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Kojo Nnamdi

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Information about Kojo Nnamdi

Profile image of Kojo Nnamdi

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
Occupation(s):
Broadcast journalist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Brown
Favorite Food:
Chicken (Grilled), Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Antigua
Favorite Quote:
The Greatest Thing You Ever Learn Is To Love And Be Loved In Return.

Birthplace

Born:
1/8/1945
Birth Location:
Georgetown,

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
Occupation(s):
Broadcast journalist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Brown
Favorite Food:
Chicken (Grilled), Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Antigua
Favorite Quote:
The Greatest Thing You Ever Learn Is To Love And Be Loved In Return.

Birthplace

Born:
1/8/1945
Birth Location:
Georgetown
See how Kojo Nnamdi is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Broadcast journalist Kojo Nnamdi was born as Rex Orville Montague Paul on January 8, 1945 in Guyana. He emigrated first to Montreal, Canada in 1967 to attend McGill University, and then to the United States in 1968.

Nnamdi first lived in Brooklyn, New York, where he worked on Wall Street and joined the Black Panther Party. He then moved to Washington, D.C. in 1969, and became part of a new organization called The Center For Black Education, developed in large measure by former members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In 1970, Nnamdi was hired as the editor of the radio show “Sauti,” a news magazine program on WOL-AM. From 1973 to 1985, he served as news editor and then news director for WHUR-FM, and produced the award-winning local news program “The Daily Drum.” Then, from 1985 to 2011, Nnamdi hosted “Evening Exchange,” a public affairs television program broadcast by WHUT-TV at Howard University. He became host of WAMU-FM’s “Public Interest” in August of 1998. In 2002, “Public Interest” changed its name to “The Kojo Nnamdi Show.” In addition, he has served as the host of WAMU’s “The Politics Hour.”

Nnamdi has chaired the board of the Public Access Corporation of Washington, D.C. since 1997, and served on the board of the Library of Congress American Folklife Center from 2003 to 2008. He has also been active in Guyaid, an organization devoted to the welfare of children in Guyana.

Nnamdi was honored as a civil rights hero by the National Council for Community Justice in 2001; and in 2003, the Library of Congress selected Nnamdi as the keynote speaker for African American History Month. In 2005, he was named a "Washingtonian of the Year" by Washingtonian magazine. DCist named Nnamdi one of "DC’s Most Influential People" in 2007, and Washingtonian has listed Nnamdi as one of the “150 Most Influential People in Washington.”

Nnamdi has five sons and lives with his wife in Washington, D.C.

Kojo Nnamdi was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 30, 2014.

See how Kojo Nnamdi is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kojo Nnamdi's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi lists his favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about the African and East Indian populations in Guyana
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi continues to describe his mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his father's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his parents' engagement
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his likeness to his parents
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his siblings
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his earliest childhood memory
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his childhood home in Georgetown, Guyana
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi describes the music and culture of Guyana
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his elementary school and sports
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his childhood interest in conversation and stories
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about anti-colonial struggle
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Forbes Burnham
  • Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Walter Rodney, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Walter Rodney, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Walter Rodney, pt. 3
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about the presence of radio in his childhood
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about attending high school at Queens College in Guyana, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about attending high school at Queens College in Guyana, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his time before and at McGill University in Montreal, Canada
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his political activity at McGill University in Montreal, Canada
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about living in New York City, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his former wife and his move to Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about the Center for Black Education in Washington, D.C., pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about the Center for Black Education in Washington, D.C., pt. 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about the Center for Black Education's radio projects
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his work at Howard University Radio
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on Howard University Radio
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about black political convenings in the '70s
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Melvin Lindsey's "Quiet Storm," pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about Melvin Lindsey's "Quiet Storm," pt. 2
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kojo Nnamdi remembers his time as news director at WHUR in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his transition into television work
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his television and radio shows, pt. 1
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his television and radio shows, pt. 2
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his television show, "Evening Exchange"
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his journalistic philosophy
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about surprising moments in his career
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on conducting interviews
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on the differences between WAMU and his broadcasting career at Howard University, pt. 1
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on the differences between WAMU and his broadcasting career at Howard University, pt. 2
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on the differences between WAMU and his broadcasting career at Howard University, pt. 3
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his plans for his future
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his experience in Ethiopia
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Kojo Nnamdi describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects on his life
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Kojo Nnamdi reflects upon his legacy
  • Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about his family
  • Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Kojo Nnamdi talks about how he would like to be remembered