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Stanley Crouch

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Information about Stanley Crouch

Profile image of Stanley Crouch

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
MusicMakers
Occupation(s):
Newspaper Columnist
Music Critic
Magazine Columnist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
None
Favorite Food:
None
Favorite Time of Year:
Winter
Favorite Vacation Spot:
None
Favorite Quote:
I'm doing the best I can.

Birthplace

Born:
12/14/1945
Birth Location:
Los Angeles, California

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
MusicMakers
Occupation(s):
Newspaper Columnist
Music Critic
Magazine Columnist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
None
Favorite Food:
None
Favorite Time of Year:
Winter
Favorite Vacation Spot:
None
Favorite Quote:
I'm doing the best I can.

Birthplace

Born:
12/14/1945
Birth Location:
Los Angeles
See how Stanley Crouch is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

An outspoken writer and critic, Stanley Crouch was born in Los Angeles, California, on December 14, 1945. Encouraged by his mother, Crouch began writing at the age of eight. Crouch became active in the Civil Rights Movement while in junior high school. After graduating from high school, he attended two junior colleges in the Los Angeles area. While studying at the East Los Angeles Junior College, Crouch worked for a poverty program in East Los Angeles, teaching a literacy class. In August 1965, Crouch witnessed the Watts Riot firsthand. This experience radicalized Crouch and he became a black nationalist.

From 1965-1967, Crouch was an actor-playwright in the Studio Watts Company. While at the Studio Watts Company, Crouch discovered the writings of Ralph Ellison and Albert Murray who became major influences in Crouch's thinking. This influence caused him to turn away from the black nationalist movement, finding it too reactionary. Crouch taught at the Claremont Colleges in California from 1968-1975 and moved to New York in 1975. For his first five years in New York, Crouch played the drums in an avant-garde jazz band, later becoming a staff writer for the Village Voice (1979-88). It was during this time that Crouch started to find his voice as a writer. Then, in the 1980s, he became the spokesperson for popular jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis.

Crouch has written articles for the New York Daily News and articles for magazines such as The New Yorker, The New Republic, and Esquire. He is the author of three collections of essays, Notes of a Hanging Judge (1990), The All-American Skin Game, or, The Decoy of Race: The Long and Short of It, 1990-1994 (1995), and Always in Pursuit: Fresh American Perspectives, 1995-1997 (1998) and one novel, Don't the Moon Look Lonesome: A Novel in Blues and Swing (2000).

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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Stanley Crouch interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch identifies one favorite thing
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch discusses his parents' background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch shares stories about his mother's childhood
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch talks about his siblings and his father's family
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch shares early memories
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Stanley Crouch recalls life in a multicultural elementary school
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Stanley Crouch discusses his childhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch reflects on his childhood household
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch talks about his childhood environment
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch explains his inclination toward introspection
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch discusses many of the community forces that helped to shape him
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch talks about his start as a writer
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch reflects on his community and its treatment of women
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch reflects on his early interest in girls
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch talks about the improved occupational choices for women
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch discusses gender perceptions
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch talks about the racial composition of his junior high school and high school
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch discusses gender differences and the natural order
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch talks about the activities in which he and his friends were involved
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Stanley Crouch discusses aggression and defense
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch explains how his mother and grandmother encouraged critical self-awareness
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch discusses the loss of importance in achieving high quality performance in the black community
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch describes cultural influences and frictions in inner city Los Angeles
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch recalls the frenzy of the 1965 Watts riot
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch describes working with illiterate adults
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch discusses cultural differences and various related issues
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch identifies lasting memories of the Watts riot
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch offers his assesment and critique of black nationalism
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch continues his critique of black nationalism
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch explains the lost friendship of LeRoi Jones
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch critiques several black writers and academicians
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch talks about his various professional endeavors
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch comments on critiques of his views
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch talks about writing and being prolific
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Second slating for the Stanley Crouch interview
  • Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch discusses his first famous poem, 'A Song for Asoka'
  • Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch talks about his plays
  • Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch identifies various events that had influenced him
  • Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch recalls how Amos Moore's poetry influenced him
  • Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch comes to his own understanding of black nationalism
  • Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch's disenchantment with black nationalism
  • Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch discusses his disaffection with black nationalism
  • Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch explains why he rejects 'fake' African identity in black Americans
  • Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch explains his fear ofgaining tenure
  • Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch discusses his rejection of a tenure-track teaching post
  • Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch describes moving to pursue a career as a critic
  • Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch shares his insight about and friendship with Ralph Ellison
  • Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch views Ralph Ellison as a tragic figure
  • Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch details his development as a critic
  • Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch reflects on his tenure at the 'Village Voice'
  • Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch discusses his book, 'Notes of a Hanging Judge'
  • Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch talks about the shift from black to African American
  • Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch offers some controversial theories on African vs. black American achievement
  • Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch discusses one of his essays, 'All American Skin Game'
  • Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch talks about human rights and objects to clitoridectomies
  • Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch describes his experience at the 'Village Voice'
  • Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch talks about his departure from the 'Village Voice'
  • Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch talks about the period in which he published essays
  • Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch talks about his novel
  • Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch comments on reactions to his novel
  • Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch continues discussing his novel, 'Don't the Moon Look Lonesome'
  • Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch shares his wife's views of his novel, 'Don't the Moon Look Lonesome'
  • Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch talks about criticisms of his novel, 'Don't the Moon Look Lonesome'
  • Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch talks about his aspirations as a writer
  • Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Stanley Crouch discusses his views on affirmative action
  • Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Stanley Crouch wants the black community to shed its decadent ways
  • Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Stanley Crouch speculates on how he would lead the country
  • Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Stanley Crouch comments on black political leadership
  • Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Stanley Crouch hopes for a renaissance in black America
  • Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Stanley Crouch examines perceptions of himself by intellectuals and workaday people