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John Carlos

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Information about John Carlos

Profile image of John Carlos

Profession

Category:
SportsMakers
Occupation(s):
Track and Field Athlete

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Green
Favorite Food:
Black Beans, Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Solitude
Favorite Quote:
See Ya! Hate to Be Ya!

Birthplace

Born:
6/5/1945
Birth Location:
New York, New York

Profession

Category:
SportsMakers
Occupation(s):
Track and Field Athlete

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Green
Favorite Food:
Black Beans, Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Solitude
Favorite Quote:
See Ya! Hate to Be Ya!

Birthplace

Born:
6/5/1945
Birth Location:
New York
See how John Carlos is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

John Carlos was born in 1945 in Harlem, New York. Carlos attended Machine Trade and Medical High School, where he was a talented track star. He received a full scholarship to East Texas State University (ETSU), and became that school’s first track and field Lone Star Conference Champion. After only one year at ETSU, Carlos was accepted at San Jose State University. Under the tutelage of Lloyd “Bud” Winter, a notable coach who would eventually be inducted into the National Track & Field Hall of Fame, Carlos began to thrive as an athlete.

While attending San Jose State University, Carlos met sociologist Harry Edwards, and under Edward’s influence helped to co-found the Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR). Edwards wanted to boycott the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City as a protest of the United States’ inability to deal with its human rights injustices. Despite the support of Carlos, Carlos’ newfound friend and fellow athlete Tommie Smith and a variety of civil rights leaders, the boycott never occurred. However, Carlos remained impressed by Edward’s ideas. His athletic career, meanwhile, had taken off – in the 1967 Pan-American games, Carlos was a bronze medalist for the 200 meter event.

At the time of the trials for the 1968 Olympic Games, Carlos beat Smith’s world record time for the 200 meter dash by 0.3 seconds, although a technicality kept the score from being officially recorded. During the actual 200 meter event, Carlos finished third, behind Smith and Australian Peter Norman. While receiving their medals, Smith and Carlos raised their gloved fists as a silent protest of racism and economic depression among oppressed people in America. In response, International Olympic Committee president Avery Brundage banned the two men from the Olympic Village and forced them from the United States Olympic team. After their return to the United States, both men received death threats. However, they had become a significant symbol of the Civil Rights struggle. Carlos also saw Martin Luther King, Jr. just ten days before King’s assassination.

Carlos continued to compete and excel in the field of track, and 1969 proved to be a year of great accomplishment. He tied the 100-yard dash record that year with a time of 9.1 seconds and led San Jose State to the NCAA championship for the first time, thanks to his winnings in the 100, 220 and 4x100-yard relay events. After his track career ended, Carlos joined the NFL’s Philadelphia Eagles, where an unfortunate knee injury cut his professional football career short after only one year. He continued to play football in Canada for the CFL, with one season as a player for the Montreal Alouettes and one year with the Toronto Argonauts. In 1985, Carlos became a counselor for Palm Springs High School in California. In 1998, both Smith and Carlos were honored in a ceremony to commemorate their protest at the 1968 Olympic Games, and the two reunited again at the funeral for Australian runner Peter Norman’s funeral ceremony in 2006.

John Carlos was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 29, 2006.

See how John Carlos is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John Carlos' interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John Carlos lists his favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John Carlos describes his mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John Carlos describes his parents' occupations
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John Carlos describes the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, New York in the 1950a
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John Carlos lists his children and siblings
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John Carlos describes his earliest childhood memories of Lenox Avenue in Harlem, New York
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John Carlos recalls reuniting with his half-brother in the 2000s
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John Carlos explains the origin of his interest in increasing African American representation
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John Carlos describes his primary and elementary school experiences in Harlem, New York, including having a learning disability
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John Carlos talks about being an elementary school student at P.S. 5 in New York, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John Carlos recalls the excessive force used by white police officers and firemen in Harlem, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John Carlos talks about the drug crisis in Harlem, New York during the 1950s and psychosocial effects of drug abuse
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John Carlos describes the discrimination experienced by his father from business suppliers and owners
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John Carlos recounts the boycott of Haaren High School in New York, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John Carlos describes raiding food from freight trains in the 1950s
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John Carlos describes a vision of the Olympics he experienced as a child
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John Carlos describes his search for existential meaning and religious faith as a teenager
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John Carlos describes his expulsion from Haaren High School in New York, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John Carlos recounts his experiences at a Catholic High School in New York, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John Carlos describes his time at Machine and Metal Trades High School in New York, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John Carlos describes his role with the New York Pioneers Track and Field Club, the United States' first interracial track team