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Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey

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Information about Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey

Profile image of Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey

Profession

Category:
MusicMakers
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Gospel Singer
Criminal Justice Activist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Black, Blue, Brown
Favorite Food:
Greens, Bread, Turkey (Smoked)
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Montego Bay, Jamaica
Favorite Quote:
All Things Work Together for the Good of Those That Love the Lord and Are Called According to His Purpose.

Birthplace

Born:
2/12/1938
Birth Location:
Chicago, Illinois

Profession

Category:
MusicMakers
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Gospel Singer
Criminal Justice Activist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Black, Blue, Brown
Favorite Food:
Greens, Bread, Turkey (Smoked)
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Montego Bay, Jamaica
Favorite Quote:
All Things Work Together for the Good of Those That Love the Lord and Are Called According to His Purpose.

Birthplace

Born:
2/12/1938
Birth Location:
Chicago
See how Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Founder and president of Probation Challenge/PCC Internet Broadcast Network, Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey was born February 12, 1938 in Chicago, Illinois to Adolphus and Lillian Bailey. He attended Forrestville Elementary School and graduated from Englewood High School in 1957. Bailey continued his education at Wilson Junior College, Central State University, Chicago State University and Governors State University.

Bailey was known from the 1950’s through the 1970’s as the lead singer of the Harold Bailey Singers. The Bailey Singers recorded gospel music with the Rush, HOB and Savoy record labels and appeared on Chicago television’s Jubilee Showcase.

As a Cook County probation officer, Bailey noted that Bailey was concerned about the merry go round of recidivism and the spiraling wave of crime in the African American community. In 1979, he proposed a rehabilitation program for offenders, which was supported by Judge R. Eugene Pincham. The program was implemented as a serious attempt at rehabilitation. Pincham’s courtroom, jury room and office were converted to part time classroom space. Judge William Cousins and Judge Earl Strayhorn also supported Bailey’s efforts. In 1984, then state representative, Carol Mosely Braun and the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus sponsored the Probation Challenge Act. The late Mayor Harold Washington helped Bailey move the program out of the criminal courts building and into Olive Harvey Community College. Unlearned, unskilled, socially deprived, adult and juvenile and electronically monitored clients are mandated to into the program. Probation Challenge is a radio and television broadcast that educates people as they return to society from within the judicial system. The organization was priased by late, federal Judge Prentice Marshall.

Bailey has appeared on ABC-TV’s Good Morning America and CBS - TV’s 60 Minutes. Bailey, the recipient of numerous awards nationally and internationally, continues this valuable work, the only court-mandated program of its kind in the United States continues to work and live in Chicago.

See how Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harold E. Bailey's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey lists his favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his parents' jobs in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his parents' upbringings
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his father's experience in the segregated U.S. Army during World War I
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey remembers experiencing segregation in the South, and his father's reaction
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls growing up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the Church of Christ (Holiness) U.S.A.
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his religious influences as a youth
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his aunt, Alma Young, and his childhood passion for the Bible
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls his years at Forrestville Elementary School on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his father, Adolphus Jerome Bailey, Sr.
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes an experience of racial discrimination at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his high school years at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his years at Woodrow Wilson Junior College in Illinois and Central State University in Ohio
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls visitors to Central State University, including Coretta Scott King and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his experience at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the origins of gospel music and its relationship with Negro spirituals
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his time in the U.S. Army, at Chicago State University, and at Governors State University in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working for the City of Chicago during a conflict between Mayor Richard J. Daley and Congressman Ralph Metcalfe
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working for the Cook County Adult Probation Department and his ordination as a minister
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working as a probation officer in the late 1960s, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working as a probation officer in the late 1960s, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains how he provided probation counseling with the help of HistoryMaker R. Eugene Pincham
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the Probation Challenge program in Cook County, Illinois, pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the Probation Challenge program in Cook County, Illinois, pt. 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the prison-industrial complex in Illinois, pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the prison-industrial complex in Illinois, pt. 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes racial disparities in the criminal justice system
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes effects of the War on Drugs on criminal recidivism and racial disparities in the criminal justice system
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the successes of programs like Probation Challenge and political obstacles to their expansion
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains how he became chair of the Cook County Board of Corrections
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes the Cook County Board of Corrections, and its conflict with Cook County Sheriff Michael Sheahan
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about positive responses to fighting corruption in the Cook County, Illinois criminal justice system
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey reflects upon his hopes and concerns for the African American community, and on his life and legacy
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his mother's attitude toward his work, and about his former music career
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey narrates his photographs