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Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps

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Information about Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps

Profile image of Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps

Profession

Category:
MedicalMakers
Occupation(s):
Pediatrician

Favorites

Favorite Color:
None
Favorite Food:
None
Favorite Time of Year:
All Seasons
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Florida
Favorite Quote:
A Job Well Done Is Its Own Reward

Birthplace

Born:
12/11/1930
Birth Location:
Little Rock, Arkansas

Profession

Category:
MedicalMakers
Occupation(s):
Pediatrician

Favorites

Favorite Color:
None
Favorite Food:
None
Favorite Time of Year:
All Seasons
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Florida
Favorite Quote:
A Job Well Done Is Its Own Reward

Birthplace

Born:
12/11/1930
Birth Location:
Little Rock
See how Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. Both of her parents were educators, as were her grandparents. Epps attended elementary school at Powell Laboratory School in Savannah, Georgia, and afterwards attended Palmer Memorial High School in Sedalia, North Carolina, before enrolling at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She graduated with a B.S. in 1951, and obtained an M.S., also from Howard, in 1955.

Upon receiving her M.S., Epps became a rotating intern with the United States Public Health Service at Freedmen's Hospital in Washington (later renamed Howard University Hospital). In 1956, she began a pediatric residency with the hospital, and two years later became its chief resident.

In 1961, she became a medical officer with the District of Columbia Department of Health, and in 1973 earned an M.Ph. from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. She continued on with the District of Columbia Department of Health, and in 1980 was appointed the first acting commissioner of health of the District of Columbia.

That year also saw her become a professor of pediatrics and children's health at Howard, and a year later, she received an M.A. from American University in Washington, D.C. She would go on to become the chief of the Child Development Division and director of the Child Development Center at Howard. Among her accomplishments during her time there were overseeing a program that aided disabled children and their parents, and she was the founder of the High Risk Young People's Project, which brought together several university health science departments, community organizations, and government agencies within the district.

In 1988, she went to work for the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. Semi-retired since 1998, she serves s a consultant for the public and private sector. Epps has written more than ninety articles for medical publications, was a co-editor for The Women's Complete Handbook , and was the first African American and female president of the District of Columbia chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has been involved in various professional and philanthropic undertakings and is the recipient of more than sixty awards. The Council of the District of Columbia declared February 14, 1981, Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps Day in Washington, D.C.

Epps passed away on September 30, 2014, at the age of 83. She was married to Dr. Charles H. Epps, Jr. and they have four children.

Roselyn Payne Epps was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 16, 2003.

See how Dr. Roselyn Payne Epps is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Roselyn Epps' interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps describes her mother, Mattie Beverly Payne, and her maternal family history
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps describes her father, William Kenneth Payne
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps describes her maternal grandfather, John William Beverly, the president of Alabama State College
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps talks about her maternal grandmother's ancestral roots
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps describes how her grandfather attended at Brown University and the impact of the American Missionary Association on black education
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps describes how her parents met and their move from Alabama to Arkansas
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps talks about her brother, William Kenneth Payne II
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Roselyn Epps describes memories of her childhood in Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Roselyn Epps describes her relationship with her brother, William Kenneth Payne II
  • Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Roselyn Epps describes her early elementary school years
  • Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Roselyn Epps talks about growing up on the campus of Savannah State University in Savannah, Georgia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps talks about taking her mother's card club on a tour of Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps describes the sights, smells, and sounds of growing up in Savannah, Georgia
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps describes the development of her parents' careers as educators
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps talks about her experience at Powell Laboratory School on the campus of Savannah State University
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps describes her childhood personality and her early dreams of becoming a pediatrician
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps talks about her experience at Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, North Carolina
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps talks about the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, North Carolina, and its founder, Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps remembers when Nat King Cole visited Palmer Memorial Institute with Maria Cole, Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown's niece
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps talks about black boarding schools like Palmer Memorial Institute, Mary Potter School, Mather Academy, and Piney Woods Country Life School, which suffered after integration
  • Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Roselyn Epps talks about close friends from her years at Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, North Carolina
  • Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Roselyn Epps talks about how her experience at Palmer impacted her formation
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps describes her parents' influence on her decision to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps describes her summer activities as a youth including 4-H camps and dance lessons
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps talks about her father and her husband's roles as academic administrators
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps describes criminal activity at the campus post office while she worked there
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps describes how her father resolved the issues at the post office and advocated for the students and faculty in his charge
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps describes the academic and social environment at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps talks about the faculty at Howard University including university president Mordecai Johnson, Alain LeRoy Locke, Frank Snowden, Lois Mailou Jones, and HistoryMaker Lloyd N. Ferguson
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps talks about the pre-med track at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps describes how she met her husband, HistoryMaker Dr. Charles H. Epps
  • Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Roselyn Epps talks about her decision to attend Howard University College of Medicine
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps talks about her experience as a woman at Howard University College of Medicine
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps remembers an embarrassing experience in her neuroanatomy lab class with Dr. Moses Wharton Young
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps talks about her studies at Howard University College of Medicine
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps talks about Dr. Blanche Bourne and Dr. Ruth Ella Moore, two influential teachers at Howard University College of Medicine
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps talks about Dr. Roland Scott, her mentor at Howard University School of Medicine
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps talks about Dr. Roland Scott and his work on sickle cell disease
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps talks about children's health issues in the 1960s and the importance of immunization
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps describes obtaining a master of public health at Johns Hopkins University while working at the D.C. Department of Public Health
  • Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps describes the impact of urban migration in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Roselyn Epps talks about Freedmen's Hospital in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps talks about distinguished interns and residents from Freedman's Hospital
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps talks about medical ethics
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps talks about her mentor Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee and affiliating with the American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps remembers integrating the D.C. Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps talks about her community involvement and her work with Children International
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps talks about her decision to study public administration and higher education at American University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps talks about evolution of public health while she was acting commissioner of health at the D.C. Department of Public Health
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps talks about a shift in national attitudes about intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps talks about the close of Junior Village, one of the unintended casualties of the Great Society programs
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps describes the beginning of the High Risk Young People's Project
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps talks about the impact of the High Risk Young People's Project
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps describes how she implemented the NIH's smoking cessation program
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps talks about her work on smoking cessation in pediatrics
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps talks about the expansion of pediatric medicine
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps talks about a study on hypertension in children and how the field of pediatrics has changed over the last few decades
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Roselyn Epps talks about the rising incidence of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Roselyn Epps talks about cancer research in children and chronic pediatric issues
  • Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Roselyn Epps talks about her work on "The Women's Complete Health Book"
  • Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps talks about Joycelyn Elders, the former Surgeon General of the United States
  • Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps talks about the importance of caring for the nation's children
  • Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps talks about the Hospital for Sick Children and learning to fundraise
  • Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps talks about Girls Inc.
  • Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps talks about lessons in leadership and her leadership roles over the years
  • Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps describes her work ethic
  • Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps talks about her exposure to significant African Americans and her experience during segregation
  • Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Roselyn Epps talks about the importance of integration and its consequences
  • Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Roselyn Epps shares her advice for aspiring medical professionals
  • Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Roselyn Epps describes the importance of historically black colleges and universities like Howard University in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Roselyn Epps talks about how she would like to be remembered
  • Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Roselyn Epps narrates her photographs, pt.1
  • Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Roselyn Epps narrates her photographs, pt.2