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Enid C. Pinkney

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Information about Enid C. Pinkney

Profile image of Enid C. Pinkney

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Community Activist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Peas (Pidgeon), Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Christmas
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Exuma, Bahamas
Favorite Quote:
Nothing is impossible if you believe in the Lord.

Birthplace

Born:
10/15/1931
Birth Location:
Miami, Florida

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
Occupation(s):
Community Activist

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Blue
Favorite Food:
Peas (Pidgeon), Rice
Favorite Time of Year:
Christmas
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Exuma, Bahamas
Favorite Quote:
Nothing is impossible if you believe in the Lord.

Birthplace

Born:
10/15/1931
Birth Location:
Miami
See how Enid C. Pinkney is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Preservation leader Enid C. Pinkney has worked aggressively over the years to ensure that the role of African Americans in Miami's history is acknowledged and preserved.

Pinkney was born the third of four children on October 15, 1931 in Miami-Dade County, Florida to Lenora and Henry Curtis. She graduated from the all-black Booker T. Washington High School in Miami in 1949, receiving a B.A. from Talladega College in 1953 and an M.S. from Barry University in 1967. Pinkney worked as a social worker from 1953 to 1955, after which she worked in the Dade County Public School System until she retired as Assistant Principal at South Miami Middle School in 1991.

She joined the Dade Heritage Trust historic preservation organization in the mid-1980s while Assistant Principal at South Miami Middle School. She was elected the first black president of the Trust in 1998. Pinkney is the founder of the African American Committee, which focuses on the contributions of blacks to the community. She has worked to preserve such historical sites as the landmark Brownsville Hotel, once the social and cultural epicenter of black Miami during segregation. Pinkney successfully led a group to form the Historic Hampton House Community Trust, working to save the hotel, which was declared a historical landmark in April 2002.

She is also an unofficial historian for Brown Sub, or Brownsville, the North Central Dade community where she lives. She has written a book and produced several videos on its history. The Miami Talladega College Alumni Association holds an Annual Enid C. Pinkney Humanitarian Awards Luncheon in which people are honored for their community contributions. Pinkney is married to Frank Pinkney, who is also involved with the Trust.

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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Enid Pinkney's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Enid Pinkney lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Enid Pinkney describes her mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Enid Pinkney describes her father's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Enid Pinkney describes her mother
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Enid Pinkney talks about participating in plays as a child
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Enid Pinkney describes her father, pt. 1
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Enid Pinkney describes her father, pt. 2
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Enid Pinkney describes her earliest childhood memories
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Enid Pinkney describes her family's Bahamian traditions
  • Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Enid Pinkney talks about how her parents valued education
  • Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Enid Pinkney describes her childhood chores
  • Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Enid Pinkney describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Enid Pinkney describes her experiences in school
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Enid Pinkney shares the story of boxer Joe Louis and his visit to Booker T. Washington High School, pt. 1
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Enid Pinkney shares the story of boxer Joe Louis and his visit to Booker T. Washington High School, pt. 2
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Enid Pinkney describes her drive to serve others
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Enid Pinkney describes her teachers role in shaping her activism
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Enid Pinkney talks about the teachers who influenced her
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Enid Pinkney describes her church, The Church of God of Prophecy
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Enid Pinkney talks about developing her speaking skills as a youth
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Enid Pinkney describes her experiences with segregation as a youth
  • Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Enid Pinkney talks about attending Talladega College in Talladega, Alabama
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Enid Pinkney recalls confronting segregation on the train
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Enid Pinkney describes attending an integrated meeting at the YWCA in Birmingham, Alabama
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Enid Pinkney describes how her experiences at Talladega College shaped her perception of discrimination and race
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Enid Pinkney talks about moving to Chicago, Illinois in 1953
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Enid Pinkney describes segregation in Chicago, Illinois in the early 1950s
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Enid Pinkney talks about starting her teaching career
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Enid Pinkney describes her experiences teaching during the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Enid Pinkney describes how integration impacted her teaching career
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Enid Pinkney talks about a play she helped her students write and produce in the late 1960s, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Enid Pinkney talks about a play she helped her students write and produce in the late 1960s, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Enid Pinkney describes the challenges she faced as a teacher during integration
  • Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Enid Pinkney describes how teachers and students interacted during the integration era
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Enid Pinkney talks about developing black history programs for her students
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Enid Pinkney describes starting the Soul Food Luncheon at South Miami Middle School
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Enid Pinkney talks about the effects of the Overtown Riots of the 1980s
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Enid Pinkney talks about her hopes for the Overtown neighborhood in Miami, Florida
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Enid Pinkney describes how she became involved with the Dade Heritage Trust, pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Enid Pinkney describes how she became involved with the Dade Heritage Trust, pt. 2
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Enid Pinkney describes how she became President of the Dade Heritage Trust
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Enid Pinkney talks about the Dade Heritage Trust's fight to save The Miami Circle in Miami, Florida
  • Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Enid Pinkney talks about the Dade Heritage Trust's battle to save Virginia Key Beach, pt. 1
  • Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Enid Pinkney talks about the Dade Heritage Trust's battle to save Virginia Key Beach, pt. 2
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Enid Pinkney talks about the Dade Heritage Trust's battle to preserve Historic Hampton House in Miami, Florida
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Enid Pinkney talks about the significance of preserving spaces that are meaningful to black heritage
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Enid Pinkney describes how she influenced others to stand up for themselves
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Enid Pinkney describes her philosophy of service
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Enid Pinkney describes her hopes and concerns for the African American communtiy
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Enid Pinkney talks about her legacy and how she would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Enid Pinkney narrates her photographs
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Enid Pinkney narrates her photographs, pt.2