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Elisabeth Omilami

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Information about Elisabeth Omilami

Profile image of Elisabeth Omilami

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
EntertainmentMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Activist
Film Actress

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Purple
Favorite Food:
Chocolate Ice Cream
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Beaches
Favorite Quote:
It's Only What You Do For Others That Will Last.

Birthplace

Born:
2/18/1951
Birth Location:
Atlanta, Georgia

Profession

Category:
CivicMakers
EntertainmentMakers
Occupation(s):
Civil Rights Activist
Film Actress

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Purple
Favorite Food:
Chocolate Ice Cream
Favorite Time of Year:
Spring
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Beaches
Favorite Quote:
It's Only What You Do For Others That Will Last.

Birthplace

Born:
2/18/1951
Birth Location:
Atlanta
See how Elisabeth Omilami is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Humanitarian and actress Elisabeth Omilami was born on February 18, 1951 in Atlanta, Georgia. At an early age, Omilami’s parents taught her that people should be accountable for each other, for their environment and should fight for justice for all people. As a young girl, she accompanied her father, the noted civil rights leader Dr. Hosea Williams, on marches and movements across the South. During the height of the Civil Rights Movement, after having the distinction of being one of the youngest people arrested in the fight for civil rights, Omilami was sent to boarding school. She then attended Hampton University, where she received her B.A. degree in theater.

In 1970, during the time her father began his own humanitarian organization Hosea Feed, the Hungry and Homeless, Omilami founded The People’s Survival Theater, one of Atlanta’s earliest performing arts companies. She also created a summer arts camp that provided arts training for the economically challenged youth of Atlanta.

Under the leadership of Mrs. Omilami and her husband Afemo, Hosea Feed The Hungry and Homeless has expanded to a year round human services organization with programs that touch over 180,000 people annually. HFTH’s “Homeless Prevention" program is an award winning initiative credited with helping place thousands of families in permanent housing. The organization’s disaster relief activities have been commended by Georgia Governor Nathan Deal and reach far beyond Georgia into Alabama and Tennessee. HFTH operates the largest food bank in the region that supports families directly with nutritious emergency food.

The Omilamis, assisted by thousands of volunteers, host an annual Holiday Dinner Series on Thanksgiving and Christmas, Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday and Easter Sunday.

Omilami is also the author of several plays, one of which, There is a River in My Soul<.em>, toured in February, 2002. As an actress, Omilami has combined her art with her life. She also toured in the play, The Life of a King<.em>, which her mother, State Representative Jaunita T. Williams co-authored. Omilami has acted in numerous films, including Runaway Jury<.em>, Ray<.em>, Madea’s Family Reunion<.em> and The Alter<.em>, a film which showcases the plight of the homeless while portraying them as individuals deserving of dignity and respect.

Omilami has been seen in "The Blind Side" alongside actress Sandra Bullock, in the Lifetime TV special "Marry Me" and at the Alliance Theatre in Janice Shaffer’s stage play "Broke".

Elisabeth Omilami is the wife of actor, Afemo Omilami, and has two children, Anodele and Tranita, and her granddaughter Kamaya. They live in Atlanta, Georgia.

Elisabeth Omilami was interview by The HistoryMaker on April 12, 2006.

See how Elisabeth Omilami is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Elisabeth Omilami's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her married name
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami describes the upbringing and education of her mother, Juanita Williams
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her maternal family history, pt.1
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her maternal family history, pt.2
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami describes the catalyst for her family's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her father, Hosea Williams' background
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's service in the U.S. Army and his education
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her parents' courtship
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her siblings
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami recounts her family's entry into the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her earliest memories of childhood in Savannah, Georgia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami recalls her early involvement in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her childhood neighborhood in Savannah, Georgia and her father's role in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami describes Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s impact on her father, and her memories of the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about being sent to boarding school at Boggs Academy in Keysville, Georgia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's organization, Chatham County Crusade for Voters
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about why she participated in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her experience at Boggs Academy in Keysville, Georgia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about integrating Wasatch Academy in Mount Pleasant, Utah in 1965
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about in-fighting among movement leaders after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1965
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's theory about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and her parents' Africa tour
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her experience at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about other children of Civil Rights Movement leaders
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about HistoryMaker Marjorie Moon and her decision to become a theater major at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia
  • Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's political career
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about the SCLC People's Survival Theater
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami recalls her training as an actress at the Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her professional preparedness after studying theater at Hampton, Virginia
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her role in her father's political campaigns
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami remembers meeting her husband, Afemo Omilami
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami describes the founding of Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless in 1971
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about civil rights issues addressed by her father, Hosea Williams, and his chemical company
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about the Atlanta Child Murders
  • Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Elisabeth Omilami describes living in New York City, New York
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Elisabeth Omilami's interview
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami describes working as an arts administrator in New York City's theater scene
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about HistoryMaker Melvin Van Peebles
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami describes the Forsyth County Civil Rights March led by her father, Hosea Williams
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about 'The Oprah Show's coverage of the Forsyth County Civil Rights March
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about why her father campaigned for Ronald Reagan, and his value for voting
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's Christian faith
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her acting career in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her relationship with her parents in her adult life
  • Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her play, 'There Is A River In My Soul'
  • Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about African American arts in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her Christian faith
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about raising money to educate an indigenous people group in the Philippines
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Elisabeth Omilami describes her father's view of her as an actress and his vision for her to lead Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her father's view of the Christian Church, her parents' marriage, and her own marriage
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her ordination and development as a preacher
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her acting credits
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about her preaching style
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Elisabeth Omilami talks about the importance of passion and freedom
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Elisabeth Omilami reflects upon her pride in her marriage
  • Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Elisabeth Omilami narrates her photographs