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Carol Randolph-Jasmine

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Information about Carol Randolph-Jasmine

Profile image of Carol Randolph-Jasmine

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
Occupation(s):
Television Anchor
Newspaper Columnist
Book Publisher

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Yellow
Favorite Food:
Broccoli
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Hilton Head, South Carolina
Favorite Quote:
Better To Wear Out Than To Rust Out.

Birthplace

Born:
2/10/1941
Birth Location:
St. Louis, Missouri

Profession

Category:
MediaMakers
Occupation(s):
Television Anchor
Newspaper Columnist
Book Publisher

Favorites

Favorite Color:
Yellow
Favorite Food:
Broccoli
Favorite Time of Year:
Fall
Favorite Vacation Spot:
Hilton Head, South Carolina
Favorite Quote:
Better To Wear Out Than To Rust Out.

Birthplace

Born:
2/10/1941
Birth Location:
St. Louis
See how Carol Randolph-Jasmine is related to other HistoryMakers

Biography

Television anchor, journalist and literary agent Carol Randolph-Jasmine received her B.A. degree in biology from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and her M.A. degree in science education from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. She went on to earn her J.D. degree from the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine entered television broadcasting in the early 1980s as the co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WDVM-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C. While there, she also worked as an anchorwoman and interviewed politicians and celebrities such as Senator Ted Kennedy, comedian Richard Pryor, former first ladies Roselyn Carter and Nancy Reagan, and musician Stevie Wonder. Randolph-Jasmine then joined Court TV, where she served as an anchorwoman, and as the host and moderator of the show, “Your Turn,” until 1986.

In 1987, Randolph-Jasmine joined the literary firm of Goldfarb, Signer & Ross (now Goldfarb, Kaufman & O’Toole), where she specialized in representing authors and clients in television from 1988 to 1991, and, during that time, she also wrote a bi-weekly column, “Metropolitan Life,” for the Washington Times. She then served as general counsel for New African Visions, Inc., the non-profit organization responsible for editing the book, Songs of My People (1992). She is the co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, a firm that represents authors, artists and athletes. Randolph-Jasmine was later appointed as the vice president of strategic communications for Miller & Long Concrete Construction, and was then named senior vice president of legal affairs for Walls Communications, Inc., a minority-owned public relations firm in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, the District of Columbia Bar Association, and The Links, Inc., where she served as chair of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Committee. In 2005, she launched a “Construction Academy” at Cardoza Senior High School in Washington, D.C. for students interested in the construction business. Randolph-Jasmine is also a member of the board of directors for the Center for Dispute Resolution.

As co-host of “Harambee” in the 1980s, Randolph-Jasmine won several awards including an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming.”

Carol Randolph-Jasmine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2013.

See how Carol Randolph-Jasmine is related to other HistoryMakers
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  • Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Randolph-Jasmine's interview
  • Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine lists her favorites
  • Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her mother's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her maternal grandfather's education
  • Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the neighborhood where her parents grew up
  • Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's family background
  • Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her grandfathers
  • Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's education
  • Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her similarities to her parents' personalities
  • Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her siblings
  • Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her earliest childhood memories
  • Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood neighborhood in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri
  • Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood
  • Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning to read and beginning kindergarten at age four
  • Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning about black history at Riddick Elementary School in St. Louis, Missouri
  • Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers a social science project in high school
  • Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her early desire to become a psychologist and her high school biology class
  • Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about St. Louis, Missouri's black entertainment scene during her youth
  • Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her high school activities
  • Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood career ambitions
  • Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her decision to attend Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee
  • Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee
  • Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee as a married woman
  • Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about various professions as well as her professors at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee
  • Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 1
  • Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 2
  • Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes going to the 1963 March on Washington
  • Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about teaching at McKinley High School in St. Louis, Missouri
  • Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about life in Washington, D.C. and working for the United Planning Organization
  • Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the 1968 riots in Washington, D.C.
  • Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about auditioning for the television show 'Harambee' in 1969
  • Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls her early days on 'Harambee'
  • Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes a black history segment on 'Harambee'
  • Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the African American community of Washington, D.C. during the early years of 'Harambee'
  • Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the impact of producer Beverly Price on the show 'Harambee'
  • Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the organization Blacks in Broadcasting group
  • Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake
  • Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes 'Harambee's AIDS segment
  • Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about earning her law degree and taking the bar exam
  • Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls traveling to Israel to cover the First Intifada
  • Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about working at Goldfarb, Kaufman, & O'Toole
  • Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her role in the publication of "Songs of My People"
  • Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she was hired at Court TV
  • Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV
  • Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine analyzes the O.J. Simpson trial
  • Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she came to work with Miller and Long Concrete Construction
  • Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her civic engagement
  • Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects on her hopes and what she would do differently
  • Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the portrayal of black people in the media
  • Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the importance of teaching black history
  • Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recounts a memorable experience from her time as a teacher
  • Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community
  • Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects upon her legacy
  • Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her family and second husband
  • Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes how she would like to be remembered