. In 1994, Carson was named president and CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation in Minnesota, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations, whose total assets more than tripled under his management. After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused over $120 billion in damage to Louisiana and surrounding states, Carson headed the Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation. He left the Minneapolis Foundation for the San Francisco Bay Area, where he merged the Community Foundation Silicon Valley and the Peninsula Community Foundation into the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, becoming its president and CEO.

In addition, Carson served on the board of directors of the National Economics Association, a professional association for minorities in the field, from 1993 to 1995; as chair of the board of the Association of Black Foundation Executives from 1994 to 1995; and on the board of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, which coordinates efforts between charitable foundations and Silicon Valley corporations. His research has received awards from the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies and the National Economics Association.

Carson is married to professor and nonprofit executive Jacqueline Copeland-Carson, and they have one daughter, Yetunde Olagbaju, a graduate of Beloit College in Wisconsin.

Emmett D. Carson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 16, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.013

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/16/2015

Last Name

Carson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Schools

Hirsch Metropolitan High School

Morehouse College

Princeton University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Emmett

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

CAR32

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Quote

It's not the things you don't know that get you in trouble, but the things you think you know, but don't.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/6/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Palo Alto

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Emmett D. Carson (1959 - ) was the president and CEO of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and the president and CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation.

Employment

Library of Congress

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

University of Maryland at College Park

Ford Foundation

Minneapolis Foundation

Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Foundation for Louisiana

Favorite Color

Black

Charles Ward

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Charles Ward was born on September 20, 1946 to Francis Lewellen Crowe and Mattie Sue Branch. He received his B.A. degree from California Western University in San Diego and obtained his J.D. degree from the University of San Diego School of Law in 1971. He served as a legislative research coordinator for the founding contingent of the Congressional Black Caucus in Washington, D.C., before Congressman Ronald Dellums appointed him his Chief-of-Staff in 1971. In 1974, Ward became a staff attorney for the Federal Communications Commission.

In 1975, Ward moved to the San Francisco, where he joined the entertainment law firm of Rohan & Stepanian. That year, he also served as an administrator for the University of California, Berkeley’s Summer Program for Minority Journalists. After leaving Rohan & Stepanian in 1983, Ward was named Director of Programming at Times Mirror Cable, Inc. He remained there for nine years, and helped to negotiate carriage agreements with HBO, CNN, ESPN and others, and rose to the position of Vice President of National Marketing & Programming. After leaving Times Mirror in 1992, Ward worked as an independent cable programming and book publishing consultant until 1996, when he became Director of Marketing and Corporate Sponsorships at the San Francisco Jazz Festival. Ward oversaw a campaign to rebrand the festival as SFJAZZ; helped launch a spring subscription series; instituted a corporate sponsorship program; and oversaw the distribution of six compilation albums. After leaving SFJAZZ in 2001, Ward was named Senior Vice President of Institutional Advancement at the Family Service Agency of San Francisco in 2002. In 2005, he accepted the position of Director of Development and Corporate Sponsorships for the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, where he was subsequently named Chief Development Officer.

Ward has served on the boards or advisory committees of the Museum of the African Diaspora, which opened in 2005; SF Travel, a nonprofit organization that oversees San Francisco’s Moscone Center; Baycat in the Bayview-Hunters Point community; the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra at U.C. Berkeley; and the Mechanics Institute in San Francisco’s Financial District. He was also appointed by then-Mayor Willie L. Brown to serve on the San Francisco Human Rights Commission from 2001 to 2005, and by the San Francisco district attorney, Kamala Harris, to serve on the city’s Ethics Commission in 2012.

Ward lives with his wife, Cheryl, in San Francisco’s Pacific Heights neighborhood.

Charles Ward was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/13/2015 |and| 11/30/2017

Last Name

Ward

Schools

California Western School of Law

University of San Diego School of Law

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

San Diego

HM ID

WAR19

State

California

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

9/20/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Short Description

Lawyer, telecommunications executive, and nonprofit chief executive Charles Ward (1946 - ) served as Congressman Ron Dellums’ Chief-of-Staff, before serving as a development officer for several San Francisco cultural institutions, including the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

Employment

Congressional Black Caucus

Congressman Ronald Dellums

Federal Communications Commission

Rohan & Stepanian

University of California, Berkeley

Times Mirror Cable

SFJAZZ

Family Service Agency of San Francisco

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Marcia Sturdivant

Educator and nonprofit chief executive Marcia M. Sturdivant was born in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. degree in psychology and behavioral sciences from Point Park University in 1978 and her M.A. degree in criminal justice from the University of Detroit in 1980. She later earned her Ph.D. degree in educational and developmental psychology from the University of Pittsburgh in 1996.

From 1987 to 1990, Sturdivant served as director of early education programs at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. From 1990 to 1998, she worked in a number of positions at the Allegheny County Department of Human Services in the Office of Children, Youth and Families (OCYF), the second largest child welfare agency in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In 1998, she was appointed deputy director of the Allegheny County Department of Human Services and administrator of the OCYF. Sturdivant was then named president and chief executive officer of the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED) in 2013. She has also served as an assistant professor at Point Park University and an adjunct faculty member in the Graduate School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh.

Sturdivant is a past president of the Pittsburgh affiliate of the National Black Child Development Institute. She directs the Children’s Church and Children’s Choir at Nazarene Baptist Church in Pittsburgh, and has served as a board member of the American Association of Family Group Decision Making.

Sturdivant’s honors include the Three Rivers Youth Nellie Award for Community Leadership; the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh’s Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award and Ron Brown Civic Award; The YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh Racial Justice Award; and the National Association of Black Administrators in Child Welfare Valerie Bullard Award. She has been cited by Pittsburgh Magazine as one of “Forty Local, Gifted and Black African American Leaders,” and was recognized by the New Pittsburgh Courier as one of their 50 Women of Excellence in 2012. Sturdivant has also served as a repeat participant and research panelist of the Oxford University Educational Roundtable in Oxford, England.

She is married to Larry Anderson, Sr. and is the mother of two sons, Larry, Jr. and Marshall.

Marcia Sturdivant was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.174

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/8/2014

Last Name

Sturdivant

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

Homeville Elementary School

Homeville Junior High

West Mifflin Area High School

Point Park University

University of Detroit Mercy

University of Pittsburgh

First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Homestead

HM ID

STU04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Disney World

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

3/24/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Pittsburgh

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab Legs

Short Description

Educator and nonprofit chief executive Marcia Sturdivant (1956 - ) , president and CEO of the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED), was deputy director of the Allegheny County (Pennsylvania) Department of Human Services and administrator of the Office of Children, Youth and Families for fifteen years.

Employment

NEED (Negro Educational Emergency Drive)

Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Allegheny County Office of Children, Youth and Family Services

Allegheny County Office of Children and Youth Services

Sturdivant Educational Consulting

University of Pittsburgh

Point Park College

Duquesne University

Carlow College

Community College of Allegheny County

Rankin Christian Center

Lemington Home for the Aged

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Sturdivant's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her maternal family's relationship to the Brownrigg plantation in Columbus, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her mother's experiences at Union Academy High School in Columbus, Mississippi and Mary Holmes College in West Point

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the history behind her family name

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers her father's morning ritual

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's interest in politics and her parents' voting advocacy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her father's experience stationed on the U.S.S. Intrepid aircraft carrier in the United States Navy during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's homecoming after serving in the United States Navy

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers an early lesson in ethnic pride

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her family's migration from Columbus, Mississippi to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her family's migration from Columbus, Mississippi to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her mother and considers which parent she takes after most

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her childhood neighborhood in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about camaraderie between black students in the West Mifflin, Pennsylvania public school system

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers the death of a cousin in Vietnam and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers writing an essay on civil rights leaders, H. Rap Brown, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Stokely Carmichael

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers her influential sixth grade school teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers overhearing a grade school teacher using the N-word to address students

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience at Homeville Junior High School in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about Civil Rights and Black Nationalist activity in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about being forbidden from wearing an afro by her grammar school administration

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience cheerleading at West Mifflin North High School in Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers the support of an influential math teacher named Mr. Caldwell

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the influence of the Pentecostal church in her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers Kennywood amusement park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers influential African American faculty at West Mifflin High School and being introduced to career options in psychology

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers a racially charged altercation with her high school typing teacher

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant explains how she elected to go to Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her undergraduate experience at Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her undergraduate experience at Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience as a research assistant and graduate student in forensic psychology at the University of Detroit

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the University of Detroit's campus

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working in the Detroit Police Department and deviating from forensic psychology

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about becoming a probation officer for the Pittsburgh juvenile court system

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant describes the philosophy of the Pittsburgh juvenile court system in the 1980s, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant recalls a memorable juvenile court case, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant recalls a memorable juvenile court case, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working on her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Pittsburgh

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working on her dissertation in educational psychology, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working on her dissertation in educational psychology, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the psychological effects of stereotypes on an individual's self-regard

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the impact of slavery on black American families

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes the research method she used for her dissertation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant explains how she met her husband

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working as director for early childhood education for the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working in the Allegheny County Department of Human Services child welfare sector

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant describes contemporary methodology in the child welfare system

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 3

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the trauma children experience in a child welfare system

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes how cultural misunderstandings can influence decisions made about a child's welfare

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the impact of crack cocaine to the families in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1990s

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about becoming the Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her tenure as Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her involvement with the National Association of Black Social Workers and the Black Administrators in Child Welfare

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her tenure as president of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Black Child Development Institute

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant describes funding and budgeting for child welfare in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her relationship with NEED, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant explains the history of NEED, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes programs that NEED, Negro Educational Emergency Drive, operates

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant considers what she would do differently in her life

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant reflects upon her professional legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her family

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant considers how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

6$6

DATitle
Marcia Sturdivant remembers an early lesson in ethnic pride
Marcia Sturdivant describes her tenure as Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department
Transcript
Now there's one more story about your father [O.C. Sturdivant] that's one of the early stories and you said that he did not, that you mentioned once, you asked your father at one point when you were a little girl how do we get straight hair? Or so-called good hair.$$Yeah, yeah, before my enlightening days, but he, my dad was a very simple man, liked simple things and I still can picture him in overalls. You know, whenever he wasn't working he would have overalls and piddlin' in the dirt. But, one thing that he liked was a clean shave and that hot shave with that hot lather and-$$And put the hot towel over himself--(simultaneous)--$$Yes.$$--And put the hot lather--$$Right, and a haircut. And, he would go, I could still picture the barber, but sometimes I would cut his hair, you know, when I got older, and I remember, you know, touching his hair and running and I says, "Daddy," and I'm so ashamed of this, I says, "Daddy, your hair, you have such pretty hair. It's so good." Oh my goodness, and I can count the number of times my dad yelled at me 'cause he was, he was real quiet but he grabbed my hand, I remember, and he turned me around and he said, "Don't you ever say that." And he said, "All hair is good hair. If you got some hair, you have good hair." (Laughter) and he said, "do you know why my hair is like this?" And he went on to explain. He says, "My mother's mother didn't have a choice." Yeah, you know, that--$$So did you get that--$$Well, you know, yeah, I started to, you know. And he was pretty graphic about it, which, again, was one of the few times we ever had that kind of a conversation, but I remember him telling me that black women, and he would call it, he said, "colored women back then--you didn't have a choice of who you selected to date." And he said, "There was nothing that we could do. So, if I'm looking like this, it wasn't by choice. So, he said, that's not something to be proud of. That's not something you celebrate or anything." And that had a lasting, you know, impression, and both my parents were very proud--are very, well my mom's [Jean Barron Sturdivant] still with us--very proud, black people and we were never able to say things like use color shades like light-skin, dark-skinned people couldn't say that, couldn't hear whatever, we just weren't allowed to say that, saying "nigger" would immediately get you a beat-down. I mean, there were just certain things that related to ethnic pride, even before the Black Power Movement or the, you know, when people were into that. In my family, we were just not allowed to make those differences and I, you know, I see now and you know, I saw once I started to really study, that it was a different time, a different experience for them and not very easy but they never accepted that, which is, I think, rather unique.$So, you were in that role [Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families, Department of Human Services, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania] through-$$Through 2013.$$--2013. Okay. (Laughter) so what were some of the, I guess milestones along the way you endured during this period?$$Well, I think that I was able to see during my tenure there, and by the way, I just loved that job. It was very stressful though, as all child welfare positions are. But I was able to, it's hard for me to talk about myself but this is what other people have said. That I was able to open up the relationship between the black community and the system, that other than law enforcement, child welfare might be the only other "system" that is more feared, you know, by the black community and there was a very negative view by the African American community as CYF [Department of Children, Youth, and Families] and was, you know, very much a closed system and I knew that in order to make it better for children, that we had to have some open discussions and some of the players in the helping profession in child welfare had to look the kids we served. So, you know, I began to advocate and provide contracts to African American grass roots organizations, churches; that was another thing. We didn't use the church. You can't talk about black folks and not talk about the church in the helping community, and I was very proud to let people know and help the black community understand the workings of child welfare. What are the laws, the regulations, but more importantly how can you partner with this system that, for decades, was viewed as really denigrating to the black community. You know, Malcolm X talked about how child welfare he thought was one of the significant systems that just broke up the black family. The other thing, proud, very proud moments was the issue of bringing race to the table. It was challenging and I took a lot of hits for it, but making sure that you just can't say anything and you also have to consider race and culture in the delivery of service. Third, I would say opening up and really pushing for kinship care. That's really what we should be doing. If we are child protection, we have to protect kids and if we can't keep them in their own home, then put them with their family. And I don't know, and we really, we were, we are the leaders. They are still the leaders in kinship care in this county. But I often wondered if people understand it wasn't just about kinship care, which was so important, but the history of black people in the United States. Child welfare sometime was a modern day way of breaking up families and changing the history of black people, just like slavery. It's another, it's a history of changing forever the life of that child. You know, it's beyond just what you do today. You take this child, remove them from their whole family. That has an impact for generations to come! You're not just changing that day, you're changing that forever. And I've often, I said I'm gonna write about it, often equated many of the practices and policies, power and control, economic survival, and who benefits a lot from child welfare, to that much of our history of slavery in this country. People don't like to say that 'cause they're well meaning, but we can see a lot of similarities between that, and just being able to say that, people, oh, would get up in arms, but I was proud that I was able to try to have those, you know, have those discussions. Then, prevention. You know that being able to bring to the table the fact that no one wants to harm their child. No one gives birth and says, you know, I think I'm going to be a terrible parent. I'm going to get on drugs. I'm going to developmental health issues, I'm going to harm my child--no one does that. But things happen to people. So, what can we do to support parents and families and communities so that there are healthier environments so they never have to come to us, never have to come to child welfare. And, you know, we were able to implement a lot of prevention programs, a lot that were culturally based, really amped up, created, actually, kinship care and amped up our kinship care component, and brought the whole issue of culture and race as important factors in delivery, so it wasn't always an easy ride, and the support and acknowledgments of my hard work outweighed those who criticized it.

Dolly Adams

Nonprofit executive Dolly Desselle Adams was born in Marksville, Louisiana on August 13, 1931, the only child of Moses J. Following her graduation from of Xavier University Preparatory High School in New Orleans, Adams enrolled at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she received her B.S. degree. Adams went on to earn her M.A. degree in education from the University of Michigan, and her Ph.D degree in education from Baylor University.

As an educator, Adams has held a variety of positions, including elementary school teacher and administrator; college dean and Professor at the University of Michigan, Wilberforce University, Albany State College, Paul Quinn College, and Howard University School of Law. Adams last served as an adjunct professor at the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) in Atlanta, Georgia. She has also held outstanding leadership positions in community service organizations. Her role as Episcopal Supervisor of the Women’s Missionary Society (WMS) and the Ministers’ Wives of the Tenth (Texas), Second (Mid-Atlantic States), Sixth (Georgia) and Seventh (South Carolina) and Eleventh (Florida and Bahamas) Episcopal Districts covered a span of 32 years. Adams served for four years as National President of The Links, Inc., and The Links Foundation, Inc., and five years as National President of the Black Women’s Agenda, Inc. In addition, Adams served on the board of directors of the United Negro College Fund, Paul Quinn College Foundation, the Southern University Foundation and the sisters of Charity Foundation. Adams now serves on the Board of Directors of the Black Women’s Agenda, Inc., the WMS Foundation and the Links, Inc.

From 1982-86, Adams was cited as one of the “100 Most Influential Black Americans” by Ebony Magazine, and Dollars & Sense Magazine named her as one of the “Top 100 Black Business and Professional Women” 1986 and 1987. Adams is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the N.A.A.C.P. In recognition of her services in South Carolina, the Governor presented to her the Order of the Palmetto, the highest citation given by the State to a citizen.

Adams and her husband, Reverend John Hurst Adams, live in Atlanta, Georgia. They are the parents of three successful daughters: Attorney Gaye Adams Massey, Dr. Jann Adams, and Madelyn R. Adams

Dolly Desselle Adams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.246

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2012

Last Name

Adams

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Schools

St. Katharine Drexel Preparatory Academy

Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

University of Michigan

Southern University Laboratory School

Baylor University

First Name

Dolly

Birth City, State, Country

Marksville

HM ID

ADA12

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Kiawah Island, South Carolina, Ft Walton, Florida

Favorite Quote

Seek Ye First The Kingdom Of God, And His Righteousness; And All These Things Shall Be Added Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

8/13/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (Seafood)

Short Description

Educator and nonprofit chief executive Dolly Adams (1931 - ) served as the national president of The Links and the Black Women’s Agenda.

Employment

New Orleans Public Schools

University of Michigan

Wilberforce University

Albany State College

Paul Quinn College

Seattle Public Schools

Head Start

Neuropsychiatric Institute

Howard University Law School

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
0,0:12620,100:18650,111:23638,165:28788,194:33928,247:34232,256:34992,323:35448,330:36588,369:38710,377:41720,425:42236,432:44816,528:56916,721:72620,934:77492,1052:90405,1297:91000,1309:109570,1518:109890,1523:111970,1552:112290,1557:112610,1570:113330,1580:114290,1595:116530,1647:117970,1670:119330,1688:128712,1762:135663,1866:136473,1878:150418,2022:150730,2027:154162,2148:154474,2153:159394,2216:162280,2273:162724,2280:167164,2373:180070,2617:183510,2685:184710,2709:185110,2715:188430,2761$0,0:612,12:1088,20:3400,89:6080,105:6619,113:7004,119:13492,245:13876,250:15316,260:18196,305:18964,314:19540,322:23890,336:24430,343:25060,353:25870,365:29290,419:31360,501:38572,599:40000,636:46580,727:52952,806:67328,1143:83250,1319:83718,1326:91030,1490:93886,1546:104090,1732:116450,1861
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dolly Adams's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams describes her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams describes her parents' personalities and her likeness to them

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dolly Adams describes her education in Marksville, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dolly Adams describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dolly Adams remembers her educational influences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dolly Adams recalls the educational environment at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams remembers the Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams recalls her graduation from Xavier University Preparatory School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams recalls the mentorship of Professor Julia Purnell

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams remembers the end of World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams remembers the marching band at Southern University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams remembers substitute teaching in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams recalls her decision to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dolly Adams remembers segregation at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dolly Adams recalls working at the Neuropsychiatric Institute in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dolly Adams recalls joining the faculty of Wilberforce University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dolly Adams remembers Wilberforce University President Charles Leander Hill

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams remembers meeting her husband, Bishop John Hurst Adams

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams recalls moving to Waco, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams talks about the desegregation of Waco, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams talks about the desegregation of Waco, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams describes her role as the dean of students at Paul Quinn College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams lists the schools affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams remembers moving to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dolly Adams describes her husband's education

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dolly Adams recalls the reprisals against her civil rights activism

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dolly Adams remembers the Black Panther Party in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Dolly Adams remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dolly Adams talks about the renaming of King County, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams describes the Grant A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams describes the founding of The Links

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams talks about the activities of The Links

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams describes her duties and mentors in the church

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams talks about female preachers in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams recalls her husband's election as bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams describes her doctoral dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dolly Adams talks about the benefits of online universities

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dolly Adams recalls her experiences at Baylor University in Waco, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dolly Adams talks about her work with Planned Parenthood in Waco, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams recalls teaching at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams remembers moving to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams describes her community involvement in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams recalls traveling to Kenya with The Links

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams describes The Links' international presence

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams remembers writing 'She in the Glass House'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams remembers living in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dolly Adams talks about the Gullah culture

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dolly Adams describes the services in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dolly Adams describes her work in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dolly Adams describes her work in Jacksonville, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dolly Adams describes the Black Women's Agenda

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dolly Adams describes her activities during retirement

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dolly Adams reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dolly Adams describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dolly Adams describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dolly Adams narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

4$10

DATitle
Dolly Adams talks about the desegregation of Waco, Texas, pt. 1
Dolly Adams recalls the reprisals against her civil rights activism
Transcript
Waco [Texas] was a nice, very segregated country town, but here again, we had our own system of, of survival. When, when Waco dec- dec- well, when we decided--when integration came, one of the first places that was picketed was across the street from the campus [Paul Quinn College, Waco, Texas; Dallas, Texas]. It was a little store, a little--one of those 7-Eleven stores, which would not employ any of our students, but nobody bought anything in there except black folk, kids from the campus or people who lived around the campus. So, we--I was on the picket line and, of course, they picket--our kids picketed downtown. I remember they called my husband [HistoryMaker Bishop John Hurst Adams] and said--the mayor called and told him, "Come get your, your students. They're sitting out here at one of these lunch counters." He said, "Well, if you fed them--they probably can't even afford to pay for the Coke, so if you, you offer to them, you would--you would be able to get rid of them. Otherwise, they can stay there until you decide, you know, what you're gonna do." And he said, "Well, we'll put them in jail." He said, "And I'll come get them out of jail and they'll be back there tomorrow." So, they--Waco was one of those towns that was very pragmatic and they really did not want all of that. So, they asked my husband to come down and talk with them and they ended by fiat, the may--the mayor integrated all of the downtown eating facilities the next day.$$Yeah. Now, I've heard a few stories like this where segregation seems like it's hard, a hard line until somebody challenges it and it fades.$$Well, the truth of the matter was we lived in separate enclaves anyway. We weren't all over town, but to say--it's--it was stupid to say here is a store in the middle, next door to your house and you can go in and buy in that store, you can keep him in business, but you cannot--they will not employ--they bring in people to employ, won't employ any of your kids.$$Okay. So, now, now were you or your husband a member of NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] or the--$$Oh, yeah.$$Okay.$$I was very active in the NA--NAACP. I was the secretary at that time and that's another interesting story. I had teachers in the public schools of, of Waco who would give me their dues, but I was--they would tell me, "You cannot report my name. You can--I will give you the money, but don't ever tell them who gave it to you."$$Okay, so (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So, I, I, I collected a whole lot of money from people. They were afraid of their jobs. They didn't know what was gonna happen if they found out they were NAACP. But, because we worked for a black church, there was nothing they could do to us.$Back to our time in Seattle [Washington]. Our time in Seattle was marvelous, but it was also tumultuous because those marches, while they didn't make the kind of publicity that, that King's [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] did down here, they were life changing there. As a matter of fact, my, my children were in school and we became targets. There was a racist who used to call me every night. He seemed to know when my husband [HistoryMaker Bishop John Hurst Adams] was gone. He'd be at church or at some meeting, and he would call and make threats and, you know, "What do you niggers want?" And, "Why, why are you doing this?" And I was trying very hard to be conciliatory and I would speak to him very nicely until one Sunday night he called and he said, "Yeah, you've got two daughters, three daughters, one is Gaye [Gaye Adams Massey] and one is Jann [Jann H. Adams] and they're at McGilvra [McGilvra Elementary School, Seattle, Washington]," it was a elementary school, "and Madelyn [Madelyn R. Adams] is in a Montessori school," and our telephone was tapped. We knew this. The police put a tap on the telephone because they knew they'd been calling and stuff, and I lost it. I promised all sorts of things I was gonna do to that man if he--if he touched my children. So, the next morning, the police came to see me and said, "Ms. Adams [HistoryMaker Dolly Adams], do you have a gun?" I said, "No." The man said, "Well, you need one. After what you told him, he just may come after you." So, they took me down to the police department, they gave me a gun, took me to the firing range and taught me how to use it, gave me the ammunition and told me if he comes up those stairs or gets anyplace near your children, feel free to shoot him and I promised I would. I never had to, praise the Lord, but I had every intention of doing so.

Christine James-Brown

Non profit executive Christine James-Brown was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 9, 1952 to Eva and Howard James. After graduating from Burlington City High School in Burlington, New Jersey, James-Brown enrolled at Rutgers University. She earned her B.A. degree in cultural anthropology in 1974. She was accepted and attended Brown University with the intent on obtaining her PhD in anthropology but left after one year to marry and move to New York with her husband, a graduate student at Columbia Business School. She then went to work at the New York City Department for the Aging, Special Project on Crime Against the Elderly. She then went to work at the New York City Foundation for Senior Citizens. Two years later, James-Brown was hired by the United Way, serving as a planning consultant before being promoted to the deputy director of administration. James-Brown was promoted to director of allocations and agency relations and director of fund distribution and community problem-solving for the United Way in 1985 and 1988, respectively. In 1994, James-Brown was appointed President and CEO of the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania (UWSEPA). She was appointed President and CEO of United Way International ten years later. In 2007, James-Brown left the United Way to become the president and CEO of the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA).

James-Brown has amassed numerous awards and recognition throughout her career, including the National Council of Negro Women’s Mary McLeod Bethune Award, B'nai B'rith’s Humanitarian Award and Operation Understanding’s Distinguished Community Leadership Award, all in 1999. One year later, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania named her a "Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania," which honors women of distinction.
She was also the recipient of the Center of Autistic Children Small Miracles Award and the American Society for Public Excellence in Public Service. In 1996, James-Brown received an honorary doctorate from Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Additionally, James-Brown has served as a White House Presidential Panel Moderator under former President George W. Bush. In 2001, she was nominated to serve as a U.S. Olympic Committee Torchbearer. James-Brown also served as a Red Cross volunteer in the African nation of Kenya.

She has served on a number of governing and advisory boards of organizations including the United Way of America National Professional Council, the Fels Fund, The William Penn Foundation, Public Private Ventures, Eagles Youth Partnership, Vanguard Charitable Trusts, Comcast & NBC Universal Joint Diversity Council, Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, The Center for Effective Philanthropy, the International Eisenhower Fellowships Nominating Committee, and the Philadelphia School Board. She has one daughter, a son-in-law and two granddaughters and resides in Alexandria, Virginia.

Christine James-Brown was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on April 30, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.086

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/30/2012

Last Name

James-Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

Burlington City High School

Brown University

Harrity Elementary School

William L. Sayre High School

Douglass Residential College

First Name

Christine

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

JAM04

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

They Say It Couldn't Be Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/9/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Matzo

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Christine James-Brown (1952 - ) served as the president and CEO of the Child Welfare League of America and the United Way International.

Employment

Child Welfare League of America

United Way International

United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania

New Jersey Department of Human Services

New York City Department of the Aging

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:247,4:1511,24:1827,29:2143,34:8226,334:9727,364:10122,370:10675,378:16710,402:17185,408:20532,423:22857,468:28652,529:30254,558:30877,566:32988,576:34008,600:35164,625:35912,639:36252,645:38768,711:39856,753:40468,766:40944,775:41352,793:41692,799:43460,840:43800,846:45160,876:52444,932:55713,976:56029,981:57360,986:58760,1018:59530,1032:59950,1039:60300,1045:60720,1052:61280,1063:62680,1096:64290,1183:69220,1217:69712,1224:70204,1231:70532,1236:75534,1395:81426,1457:82128,1472:87042,1578:90084,1645:95907,1701:96635,1710:103915,1880:104734,1895:113780,2022:114280,2035:116566,2061:117084,2071:117750,2082:119378,2126:122560,2217:122856,2222:123670,2237:127902,2258:128994,2276:129750,2288:132270,2336:132690,2342:133110,2358:137278,2401:137590,2406:142364,2455:142708,2460:143482,2472:145803,2483:147081,2503:147720,2518:149566,2562:149992,2569:152406,2619:152690,2624:155317,2674:155885,2683:156311,2690:163456,2746:169744,2839:171040,2872:171976,2897:175648,2992:176296,3007:176872,3016:184974,3111:186591,3136:187515,3150:190133,3188:192135,3234:194753,3313:199530,3352$0,0:2784,75:5376,149:9120,216:10080,230:10752,238:13152,277:14688,301:15552,311:20930,322:22010,336:23738,360:24458,371:25106,381:25754,392:26402,403:27122,416:29210,458:33938,506:34796,527:35390,538:35720,544:35984,549:36512,561:37172,573:39086,611:39482,618:39878,628:40142,633:45884,753:47336,791:48326,817:54114,843:54746,852:55220,857:55615,863:56326,874:57116,886:57511,892:57827,897:58380,905:59249,918:66278,1006:70166,1031:71002,1044:73738,1092:74802,1111:76170,1121:87860,1253:88715,1260:94281,1302:96023,1336:96626,1347:96894,1352:97296,1359:97698,1366:102881,1400:103266,1406:104960,1426:105268,1431:112135,1474:112756,1484:113446,1495:114205,1508:114481,1513:116068,1538:117034,1560:117379,1566:117655,1571:117931,1576:118828,1593:119311,1601:124568,1664:127606,1728:131636,1826:132628,1852:133000,1860:133310,1866:133868,1878:141277,1976:141746,1984:142885,2009:144225,2036:144895,2047:145163,2052:145431,2057:147173,2097:153005,2176:153460,2186:154370,2203:154825,2211:156125,2235:158380,2247:162592,2344:167968,2398:171556,2484:172336,2501:173038,2511:186910,2729:187365,2737:187755,2744:192354,2768:192610,2773:193122,2782:193378,2787:193634,2795:194210,2805:194530,2811:194914,2819:195874,2839:196130,2844:196450,2850:196706,2855:197154,2863:203785,2934:204268,2942:204613,2964:205579,2984:206614,3005:206890,3010:207166,3016:207649,3024:207994,3030:208477,3042:210616,3097:212617,3133:213307,3144:213928,3157:214963,3177:221424,3233:222126,3245:223530,3280:228470,3361
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Christine James-Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown talks about her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Christine James-Brown describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Christine James-Brown remembers her mother's death

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown talks about her brother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown describes the demographics of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown remembers Harrity Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown remembers the music of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Christine James-Brown talks about William L. Sayre Junior High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown remembers the gang activity in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown remembers moving to Burlington County, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown describes her experiences at Burlington City High School in Burlington, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown describes her decision to attend Douglass College in New Brunswick, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown describes her experiences at Douglass College in New Brunswick, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown remembers her classmates at Douglass College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown describes her reasons for leaving Brown University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown talks about the New York City Department for the Aging, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown talks about the New York City Department for the Aging, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown describes the history of MOVE in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown talks about her cousin's involvement in MOVE

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown remembers the bombing of the MOVE commune

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown describes the aftermath of the MOVE bombing

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown talks about the struggle against police authority in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown describes her career at the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown remembers becoming the CEO of the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown talks about the reorganization of the United Way of America

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown describes the structure of the United Way of America

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown recalls serving on the Board of Education for the School District of Philadelphia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown reflects upon her career at the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown recalls her trip to Kenya with the American Red Cross, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown recalls her trip to Kenya with the American Red Cross, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown describes her role as the CEO of United Way International

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown recalls her transition to the Child Welfare League of America

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown talks about the connections between the juvenile justice and child welfare systems

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown talks about the state of the child welfare system in the United States

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown talks about the future of the Child Welfare League of America

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Christine James-Brown talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Christine James-Brown describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Christine James-Brown reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Christine James-Brown reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Christine James-Brown talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Christine James-Brown talks about her international travel

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Christine James-Brown reflects upon the welfare of children in the United States

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Christine James-Brown describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Christine James-Brown narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Christine James-Brown remembers becoming the CEO of the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania
Christine James-Brown recalls her transition to the Child Welfare League of America
Transcript
The labor community was very much against me getting the job and so was the Catholic community.$$Now, why, why was the labor committee against you (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, the United Way [United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania; United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and labor has a real--have a real close working relationship, and I was never seen as a real friend of labor because I never let the fact that someone was in a union, keep me from saying you have to work in a certain way and do certain things. I wasn't caught up in the politics of it, so I had people in the labor department who knew that if I got the job that they would have to work harder than they (laughter) had been working. So, that was just, you know, a minor thing. In the, in the Catholic Church, I think that they were very concerned that I was a, a liberal, you know, bra burning woman or something. They just didn't know. And I had done that study on the needs of women and girls and had talked about issues that I was called on the carpet for talking about by the head of the United Way [United Way of America; United Way Worldwide], you know, at the time. So, I was this person coming from Brown [Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island], didn't--not understanding. And I wrote about--when I wrote about the needs, I talked about teen pregnancy, domestic violence, and rape. And I can remember the, the, the person who was killed in the car accident calling me into his office and he had my paper and he said, "You've gotta take these words out of this paper." And I'm like, "What words?" And he said, "Those words." And he had circled, you know, like sexually active and--'cause it was at a time when that's what--that--you know, even then, and by then it was '81 [1981], you didn't talk about it. You know, domestic violence was something that everybody knew was going on but nobody talked about, you know. And so it's interesting because United Way then got in a lot of trouble as a result, you know. Because that same person put down this group that started up called wom- called Women's Way [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and put them down in a negative way and it just blew up in the community because of that conservative streak, you know, well intentioned but, you know, it's like women don't know, you know, what they're doing, so--and we don't talk about it. So, the, the, the Catholic church knew that part of the story, you know. Actually, the person who was killed had said that--Women's Way wanted to become part of the United Way and they got rejected, and this person told them that it was rejected because the Catholic church wouldn't stand for it 'cause they deal with things like abortion and rape crisis things and all of that. So, of course, me coming in having done the study saying we need to be doing more about it, you know, created a concern, you know, on the part--but, you know, I was told--when I got the job, I was told where the pressure points were and I worked on them and developed a excellent relationship with the, the Catholic community and the Jewish community and labor community. But, I knew I had to work on it. So, they gave me a gift of saying that we don't know if we want you in this job, you know, 'cause then you could work on it--work on it a different way.$What is the Child Welfare League of America [Washington, D.C.] and why was that attractive and, and--$$It was--it's an advocacy and standard setting organization for the child welfare field. So, it started a hundred years ago. It started with the--it was started by a group of organizations that were primarily orphanages that believed that there needed to be consistent standards across the country in terms of how children who are abused and neglected are treated. And so the United Way--United Way--the Child Welfare League became the group that worked with members and others and experts and researchers to define what does good service look like and then to do advocacy, at the federal level primarily 'cause that's where most of the child welfare legislation is set, although more and more is--it's also at the state level, to influence policies that would enable the delivery of these high quality services for children. And so we have an advocacy component, we have a publications component to get information out, we have training and technical assistance and consulting. So--but, I wasn't asked to go there for that reason. It was a turnaround situation. Organization basically, very much teetering on the edge and, and 'til this day still is around having to rethink its business model. The consulting network that--our, our budget had been around twenty million [dollars]. (Cough) The--a large part of it was dues from members, but also money from--revenue from providing consulting services and from publications. Consulting services now over the years have been picked up by the federal government through what's called resource centers for free, so people can get what we used to deliver, you know, for free from resource centers and from foundations that are now doing it too and the publications business has changed dramatically. So, both of those things have really kind of significantly reduced the revenue that the organization can get and membership has changed from what used to be big orphanages and residential facilities that were members and could give a lot of money a year for a membership. Child Welfare, and I think it's the right direction, is much more community based, smaller organizations who can't afford. So, we're in the middle of a fight for our lives right now, also--always questioning the mission. Is this mission still relevant and still valid? A lot of people tell me it's not because of the political environment that we're in. Who cares about abused and neglected children? You know, and I feel because of the political environment, it's more--even more important for us to be out there. And I think our advocacy is to the federal government, but also to our members to step up and provide higher quality services. So, I feel strongly that it's an important thing that is required. We're the only group that focuses specifically on abused and neglected children, that no one else--their parents don't fight for them, like the parents of mentally ill kids or sick kids, because their parents are often the ones that are abusing or neglecting them, so they have no voice. So, I feel it's critically important to figure out a way to keep the organization moving forward. But it's--I don't know by the time that people are watching this where it's gonna be, you know. It's a scary kind of time for our nation, I think.