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J. K. Haynes

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Information about J. K. Haynes

Profile image of J. K. Haynes

Profession

Category:
EducationMakers
ScienceMakers
Occupation(s):
Academic Administrator
Biologist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Lamb
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Paris, France
Favorite Quote:
We're Building A House At The House.

Birthplace

Born:
10/30/1943
Birth Location:
Monroe, Louisiana

Profession

Category:
EducationMakers
ScienceMakers
Occupation(s):
Academic Administrator
Biologist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Lamb
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Paris, France
Favorite Quote:
We're Building A House At The House.

Birthplace

Born:
10/30/1943
Birth Location:
Monroe
See how J. K. Haynes is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Biologist and academic administrator John K. “J.K.” Haynes was born on October 30, 1943 in Monroe, Louisiana to John and Grace Haynes. His mother was a teacher and his father was the principal of Lincoln High School in Ruston, Louisiana. Haynes began first grade when he was four years old. When he was six, his family moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Haynes began attending Southern University Laboratory School. He attended Morehouse College when he was seventeen and he received his B.S. degree in biology in 1964. Haynes aspired to attend medical school. However, a professor advised him to apply to graduate school and he went on to attend Brown University, where he obtained his Ph.D. degree in biology in 1970.

Haynes completed his first year of postdoctoral research at Brown University, where he worked on restriction enzymes. During this time, he became interested in sickle cell anemia, which led to a second postdoctoral appointment in biochemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he worked with Vernon Ingram, the scientist who discovered the amino acid difference between normal and sickle cell hemoglobin. In 1973, Haynes joined the faculty at the Meharry Medical School as a junior faculty member in the department of genetics and molecular medicine and the department of anatomy. His research was focused on why sickle cells were less deformable than normal. In 1979, he returned to Morehouse College as an associate professor of biology as well as the director of the Office of Health Professions. As part of his work, Haynes created a program for high school students interested in medical school. Haynes has also helped recruit minority students into science with the assistance of agencies like the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Haynes became the endowed David E. Packard Chair in Science at Morehouse College and chairman of the biology department in 1985. In 1991, he took a sabbatical and went to Brown University to continue his work on sickle cells. Since 1999, he has served as Dean of Science and Mathematics at Morehouse College.

Under Haynes administrative leadership, new buildings for both chemistry and biology were built at Morehouse College as well as a curriculum with an emphasis on lab work. Haynes has published papers on cell biology as well as on undergraduate STEM education.

J. K. Haynes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 14, 2011.

See how J. K. Haynes is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of J.K. Haynes' interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes lists his favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes talks about his mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes talks about his father's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes recalls his childhood in Louisiana
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about himself as a student
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes explains his family's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes recalls his father's funeral home business
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - J.K. Haynes recounts his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - J.K. Haynes talks about his interests during high school
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his experience in high school
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about resemblance to certain family members
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes recalls his experience at Morehouse College under President Benjamin Mays
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes recalls student activism in Atlanta
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about the influential science faculty at Morehouse College, part 1
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about the influential science faculty at Morehouse College, part 2
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes talks about his graduate school experience at Brown University
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about sickle cell anemia and relates his Ph.D. dissertation topic
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes describes his postdoctoral molecular biology research at Brown University
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes responds to a question about his work as a biologist
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes discusses the nature of post doctoral research
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about financial problems at the Meharry Medical College
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his achievements in sickle cell anemia research, part 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes talks about his achievements in sickle cell anemia research, part 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes discusses his reaction to the first reported sickle cell anemia cure
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his research in sickle cell anemia, part 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about his research in sickle cell anemia, part 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes discusses the nature of his scientific research and funding
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes describes Project Kaleidoscope
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes describes the history of the Nabrit-Mapp-McBay building at Morehouse College
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his involvement with the American Society for Cell Biology Minorities Affairs Committee
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes recalls Walter Massey's presidency at Morehouse College
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes talks about the sickle cell anemia drugs and treatments
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes reflects on the wisdom of his parents
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes talks about his academic promotions at Morehouse College
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes discusses health issues in the black community
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - J.K. Haynes reflects on balancing his administrative, research, and teaching responsibilities
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - J.K. Haynes talks about the changing focus of sickle cell anemia research
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - J.K. Haynes talks about his involvement with the World Learning School for International Training
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - J.K. Haynes describes his concept for a program to develop new science faculty
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - J.K. Haynes shares his hopes for Morehouse College's future
  • Tape: 5 Story: 9 - J.K. Haynes talks about what he would have done differently in his career
  • Tape: 5 Story: 10 - J.K. Haynes discusses the impact of advice from his mentors
  • Tape: 5 Story: 11 - J.K. Haynes reflects on his life's accomplishments
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - J.K. Haynes talks about his family and his likeness to Ebony editor, Lerone Bennett
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - J.K. Haynes responds to a question about how he would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - J.K. Haynes talks about his interest in art and music