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Glory Van Scott

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Information about Glory Van Scott

Profile image of Glory Van Scott

Profession

Category:
ArtMakers
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Dancer
Theater Professor
Stage Actress

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Purple
Favorite Food:
Broccoli
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Paris, France
Favorite Quote:
Let's go get some grub.

Birthplace

Born:
6/1/1947
Birth Location:
Chicago, Illinois

Profession

Category:
ArtMakers
EducationMakers
Occupation(s):
Dancer
Theater Professor
Stage Actress

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Purple
Favorite Food:
Broccoli
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Paris, France
Favorite Quote:
Let's go get some grub.

Birthplace

Born:
6/1/1947
Birth Location:
Chicago
See how Glory Van Scott is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Producer, performer, educator, and civic activist, Glory Van Scott, was born in Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1947. Van Scott's parents, Dr. and Ms. Thomas Van Scott, were raised near Greenwood, Mississippi and shared some Choctaw and Seminole ancestry. The trauma of Van Scott's cousin Emmett Till’s murder in 1955 did not diminish the benefit of the art, dance, and drama classes at The Abraham Lincoln Center, where she met Paul Robeson and Charity Bailey. Van Scott spent summers in Ethical Culture Camp in New York. A student at Oakland Elementary School and Dunbar High School, Van Scott finished high school at Ethical Culture High School in New York City.

That summer at the Society for Ethical Culture’s Encampment for Citizenship, Cicely Tyson referred Van Scott to actress Vinette Carroll, who mentored Van Scott in theatrical arts. Soon Van Scott was moving easily between modeling for the Wilhelmina Agency and performing; a principal dancer with the Katherine Dunham, Agnes DeMille, and Talley Beatty dance companies, she also joined the American Ballet Company. Van Scott appeared on Broadway in House of Flowers, with Pearl Bailey in 1954; Kwamina in 1961; The Great White Hope in 1968; Billy No-Name in 1970; and Rhythms of the Saints in 2003. Van Scott played the Rolls Royce Lady in 1974’s film, The Wiz.

While pursuing her career in the performing arts, Van Scott earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees from Goddard College, and her Ph.D. from Antioch College's Union Graduate School. For ten years Van Scott taught theater at Bucknell University’s Pennsylvania School for the Arts, and, later, Theater As Social Change at Fordham University. Van Scott became a Breadloaf Writers Scholar and the author of eight musicals including Miss Truth. Van Scott founded Dr. Glory’s Youth Theatre. Lipincott published Van Scott’s first children’s book, Baba and the Flea.

Van Scott served as coordinator for WNET’s Dance in America - Katherine Dunham: Devine Drum Beats in 2000, and produced The Katherine Dunham Gala at Carnegie Hall, and the 2003 Tribute to Fred Benjamin at Symphony Space. Van Scott was also project director and artistic coordinator for the Alvin Ailey Company’s The Magic of Katherine Dunham/I> and co-producer of the National Black Touring Circuit, with Woodie King, Jr. of New York Dance Divas. Van Scott, immortalized in bronze by Elizabeth Catlett in 1981, was awarded the first Katherine Dunham Legacy Award in 2002.

See how Glory Van Scott is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Glory Van Scott's interview, session one
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott explains the origin of her name
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott remembers the origins of her interest in the Dunham Technique of dance
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott explains what makes the Dunham Technique of dance unique
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott remembers how the Dunham Technique affected her dance career
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott recalls meeting Katherine Dunham for the first time
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott remembers the culture of the Katherine Dunham Company in 1959 to 1960
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott details the Dunham Technique of dance
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Glory Van Scott recalls her favorite memories of travelling with the Katherine Dunham Company
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Glory Van Scott remembers Katherine Dunham as dance pioneer and humanitarian
  • Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Glory Van Scott describes Katherine Dunham's dancers
  • Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Glory Van Scott talks about reuniting the Katherine Dunham Company at a gala in Katherine Dunham's honor at Carnegie Hall in New York, New York
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Glory Van Scott talks about some of HistoryMaker Katherine Dunham's choreographic pieces
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott describes lessons she learned from HistoryMaker Katherine Dunham
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott reflects upon the legacy of HistoryMaker Katherine Dunham
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Slating of Glory Van Scott's interview, session two
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott lists her favorites
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott describes her mother's family background
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott remembers being taught social consciousness by her mother
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott recalls the murder of her cousin, Emmett Till, in 1955
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott lists her siblings
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott describes her father's family background
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott remembers being prevented from learning about her father's Seminole heritage
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Glory Van Scott explains her politics, pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Glory Van Scott explains her politics, pt. 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott talks about her father
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott describes her parents' roles in the community of Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott recalls her earliest childhood memory
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott remembers visiting the Abraham Lincoln Center while growing up in the Oakwood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott remembers her schooling in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott recalls the genesis of Arthur Mitchell's Dance Theatre of Harlem on the night of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination
  • Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Glory Van Scott remembers her disposition in elementary and high school
  • Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Glory Van Scott recalls her orientation toward religion as a child
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Glory Van Scott recalls her mother and grandmothers' relationship with Reverend Joseph H. Jackson of Olivet Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott explains her transfer from Dunbar High School in Chicago, Illinois to Ethical Culture Fieldston School in New York, New York
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott remembers her entree into the performing arts world after attending Encampment for Citizenship in New York, New York
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott describes her early performance career in New York, New York
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott recalls how her successful performance career evolved
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott remembers HistoryMaker Katherine Dunham's influence on her career
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott recalls being principal dancer for Agnes de Mille American Heritage Dance Theater and Tally Beatty's company during the 1960s
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott talks about learning from senior members of the Katherine Dunham Company
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Glory Van Scott describes her philosophy of art
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott recalls fighting against racist representations of African Americans in the performance art world, pt. 1
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott recalls fighting against racist representations of African Americans in the performance art world, pt. 2
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott remembers appearing as a principal dancer in 'Porgy and Bess' and as the Rolls Royce Lady in 'The Wiz'
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott remembers the dangers of being in the public eye
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott talks about the musical she wrote, 'Miss Truth'
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott describes her children's theater company, Dr. Glory's Children's Theatre in New York, New York
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott explains what drew her to tell Sojourner Truth's story
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Glory Van Scott talks about her tribute to September 11, 2001 rescue workers, 'Final Ladder'
  • Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Glory Van Scott recalls a fire in her childhood home in Chicago, Illinois
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Glory Van Scott talks about her achievements in higher education
  • Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Glory Van Scott explains the importance of reading and learning for children
  • Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Glory Van Scott remembers being cast in bronze by HistoryMaker Elizabeth Catlett in 1981
  • Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Glory Van Scott describes her hopes for the African American community
  • Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Glory Van Scott reflects upon her life
  • Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Glory Van Scott reflects upon her legacy
  • Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Glory Van Scott describes her family's opinion of her success
  • Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Glory Van Scott reflects upon her religious beliefs
  • Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Glory Van Scott describes how she would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Glory Van Scott narrates her photographs