The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Mary Hatwood Futrell

Share on Social Media

Information about Mary Hatwood Futrell

Profile image of Mary Hatwood Futrell

Profession

Category:
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Academic Administrator
Education Chief Executive

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Navy Blue
Favorite Food:
Catfish, Coleslaw, Salad, Vanilla Ice Cream, Coca-Cola
Favorite Time of Year:
Christmas
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Home
Favorite Quote:
If I Am Not For Myself, Then Who Will Be For Me? But If I’m Only For Myself, Then What Am I? And If Not Now, When?

Birthplace

Born:
5/24/1940
Birth Location:
Altavista, Virginia

Profession

Category:
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Academic Administrator
Education Chief Executive

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Navy Blue
Favorite Food:
Catfish, Coleslaw, Salad, Vanilla Ice Cream, Coca-Cola
Favorite Time of Year:
Christmas
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Home
Favorite Quote:
If I Am Not For Myself, Then Who Will Be For Me? But If I’m Only For Myself, Then What Am I? And If Not Now, When?

Birthplace

Born:
5/24/1940
Birth Location:
Altavista
See how Mary Hatwood Futrell is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Mary Alice Franklin Hatwood Futrell was born on May 24, 1940, in Altavista, Virginia; her mother was a domestic and factory worker and her father worked in construction. Futrell was raised in a single parent household and did not develop a relationship with her father until she was an adult. In 1958, Futrell earned her high school diploma from Dunbar High School in Lynchburg, Virginia, where she was a cheerleader, and a member of student government, Future Business Leaders of America and the National Honor Society.

In 1962, Futrell received her degree in business education from Virginia State University where she was a cheerleader and pledged Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. From 1962 until 1964, Futrell worked as a teacher at the segregated Parker Gray High School in Alexandria, Virginia. In 1965, Futrell helped integrate the teaching staff at George Washington High School, where she taught business until 1980; while there, she earned her master’s degree in secondary education from George Washington University in 1968.

In 1983, Futrell became the president of the National Education Association, becoming the fourth minority to serve in the position; she remained there until 1989. During her three terms as NEA president, Futrell helped the organization achieve leadership status in the areas of civil and human rights, especially women’s rights. As a result of her tireless efforts, the NEA created the Mary Futrell Award to honor individuals whose activities in women’s rights have made a significant impact on education and on the achievement of equal opportunities for women and girls.

In 1992, Futrell joined the faculty at George Washington University, while earning her Ph.D. in education policy studies; in 1995, she was promoted to dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development. Futrell also served as the director of the George Washington Institute for Curriculum Standards and Technology.

Futrell served as the president of the World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession; The Virginia Education Association; Education International; and ERAmerica. Futrell published articles in a number of scholarly journals, such as Education Record, Foreign Language Annals and Education Administration Quarterly. For her work in education policy and reform, Futrell has been awarded numerous honors and awards, including more than twenty honorary degrees.

See how Mary Hatwood Futrell is related to other HistoryMakers
Loading...
Click Here To Explore The Archive Today!
  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mary Hatwood Futrell's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mary Hatwood Futrell lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her mother's childhood and youth
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her mother, Josephine Calloway Austin
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her biological father and her two stepfathers
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her relationship with her biological father, Chester Minnis
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her great-grandparents and how she takes after her great-grandmother
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her maternal family history
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her earliest childhood memories
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her memories of childhood on Spruce Street in Lynchburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about why her mother held her to higher standards than her siblings
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes why her mother taught her to work at an early age
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her siblings
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes growing up in the town of Lynchburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood in Lynchburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her experience at Payne Elementary School in Lynchburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her junior high school years
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her experience at Dunbar High School in Lynchburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mary Hatwood Futrell remembers the funds that enabled her to enroll at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mary Hatwood Futrell remembers her advisor's challenge to take her studies seriously at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mary Hatwood Futrell remembers being poor in college and her resolve to focus on her education
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her religious upbringing and childhood Christmases
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her early teaching career and the riots following desegregation at George Washington High School in Alexandria, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about school desegregation in Alexandria, Virginia in the mid-1960s
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her reception by white teachers at George Washington High School in Alexandria, Virginia after the school was desegregated
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Mary Hatwood Futrell remembers her reputation as a teacher at George Washington High School in Alexandria, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes commuting during her graduate school years at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes the 1968 civil unrest in Washington, D.C. after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes the changes at George Washington High School in Alexandria, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about the effects of desegregation on African American educators
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes cultural changes affecting the education of children
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her tenure as President of the National Education Association
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about becoming dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at George Washington University
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes her accomplishments at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and the school's history
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mary Hatwood Futrell provides her personal assessment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB)
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about transformations needed in the teaching profession
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Mary Hatwood Futrell reflects upon the formative experiences in her life
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about the importance of history
  • Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Mary Hatwood Futrell shares her advice for aspiring educators
  • Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about what she hopes to accomplish and what she regrets
  • Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Mary Hatwood Futrell describes how she would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Mary Hatwood Futrell reflects upon her legacy
  • Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Mary Hatwood Futrell talks about her family