The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Hubie Jones

Share on Social Media

Information about Hubie Jones

Profile image of Hubie Jones

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Social Worker
Academic Administrator

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Grits (Hominy)
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Hilton Head, South Carolina
Favorite Quote:
Life Is Not A 60-Yard Dash. It's A Marathon And Staying The Course Is The Secret To It All.

Birthplace

Born:
12/13/1933
Birth Location:
New York, New York

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Social Worker
Academic Administrator

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Grits (Hominy)
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Hilton Head, South Carolina
Favorite Quote:
Life Is Not A 60-Yard Dash. It's A Marathon And Staying The Course Is The Secret To It All.

Birthplace

Born:
12/13/1933
Birth Location:
New York
See how Hubie Jones is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Hubert Eugene Jones, better known as “Hubie,” shaped and defined the civic and social landscape of Boston for more than forty-five years. He played a leadership role in the formation, building and rebuilding of at least thirty community organizations within Boston’s Black community and across all neighborhoods in the city.

Born in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City on December 13, 1933, Jones came to Boston in 1955 after graduating from the City College of New York. Growing up in the South Bronx, he was inspired by his mother Dorcas, who earned her high school diploma, a B.A. degree and a master’s degree after raising him and his siblings. His father, Hilma, a Pullman Porter, was also an inspiration as he worked along side A. Philip Randolph in organizing the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Randolph even gave the eulogy at his father’s funeral. At CCNY, Jones was inspired by the famed psychologist Dr. Kenneth Clark, whose psychological studies with Black and White children helped bring about the 1954 Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education.

After receiving a master’s in social work from Boston University, Jones moved through a series of positions in Boston social work agencies. Starting at Boston Children’s Services in 1957, he left for Judge Baker Guidance Center in 1961, and in 1965, he became the director of the Roxbury Multiservice Center, where he remained until 1971. Under Jones, RMC became a national model for neighborhood-based social services for low-income city residents.

While serving as RMC’s director in 1967, Jones noticed a pattern of children who were not going to school in Boston. He led a formal investigation and published a scathing indictment of the Boston Public Schools for systematically excluding 10,000 children because they were physically or mentally disabled, had behavioral problems, did not speak English or were pregnant. The task force report, The Way We Go to School: The Exclusion of Children in Boston, led to the groundbreaking enactments of two landmark laws in Massachusetts, the Special Education Law and the Bilingual Education Law, to protect the rights of and give appropriate education services and instruction to special needs children. The task force, chaired by Jones, became known as the Massachusetts Advocacy Center, now the Massachusetts Advocates for Children.

Jones spent the 1971-1972 year as the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Community Fellow at MIT, and from 1972 until 1977 he was an associate professor in the department of urban studies and planning at MIT. He then became the first African American appointed to a deanship at Boston University, serving as the dean of the School of Social Work from 1977 to 1993.
Between 1995 and 2002, Jones served as special assistant to the chancellor for urban affairs at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In 2002, he founded the Boston Children’s Chorus, consisting of eighty young people from diverse ethnic and socio-economical backgrounds.

Jones has been honored numerous times for his dedication to children’s advocacy, and friends and colleagues have established The Hubie Fund, to benefit ongoing social concerns in Boston.

See how Hubie Jones is related to other HistoryMakers
Loading...
Click Here To Explore The Archive Today!
  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hubie Jones' interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones lists his favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones describes his mother's background in Abbeville, South Carolina
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones explains his mother's hospitality toward family
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones tells stories of his mother's humor and tenacity
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones speaks about his mother's aspirations and determination
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hubie Jones describes his maternal grandmother's depression
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hubie Jones talks about his father's accomplishments as a Pullman porter, pt. 1
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hubie Jones talks about his father's accomplishments as a Pullman porter, pt. 2
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones explains his father's position within the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones describes his paternal grandmother's quiet strength
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones talks about growing up in the South Bronx neighborhood of New York, New York in the 1930s and 1940s
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones remembers his elementary, middle and high schools in the Bronx, New York, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones recalls his initial interest in social work
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones talks about his mentor, Dr. Kenneth Bancroft Clark
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hubie Jones remembers his training at the School of Social Work at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hubie Jones recalls being transformed by Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King's Ford Hall Forum oration on October 28, 1956 in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones describes "being up south" in 1950s Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones recalls organizing the 1963 Stop Day work strike in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones recalls organizing the 1963 Stop Day work strike in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones remembers his experience working with delinquent children at the Judge Baker Guidance Clinic in Newton, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones talks about his eight children
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones remembers being hired as assistant director for Action for Boston Community Development
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hubie Jones talks about his achievements as executive director of the Roxbury Multi-Service Center in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones explains the significance of Massachusetts Chapter 766 and the Transitional Bilingual Education Act
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones remembers joining the Mel King Community Fellows program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones recalls teaching urban studies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones remembers becoming dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones recalls his faculty recruitment at School of Social Work at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones remembers serving as acting president of Roxbury Community College in Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hubie Jones remembers the 1992 re-accreditation for Roxbury Community College in Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hubie Jones recalls negotiating the location of the school board track at Roxbury Community College in Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones recalls becoming special assistant to the chancellor of University of Massachusetts Boston in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones describes civic programs he created at the University of Massachusetts Boston in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 1
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones describes civic programs he created at the University of Massachusetts Boston in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 2
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones talks about his involvement with Massachusetts Advocates for Children
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones describes some of the civic organizations he helped establish in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones talks about the Boston Children's Chorus
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones talks about appearing as a regular panelist on 'Five on Five'
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hubie Jones describes the production of 'Five on Five' for WCVB-TV
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hubie Jones reflects upon his life, pt. 1
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hubie Jones reflects upon his life, pt. 2
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hubie Jones shares lessons he has learned about organizing community programs and initiatives
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hubie Jones describes how he would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hubie Jones reflects upon his legacy
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Hubie Jones talks about his honorary doctorate of public service from the University of Maryland in Baltimore, Maryland
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Hubie Jones reflects upon his father inspiring his achievements
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hubie Jones narrates his photographs