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The Honorable Reverend Walter Fauntroy

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Information about The Honorable Reverend Walter Fauntroy

Profile image of The Honorable Reverend Walter Fauntroy

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
PoliticalMakers
ReligionMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Leader
U.S. Congressman
Pastor

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Greens (Collard)
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer at the Beach
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Any Beach
Favorite Quote:
Mr. Say Ain't Nothing; Mr. Do Is The Man.

Birthplace

Born:
2/6/1933
Birth Location:
Washington, District of Columbia

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
PoliticalMakers
ReligionMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Leader
U.S. Congressman
Pastor

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Greens (Collard)
Favorite Time of Year:
Summer at the Beach
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Any Beach
Favorite Quote:
Mr. Say Ain't Nothing; Mr. Do Is The Man.

Birthplace

Born:
2/6/1933
Birth Location:
Washington
See how The Honorable Reverend Walter Fauntroy is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

The Reverend Walter Edward Fauntroy was born in Washington, D.C., on February 6, 1933, to Ethel Vine and William T. Fauntroy. Graduating from Virginia Union University with a B.A. in 1955 and from Yale University Divinity School with a B.D. in 1958. The following year he became pastor of his childhood church, New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington, D.C, where he still serves as pastor.

In 1961, Fauntroy was appointed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as director of the Washington Bureau of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He then worked as the Washington, D.C., coordinator of the historic 1963 March on Washington and directed the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March, the 1966 Meredith Mississippi Freedom March, and the 1983 20th Anniversary March on Washington. In 1966, Fauntroy founded and served as the president of the Model Inner City Community Organization, a group committed to community development and neighborhood development.

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Fauntroy vice chairman of the White House's "To Fulfill These Rights" conference. One year later, Johnson appointed him vice chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia, and in 1971 Fauntroy was elected as the District of Columbia's delegate to Congress. He served ten terms in this role and designed and engineered many significant changes in national public policy. He was also one of the founding members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Fauntroy served for six years, as chair of the Subcommittee on International Development, Finance, Trade and Monetary Policy while he was member of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee. In 1977 Fauntroy founded the National Black Leadership Roundtable for leaders of National African American organizations. Fauntroy was chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus Brain Trust on Black Voter Participation and Network Development.

In 1984, Fauntroy was arrested at the South African Embassy as part of the Free South Africa Movement. Fauntroy is married to Dorothy Simms and they have two children: Marvin Keith and Melissa Alice.

See how The Honorable Reverend Walter Fauntroy is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Walter Fauntroy's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his parents' family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy describes his mother, Ethel Vine Fauntroy
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy lists his six siblings
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy describes his father, William Fauntroy
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy remembers the time he tried playing the numbers as a boy
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy describes his earliest memory of childhood
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the impact of World War II on his childhood
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Walter Fauntroy describes his childhood activities
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Walter Fauntroy describes his childhood neighborhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy describes his grade school years
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy lists his favorites
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy recalls memories from his childhood neighborhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy describes his pastor, Reverend C. David Foster
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy describes his early ambition to become a minister
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy describes his high school years at Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy talks about how he met and married his wife, Dorothy Simms
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Walter Fauntroy describes the impression that theologians Vernon Johns and Howard Thurman made upon him as a student at Virginia Union University
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy describes his early memories of racial segregation and discrimination
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy remembers racial segregation and discrimination in Richmond, Virginia and the first time he met Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy describes influential figures at Virginia Union University like Howard Thurman, Vernon Johns, Virgil Wood, Samuel DeWitt Proctor, and HistoryMakers L. Douglas Wilder and Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker,
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the history of Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy describes how his experience at Virginia Union University prepared him for Yale Divinity School
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the discrimination he faced as a black man, an athlete, a singer, and a politician
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy talks about succeeding Reverend C. David Foster and the shifts in black politics
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his early years and enduring commitment to New Bethel Baptist Church
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his role in the Albany Movement, the Freedom Rides, and the March on Washington as director of the Washington Bureau for the SCLC
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his role in organizing the 1963 March on Washington and tensions between movement leaders leading up to the event
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy compares the ups and downs of The Civil Rights Movement to the Free South Africa Movement
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy describes the SCLC and the tensions between ministers
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the tensions in the SCLC with HistoryMakers like John Lewis and Marion Barry and the subsequent formation of SNCC
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy talks about SNCC and SCLC leaders, petitioning President Lyndon B. Johnson for voting rights, and Hosea Williams' role in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery Marches
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy describes the contributions of Robert F. Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson to The Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy reflects upon his church's support of his activity in the SCLC
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy describes Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in 1968 and its aftermath
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the White House Conference on Civil Rights and organizing the continuation of James Meredith's March Against Fear
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his appointment as Vice Chairman of the D.C. City Council
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his investigation of the FBI's role in Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the Poor People's Campaign and the effect of the successive assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert Kennedy
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the end of the Poor People's Campaign and increased voter engagement after the Voting Rights Act
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy explains why he ran for the position of District of Columbia delegate to the U.S. Congress
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the Voter Education Project and the first Congressional Black Caucus
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the early years of the Congressional Black Caucus and the impact of President Richard Nixon on progressive policies
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy describes the impact of the Carter administration on black political power and black constituents
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy talks about HistoryMaker Andrew Young's resignation from his post as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and President Jimmy Carter's subsequent loss of black support
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy talks about his congressional career as a D.C. delegate to the U.S. Congress
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy talks about HistoryMaker Marion Barry's economic reforms as the mayor of Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the impact of the Reagan administration on national income inequality
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy talks about HistoryMaker Marion Barry and the disillusionment of the black electorate
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy describes the focus of his efforts in Congress
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy describes the worsening condition of the black community over a fifty year period
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Walter Fauntroy describes problems facing the black community worldwide
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy comments on the role of the black church and mobilizing the black electorate
  • Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Walter Fauntroy talks about the ability of people of all religions to advocate for equality and justice
  • Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Walter Fauntroy describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community
  • Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Walter Fauntroy describes his hopes
  • Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Walter Fauntroy talks about how he would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Walter Fauntroy reflects upon his relationship with his mother and her view of his accomplishments
  • Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Walter Fauntroy talks about civil rights of the future
  • Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Walter Fauntroy talks about findings by the Subcommittee on the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and improving the quality of life in the black community
  • Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Walter Fauntroy talks about Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Walter Fauntroy narrates his photographs