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Hattie B. Dorsey

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Information about Hattie B. Dorsey

Profile image of Hattie B. Dorsey

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Activist
Community Development Executive

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue, Green
Favorite Food:
Soul Food
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Beaches
Favorite Quote:
Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Birthplace

Born:
5/31/1939
Birth Location:
Teachey, North Carolina

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Activist
Community Development Executive

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue, Green
Favorite Food:
Soul Food
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Beaches
Favorite Quote:
Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Birthplace

Born:
5/31/1939
Birth Location:
Teachey
See how Hattie B. Dorsey is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Founder and former president of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership (ANDP), Hattie Beleatha Dorsey was born the eldest of eleven children on May 31, 1939 in Teachey, North Carolina. When Dorsey was an adolescent, her family moved to New York City where she attended Charles Evan Hughes High School. As a high school student, Dorsey took courses in fashion design and interior design. The Dorsey Family moved to Atlanta where she attended David T. Howard High School. Her father was the residing pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Atlanta and chairman of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Operation Bread Basket. She is a first cousin to the father of gospel music great Thomas A. Dorsey.

After attending Spelman College, Dorsey transferred to Clark Atlanta University. In 1964, Dorsey graduated from Clark Atlanta University with her B.S. degree in secretarial science. Dorsey performed secretarial work for various companies, until she became an administrative assistant for the National Urban League. Dorsey continued her civil rights work by working on the NAACP’s legal defense team throughout the 1970s and 1980s, helping to bring landmark legal suits against those who practiced housing discrimination. Dorsey worked for Stanford Mid - Peninsula Urban Coalition on Affordable Housing in San Francisco, California before becoming director of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership.

As president of ANDP, Dorsey worked to solidify Metro Atlanta neighborhoods and community development corporations. Under Dorsey’s leadership, issues related to public housing became a regional priority. A larger part of Dorsey’s success as ANDP’s president resided in her ability to develop financial resources from all sectors – private, public and philanthropic. In 1995, ANDP launched a $16 million capital campaign to accelerate housing construction and innovation in preparation for the Olympic Games.

Dorsey has received many awards and honors including the 2005 Spelman College Local Community Service Award; Atlanta Woman magazine’s nominee for Woman of the Year; Georgia Trend magazine’s “2004 Notable Georgians”; 2001 Honoree of Women Looking Ahead; 2003 Inductee into the Atlanta Business League’s Women Hall of Fame; The Georgia Black Caucus Grace Towns Hamilton Leadership Award; and the Atlanta Regional Commission’s Golden Glasses Award.

Dorsey and her daughter, Victoria “Michelle,” live in Atlanta.

Dorsey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 13, 2007.

See how Hattie B. Dorsey is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hattie B. Dorsey's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her mother's upbringing
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of visiting her family in rural North Carolina
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her white heritage
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her mother's education
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her father, Rev. Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her earliest childhood memory
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes how her parents met
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about music in her family, and her first cousin once-removed, gospel singer Thomas A. Dorsey
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls being hospitalized at the Roslyn, New York Home for Cardiac Children from 1949 to 1951
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her childhood illness and the treatment she received at the Roslyn, New York Home for Cardiac Children
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her family and home life in 1940s Brooklyn, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists her ten siblings
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her neighborhood growing up in Brooklyn, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her elementary school years at P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her mother's strict discipline
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her classes at P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York, and her interest in sewing
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her favorite books as a child, and her decision to attend Straubenmuller Textile High School (later Bayard Rustin Educational Complex) for fashion and interior design
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving from Brooklyn, New York to Teachey, North Carolina at age fifteen
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending Charity High School in Rose Hill, North Carolina until her father, the Reverend E.H. Dorsey, moved the family to Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving to Atlanta, Georgia and attending David T. Howard High School there
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her friends and extracurricular interests at David T. Howard High School in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey recounts her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, then to transfer to Clark College (now Clark-Atlanta University)
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University) in Atlanta, Georgia from 1958 to 1962
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey explains her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey's role in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes the Atlanta, Georgia home of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s family
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about the Atlanta, Georgia chapter of Operation Breadbasket, headed by her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about marrying her first husband, Samuel Thomas, and moving to Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her first job as an administrative assistant at the U.S. Department of the Interior
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about working for Representative Charles L. Weltner (D-Georgia)
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for the National Urban League in Washington, D.C. with HistoryMakers Sterling Tucker and John E. Jacob
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about returning to Atlanta, Georgia after her 1968 divorce, working for the federal Model Cities Program and then for Mayor Ivan Allen
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for Atlanta, Georgia mayor Ivan Allen after the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 assassination
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving to Oakland, California in 1971 to work for the Urban League, then the Stanford, California Urban Coalition; and marrying James Harlow
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for the Stanford, California Urban Coalition
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey recounts her fundraising work as the Stanford, California Urban Coalition's Director of Resource Development
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes the Stanford, California Urban Coalition's education and training programs, and its independence from federal funding
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about working for the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation in New York City and adopting her daughter Michelle
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her friendships with HistoryMakers Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., Julian Bond, and Xernona Clayton; and Atlanta, Georgia mayor Maynard Jackson
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working at the Atlanta Economic Development Corporation in Georgia
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about founding the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership in Georgia
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists some of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership's projects
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and the role of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey explains the benefits of mixed-income urban communities, and the need for affordable housing
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey reflects upon the communities her Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership has strengthened, and the challenges they face
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey reflects upon her legacy, and what she would like to tell future generations
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her involvement with 100 Black Women in America and her hopes for HistoryMaker Barack Obama
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey narrates her photographs